Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: Telephone surveys are conducted to monitor prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature MORBIDITY and MORTALITY. The data collected is in regard to actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1984.United StatesPopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Healthy People Programs: Healthy People Programs are a set of health objectives to be used by governments, communities, professional organizations, and others to help develop programs to improve health. It builds on initiatives pursued over the past two decades beginning with the 1979 Surgeon General's Report, Healthy People, Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives, and Healthy People 2010. These established national health objectives and served as the basis for the development of state and community plans. These are administered by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). Similar programs are conducted by other national governments.United States Virgin Islands: A group of islands in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, the three main islands being St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. The capital is Charlotte Amalie. Before 1917 the U.S. Virgin Islands were held by the Danish and called the Danish West Indies but the name was changed when the United States acquired them by purchase.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Seat Belts: Restraining belts fastened to the frame of automobiles, aircraft, or other vehicles, and strapped around the person occupying the seat in the car or plane, intended to prevent the person from being thrown forward or out of the vehicle in case of sudden deceleration.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Rhode IslandPreventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.MontanaHispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)MississippiAlaskaIndians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Telephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Sigmoidoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the sigmoid flexure.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.MissouriMassachusettsNorth DakotaKansasLife Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Tobacco, Smokeless: Powdered or cut pieces of leaves of NICOTIANA TABACUM which are inhaled through the nose, chewed, or stored in cheek pouches. It includes any product of tobacco that is not smoked.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.ArthritisLogistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Homosexuality, Female: Sexual attraction or relationship between females.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.WashingtonIncome: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Binge Drinking: Drinking an excessive amount of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES in a short period of time.Inuits: Inuktitut-speakers generally associated with the northern polar region.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Influenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Mammography: Radiographic examination of the breast.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.TexasAfrican Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Sampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Vaginal Smears: Collection of pooled secretions of the posterior vaginal fornix for cytologic examination.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.JordanWisconsinPublic Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.North CarolinaOdds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Occult Blood: Chemical, spectroscopic, or microscopic detection of extremely small amounts of blood.Pneumococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infections with STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Leisure Activities: Voluntary use of free time for activities outside the daily routine.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Smoking Cessation: Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Physical Fitness: The ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities in a highly functional state, often as a result of physical conditioning.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Bisexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of both the same and the opposite SEX.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.South CarolinaAlcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.FloridaRural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Early Detection of Cancer: Methods to identify and characterize cancer in the early stages of disease and predict tumor behavior.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Disease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Public Health Surveillance: The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data with the purpose of preventing or controlling disease or injury, or of identifying unusual events of public health importance, followed by the dissemination and use of information for public health action. (From Am J Prev Med 2011;41(6):636)Veterans: Former members of the armed services.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Primary Prevention: Specific practices for the prevention of disease or mental disorders in susceptible individuals or populations. These include HEALTH PROMOTION, including mental health; protective procedures, such as COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL; and monitoring and regulation of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS. Primary prevention is to be distinguished from SECONDARY PREVENTION and TERTIARY PREVENTION.

The community-oriented primary care experience in the United kingdom. (1/527)

The UK National Health Service has long delivered public health programs through primary care. However, attempts to promote Sidney Kark's model of community-oriented primary care (COPC), based on general practice populations, have made only limited headway. Recent policy developments give COPC new resonance. Currently, primary care trusts are assuming responsibility for improving the health of the populations they serve, and personal medical service pilots are tailoring primary care to local needs under local contracts. COPC has yielded training packages and frameworks that can assist these new organizations in developing public health skills and understanding among a wide range of primary care professionals.  (+info)

A reexamination of smoking before, during, and after pregnancy. (2/527)

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the patterns and correlates of maternal smoking before, during, and after pregnancy. METHODS: We examined socioeconomic, demographic, and clinical risk factors associated with maternal smoking in a nationally representative cohort of women (n = 8285) who were surveyed 17 +/- 5 months and again 35 +/- 5 months after delivery. RESULTS: Smoking rates among women with a college degree decreased 30% from before pregnancy to 35 months postpartum but did not change among the least educated women. Risk factors clustered, and a gradient linked the number of risk factors (0, 2, 4) to the percentage smoking (6%, 31%, 58%, P <.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The period of pregnancy and early parenthood is associated with worsening education-related disparities in smoking as well as substantial clustering of risk factors. These observations could influence the targeting and design of maternal smoking interventions.  (+info)

Breast, cervical, and colorectal carcinoma screening in a demographically defined region of the southern U.S. (3/527)

BACKGROUND: The "Southern Black Belt," a term used for > 100 years to describe a subregion of the southern U.S., includes counties with high concentrations of African Americans and high levels of poverty and unemployment, and relatively high rates of preventable cancers. METHODS: The authors analyzed data from a state-based telephone survey of adults age >or= 18 years to compare the cancer screening patterns of African-American and white men and women in nonmetropolitan counties of this region, and to compare those rates with those of persons in other southern counties and elsewhere in the U.S. The primary study groups were comprised of 2165-5888 women and 1198 men in this region interviewed through the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. The respondents lived in predominantly rural counties in 11 southern states with sizeable African-American populations (>or= 24.5% of county residents). The main outcome measures were recent use of the Papanicolau (Pap) test, mammography, test for fecal occult blood in the stool (FOBT), and flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. RESULTS: Between 1998-2000, 66.3% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] +/- 2.7%) of 1817 African-American women in the region age >or= 40 years had received a mammogram within the past 2 years, compared with 69.3% (95% CI +/- 1.8%) of 3922 white women (P = 0.066). The proportion of African-American and white women who had received a Pap test within the past 3 years was similar (85.7% [95% CI +/- 1.9%] vs. 83.4% [95% CI +/- 1.5%]; P = 0.068]. In 1997 and 1999, 29.3% of African-American women in these counties reported ever receiving an FOBT, compared with 36.9% in non-Black Belt counties and 42.5% in the remainder of the U.S. Among white women, 37.7% in Black Belt counties, 44.0% in non-Black Belt counties, and 45.3% in the remainder of the U.S. ever received an FOBT. Overall, similar patterns were noted among both men and women with regard to ever-use of FOBT, flexible sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy. Screening rates appeared to vary less by race than by region. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study underscore the need for continued efforts to ensure that adults in the nonmetropolitan South receive educational messages, outreach, and provider recommendations concerning the importance of routine cancer screening.  (+info)

Youth risk behavior surveillance--United States, 1999. (4/527)

PROBLEM/CONDITION: Priority health-risk behaviors, which contribute to the leading causes of mortality and morbidity among youth and adults, often are established during youth, extend into adulthood, are interrelated, and are preventable. REPORTING PERIOD: February-May 1999. DESCRIPTION OF THE SYSTEM: The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six categories of priority health-risk behaviors among youth and young adults --behaviors that contribute to unintentional and intentional injuries; tobacco use; alcohol and other drug use; sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) (including human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] infection); unhealthy dietary behaviors; and physical inactivity. The YRBSS includes a national school-based survey conducted by CDC as well as state, territorial, and local school-based surveys conducted by education and health agencies. This report summarizes results from the national survey, 33 state surveys, and 16 local surveys conducted among high school students during February-May 1999. RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION: In the United States, approximately three fourths of all deaths among persons aged 10-24 years result from only four causes: motor-vehicle crashes, other unintentional injuries, homicide, and suicide. Results from the 1999 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey demonstrate that numerous high school students engage in behaviors that increase their likelihood of death from these four causes--16.4% had rarely or never worn a seat belt; during the 30 days preceding the survey, 33.1% had ridden with a driver who had been drinking alcohol; 17.3% had carried a weapon during the 30 days preceding the survey; 50.0% had drunk alcohol during the 30 days preceding the survey; 26.7% had used marijuana during the 30 days preceding the survey; and 7.8% had attempted suicide during the 12 months preceding the survey. Substantial morbidity and social problems among young persons also result from unintended pregnancies and STDs, including HIV infection. In 1999, nationwide, 49.9% of high school students had ever had sexual intercourse; 42.0% of sexually active students had not used a condom at last sexual intercourse; and 1.8% had ever injected an illegal drug. Two thirds of all deaths among persons aged > or = 25 years result from only two causes--cardiovascular disease and cancer. The majority of risk behaviors associated with these two causes of death are initiated during adolescence. In 1999, 34.8% of high school students had smoked cigarettes during the 30 days preceding the survey; 76.1% had not eaten > or = 5 servings/day of fruits and vegetables during the 7 days preceding the survey; 16.0% were at risk for becoming overweight; and 70.9% did not attend physical education class daily. ACTIONS TAKEN: These YRBSS data are already being used by health and education officials at national, state, and local levelsto analyze and improve policies and programs to reduce priority health-risk behaviors among youth. The YRBSS data also are being used to measure progress toward achieving 16 national health objectives for 2010 and 3 of the 10 leading health indicators.  (+info)

Smoking cessation and prevention: an urgent public health priority for American Indians in the Northern Plains. (5/527)

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of cigarette smoking and smoking cessation among American Indians living on or near Montana's seven reservations to those of non-Indians living in the same geographic region. METHODS: Data for Montana Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) respondents (n = 1,722) were compared to data from a BRFSS survey of American Indians living on or near Montana's seven reservations in 1999 (n = 1,000). Respondents were asked about smoking and smoking cessation as well as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and selected risk factors. Quit ratios were calculated for both groups. RESULTS: American Indians were more likely to report current smoking (38%) than non-Indians (19%; p < 0.001). Thirty-seven percent of Indian respondents with CVD risk factors reported current smoking, compared with 17% of non- Indians with CVD risk factors. However, there was no significant difference in reported smoking rates between Indians (21%) and non-Indians (27%) with a history of CVD. Indian smokers were more likely to report quitting for one or more days in the past year (67%), compared with non-Indians (43%). Quit ratios were significantly lower among Indians (43%) than among non-Indians (65%). CONCLUSIONS: High smoking rates in Indians, particularly among those with other CVD risk factors, demonstrate an urgent need for culturally sensitive smoking cessation interventions among Northern Plains Indians and highlight the need for the Surgeon General's focus on smoking in minority populations.  (+info)

Preventive-care practices among persons with diabetes--United States, 1995 and 2001. (6/527)

