Gardening: Cultivation of PLANTS; (FRUIT; VEGETABLES; MEDICINAL HERBS) on small plots of ground or in containers.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Animals, ZooHypocreales: An order of fungi in the phylum ASCOMYCOTA that includes a number of species which are parasitic on higher plants, insects, or fungi. Other species are saprotrophic.Garbage: Discarded animal and vegetable matter from a kitchen or the refuse from food preparation. (From Random House College Dictionary, 1982)Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Rubiaceae: The Madder plant family of the order Rubiales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida includes important medicinal plants that provide QUININE; IPECAC; and COFFEE. They have opposite leaves and interpetiolar stipules.Convolvulaceae: The morning glory family of flowering plants, of the order Solanales, which includes about 50 genera and at least 1,400 species. Leaves are alternate and flowers are funnel-shaped. Most are twining and erect herbs, with a few woody vines, trees, and shrubs.Agaricales: An extensive order of basidiomycetous fungi whose fruiting bodies are commonly called mushrooms.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Peas: A variable annual leguminous vine (Pisum sativum) that is cultivated for its rounded smooth or wrinkled edible protein-rich seeds, the seed of the pea, and the immature pods with their included seeds. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1973)Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Air Ionization: The dissociation of molecules in the air into positive and negative ions under the influence of an electric field.Animal Shells: The hard rigid covering of animals including MOLLUSCS; TURTLES; INSECTS; and crustaceans.Sasa: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. Folin is the water-soluble extract from Sasa albomarginata. Sasa kurinensis is an ingredient of Sho-ju-sen, a Japanese herbal medicine.PanamaPoa: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that contains the Poa p Ia allergen and allergen C KBGP.Lamiaceae: The mint plant family. They are characteristically aromatic, and many of them are cultivated for their oils. Most have square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped, open-mouthed, tubular corollas (united petals), with five-lobed, bell-like calyxes (united sepals).Viola: A plant genus of the family VIOLACEAE. Some species in this genus are called bouncing bet which is a common name more often used with SAPONARIA OFFICINALIS. Members contain macrocyclic peptides.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Bromelia: A plant genus of the family BROMELIACEAE. Members contain karatasin and balansain (ENDOPEPTIDASES) and BROMELAINS.Cellulases: A family of glycosidases that hydrolyse crystalline CELLULOSE into soluble sugar molecules. Within this family there are a variety of enzyme subtypes with differing substrate specificities that must work together to bring about complete cellulose hydrolysis. They are found in structures called CELLULOSOMES.Candicidin: Mixture of antifungal heptaene macrolides from Streptomyces griseus or Actinomyces levoris used topically in candidiasis. The antibiotic complex is composed of candicidins A, B, C, and D, of which D is the major component.Hydroponics: A technique for growing plants in culture solutions rather than in soil. The roots are immersed in an aerated solution containing the correct proportions of essential mineral salts. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Endophytes: An endosymbiont that is either a bacterium or fungus living part of its life in a plant. Endophytes can benefit host plants by preventing pathogenic organisms from colonizing them.Nature: The system of all phenomena in space and time; the totality of physical reality. It is both a scientific and philosophic concept appearing in all historic eras. (Webster 2d; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Maps as Topic: Representations, normally to scale and on a flat medium, of a selection of material or abstract features on the surface of the earth, the heavens, or celestial bodies.Plantago: A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. The small plants usually have a dense tuft of basal leaves and long, leafless stalks bearing a terminal spike of small flowers. The seeds, known as PSYLLIUM, swell in water and are used as laxatives. The leaves have been used medicinally.Soil Pollutants: Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.Rosaceae: The rose plant family in the order ROSALES and class Magnoliopsida. They are generally woody plants. A number of the species of this family contain cyanogenic compounds.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Heliconiaceae: A plant family of the order ZINGIBERALES, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida.Quercus: A plant genus of the family FAGACEAE that is a source of TANNINS. Do not confuse with Holly (ILEX).Lepidium: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE growing in Peru mountains. It is the source of maca root.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Pest Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous plants, insects, or other animals. This includes control of plants that serve as habitats or food sources for animal pests.Pacific States: The geographic designation for states bordering on or located in the Pacific Ocean. The states so designated are Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. (U.S. Geologic Survey telephone communication)Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Lepidium sativum: A plant species of the genus LEPIDIUM, family BRASSICACEAE that is a fast-growing, often weedy native of western Asia. It is widely grown, especially in its curl-leaved form, and used as a garnishIntroduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.Herbivory: The act of feeding on plants by animals.