Effective interventions are available to persons with diabetes that can prevent or delay the development of serious health complications such as lower limb amputation, blindness, kidney failure, and cardiovascular disease. However, the use of preventive-care practices is lower than recommended, and the national health objectives for 2010 aim to improve care for all persons with diabetes. To assess progress toward meeting these goals, CDC analyzed data on selected diabetes-related preventive-care practices, including influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage, from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 1995 and 2001. This report presents the findings of these analyses, which indicate that levels of preventive-care practices among persons with diabetes in the United States increased from 1995 to 2001. Further efforts are needed to improve care among persons with diabetes, reduce the burden of diabetes-related complications, and achieve the national health objectives, including continued surveillance of diabetes-related preventive-care practices and collaboration with community-based organizations, health-care providers, public health officials, and persons with diabetes.  (+info)

Risk behaviors of Filipino methamphetamine users in San Francisco: implications for prevention and treatment of drug use and HIV. (7/527)

OBJECTIVE: This study describes the demographics, HIV risk and drug use behaviors, and psychosocial status of Filipino American methamphetamine users in the San Francisco Bay area. METHODS: Individual interviews were conducted with 83 Filipino American methamphetamine users, recruited through snowball sampling methods. A structured survey questionnaire included measures of drug use behaviors, HIV-related sexual behaviors, psychosocial factors, and demographics. RESULTS: Filipino methamphetamine users tended to be male, to have low levels of perceived personal control in their lives, and to report low levels of shame about their drug use. Methamphetamine use was strongly associated with HIV-related risk behaviors. Frequent methamphetamine users tended to engage in drug use before or during sex and to use condoms infrequently. Commercial sex activity was associated with frequency of methamphetamine use. About one-third of the study participants had never been tested for HIV. CONCLUSION: HIV/STD and drug abuse prevention programs that target Filipino Americans are needed. These programs should be tailored to meet clients' needs on the basis of gender, employment status, acculturation, and psychosocial variables that affect drug use and sexual behaviors.  (+info)

Prevalence of self-reported arthritis or chronic joint symptoms among adults--United States, 2001. (8/527)

Arthritis and other rheumatic conditions comprise the leading cause of disability among adults in the United States, and the cost of this public health burden is expected to increase as the U.S. population ages. State-specific estimates of the prevalence of arthritis and chronic joint symptoms (CJS) are important for planning health services and programs to prevent arthritis-related disability and for tracking progress toward meeting state and national health objectives for 2010. In 2001, questions about arthritis and CJS were asked of adult respondents in every state through the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). This report summarizes the results of that survey, which indicate that the estimated U.S. prevalence of arthritis/CJS was 33.0% among adults. Increased intervention efforts, including early diagnosis and appropriate clinical and self-management (e.g., physical activity, education, and maintaining appropriate weight), are needed to reduce the impact of arthritis and CJS.  (+info)

*Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a United States health survey that looks at behavioral risk factors. ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System CDC Website. ...

*Disability in the United States

"Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System". CDC.gov. Retrieved 2015-07-28. "National Institute on Aging, Laboratory of ... the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, and the Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study are used to ... 2015). Risk for Disability and Poverty amongst "Central Asians" in the United States. Central Asian Journal of Global Health, ... The second and third criteria are seen as ensuring protection from unjust discrimination based on a perception of risk, just ...

*Effects of divorce

Analysis of Data from the US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1996-99". Journal of Rheumatology. 29: 1981-9. Kopec, ... A Generation at Risk: Growing Up in an Era of Family Upheaval. Harvard University Press, 1997. ISBN 0-674-29283-9 and ISBN 0- ... There is extensive and heated debate over just how much harm, just how many children are harmed to what extent, what factors ... seek formal psychiatric care at higher rates - Studies vary, suggesting from 5 to 21 times the risk, and vary over whether men ...

*Adverse Childhood Experiences Study

The CDC runs the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), an annual survey conducted by individual state health ... Findings From the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System" (PDF). L. Bynum; T. Griffin; D.L. Ridings; R.F. Anda; V.J. ... Risk Factors for Substance Misuse and Mental Health Dr. Robert Anda, co-principal investigator, explains some of the study's ... a trauma-informed approach may better help to address some of these criminogenic risk factors and can create a less ...

*Epidemiology of obesity

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System surveys, United States, 2006−2008". Finkelstein EA, Ruhm CJ, Kosa KM (2005). " ... Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and NGOs such as the Indian Heart Association have been raising ... was the country's leading risk factor driving the most death and disability combined. China is currently facing challenges of ... as Asian populations are particularly susceptible to the health risks of excess adipose tissue the Japanese have redefined ...

*Health Information National Trends Survey

The University of Puerto Rico Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Puerto Rico Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System ... Journal of General Internal Medicine, 23(3), 223-228 Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance Survey National Health Interview ... The Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance Survey and National Health Interview ... The sampling consisted of a two-stage stratified sample of addresses used by Marketing Systems Group (MSG). In the All Adult ...

*Sweetened beverage

According the Center for Disease Control, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey found that 30.1% of American ... In addition to dietary sugar being associated with CKD risk factors, data from animal studies do suggest that sugar consumption ... Obesity prevalence is due to genetic, metabolic, cultural, environmental, socioeconomic, and behavioral factors.[1] Along with ... did not significantly increase the risk for Type II Diabetes throughout the course of this study and these increases in risk ...

*Varicella vaccine

"The incidence of varicella and herpes zoster in Massachusetts as measured by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System ( ... "The incidence of varicella and herpes zoster in Massachusetts as measured by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System ( ... However, this risk is less than the risk due to a natural infection resulting in chickenpox. Most of the cases reported have ... However, the risk of getting shingles from vaccine-strain VZV after chickenpox vaccination is much lower than getting shingles ...

*Respiratory Health Association of Metropolitan Chicago

Health Association secures the inclusion of questions about COPD on the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, the ...

*Shingles

"The incidence of varicella and herpes zoster in Massachusetts as measured by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System ( ... Another important risk factor is immunosuppression. Other risk factors include psychological stress. According to a study in ... It is unclear whether the risk is different by gender. Other potential risk factors include mechanical trauma and exposure to ... Risk factors for reactivation include old age, poor immune function, and having had chickenpox before 18 months of age. How the ...

*America's Health Rankings

Data from CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Binge drinking: Percentage of adults who had four or more ( ... americashealthrankings.org/about/senior CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). National Vital Statistics ... Data from the Youth Behavioral Risk Surveillance System. Youth Obesity: Percentage of high school students who were greater or ... Data from the Youth Behavioral Risk Surveillance System. Chronic Disease Heart Disease: Percentage of adults told by a health ...

*Questionnaire

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Computer-assisted personal interviewing Enterprise Feedback Management Quantitative ... "A Prospective Study of Dietary Acrylamide Intake and the Risk of Endometrial, Ovarian, and Breast Cancer". Cebp.aacrjournals. ...

*List of MeSH codes (N05)

... behavioral risk factor surveillance system MeSH N05.715.360.300.375.300 --- dental health surveys MeSH N05.715.360.300.375.300. ... risk assessment MeSH N05.715.360.750.625.700.690.800 --- risk adjustment MeSH N05.715.360.750.625.700.700 --- risk factors MeSH ... precipitating factors MeSH N05.715.350.200.700 --- risk factors MeSH N05.715.350.225 --- comorbidity MeSH N05.715.350.240 --- ... epidemiologic factors MeSH N05.715.350.075 --- age factors MeSH N05.715.350.075.100 --- age of onset MeSH N05.715.350.075.550 ...

*Native American disease and epidemics

... and The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey (conducted between 2011 and 2013, covered more than 21,000 Native ... It is clearly a disorder that has many factors, but the behavioral component distinguishes it from many other diseases, such as ... "high prevalence and risk factors for mental health and suicide, obesity, substance abuse, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), ... Another contributing factor is that Native people generally wait longer for organ transplants than white people. Diabetes is ...

*Simin Liu

Evaluation of the behavioral risk factor surveillance system for annual estimation of the prevalence of alcohol misuse in US ... tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6, and the risk of clinical diabetes in the Women's Health Initiative ... Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in relation to cardiometabolic risk factors and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal ... Hsu YH, Niu T, Song Y, Tinker L, Kuller LH, Liu S. Genetic variants in the UCP2-UCP3 gene cluster and risk of diabetes in the ...

*HIV/AIDS in Jamaica

Although Jamaica has a well-established national surveillance system, collecting accurate data about at-risk groups is ... The primary contributors to the epidemic are sociocultural, behavioral, and economic factors that result in risky behaviors ... A 2004 Behavioral Surveillance Survey demonstrated that 89 percent of males and 78 percent of females aged 15 to 24 had sex ... However, surveillance data, as presented by Dr. Peter Figueroa of Jamaica's Ministry of Health (MOH) at the U.S. Government- ...

*Discrimination against people with HIV/AIDS

The stigma is profound in Saudi Arabia as Islam prohibits behaviours associated with risk factors related to transmission of ... It was found through survey that if there is no behavioral change towards HIV/AIDS than no change to fight the epidemic will ... which will lead them to reject other groups that are perceived as deviant and may threaten their worldview and their system of ... Public attitudes toward HIV surveillance policies and the social construction of illness. Health Psychology, 22 (5), 533-540. ...

*Spatial epidemiology

This is done in consideration of "demographic, environmental, behavioral, socioeconomic, genetic, and infections risk factors ... With the more mainstream use of geographic information systems, the capabilities of spatial interpolation and mapping have been ... Clustering, disease clusters, and surveillance. Disease clusters, or spatial groupings of proximity and characteristically ... Mainly used for explanatory purposes, disease maps can be presented to survey high-risk areas and to help policy and resource ...

*Work-related road safety in the United States

... it provides little detail on circumstances and risk factors specific to MVCs. A national surveillance system based on police ... has focused on identifying and mitigating road risk for operators of large trucks and buses through behavioral, engineering, ... crash avoidance systems such as collision warning systems and stability control, biomechanics, and risk factors such as ... Other U.S. studies have used injury and fatality to describe crash risk factors in worker groups perceived to be at high risk. ...

*Self-care

Behavioral economics is a subset of the study of economics that examines how cognitive, social, and emotional factors play in ... By avoiding or quitting tobacco use, overall health and quality of life are improved and risk of disease and premature death ... Access to the health care system is largely influenced by providers. Many people suffering from a chronic illness do not have ... Self-care monitoring is the process of surveillance that involves measurement and perception of bodily changes. Effective self- ...

*Demographic and Health Surveys

Biomarker data contributes to the understanding of behavioral risk factors and determinants of different illnesses. National ... and Behavioral Surveillance Surveys (BSS). Eventually it will cover all countries for which indicators are available. The ... The DHS Program now analyzes the impact of geographic location using DHS data and geographic information systems (GIS). The DHS ...