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.AcetyleneClimate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Pinus ponderosa: A plant species of the genus PINUS that contains isocupressic acid.MissouriPesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Rosa: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE and order Rosales. This should not be confused with the genus RHODIOLA which is sometimes called roseroot.Refuse Disposal: The discarding or destroying of garbage, sewage, or other waste matter or its transformation into something useful or innocuous.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Oligochaeta: A class of annelid worms with few setae per segment. It includes the earthworms such as Lumbricus and Eisenia.Oviposition: The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Avian Leukosis: A group of transmissible viral diseases of chickens and turkeys. Liver tumors are found in most forms, but tumors can be found elsewhere.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Nymph: The immature stage in the life cycle of those orders of insects characterized by gradual metamorphosis, in which the young resemble the imago in general form of body, including compound eyes and external wings; also the 8-legged stage of mites and ticks that follows the first moult.Snails: Marine, freshwater, or terrestrial mollusks of the class Gastropoda. Most have an enclosing spiral shell, and several genera harbor parasites pathogenic to man.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Bacteroidetes: A phylum of bacteria comprised of three classes: Bacteroides, Flavobacteria, and Sphingobacteria.Proteobacteria: A phylum of bacteria consisting of the purple bacteria and their relatives which form a branch of the eubacterial tree. This group of predominantly gram-negative bacteria is classified based on homology of equivalent nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA or by hybridization of ribosomal RNA or DNA with 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA.Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Acclimatization: Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.Actinobacteria: Class of BACTERIA with diverse morphological properties. Strains of Actinobacteria show greater than 80% 16S rDNA/rRNA sequence similarity among each other and also the presence of certain signature nucleotides. (Stackebrandt E. et al, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. (1997) 47:479-491)Seedling: Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.Food Supply: The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.Spiders: Arthropods of the class ARACHNIDA, order Araneae. Except for mites and ticks, spiders constitute the largest order of arachnids, with approximately 37,000 species having been described. The majority of spiders are harmless, although some species can be regarded as moderately harmful since their bites can lead to quite severe local symptoms. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p508; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, pp424-430)Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Passeriformes: A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Rodentia: A mammalian order which consists of 29 families and many genera.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Hemiptera: A large order of insects characterized by having the mouth parts adapted to piercing or sucking. It is comprised of four suborders: HETEROPTERA, Auchenorrhyncha, Sternorrhyncha, and Coleorrhyncha.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Ascomycota: A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.PeruDisease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Angiosperms: Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Insects: The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Quinones: Hydrocarbon rings which contain two ketone moieties in any position. They can be substituted in any position except at the ketone groups.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.BrazilIndiaGenetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Genes, rRNA: Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.EuropePolymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
In a container garden, as in bedding mixes, compost may be a beneficial ingredient in potting media, used up to 30 percent of ... Composting can be carried out at the household level, in garden composters or in composting toilets, or at municipal level at ... EPA Class A and B guidelines in the U.S.A. were developed solely to manage the processing and beneficial reuse of sludge, also ... However, the STA program is not ISO approved, and is a financially beneficial activity for the private USCC, an organization ...
Laws, Bill (19 June 2014). A History of the Garden in Fifty Tools. University of Chicago Press. p. 86. ISBN 9780226139937. .. ... The compost itself is beneficial for the land in many ways, including as a soil conditioner, a fertilizer, addition of vital ... The advantage of this method is that little working time or effort is required from the composter and it fits in naturally with ... Kew Gardens in London has one of the biggest non-commercial compost heaps in Europe.[citation needed] ...
Too much and most of the beneficial heat will escape and too little and the steam turns to streams of water in the inside and ... Hot container composters aim for a temperature range of between 100 degrees Fahrenheit (43 degrees Celsius) and 140 degrees ... The hyperthermic bacteria present in the container, derived from the handful of garden soil you added, reproduces and ... thick walls or cavity/ceiling insulation vents on top and bottom A starter composting medium A handful of soil from garden that ...