*Information asymmetry

Informing Processes, Risks, Evaluation of the Risk of Misinforming, in Foundations of Informing Science, ISI, 2009, pp. 323-356 ... Lastly, mass surveillance helps the political and industrial leaders to amass large volumes of information, which is typically ... Furthermore, an educational system relying on substantial tuition fees can generate information imbalances between the poor and ... Skill in learning is malleable, and depends upon many factors, including diet, exercise and money. Spence proposes, for example ...

*Kenan Institute Asia

The project strengthened the national capacity for surveillance and response covering an at risk population of 17.6 million ... In particular, metabolic syndrome (the combination of multiple non-infectious risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, and ... Asia's Innovation Systems in Transition. Cheltenham, Glos, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2006. World Tourism Organization, ... and pre-seniors in order to encourage healthful habits and induce behavioral changes that allow individuals to maintain ...

*Avian influenza

... the Global Avian Influenza Network for Surveillance, OFFLU, and the Global Early Warning System for major animal diseases. ... The risk of mass culling of birds and the resulting economic impact led farmers who were reluctant to report sick poultry. The ... While several environmental, behavioral, and biological explanations for this pattern have been proposed, as yet, the reason is ... Genetic factors in distinguishing between "human flu viruses" and "avian flu viruses" include: PB2: (RNA polymerase): Amino ...

*Multiple sex partners

According to the CDC's Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, having multiple sex partners has been quantified to mean that ... A 2004 Behavioral Surveillance Survey demonstrated that 89 percent of males and 78 percent of females aged 15 to 24 had sex ... In Sub-sahara Africa, travel and wealth is a risk factor in engaging in sexual activities with multiple sex partners. " ... MSP increases the risk of developing bacterial vaginosis. MSP can result in pregnant women with a greater risk of contracting ...