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Laws, Bill (2014-06-19). A History of the Garden in Fifty Tools. University of Chicago Press. p. 86. ISBN 9780226139937.. ... The compost itself is beneficial for the land in many ways, including as a soil conditioner, a fertilizer, addition of vital ... The advantage of this method is that little working time or effort is required from the composter and it fits in naturally with ... Kew Gardens in London has one of the biggest non-commercial compost heaps in Europe.[citation needed] ...
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Springtime Gardening Tips Now that spring is here, gardens have started to come to life thanks to the warm weather plants that ... Compost gives plants the nutrients and beneficial microbes they need to fight off disease. Compost also helps to control ... Through Mayor Buddy Dyers Green Works initiative, City of Orlando residents can receive a free backyard home composter. ... that can be used in your yard and garden. The soil helps retain nutrients, moisture and air for the betterment of plants. ...
Transform your food scraps-cooked and uncooked-into a beneficial addition to your garden. This food recycler takes just three ... Includes electric composter, 2.5 L non-stick ceramic waste bucket, and two activated carbon filters ... I can now make good use of my copious kitchen scraps and make good compost for my summer garden. All of the problems that the ... Love being a part of recycle sustainability life style I use the byproduct in my garden. My plants love the nutrition my trash ...
There are currently around six community gardens in Eugene. One of the largest gardens is the Skinner City Farm (SCF), which ... "It feels good to make something beneficial out of waste that would normally just be thrown away. Not only that, but using the ... For those people who are wanting a little more tutelage on the topic, OSU offers a Master Composter course. The program is open ... He has his own garden plot at River House, and he is in charge of all of its community plots. Using his own truck, he picks up ...
For more information about community gardens, classes, school gardens and farmers markets, visit www.urbanharvest.org . ... Finished compost can be added as needed to landscape beds and vegetable gardens or it can be screened and used as a topdressing ... Open-air galvanized or plastic coated wire compost bins can be purchased from area plant nurseries or garden centers, or you ... Visit CE Shepherds Web site www.ceshepherd.com for information on their inexpensive compleat composter. This is a local ...
... check out indoor composters like the Nature Mill. For a full picture of the bewildering array of composters available, check ... worm castings contain as much as ten to twenty times the microbial activity of regular garden soil. Visit your local garden ... I once described compost as being like yoghurt for the soil, acting as a probiotic that nurtures beneficial microfauna. There ... Worm composters Buying worm castings is one thing, but you can also make your own. Take a look at purpose-built vermicomposters ...
vegetable gardening) by Sunset; Home and garden Organic gardening Methods Vegetable gardening ... Since the garden is all organic, its also a haven for birds, butterflies, and beneficial insects. "Weve managed to create a ... Before planting, the Rishes mix in compost, which they make in their barrel composter with garden waste and manure from their ... Started from bare ground, this Santa Barbara garden yields vegetables year-round A FRENCH POTAGER (kitchen garden) inspired the ...
Name 2 ways in which garden/kitchen organic waste can be beneficial for the enviroment. ... What may gardeners add to composters add to speed up the process? ... Why is recycling organic kitchen and garden waste necessary? Reduce landfill, reduce methane production, recycling minerals and ...
Stephanie Choi, a freshman Eco-rep for the Árbol de la Vida Residence Hall, is an avid composter. "I save my tea bags and ... Composting is "turning garbage into gardens," according to Compost Cat James Garlant. The process is entirely due to microbial ... the massive quantity of waste that the university produces could be reduced and repurposed into something that is beneficial to ... are collected each week to be treated and converted into nutrient-rich compost that will be used in the UAs Community Garden ...
Beneficial microbial inoculate,/li, ,/ul, ,p,,br /, Bokashi is for use in organic production of ... How does the Bokashi Indoor Composter work? The system uses beneficial microbes in the bokashi to FERMENT organic waste as it ... Pet Food Pet Accessories Garden Gardening Products Bokashi Products Composting Growing Seeds Garden Decor Incense & Candles ... Beneficial microbial inoculate. Bokashi is for use in organic production of recycled food waste. It also helps to cultivate the ...