*Health in Nepal

Results from the 2007 Integrated Bio-Behavioral Surveillance Study (IBBS) among IDUs in Kathmandu, Pokhara, and East and West ... "A case control study on risk factors associated with malnutrition in Dolpa district of Nepal". Retrieved 2016-09-11. Policy - ... Nepal is one of the countries recognized for the well‐functioning immunization system with coverage of 97% population equally, ... Measles case based surveillance is in process to meet the target of elimanation of Measles by 2019. One percent of children in ...
The principal objective of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS) is to monitor risk behaviors and access to prevention services among three pop...
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data and prevalence tables. The data contains landline and cellphone only respondents from all 50 states, the District of Colombia, Guam, and Puerto Rico. The telephone-based BRFSS surveillance system is designed to collect data in health-related risk behaviors, use of preventive services, and chronic health conditions from the adult population (≥18 years) in the United States. It provides a basis for the development and evaluation of public health programs, including programs targeted to reduce health disparities.. ...
The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state conducted telephone survey. The BRFSS began in 1984 and gathers information on health risk behaviors, preventive health practices, and health care access primarily related to chronic disease and injury. As of 2011, the BRFSS has collected information through both landline and cellular telephone surveys. Data were collected in 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico; the U.S. Virgin Islands did not collect data in 2012. A list of data available by state and year is available on the BRFSS site.. ...
This website provides access to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) mapping tool. The BRFSS is a telephone survey conducted by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention which ...
Background: Obesity is a costly condition that can reduce quality of life and increases the risk for many serious chronic diseases and premature death. The U.S. Surgeon General issued the Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity in 2001, and in 2007, no state had met the Healthy People 2010 objective to reduce obesity prevalence among adults to 15%.. Methods: CDC used 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data to update estimates of national and state-specific obesity prevalence. Obesity was calculated based on self-reported weight and height and defined as body mass index (weight [kg] / height [m]2) ≥30.. Results: Overall self-reported obesity prevalence in the United States was 26.7%. Non-Hispanic blacks (36.8%), Hispanics (30.7%), those who did not graduate from high school (32.9%), and persons aged 50--59 years (31.1%) and 60--69 years (30.9%) were disproportionally affected. By state, obesity prevalence ranged from 18.6% in Colorado to 34.4% in ...
KCPW News) More people are surviving cancer in Utah, but new data released by the Utah Department of Health show cancer survivors are experiencing more chronic diseases than those without cancer. Utah Cancer Control Program Epidemiologist Meghan Balough says the data comes from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey, which is part of a five-year plan to combat cancer in Utah.. "By knowing that they have a higher burden of chronic diseases as well as quality of life issues, like they are more likely to be smokers, we can actually tailor our programs to assess their needs and do something about it," she explains.. The survey, done by the Utah Department of Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tracked cancer survivor treatment and health insurance coverage, as well as their health behaviors and quality of life. Balough says the data collected found that more cancer survivors suffer from diseases like asthma and hypertension than those without cancer, and ...
July 23, 2008 - Wisconsins new adult smoking prevalence rate of 19.6 percent marks the lowest in Wisconsins history. The new rate comes from the 2007 Wisconsin Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey. The telephone survey focused on state residents age 18 and older. The new adult prevalence rate of 19.6 percent is down from 24 percent in 2000. Currently, the national adult smoking rate is 20 percent. The survey also reports that more than 52 percent of those who smoke have tried to quit for one day or longer, and more than 83 percent report that the smoking policy at work does not allow smoking in any work areas. Wisconsin legislators are reminded that these advances are not permanent - only with their support and funding can anti-tobacco organizations continue to help smokers quit and discourage kids from starting in the first place. Reference: ...
Objective: To estimate quality-of-life (QoL), primary care, health insurance, prevention behaviors, absenteeism, and presenteeism in a statewide sample of the unemployed, self-employed, and organizationally employed. Methods: A statewide survey of 1602 Iowans included items from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention QoL and Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey prevention beha
Problem: Behavioral risk factors (e.g., tobacco use, poor diet, and physical inactivity) can lead to chronic diseases. In 2005, of the 10 leading causes of death in the United States, seven (heart disease, cancer, stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases, diabetes, Alzheimers disease, and kidney disease) were attributable to chronic disease. Chronic diseases also adversely affect the quality of life of an estimated 90 million persons in the United States, resulting in illness, disability, extended pain and suffering, and major limitations in daily living. Reporting Period Covered: 2005. Description of the System: CDCs Steps Program funds 40 selected U.S. communities to address six leading causes of death and disability and rising health-care costs in the United States: obesity, diabetes, asthma, physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use. In 2005, a total of 39 Steps communities conducted a survey to collect adult health outcome data. The survey instrument was a modified version of ...
Understanding the signs and symptoms of heart attacks and strokes are important not only in saving lives, but also in preserving quality of life. Findings from recent research have yielded that the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors are higher in rural populations, suggesting that adults living in rural locales may be at higher risk for heart attack and/or stroke. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology as well as calling 911 for a suspected heart attack or stroke are essential first steps in seeking care. This study sought to examine the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among rural adults in comparison to non-rural adults living in the U.S. Using multivariate techniques, a cross-sectional analysis of an amalgamated multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) database was performed. The dependent variable for this analysis was low heart attack and stroke knowledge score. The covariates for the analysis were: age, sex, race/ethnicity, annual
In the U.S. diabetes prevalence estimates for adults ≥ 65 years exceed 20%. Rural communities have higher proportions of older individuals and health disparities associated with rural residency place rural communities at risk for a higher burden from diabetes. This study examined the adequacy of care received by older rural adults for their diabetes to determine if older rural adults differed in the receipt of adequate diabetes care when compared to their non-rural counterparts. Cross-sectional data from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey were examined using bivariate and multivariate analytical techniques. Logistic regression analysis revealed that older rural adults with diabetes were more likely to receive less than adequate care when compared to their non-rural counterparts (OR = 1.465, 95% CI: 1.454-1.475). Older rural adults receiving less than adequate care for their diabetes were more likely to be: male, non-Caucasian, less educated, unmarried, economically poorer, inactive, a
Weight: BRFSS Weighting Formula FINALWT = STRWT * 1 OVER NPH * NAD * POSTSTRAT. The computational formula above is intended to reflect all the possible factors that could be taken into account in weighting a states data. Where a factor does not apply its value is set to one. FINALWT is the final weight assigned to each respondent. STRWT accounts for differences in the basic probability of selection among strata (subsets of area code/prefix combinations). It is the inverse of the sampling fraction of each stratum. There is almost never a complete correspondence between strata, which are defined by subsets of area code/prefix combinations, and regions, which are defined by the boundaries of government entities. 1/NPH is the inverse of the number of residential telephone numbers in the respondents household. NAD is the number of adults in the respondents household. POSTSTRAT is the number of people in an age-by-gender or age-by-race-by-gender category in the population of a region or a state ...
Weight: BRFSS Weighting Formula FINALWT = STRWT * 1 OVER NPH * NAD * POSTSTRAT. The computational formula above is intended to reflect all the possible factors that could be taken into account in weighting a states data. Where a factor does not apply its value is set to one. FINALWT is the final weight assigned to each respondent. STRWT accounts for differences in the basic probability of selection among strata (subsets of area code/prefix combinations). It is the inverse of the sampling fraction of each stratum. There is almost never a complete correspondence between strata, which are defined by subsets of area code/prefix combinations, and regions, which are defined by the boundaries of government entities. 1/NPH is the inverse of the number of residential telephone numbers in the respondents household. NAD is the number of adults in the respondents household. POSTSTRAT is the number of people in an age-by-gender or age-by-race-by-gender category in the population of a region or a state ...
CDC Brief: The State of Vision, Aging, and Public Health in America. Vision impairment is a serious public health concern among older adults, affecting more than 2.9 million people in the United States. This issue brief summarizes the prevalence of vision loss and eye diseases reported by people aged 65 or older, and it provides information about access to eye care, health status, and comorbid conditions among older adults. Data were collected from 19 states that used the Vision Impairment and Access to Eye Care Module (Vision Module) of CDCs Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) during 2006-2008. You can access the issue brief at: http://www.cdc.gov/visionhealth/pdf/vision_brief.pdf.. CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR): Reasons for Not Seeking Eye Care Among Adults Aged ≥40 Years with Moderate-to-Severe Visual Impairment --- 21 States, 2006--2009. The CDC analyzed data for 21 states from 2006-2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys to learn ...
Overall obesity prevalence was 24.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.0-25.1). Workers in protective services were 2.46 (95% CI, 1.72-3.50) times as likely to be obese as workers in health diagnosing occupations. Compared with their counterparts, workers who consumed adequate amounts of fruits and vegetables and had adequate LTPA were significantly less likely to be obese (PR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.86-0.97 and PR = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.60-0.67, respectively). Workers with physically demanding occupational physical activity had a lower PR of obesity (PR = 0.83; 95% CI, 0.78-0.88) than those with nonphysically demanding occupational physical activity ...
Given the rapid adoption of e-cigarettes despite unclear benefits and harms, understanding use patterns, together with those of combustible cigarettes, is important for efforts to safeguard public health. This nationally representative survey assessed demographic patterns of e-cigarette and combustible cigarette use. Use this paper to:
Copyright © HHTM, 2020. All rights reserved. Please review the TERMS OF SERVICE for using this website. The information at HearingHealthMatters.org (HHTM) is not intended to replace the services of a trained legal or health professional. No one associated with HHTM is engaged in rendering legal, psychological, health or other professional services. The editors and contributors specifically disclaim any liability, loss or risk, personal or otherwise, which is incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, of the use and application of any of the contents of this Web site ...
Background: It is unclear whether geographic variation in processes of care and vascular morbidity exists among diabetics in the U.S. We sought to determine the extent of regional variations in processes of care and their association with vascular disease in a cohort of diabetic adults in the U.S.. Methods and Results: The 2007 Centers for Disease Control Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey was utilized to identify a cohort of diabetic patients. Participant residence was classified based on four U.S. regions: (1) Northeast, (2) Midwest, (3) South, and (4) West. Demographic data, clinical history, processes of care (regular medical checkup, foot exam, eye exam, diabetic education, aspirin use, and antihypertensive use) and vascular morbidity for diabetics of each region were compared. Presence of vascular morbidity was based upon patient report of myocardial infarction, stroke, retinopathy, nonhealing foot sores or bilateral foot amputations. Among the 42,072 diabetics, 43.9% were from the ...
The Lancaster County Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) has been conducting surveys annually since 1989 for the purpose of collecting data on the prevalence of major health risk factors among adults residing in the Lancaster County. Information gathered in these surveys can be used to target health education and risk reduction activities throughout the state in order to lower rates of premature death and disability.
Relationships between sleep duration and selected chronic diseases among US adults ages 45 years or older were examined in 14 states, using data from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, and whether those relationships were attenuated by FMD and/or obesity. Chronic diseases were defined through subjects affirmative responses to the question of whether they had ever been told by a doctor they had diabetes mellitus or CHD, which included a heart attack, angina pectoris, and/or stroke. Sleep duration was based on response to: "On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period?" Sleep duration for these analyses was defined as short (≤6 hours), optimal (7-9 hours), and long (≥10 hours). FMD was defined if respondents indicated ≥14 days to the question "...about your mental health, which includes stress, depression, and problems with emotions, for how many days during the past 30 days was your mental health not good?" Obesity was calculated based on ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Consumer assessment of healthcare providers and systems survey. T2 - Implications for the primary care physician. AU - Fowler, Lindsay. AU - Saucier, Ashley. AU - Coffin, Janis. PY - 2013/7/1. Y1 - 2013/7/1. N2 - Medical care is under constant reform. Physicians are encouraged to stay current and well informed to receive maximum reimbursement, while still providing high-quality medical care to our patients. The trend has been that insurers are following the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid standards in the new wave of quality reporting with a patient assessment of their experience, or the care received, in regulated surveys for inpatient as well as ambulatory settings. These surveys, Hospital-level and Clinician and Group-level Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey(s), would begin to dramatically affect physician reimbursement(s), potentially change the way we practice medicine to meet guidelines to be consistent with the Patient-Centered Medical Home ...
The 2011 BRFSS data reflects a change in weighting methodology (raking) and the addition of cell phone only respondents. Shifts in observed prevalence from 2010 to 2011 for BRFSS measures will likely reflect the new methods of measuring risk factors, rather than true trends in risk-factor prevalence. A break in trend lines after 2010 is used to reflect this change in methodolgy. Percentages are weighted to population characteristics. Data are not available if it did not meet BRFSS stability requirements. For more information on these requirements, as well as risk factors and calculated variables, see the Technical Documents and Survey Data for a specific year - http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/annual_data/annual_data.htm. Recommended citation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, [appropriate year ...
A statistical analysis of depression in the United States, its prevalence, sociodemographics, comorbidity with other chronic illnesses, and its costs. The data source for this project was the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey, a national, state-based cross-sectional telephone survey of over 500,000 American respondents, capturing and documenting health practices and behavioral factors such as tobacco use, HIV/AIDS knowledge and prevention, exercise, immunization, health status, healthy days - health-related quality of life, health care access, inadequate sleep, hypertension awareness, cholesterol awareness, chronic health conditions, alcohol consumption, fruits and vegetables consumption, arthritis burden, and seatbelt use. The aim of the analysis was to engage four questions: (1) is there a relationship between socioeconomic status and depression, (2) to what degree
In 2011, rates of adult obesity remained high, with state estimates ranging from 20.7% in Colorado to 34.9% in Mississippi, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Twelve 12 states reported a prevalence of 30% or more. The South had the highest prevalence of adult obesity (29.5%), followed by the Midwest (29%), the Northeast (25.3%), and the West (24.3%).. In 2011, CDC made several changes to its Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) that affect estimates of state-level adult obesity prevalence. First, there was an overall change in the BRFSS methodology, including the incorporation of cell phone-only households and a new weighting process. These changes in methodology were made to ensure that the sample better represents the population in each state. Second, to generate more accurate estimates of obesity prevalence, small changes were made to the criteria used to determine which respondents are included in the data analysis.. Because of ...
In 2011, rates of adult obesity remained high, with state estimates ranging from 20.7% in Colorado to 34.9% in Mississippi, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Twelve 12 states reported a prevalence of 30% or more. The South had the highest prevalence of adult obesity (29.5%), followed by the Midwest (29%), the Northeast (25.3%), and the West (24.3%).. In 2011, CDC made several changes to its Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) that affect estimates of state-level adult obesity prevalence. First, there was an overall change in the BRFSS methodology, including the incorporation of cell phone-only households and a new weighting process. These changes in methodology were made to ensure that the sample better represents the population in each state. Second, to generate more accurate estimates of obesity prevalence, small changes were made to the criteria used to determine which respondents are included in the data analysis.. Because of ...
The American Heart Association (AHA) recently proposed a new metric of cardiovascular health comprised of 7 health behaviors and factors. National estimates of cardiovascular health are available; however, state-level assessments have not been reported. The purpose of this study is to estimate the cardiovascular health status in each US state, using 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data from all 50 states and District of Columbia. As data are self-reported, the AHA definition of cardiovascular health was modified using self-reported hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, current smoking status, weight classification, physical activity and dietary behavior. Ideal cardiovascular health was defined as meeting current guidelines or standards from each behavior or factor. The percentage of population in each state with ideal cardiovascular health and the adjusted prevalence ratio of ideal cardiovascular health in each state were estimated (adjusted for age, sex, ...
2 2015 BRFSS Survey Data is the source for this data collected by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...
2 2014 BRFSS Survey Data is the source for this data collected by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...
PLOS One: April 5, 2013. Hypertension is an important and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Over the last decade, national-levels of controlled hypertension have increased, but little information on hypertension prevalence and trends in hypertension treatment and control exists at the county-level. We estimate trends in prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in US counties using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in five two-year waves from 1999-2008 including 26,349 adults aged 30 years and older and from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 1997-2009 including 1,283,722 adults aged 30 years and older. Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure (BP) of at least 140 mm Hg, self-reported use of antihypertensive treatment, or both. Hypertension control was defined as systolic BP less than 140 mm Hg. The median prevalence of total hypertension in 2009 was estimated at 37.6% ...
The Chronic Disease Surveillance and Research Branch (CDSRB) is committed to serving the public by collecting statewide data about cancer and cancer risk factors, conducting surveillance and research into the causes, cures, and controls of cancer, and communicating the results to the public. CDSRB coordinates these activities by directing, managing, and monitoring the state-mandated Ken Maddy California Cancer Registry (CCR), the California Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (CBRFSS), and Californias Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (CCCP). CCR is the cornerstone for a substantial amount of cancer research with more than 450 funded research projects and over 2000 publications that have relied on CCR data. CBRFSS specializes in conducting scientific health-related surveys. CCCP oversees the California Dialogue on Cancer (CDOC) a statewide comprehensive cancer control coalition ...
To support many of these programs, the department relies on high-quality data to guide decision making at the state and local levels such as the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Immunization Registry and Office of Vital Statistics.. These are just a handful of the services public health provides every day to support of vision our healthier people and healthier communities.. The department is organized into seven divisions with the Commissioners Office providing oversight and support for the divisions and programs. The Center for Performance Management, the Office of Health Equity and the Public Health Nursing Office are located in the Commissioners Office. More information about each division can be found on the links at the left of this page. ...
The research was carried out in accordance to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System which is a method of telephone survey used by various health departments. In total 76,292 participants were questioned over the telephone. All participants were over 19 years of age.. Out of the 76,292 participants, those who reported tooth loss also reported some level of depression and anxiety. The research has also shown that depression and tooth loss were more common in men as compared to women. The data obtained from the research clearly showed that there is a relation between tooth loss and depression or anxiety disorders.. ...
National Center for Health Statistics, final natality data. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prematurity risk factors compiled by March of Dimes available at marchofdimes.org/pregnancy/preterm-labor-and-birth.aspx. IPUMS-USA, University of Minnesota, ipums.org. American Community Survey, US Census Bureau. Blumenshine P, Egerter S, Barclay CJ, et al. Socioeconomic disparities in adverse birth outcomes: a systematic review. Am J Prev Med 2010;39(3):263-72. National Center for Health Statistics, period linked birth/infant death data. Long-term health effects of preterm birth compiled by March of Dimes available at marchofdimes.org/complications/long-term-health-effects-of-premature-birth.aspx Institute of Medicine. 2007. Preterm Birth: Causes, Consequences, and Prevention. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. ...
2015) 2015 Cancer in Iowa Report, 2015. University of Iowa (2015) 2015 Iowa Commission on the Status of Women Issues and Policy Priorities. Human Rights, Department of (2015) African-Americans in Iowa, 2015. Library of Iowa, State (2015) The Annual Condition of Education Report, 2015. Education, Department of (2015) Annual Report Survey Results for the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2015. Public Health, Department of (2015) Career guide / University of Iowa Pomerantz Career Center. University of Iowa (2015) Comparisons of Estimates of Annual Exceedance-Probability Discharges for Small Drainage Basins in Iowa, Based on Data through Water Year 2013, TR-678, 2015. Transportation, Department of (2015) Department of Commerce - Iowa Utilities Board, Performance Report, Performance Results Achieved for Fiscal Year 2015. Utilities Division (Commerce) (2015) Department of Management Agency Performance Plan, FY2015. Management, Department of (2015) Executive summary -- 2015 Corridor ...
Arch Dis Child 2004; 89: 956-960. 17. The 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BFRSS). htm. Last accessed November 23, 2004. 18. Genes for asthma? An analysis of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 1997; 156: 177-180. 19. deMarco R, Pattaro C, Locatelli F, Svanes C. ECRHS Study Group. Influence of early life exposures on incidence and remission of asthma throughout life. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2004; 113: 845-852. 20. Toelle BG, Xuan W, Peat JK, Marks GB. If some 36 Klein pollen is put into a glass followed by mite allergen, mold allergen, and then when you add pet allergens, the glass begins to overflow (as do patients symptoms). Food Allergy Food allergy is common and has a more important role in infancy and early childhood (34). Sicherer and Furlong studies have shown that approximately 4% of the US population and 6% of children under the age of 3 yr have food-induced hypersensitivity (35). Allergic reactions to foods occur immediately or ...
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published a report on the prevalence of cholesterol screening and awareness using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
Read Medical, Genetic & Behavioral Risk Factors of Poodles by ROSS D. CLARK, DVM with Rakuten Kobo. This book provides you with a through description and positive attributes of this breed including origin, purpose, histo...
Diabetes in Pregnancy Project--Maine, 1986-1987 -- Hepatitis B in an extended family-Alabama -- Influenza A isolates--United States, 1987 -- Regional variation in smoking prevalence and cessation: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance, 1986 -- Table ...
Hispanic, Black but not of Hispanic heritage, non- In some studies, although not universally found, apo B Hispanic White, or others. Standardized questionnaires was reported to give better information than lipid levels, regarding sociodemographic characteristics, stroke risk while in general, apo A-I levels have not been found to factors and comorbid atherosclerotic diseases were be independently predictive . However, most of adapted from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance these studies were performed in younger and middle- System by the Centers for Disease Control and Preven- aged populations. Among the elderly, although total tion Hypertension was defined as a systolic blood cholesterol levels tend to decline, the HDL fraction of pressure recording E/160 mmHg or a diastolic blood plasma cholesterol (HDL-C), and its ratio with total pressure recording E/95 mmHg based on the mean of cholesterol (THR) remain important protective factors two blood pressure measurements, a patients ...
The following analysis provides insight into selected ICD-10 chapters and specific causes of death. Further information on underlying causes of death is presented in the data cubes associated with this publication. Included in the data cubes are counts, standardised death rates, years of potential life lost, and changes over time for all causes at the ICD-10 three-character level by sex for Australia and each state/territory of usual residence. Age-specific rates are also presented for Australia and each state/territory of usual residence for selected causes of death. ...
2015 (English)In: Journal of Analytical Research in Clinical Medicine (JARCM), ISSN 2345-4970, Vol. 3, no 2, 129-130 p.Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published ...
This Program Instruction (PI) transmits the revised State/Territory Plan Preprint (ACF-118) for the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) program for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2014-2015 biennium, and provides guidance for completing and submitting the Plan. This Plan is required by Section 658E of the CCDBG Act ...
and earlier years. ***The estimate was suppressed because it did not meet statistical reliability standards. See BRFSS 2015 Annual Results Technical Notes for more details. ^Use caution in interpreting cell sizes less than 50, % = Percentage, C.I.(95%) = Confidence Interval (at 95 percent probability level ...
and earlier years. ***The estimate was suppressed because it did not meet statistical reliability standards. See BRFSS 2016 Annual Results Technical Notes for more details. ^Use caution in interpreting cell sizes less than 50, % = Percentage, C.I.(95%) = Confidence Interval (at 95 percent probability level ...
Performance racers and touring cyclists alike need technology that can be counted on. Weve got you covered with GPS bike computers, turn-by-turn navigation, bike-specific routing, cycling awareness accessories and so much more. Get detailed data about your performance or just plan your next ride. Its all possible.. ...
The North Dakota Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) program director writes reports and gives presentations throughout the year. Some of these display prevalence data and others take an in-depth look at certain behavioral risk factors in North Dakota.. COUNTY REPORTS: Please select a county and click Search to view available county reports. Note that reports are not available for all North Dakota counties.. ...
The North Dakota Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) program director writes reports and gives presentations throughout the year. Some of these display prevalence data and others take an in-depth look at certain behavioral risk factors in North Dakota.. COUNTY REPORTS: Please select a county and click Search to view available county reports. Note that reports are not available for all North Dakota counties.. ...
Data & statistics on Oklahoma Adult Obesity Prevalence by Race and Ethnicity: Oklahoma Adult Obesity Prevalence by Race/Ethnicity 2007 BRFSS, State-specific percentage* of adults categorized as obese,† by black/white race or Hispanic ethnicity - Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System surveys, United States, 2006−2008 White, non-Hispanic, Prevalence of Obesity by Race/Ethnicity and State (percent of adult population)...
In addition to pain and discomfort, loss of productivity and work absenteeism, arthritis also increases an individuals risk of falling. "Falls are a significant health concern, particularly for the aging population, where we see individuals dramatically and often irrevocably impacted by these injuries," said DAIL Commissioner Deborah Anderson. "By taking advantage of one of the recommended physical activity programs - which are all easy to follow and encourage participants to go at their own pace - anyone suffering from arthritis can improve their condition, increase their strength and flexibility and lessen the likelihood of falls or physical injury.". According to data from the 2013 Kentucky Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, arthritis is a common health problem in Kentucky where 32 percent of adults -- or approximately 1.1 million people--have been diagnosed with the condition. Kentucky ranks third highest in the nation for arthritis prevalence. Arthritis is not confined to ...