When garden soil is in good shape, theres less of a need for fertilizers or pesticides. As author and respected gardener Frank ... Improving Garden Soil. Adding organic matter in the form of compost and aged manure, or using mulch or growing cover crops is ... If a pile is too messy or you are concerned about animals getting into it, there are all kinds of composters available for ... Compost is a food source for beneficial microorganisms. Making your own compost can be as easy as piling brown layers (straw, ...
Tips on how to start an organic garden, from watering to weeding, natural pest control, harvesting and much more. Get the most ... Favorite Compost Bin: Yimby Tumbler Composter ($89, amazon.com). Breathable Garden Gloves: Pine Tree Tools Bamboo Working ... Its a good thing to foster natural predators in your garden, such as frogs, toads, lizards, birds, and even bats. Beneficial ... If your garden is being assaulted by pests, it may be a sign of other problems, so the first thing you should do is make sure ...
Our Beneficial Bugs Pack includes three species of efficient pest-eaters that wont harm plants, earthworms, or humans: ... Comments about Beneficial Bugs Garden Pack:. I have a 200+ square foot home garden, and this pack provided good coverage. I do ... Home Garden Supplies Pest & Disease Controls Insect Controls Beneficial Bugs Garden Pack ... Beneficial Bugs Garden Pack. Details. https://www.gardeners.com/buy/beneficial-bugs-garden-pack/33-446.html Item# 33-446 ...
Some nurseries and garden centers carry fresh brewed tea for around $3 per gallon. Compost tea has a short shelf life, so if ... These are great resources for new composters.. Brew Your Own. Dr. Ingham also tells how to make your own brewing device and how ... This is an unbrewed product where water is sprayed through compost to release the beneficial microbes. It is a much faster ... Its good for the garden. You can use it like fertilizer to give your plants a boost, or work it into the soil to loosen it up ...
... but a slower approach can also yield an elixir for the garden.. Many composters actually prefer to exert themselves less and ... And dont forget: fall is the only beneficial time to consider feeding your lawn -- only use a slow-release or organic nutrient ... Butterfly Gardens. You can invite these winged jewels home to share with your family - and add color to your landscape. Click ... Here is a solution to simplify your fall and improve the long-term health and vigor of your lawn, trees, and garden beds:. ...
Simply bury the waste in your garden. If you dont have a garden, ask a friend or relative or a community garden if they would ... Urban Composters spray is vegan.. How much bokashi mix do I use?. For every one cup of waste, add one tablespoon of Bokashi ... Bokashi is a natural composting method that utilises beneficial bacteria, known as Effective Micro-organisms, to ferment the ... How regularly could I bury the food waste in the same spot in my garden? I have an unused raised garden bed, about 1m x 1m. The ...
Too much and most of the beneficial heat will escape and too little and the steam turns to streams of water in the inside and ... Hot container composters aim for a temperature range of between 100 degrees Fahrenheit (43 degrees Celsius) and 140 degrees ... The hyperthermic bacteria present in the container, derived from the handful of garden soil you added, reproduces and ... thick walls or cavity/ceiling insulation vents on top and bottom A starter composting medium A handful of soil from garden that ...
  • Third-graders transplanted lettuce seeds for Pacifica Gardens' food donation program. (mercurynews.com)
  • Regarding free seeds, starter plants, assistance with home gardening grants, etc. - the Vermont Community Garden Network collaborates with another agency called Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity on organizing a free plant give away in late May. (uvm.edu)
  • The waste is then fed to the worms to make compost, which is later applied to the garden plots. (eugeneweekly.com)
  • Earth worms and red wrigglers love to feed off of dog droppings, and the worm poop created (called castings) is a very rich, usable compost that is safe to use in the garden. (compostinstructions.com)
  • I have them in my worm composter, and they are very hard to get rid of because most methods will also hurt the worms. (garden.org)
  • If they won't harm my worms, I'll put them back in the composter. (whatsthatbug.com)
  • Kids are coming back to an abandoned soccer field behind Linda Mar Education Center, but instead of playing ball they are learning about worms, bugs and plants during field trips to Pacifica Gardens, an urban gardening project now flourishing on the site. (mercurynews.com)
  • Earth worms find their way to the pile after this (or are introduced) and do their work (vermiculture) The end product is a rich, dark, earthy organic material called humus which is great for the garden. (kabook-i.com)
  • A good composter bin should allow for aeration along the sides to help oxygenate the pile, holes in the bottom to allow our friends the worms in and a lid to prevent excessive rainwater. (kabook-i.com)
  • Visit your local garden center for bags of worm castings which are becoming increasingly easy to get hold of, or check out companies like Green Sense or Wiggly Worm on Amazon. (treehugger.com)
  • Worm Farm Compost Bin - Continuous Flow Through Vermi Composter for Worm Castings, Worm Tea Maker, Indoor/Outdoor, 20 gallons #ad - ✔️lifetime guarantee hungry bin has been designed to last, its durable components and exceptional design means we standby our product and will guarantee it and its parts for life all parts of the hungry bin are fully recyclable. (justgardenhome.com)
  • ️ Easy to use the hungry bin is a continuous flow-through worm composter so it does not rely on turning, stirring or mixing like a conventional composter it uses a patented flow-through technology to continuously compost without your supervision because it is on wheels, the hungry bin can be easily moved. (justgardenhome.com)
  • If an indoor worm garden isn't for you, composting outdoors is a great option. (kitchenstewardship.com)
  • To help with the process of evaluating your existing garden and taking a few steps toward sustainability, the Spokane Conservation District will be offering its monthlong Backyard Conservation Stewardship workshop series again this year. (spokesman.com)
  • A backyard flock of chickens will keep you entertained and provide a number of benefits to the garden, but you will need to be prepared for a little damage and heartbreak too. (joegardener.com)
  • So do not commit a whole lot on the backyard garden when the fertilizers can be experienced for free. (wikidot.com)
  • This h2o is chock full of vitamins, and will offer a good, wholesome enhance to your backyard garden. (wikidot.com)
  • Once you have completed the landscaping, transfer on to the very last step to your backyard garden planting your favourite bouquets, shrubs and trees. (wikidot.com)
  • SCD Probiotics sells the All Season Indoor Composter™ Kit through retail outlets throughout the United States and around the world. (bio-medicine.org)
  • For those who want to be a little neater, bins like the collapsable Fiskars compost bin above are a practical solution, and if you're limited on outdoor space, check out indoor composters like the Nature Mill . (treehugger.com)
  • The fermenting food waste in the Indoor Composter will retain much of its original physical properties but will have a pickled appearance. (faithful-to-nature.co.za)
  • Pairing with the iconic Hot Box Café/Roach-a-Rama , one of the oldest cannabis friendly cafés, Hot Box Homegrown will offer indoor and outdoor specialty garden products to the urban community. (hydroponics.com)
  • One of the biggest trends in gardening this year is growing your own produce," states Eric Asakawa, Regional Manager of Armstrong Garden Centers. (installitdirect.com)
  • This weekend, free ladybug packets are available at Armstrong Garden Centers (while supplies last,limited to one per family). (installitdirect.com)
  • Some nurseries and garden centers carry fresh brewed tea for around $3 per gallon. (pesticide.org)
  • Some varieties are less susceptible to the fungus, and they are advertised as being resistant in seed catalogs and garden centers. (selint.info)
  • It was attended by 35 representatives of our staff, the college Sustainability Committee, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, local public gardens, Penn State research and extension centers, and local turf care companies. (scottarboretum.org)