More Californians than ever are obese, according to a new report by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.. The study found that 24.8 percent of adults were obese in 2011-12, compared to 19.3 percent a decade earlier. Nearly 18 million California adults and adolescents are considered overweight or obese, and about 7.4 million of them can be classified as obese. Data for the research was drawn from California Health Interview Survey results starting in 2001. Adults with a body mass index of 25 or greater are considered overweight; those with a BMI of 30 or more are considered obese.. The authors also found that 16 percent of Californians ages 12 to 17 were overweight and 17 percent were obese - both figures were relatively unchanged from 2001. Nearly 1 million California adolescents were overweight or obese in 2011-12.. Nationally, 28 percent of adults are obese, according to Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data. Although the California average is slightly below that figure, the ...
This issue brief contains corrections.. The United States is home to at least 9 million people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or LGBT. Despite recent advances in social acceptance and legal protections, such as the 2015 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that gave same-sex couples in every state the right to marry, LGBT people and their families across the country continue to face discrimination in areas of everyday life such as employment, housing, and health care.. In order to make meaningful progress in improving the lives of LGBT Americans, policymakers, researchers, advocates, and service providers need more and better data related to the experiences and needs of the LGBT population. Sexual orientation and gender identity, or SOGI, data are a critical component of accurately assessing the current problems that LGBT people experience-such as mental health and substance use disparities and barriers in access to health insurance coverage and health care-and developing ...
Based on an analysis of new state-by-state data from the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, adult obesity rates by state from highest to lowest were:. Note: 1 = Highest rate of adult obesity, 51 = lowest rate of adult obesity.. 1. (tie) Mississippi and West Virginia (35.1%); 3. Arkansas (34.6%); 4. Tennessee (33.7%); 5. Kentucky (33.2%); 6. Louisiana (33.1%); 7. Oklahoma (32.5%); 8. Alabama (32.4%); 9. Indiana (31.8%); 10. South Carolina (31.7%); 11. Michigan (31.5%); 12. Iowa (31.3%); 13. Delaware (31.1%); 14. North Dakota (31%); 15. Texas (30.9%); 16. (tie) Missouri and Ohio (30.4%); 18. Georgia (30.3%); 19. (tie) Kansas and Pennsylvania (30%); 21. South Dakota (29.9%); 22. Wisconsin (29.8%); 23. (tie) Idaho and Nebraska (29.6%); 25. (tie) Illinois and North Carolina (29.4%); 27. Maine (28.9%); 28. Alaska (28.4%); 29. Maryland (28.3%); 30. Wyoming (27.8%); 31. Rhode Island (27.3%); 32. (tie) Virginia and Washington (27.2%); 34. Arizona ...
Based on an analysis of new state-by-state data from the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, adult obesity rates by state from highest to lowest were:. Note: 1 = Highest rate of adult obesity, 51 = lowest rate of adult obesity.. 1. (tie) Mississippi and West Virginia (35.1%); 3. Arkansas (34.6%); 4. Tennessee (33.7%); 5. Kentucky (33.2%); 6. Louisiana (33.1%); 7. Oklahoma (32.5%); 8. Alabama (32.4%); 9. Indiana (31.8%); 10. South Carolina (31.7%); 11. Michigan (31.5%); 12. Iowa (31.3%); 13. Delaware (31.1%); 14. North Dakota (31%); 15. Texas (30.9%); 16. (tie) Missouri and Ohio (30.4%); 18. Georgia (30.3%); 19. (tie) Kansas and Pennsylvania (30%); 21. South Dakota (29.9%); 22. Wisconsin (29.8%); 23. (tie) Idaho and Nebraska (29.6%); 25. (tie) Illinois and North Carolina (29.4%); 27. Maine (28.9%); 28. Alaska (28.4%); 29. Maryland (28.3%); 30. Wyoming (27.8%); 31. Rhode Island (27.3%); 32. (tie) Virginia and Washington (27.2%); 34. Arizona ...
Abstract Objective. This study assessed the usefulness of the Healthy Weight Disparity Index (HWDI) to evaluate income disparities related to obesity. We compared state based body mass index (BMI) rankings with HWDI rankings. Methods. National data from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to estimate mean BMI levels in each of the 50 states (plus Washington, D.C.) by income level. Income-related disparities were described with the HWDI. Kappa statistics analyzed the concordance between the two rankings. Results. State-based BMI and the HWDI rankings were not concordant. For example, Washington, D.C. was ninth for lowest mean BMI yet ranked 49th on the HWDI. West Virginia ranked 42nd and 5th, and Mississippi ranked 51st on both the BMI and HWDI, respectively. Discussion. State-based BMI and HWDI rankings present divergent perspectives on the obesity crisis. We recommend adding HWDI rankings to BMI rankings to reflect fully patterns of obesity and subgroup ...
Obesity and diabetes are major health problems in the United States. The primary aim of this study is to examine the association between obesity and diabetes and to estimate the cost of diabetes linked to obesity in the Appalachian region. A system of simultaneous equations approach, and a logit estimation are employed for the analyses. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys for 2001 and 2009 are the main sources of data. Both county-level and individual-level data are used for the analyses. The simultaneous approach at county-level based on the changes of income, employment, obesity, and diabetes reveals that obesity increases diabetes, but diabetes does not have an effect on obesity. The counties with high initial levels of obesity had less obesity growth but more diabetes growth. Increasing income impacts negatively on diabetes growth. Logit analysis indicates that obesity significantly increases the risk of diabetes of adults in Appalachia. Besides, being employed, higher income
Led by Shivani Patel, PhD, researcher in the Hubert Department of Global Health at Rollins School of Public Health, the team studied data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) national surveys from 2009 to 2010. The goal was to determine the extent to which national cardiovascular mortality could be expected to decrease if all states were successful at reducing those risk factor levels to specified target levels.. Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death nationally. The top five leading preventable risk factors for heart disease are elevated cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and smoking. The fraction of cardiovascular deaths that could have been prevented in 2009 to 2010 were reported under two scenarios: complete elimination of risk factors, and a more realistic goal of reduction of risk factors to the best achieved levels in U.S. states in 2009-2010.. Findings suggest that about half of deaths could be prevented if the modifiable risk factors ...
Provides access to data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) about average daily frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption through 2009. User can view prevalence and trends by selecting the state, year, and Fruits and Vegetables category from drop-down menus. ...
The obesity rate in the United States has risen significantly in the past few decades. While a number of economic causes for the rise in obesity have been explored, little attention has been on the role of health insurance per se. This paper examines obesity in the context of a model where health insurance status can influence body weight. We attempt to isolate the effects of ex ante moral hazard, where people with health insurance may change their behaviors towards weight control. We use data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System from 1993 to 2002 to determine the potential effect of having health insurance on measures of body weight. In our analyses, we control for a variety of confounding factors that may influence body weight and address the endogenous nature of health insurance. Our results show evidence that having insurance is associated with higher body mass (particularly for those above the poverty threshold) and an increased probability of being overweight. However, we ...
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless gas that can be detected by a CO detector in the home. Acute CO poisoning in pregnancy has been associated with increased maternal (18-24%) and fetal (36-67%) mortality [1]. Accidental household exposure to CO is the most frequent cause of poisoning in pregnancy [1]. From 2012-2013, 53.7% of women in South Carolina (SC) reported their pregnancy was unintended (29.0% mistimed; 8.4% unwanted; 16.3% unsure) [2]. Due to the high fetal mortality rate associated with CO exposure and high incidence of unintended pregnancy in SC, we investigated associations between CO detector presence in the residence and demographic characteristics of reproductive aged (18-44 years old) women in SC using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).. ...
The maps and table below display the percentage of adults who have not received dental cleanings for more than one year and for more than two years in each county. The 2007 through 2009 data were retrieved from the Illinois State Department of Public Health. The data come from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a survey designed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and conducted by individual states.. ...
During the 2000s, The Fraction of the Population That is Overweight or Obese Has Greatly Increased Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5 4 person)
California Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance (BRFSS) Update. This webinar introduces the CSUS Public Health Survey Research Program, its staff, mission, and services. In addition, it provides an overview of the BRFSS, a summary of the types of data that have been collected over its nearly 30-year history, and how California has used the data collected by the BRFSS. Participants will learn how they can access BRFSS data as well as how to they can include questions on future surveys. (June 2015) ...
MB_Category: The Mesh Block Category (MB_Category) attribute is a field based on planning/zoning scheme data provided by each state/territory. The ABS consolidated the files for each state/territory then mapped the land uses to a highly generalised set of land uses. The ABS acknowledges that this planning data represents a planned land use and there will be many cases where actual land use is quite different to the planned land use. The Mesh Block category shown in the Mesh Blocks boundary dataset is not designed to provide a definitive land use mapping, it is purely an indicator of the main planned land use for a Mesh Block ...
A Special Feature on 150 of the nations largest hospital and healthcare systems. Source: Modern Healthcares 37th annual Hospital Systems Survey. Published June 24, 2013, p. 26.
A study of more than 150,000 adults in the U.S. found that wanting to lose weight was as important in predicting the amount of days people were ill as their weight itself. People who wanted to weigh less were more likely to be mentally or physically unhealthy than people of the same weight who were content with their body image. After controlling for actual BMI and age the researchers found that men who wished to lose 1, 10 and 20% of their body weight respectively reported 0.1, 0.9 and 2.7 more unhealthy days per month than those who were happy with their weight. Among women the corresponding increase in numbers of reported unhealthy days was 0.1, 1.6 and 4.3. People who were happy with their weight experienced fewer physically unhealthy days and fewer mentally unhealthy days than those unhappy with their weight ...
Utah Fugitive Emissions federal, national and state compliance resources - regulations, laws, and state-specific analysis for employers and environmental professionals
Purpose: Adherence to preventive health behaviors for chronic diseases would avert 80% of all heart disease, stroke, type II diabetes, and more than 40% of cancer cases. The purpose of this study is to describe the preventive health behaviors for chronic diseases among Mexican Americans residing along U.S.-Mexico border and in the U.S. Method: Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests were conducted on two rich data sets for Mexican Americans. The first data set (n=1439) was from the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC), a prospective cohort study of Mexican American adults aged 18 years and older living in a large and poor city along the Texas- Mexico border. The second data set was the Hispanic Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for 2009, a national random sample telephone survey (n=30075). Results:In the CCHC, the sample (67.06% female) has a mean age of 48.06 ± 15.60 years, 48.81% employed, 45.66% has less than high school education, 77.57% chose to complete the survey in Spanish
Methods This study pooled individual data from the 2008 Behavioural and Risk Factor Surveillance System and state-level data from the US Census Bureau. The Behavioural and Risk Factor Surveillance System collected information on demographic characteristics (age, sex, race/ethnicity and marital status), socioeconomic position (education and annual household income) and tooth loss, which was self-reported on a 4-point scale (none, 1 to 5, 6 or more but not all, and all teeth). Income inequality at state level was measured with the Gini coefficient, based on household income for 1979, 1989 and 1999, respectively. Two-level ordered logit models with individuals nested within states were used to test the association of state Gini coefficient at different lag periods with tooth loss after adjustment for state median household income and individuals characteristics. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cigarette smoking and prostate cancer mortality in four US States, 1999-2010. AU - Jones, Miranda. AU - Joshu, Corinne E.. AU - Kanarek, Norma F. AU - Navas Acien, Ana. AU - Richardson, Kelly A.. AU - Platz, Elizabeth A. PY - 2016/4/1. Y1 - 2016/4/1. N2 - Introduction In the United States, prostate cancer mortality rates have declined in recent decades. Cigarette smoking, a risk factor for prostate cancer death, has also declined. It is unknown whether declines in smoking prevalence produced detectable declines in prostate cancer mortality. We examined state prostate cancer mortality rates in relation to changes in cigarette smoking. Methods We studied men aged 35 years or older from California, Kentucky, Maryland, and Utah. Data on state smoking prevalence were obtained from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Mortality rates for prostate cancer and external causes (control condition) were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions Wide-Ranging ...
Introduction: Hepatocellular carcinoma incidence and mortality rates are the rise in the United States and in Kentucky as well. According to the National Cancer Institute, there will be an estimated 40,710 new cases of liver and intrahepatic bile duct cancer and 28,920 deaths in 2017, with than 20% of 5-years survivors 1. The numbers of new cases expected by year 2030 is 37,574 2. The aim of this capstone is to assess the risk factors of late-stage diagnosis and survivability in Kentucky. Methods: A combined dataset from the Kentucky Cancer Registry and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System was used to perform a descriptive statistics, a logistic regression and a Cox proportional-hazards regression. Results: Of the 2,205 cases analyzed, 72.1% were males, 90.2% of white/other ethnicity, 41.1% were married and lived mostly in urban (59.5%0 and non-Appalachian region (72.1%). Their mean age at diagnosis was 64.1 years and most were diagnosed between 2005 and 2009 (81.5%) with late-stage (41.9%)
Downloadable! The main goal of this paper is to test whether macroeconomic conditions affect alcohol consumption using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for the period 1987-2003. We try to control unobserved heterogeneity by relying on the construction of pseudo-panel data from the different cross-sections available. Our results indicate that when we do not take into account unobserved heterogeneity, the unemployment rate is signifficant and reduces the probability of becoming drinker and the number of alcoholic beverages consumed. However, once we estimate the model using cohort data, controlling for both observed and unobserved heterogeneity, the unemployment rate becomes non-signifficant. This implies that unobserved effects are important when explaining alcohol consumption. As a result, inferences obtained without controlling for them should be interpreted with caution.