  • He went so far as to refer to vermicompost teas as "almost magic" in an email he sent me, referring specifically to the success he had growing a prolific crop of cherry tomatoes in his own garden (uh-oh! (redwormcomposting.com)
  • This Beneficials Garden Pack includes three species of efficient pest-eaters that (unlike chemical controls) won't harm plants, earthworms, or humans. (gardeners.com)
  • In raised bed gardening, compost can be mixed with sand, clay, aged sawdust, and other materials to create an enriched mix for landscape beds or raised-bed gardens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Garden Beds And Landscape Plantings Always Look Their Best With Well-defined Edges. (supershopsite.com)
  • I've been told it's so good that you can just use it in your raised vegetable garden beds and nothing else with it. (growingagreenerworld.com)
  • Use in garden beds and potting soils to stimulate root development, stop transplant shock, boost growth, prevent fungal problems, and alleviate stress caused by fluctuations in temperature extremes. (justgardenhome.com)
  • Garden Manager Loretta O'Brien said, "We are cultivating vegetable, herb and native plant beds and an orchard to demonstrate how to do it, and we are inspiring people to volunteer for the project and to grow food in their own back yards. (mercurynews.com)
  • The garden now has 50 vegetable, herb, flower and native beds and a small orchard that is beginning to produce apples, plums and figs. The bounty is shared by the volunteers who tend it, the students who visit and local families who benefit from the food donation program that is partnered with The Resource Center and St. Edmund's Episcopal Church. (mercurynews.com)
  • I am glad there are wood chips around the bulk of the garden beds . (permies.com)
  • Use These 4' X 4' Beds To Make A Ne wGarden, Or To Better Define Planting Areas In Yoir Current Garden. (supershopsite.com)
  • The Ecology Action Center begins its annual series of water-conserving and waste-reduction workshops in April, with sessions on building rain-harvesting and composting systems for your yard or garden. (ecologyactioncenter.org)
  • The Ecology Action Center continues its water-conserving and waste-reduction workshops in September, with sessions on building rain-harvesting and composting systems for your yard or garden. (ecologyactioncenter.org)
  • I planned to put mostly herbs in the front yard vegetable garden, though I imagine with companion planting, herbs will end up all over the property eventually. (permies.com)
  • Chopping your garden materials with a chipper, shredder, or lawnmower will help them decompose faster. (list.ly)
  • The following is an excerpt from the Oregon State University Garden Hints website and the quotes are from Cindy Wise, compost specialist volunteer coordinator with the Lane County office of the Oregon State University Extension Service. (whatsthatbug.com)
  • We are really looking at transitioning a volunteer sector into a sustainable economic sector," Sarah Smuts-Kennedy, vision holder and one of the founders of OMG (organic market garden), an urban farm in Symonds St, Auckland, says. (odt.co.nz)
  • Need a Master Gardener or Composter Volunteer? (uvm.edu)
  • Until a program can be established, the city supports the efforts of grassroots programs such as the composting demos and classes given by the OSU Extension Service, the coffee grounds diversion programs, the Sustainable Disposal at Eugene Schools project and the composting done at community gardens. (eugeneweekly.com)
  • There are many different uses for coffee grounds, especially in the garden. (instructables.com)
  • The garden is a completely citizen-driven project that provides food for the community and revamps the infrastructure of the city," says Vandertuin. (eugeneweekly.com)
  • The children come away from the garden experience with new knowledge of what their food looks like before it gets to the store and an understanding of the complexity in growing it," said Long. (mercurynews.com)
  • The field trips support Pacifica Gardens' mission to "educate, cultivate and inspire our community to grow food locally," and the garden itself is supported by grants from the Sam Mazza Foundation, Silicon Valley Community Foundation, the Foundation for Sustainability and Innovation and Kaiser Permanente. (mercurynews.com)
  • We supply native British Adult Ladybirds in packs of 25, 50 or 100 with food ready for release in your garden. (greengardener.co.uk)
  • Create And Print A Custom Delineate With Our Kithcen Garden Planner, Or Try One Of The Expertly Pre-planned Gardens In Our Family Food Garden Tool! (supershopsite.com)
  • 62 of the city farmers produce their food at home, 21 in a community garden. (cityfarmer.org)
  • You can put most weeds into the compost they will be taking care of no problem, there are a few like this quack grass or bind weed or others that really spread that you really don't want to take the chance that they are going to be put all throughout your garden when you spread your compost. (smilinggardener.com)
  • A few things Pops can choose from: a recycled plastic 5 gallon bucket for painting and other home improvement projects, a countertop composter, a bamboo gong brush, or a planter made from repurposed wood. (mnn.com)