This study examines the relationships between alcohol taxation, drinking during pregnancy, and infant health. Merged data from the US Natality Detailed Files, as well as the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (1985-2002), data regarding state taxes on beer, wine, and liquor, a state- and year-fixed-effect reduced-form regression were used. Results indicate that a one-cent ($0.01) increase in beer taxes decreased the incidence of low-birth-weight by about 1-2 percentage points. The binge drinking participation tax elasticity is −2.5 for beer and wine taxes and −9 for liquor taxes. These results demonstrate the potential intergenerational impact of increasing alcohol taxes.
Asthma rates in Connecticut are rising, and residents of Bridgeport and the states four other largest cities are more likely to be hospitalized with the condition than individuals anywhere else in the state. The report offers a comprehensive look at asthma in the state up to 2010, using information from a variety of sources, including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Preventions 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Since 2000, asthma rates in the state have been higher than national rates. In 2009 alone, there were 5,146 hospitalizations and 24,239 emergency department visits attributed to asthma. Many of these people are getting their asthma care in the emergency room and not a doctors office, Veksler said. [...] Medicare or Medicaid was the payment source for 73.8 percent of asthma hospitalizations and 60 percent of asthma emergency department visits in 2009.
Hypertension is the number one cause of racial group disparities in mortality in the U.S. Thus, understanding the mechanisms by which race is linked with the cardiovascular system is key. African Americans (AA) are exposed to more stress across the lifespan and lifetime adversity is associated with cardiovascular disease (CHD) and hypertension. However, mechanisms accounting for the links between long-term stress exposure, hypertension and CHD remain unclear. Cardiovascular reactivity is hypothesized to be a major contender as it predicts increased risk of cardiac events and mortality, especially among people with hypertension. According to existing theories of racial health disparities, stress, and social relations, racial health disparities are due to variations in long-term exposure to stress and stress reactivity (biological, psychological, behavioral) and those race differences are moderated by social relations and age. In response to the FOA Aging Research on Stress and Resilience to ...
Approximately 21% of HIV infections in the U.S. are undiagnosed, but only about 40% of all adults have been tested. Thus, late diagnosis of HIV is common, and, furthermore, treatment delays and disruptions are widespread. Heterosexuals at high risk (HHR) are significantly less likely to test for HIV, are more likely to be diagnosed with HIV late, and experience serious barriers to entering care compared to other groups. Our research team has studied HHR in New York City (NYC) as part of the CDCs National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) studies. The investigators found an HIV prevalence rate of 7.4% among HHR in NYC, and only 6% of these infections had been previously diagnosed. Further, in central Brooklyn, 10% were newly diagnosed with HIV. The proposed study will use NHBS methodology to target HHR. Reduced rates of HIV testing and treatment among HHR are due to structural (e.g., poor access), social (e.g., peer norms), and individual-level (e.g., low perceived risk) barriers. Thus active ...
First inhabited by Arawak and later by Carib Indians, the Virgin Islands were settled by the Dutch in 1648 and then annexed by the English in 1672. The islands were part of the British colony of the Leeward Islands from 1872-1960; they were granted autonomy in 1967. The economy is closely tied to the larger and more populous US Virgin Islands to the west; the US dollar is the legal currency ...
Latitude and longitude of Virgin Island is 18 degrees 20 N and 64 degrees 50 W. Find Virgin Island latitude and longitude map showing comprehensive details including cities, roads, towns, airports and much more.
Thank you for your interest in and support of the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Territory continues to recover and rebuild from back-to-back hurricanes. While some of our larger hotels renovate and rebuild and power restoration continues, there are many accommodation options, restaurants and attractions that are open for business. Please contact your airline, accommodations provider and/or travel consultant/advisor for updates before you travel. Also, please visit usviupdate.com for more details as we welcome visitors back to our shores. We cant wait to show you that the USVI is #stillnice.. ...
In the midst of Syrias civil war, doctors opposed to the Assad regime and a network of young volunteers are venturing into combat zones to vaccinate children against polio. Video.
Click here to view Munchkin Cats in U.S. Virgin Islands for adoption. Individuals & rescue groups can post animals free. ― ♥ RESCUE ME! ♥ ۬
Sex practices and lifestyle are culprits. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have teased out two distinct sets of risk factors for head and neck cancers, suggesting that there are two completely different kinds of the disease.. In the Johns Hopkins study, head and neck tumors caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted virus, were most often linked to certain sexual behaviors and marijuana use, rather than tobacco and alcohol. The Johns Hopkins scientists also found that people with the viral-linked cancer were younger, more likely to be white, married, college-educated and have an annual income of $50,000 or higher. By contrast, those not caused by HPV, were associated with tobacco smoking, alcohol use and poor oral hygiene, which are the behaviors most often linked to head and neck cancer.. "Our results indicate that HPV-positive and HPV-negative head and neck cancers have different risk-factor profiles and should be considered two distinct ...
Powered by Pure, Scopus & Elsevier Fingerprint Engine™ © 2020 Elsevier B.V. We use cookies to help provide and enhance our service and tailor content. By continuing you agree to the use of cookies. ...
Health,... Georgia Receives Failing Marks for Second Straight Year ...WASHINGTON Nov. 27 -- Today Lung CancerAlli...Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer deaths nationally aswe... Despite these alarming statistics the Georgia legislature and Georgi...,Lung,Cancer,Alliance-Georgia,Issues,Second,Annual,State-Specific,Report,Card,on,Lung,Cancer,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
Data & statistics on Current Asthma Status by Health Care Utilization Colorado Adults BRFSS: Current Asthma Status by Health Care Utilization: Colorado Adults, BRFSS 2000, To the right breaks down the prevalence of COPD among Colorado adults by age, race/ethnicity, sex, employment status, education level, income, marital status, smoking status, and asthma history., Urgent care visits: Percent of adults currently with asthma who had at least one urgent care visit for asthma with their provider in the past 12 months by State, District of Columbia and U.S. Territory, 2003...
Two bills signed by the Nebraska governor give the state more control over pipelines crossing state territory, the legislation reads.
The antecedent of both the Behavior Risk Factor Survey and the Healthy! Capital Counties Community Health Profile was a report was called Our Health Is in Our Hands. Our Health Is in Our Hands was so well received by the community that demand for health assessment data for a variety of planning activities increased to the point that one document was no longer sufficient to contain all the information demanded, hence the two reports. Although both reports are similar, they perform very different functions. One, the Behavioral Risk factor report, is concerned exclusively to the health and behaviors of the adult population of the region and functions more as a data reference tool for the Department and the Community. The products from the Healthy!Capital Counties Project, however, contain information from a variety of sources and chronicles the overall health and wellbeing of the entire community. Its intent is to assist in long-term planning and prioritization of community concerns.. ...
Downloadable! The long-standing inverse relationship between education and mortality strengthened substantially later in the 20th century. This paper examines the reasons for this increase. We show that behavioral risk factors are not of primary importance. Smoking has declined more for the better educated, but not enough to explain the trend. Obesity has risen at similar rates across education groups, and control of blood pressure and cholesterol has increased fairly uniformly as well. Rather, our results show that the mortality returns to risk factors, and conditional on risk factors, the return to education, have grown over time.
Diseases start from heart, from mind, from the conception of the world and from mental imbalance. A suppression of feelings, emotions and inner feelings lead in time to the accumulation of stress, frustration, negative and pessimistic thoughts, all this leads to physical and mental illness.
... is one of the best joint supplements you can buy. Its designed to relieve joint pain and inflammation, increase mobility, and even help treat osteoarthritis, which commonly occurs in the weight-bearing joints of the hips, knees, and spine. By 2040, the CDC projects 26% of US adults aged 18 years or older will have doctor-diagnosed arthritis. Almost 50% of …. Read More » ...
Overall, people with dementia make up 10 percent of noninstitutionalized adults age 65 or older, but they account for more than 40 percent o…
Wisconsin Selection and Testing federal, national and state compliance resources - regulations, laws, and state-specific analysis for employers and HR professionals
Context: Ethnoracial differences may exist in exposure to trauma and posttraumatic outcomes. However, Asian Americans and Native Hawaiians/other Pacific Islanders (NHOPIs) are vastly underrepresented in research pertaining to trauma and health status sequelae.. Objective: To determine whether there are ethnoracial disparities in sexual trauma exposure and its sequelae for health and functioning among Asian Americans and NHOPIs.. Method: We examined data on sexual assault exposure from the 2006-2007 Hawaii Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (H-BRFSS), which yielded a cross-sectional, adult, community-based probability sample (N = 12,573). Data were collected via computer-assisted random-digit landline telephone survey. Survey response rate was found to be about 48% in 2006 and 52% in 2007. The main outcome measures were demographic information, the sexual violence module of the H-BRFSS regarding unwanted sexual experiences, and questions about health lifestyles, chronic diseases and ...
Buy Winstrol Steroids Online from Virgin Islands. Buy Winstrol Steroids online in official website from Virgin Islands with cheap price, Buy Stanozolol depot steroids alternative online in Virgin Islands
Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBSS) are conducted and analyzed by MSDHs Health Data and Research Unit to evaluate adolescent health and risk behaviors such as smoking, drug use, exercise and diet.. ...
Although men who have sex with men (MSM) recruited through web-based and venue-based sampling methods have been compared, no large web-based and venue-based samples using similar survey instruments have been examined in the U.S. This study describes the differences in sociodemographic characteristics and risk behaviors between the 2012 Web-based HIV Behavioral Survey (n = 3221) and 2011 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (n = 9256). Compared with participants in the venue-based sample, participants in the web-based sample were older, less likely to be black or Hispanic, more likely to have higher socioeconomic status, and more likely to have anal sex without a condom with their last male sex partner. Web-based participants were less likely to have multiple male sex partners, ever injected drugs, been tested for HIV in the past 12 months, and received free condoms than venue-based participants. The method for sampling MSM into a behavioral survey should consider the sub-population of MSM to be ...
S. 2165. A bill to provide additional disaster recovery assistance for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands, and for other purposes. In GovTrack.us, a database of bills in the U.S. Congress.
Teen Alcohol & Drug Rehab Centers In Virgin Islands. List of all teenage treatment facilities - ratings, address, treatment models, maps, websites, and more.
The U.S. Virgin Islands is an unincorporated organized territory of the United States of America between the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, east of Puerto Rico. It was formerly known as the Danish West Indies. Together with the British Virgin Islands, to the northeast, the territory forms the Virgin Islands archipelago.
The New Jersey Department of Education has conducted the Youth Risk Behavior Survey every other year since 1993 with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. The study provides the self-reported behaviors of New Jersey public high school students in the six areas most highly related to preventable illness and premature death among adolescents and young adults.. Shown below are links to two brochures that summarize findings of the 1999 New Jersey Youth Risk Behavior Survey among high school students in the states 30 Abbott Districts and among the remaining public high schools across the state respectively. These summaries may be downloaded and reproduced.. ...
Learn how to call Dominica from US Virgin Islands. Out complete resource guide gives you the Dominica country code & Virgin Island dialing code to make your international calls.
N.C. Division of Public Health / Surveillance and Evaluation Team / 919-707-5425 / www.ncpublichealth.com State of North Carolina / Department of Health and Human Services / www.dhhs.state.nc.us N.C. DHHS is an equal opportunity employer and provider. The N.C. Youth Risk Behavior Survey (N.C. YRBS) provides a critical source of public health data for understanding the scope of injury-related problems and measuring progress toward overall goals among public school students. N.C. YRBS is a comprehensive statewide sample of 2,000 middle and 2,300 high school students from across the state. Every other spring in odd years, a core set of injury-related questions are asked along with other health and risk-factor questions. Risk-factor variables include information such as alcohol use, seat belt use and physical assault. The sampling scheme is intended to generate a statewide representative sample of weighted data. Increasing school district participation and data utilization are two keys for future ...
Marta Induni, PhD, is the research program director of the Survey Research Group (SRG) at PHI. With more than 20 years of survey research experience, Dr. Induni has served as state coordinator of many surveys, including the California Behavioral Risk Factor Survey, the California Womens Health Survey, and the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Dr. Induni is particularly interested in survey research methods and issues in questionnaire development and translation. In addition to directing SRG, she currently serves on the CDCs Bi-national Border Health Technical Workgroup, as part of the Obesity Prevention Evaluation Task Force, and the California Womens Health Survey Editorial Board. She has served as the data director and administrative project manager for multiple case-control studies, such as food-borne disease outbreaks, immunization coverage, and cancer studies. Dr. Induni received her doctoral degree in educational psychology from the University of California, Davis, where she studied health ...
Several studies have examined the effects of state cigarette tax increases on youth substance use over the 1990s, with most -- but not all -- finding that higher taxes reduce youth consumption of tobacco. We advance the literature by using data from the 1991-2005 waves of the national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS), providing information on over 100,000 high school age youths. We also are the first to make use of hundreds of independently fielded state and local versions of the YRBS, reflecting data from over 750,000 youths. Importantly, these data are to our knowledge the only sources of relevant information on youth smoking that were explicitly designed to be representative of the sampled state or locality. We estimate two-way fixed effects models of the effect of state cigarette taxes on youth smoking, controlling for survey demographics and area and year fixed effects. Our most consistent finding is that -- contrary to some recent research -- the large state tobacco tax increases of the ...

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance SystemBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

BRFSS has a long history in behavioral and chronic disease surveillance. Fifteen states participated in the first BRFSS, ... The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the nations premier system of health-related telephone surveys that ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. ... it the largest continuously conducted health survey system in ... collect state data about U.S. residents regarding their health-related risk behaviors, chronic health conditions, and use of ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/brfss/

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System | CDCBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System | CDC

... is the nations premier system of telephone surveys that collect state data about health risk behaviors, chronic health ... Monitoring Health Risks and Behaviors Among Adults. At A Glance 2016. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is ... Data source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.. Using Workplace Data to Identify Health Risks. In Massachusetts, ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: At A Glance 2016 Cdc-pdf. [PDF - 323 KB] ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/brfss.htm

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance SystemBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

This website provides access to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) mapping tool. The BRFSS is a telephone ... This website provides access to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) mapping tool. The BRFSS is a telephone ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/. Division of Adult and Community Health Centers for ... Maps created on the BRFSS website illustrate health risks at national, state, and local levels. Categories that may be mapped ...
more infohttps://serc.carleton.edu/resources/15638.html

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance SystemBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

... The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data for health assessment ... Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trends (SMART) Asthma Prevalance per BRFSS BRFSS Web Enabled Analysis Tool ... and health risk indicators are available at the following sites: BRFSS Home BRFSS Data Trends ...
more infohttps://wonder.cdc.gov/brfss.html

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System - 863 Words | BartlebyBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System - 863 Words | Bartleby

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. 2867 Words , 12 Pages I. Background The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System ... Risk Factors And Risk Of Suicide. 2578 Words , 11 Pages * Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System And Child Health. 1840 ... Factors That Affect Family Risk Factors. 1579 Words , 7 Pages * The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. 1567 Words , 7 ... More about Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. * Installing A Office Surveillance System. 1714 Words , 7 Pages ...
more infohttps://www.bartleby.com/essay/Behavioral-Risk-Factor-Surveillance-System-F3EWZ7KTU5ZQ

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on ... The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003 (ICPSR 34085) Principal Investigator(s): United States Department of ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003. ICPSR34085-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for ...
more infohttp://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/RCMD/studies/34085?archive=RCMD&classification=RCMD.V.&recency=QUARTER&paging.startRow=1

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on ... The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003 (ICPSR 34085) Principal Investigator(s): United States Department of ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003. ICPSR34085-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for ...
more infohttp://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NAHDAP/studies/34085?q=%22program+evaluation%22&

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (1989)Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (1989)

CDC WONDER is a system for disseminating Public Health data and information ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (1989). BRFS ABSTRACT The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ... risk factor prevalence. Taken together, the behavioral risk factor survey and surveillance data provide a new resource to guide ... and have come to be known collectively as the Behavior- al Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The CDC continues to ...
more infohttps://wonder.cdc.gov/wonder/sci_data/surveys/brfs/type_txt/brfs2.asp

North Dakota Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System » PublicationsNorth Dakota Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System » Publications

The North Dakota Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) program director writes reports and gives presentations ... Some of these display prevalence data and others take an in-depth look at certain behavioral risk factors in North Dakota. ... Behavioral Risks Reported by ND American Indian Adults 1996-2002. *ND BRFSS Risk Factors by Year 2001-2006 ... Adult Alcohol Risk Factors and Regional Analysis 1997-2003. *County Level Estimates for Health Risk Factors 2000-2006 ...
more infohttp://ndhealth.gov/brfss/publications/

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2000 - SociometricsBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2000 - Sociometrics

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a collaborative project of the Centers for Disease Control and ... The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a collaborative project of the Centers for Disease Control and ... is an on-going data collection program designed to measure behavioral risk factors in the adult population 18 years of age or ... The BRFSS was initiated in 1984, with 15 states collecting surveillance data on risk behaviors through monthly telephone ...
more infohttps://www.socio.com/products/aids-petra-09

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Archives - Hearing EconomicsBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Archives - Hearing Economics

Category: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Johns Journey Continues: Preparation. September 22, 2015. September 22, ... Holly Hosford-Dunn Audiology / Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System / BRFSS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... Holly Hosford-Dunn Audiology / Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System / BRFSS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... HomeCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Category Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System ...
more infohttps://hearinghealthmatters.org/hearingeconomics/centers-for-disease-control-and-prevention-cdc/behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system/

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System | Food and Nutrition Information Center | NAL | USDABehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System | Food and Nutrition Information Center | NAL | USDA

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Data ... Links to questionnaires and results from the BRFSS, a telephone survey that tracks health risks in the United States. ...
more infohttps://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Archives - TheJointBlogBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Archives - TheJointBlog

Tag: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Study: Medical Cannabis Laws Associated with Reduced Obesity-Related Medical ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, health Economics, obesity, obesity cannabis, obesity marijuana ...
more infohttps://thejointblog.com/tag/behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system/

Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) - Worker Health ModuleWashington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) - Worker Health Module

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an annual telephone survey that collects data on emerging public health ... WA DOH - Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) CDC NIOSH Industry & Occupation Coding: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ ... Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) - Worker Health Module. Washington State Behavioral Risk ... risk factors and behaviors. The Dept. of Health operates BRFSS in Washington. Through successful collaboration with Washington ...
more infohttps://www.lni.wa.gov/Safety/Research/Projects/BRFSSWorkerHealth/default.asp

Kansas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Expansion - Kansas Health FoundationKansas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Expansion - Kansas Health Foundation

... of Health and Environment to double the number of respondents participating in the Kansas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance ...
more infohttps://kansashealth.org/grants/kansas-behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system-brfss-expansion/

PPT - Kentucky Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System PowerPoint Presentation - ID:698658PPT - Kentucky Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System PowerPoint Presentation - ID:698658

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System -Brfss. 2003 northeast nc ii region* nc brfss survey results. behavioral risk factor ... surveillance systems and data source descriptions. behavioral risk factor surveillance system (brfss). a state-based system of ... Manitoba Risk Factor Surveillance - Building on Success -. growing up: expanding from youth to adult risk factor surveillance ... Risk Factor Approach -. risk factor approach . risk factors are taken from empirical research conducted for theory testing take ...
more infohttps://www.slideserve.com/pippa/kentucky-behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system

2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Data Released | CityMatCH2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Data Released | CityMatCH

2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Data Released. 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data ... The telephone-based BRFSS surveillance system is designed to collect data in health-related risk behaviors, use of preventive ...
more infohttp://citymatch.org/publications/news-room/198/2016-behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system-brfss-data-released

Prevalence of arthritis: analysis of data from the US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1996-99.  - PubMed - NCBIPrevalence of arthritis: analysis of data from the US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1996-99. - PubMed - NCBI

Prevalence of arthritis: analysis of data from the US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1996-99.. Mili F1, Helmick CG ... We used data from a cross sectional random digit telephone survey (the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System) of ... Because appropriate management can minimize the influence of arthritis, health care providers should ask patients in high risk ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12233896

Discrepancy among Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Social Security, and functional disability measurementDiscrepancy among Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Social Security, and functional disability measurement

... ... Hall, JP, Kurth, NK, & Fall, EC (2012). Discrepancy among Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Social Security, and ...
more infohttps://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/handle/1808/8706

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System - WikipediaBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System - Wikipedia

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a United States health survey that looks at behavioral risk factors. ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System CDC Website. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behavioral_Risk_Factor_Surveillance_System

Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data Collection in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System - Center for American...Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data Collection in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System - Center for American...

... including the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, or BRFSS-the largest continuously conducted health survey system in ... Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data Collection in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. By Kellan Baker and ... Within the purview of HHS, two priority surveys are the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, or YRBSS, and the National ... Issues such as discrimination and poverty threaten the health and well-being of LGBT people by increasing risk factors for poor ...
more infohttps://www.americanprogress.org/issues/lgbt/reports/2016/03/29/134182/sexual-orientation-and-gender-identity-data-collection-in-the-behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system/

Annual Report Survey Results for the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2006  - Iowa Publications OnlineAnnual Report Survey Results for the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2006 - Iowa Publications Online

The Iowa Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing telephone survey. It is financially and technically ... 2006) Annual Report Survey Results for the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2006. Public Health, Department of ... Annual Report Survey Results for the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2006 ...
more infohttp://publications.iowa.gov/23844/

Prevalence and Distribution of E-Cigarette Use Among U.S. Adults: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016 | November...Prevalence and Distribution of E-Cigarette Use Among U.S. Adults: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016 | November...

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016. Prevalence and Distribution of E-Cigarette Use Among U.S. Adults: Behavioral ... Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016. Given the rapid adoption of e-cigarettes despite unclear benefits and harms, ...
more infohttps://www.acponline.org/membership/medical-students/acp-impact/archive/november-2018/prevalence-and-distribution-of-e-cigarette-use-among-us-adults-behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance
  • On-going surveillance surveys were conducted in 15 states in 1984, 22 states in 1985, 26 states in 1986, 34 states in 1987, 37 states in 1988, 40 states in 1989, and 45 states in 1990. (cdc.gov)
  • Risk Indicators: Risk factors, such as, conditions, personal characteristics, and traumatic life events greatly affect the risk of suicidal ideation, planning of a suicide, or the act of committing suicide. (bartleby.com)
  • This SOGI module follows the recommendations of the expert Sexual Minority Assessment and Research Team, or SMART, and the Gender Identity in U.S. Surveillance, or GenIUSS, Group about how to optimally design sexual orientation and gender identity questions. (americanprogress.org)
  • This dataset includes data on adult's diet, physical activity, and weight status from Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. (data.gov)
  • The editors and contributors specifically disclaim any liability, loss or risk, personal or otherwise, which is incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, of the use and application of any of the contents of this Web site. (hearinghealthmatters.org)
  • The difference between these types of factors lies in the information about causation. (bartleby.com)