Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Behavioral Symptoms: Observable manifestations of impaired psychological functioning.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Behavioral Medicine: The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.Behavioral Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the study of human and animal behavior.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Hospital Departments: Major administrative divisions of the hospital.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Noble Gases: Elements that constitute group 18 (formerly the zero group) of the periodic table. They are gases that generally do not react chemically.Miller Fisher Syndrome: A variant of the GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME characterized by the acute onset of oculomotor dysfunction, ataxia, and loss of deep tendon reflexes with relative sparing of strength in the extremities and trunk. The ataxia is produced by peripheral sensory nerve dysfunction and not by cerebellar injury. Facial weakness and sensory loss may also occur. The process is mediated by autoantibodies directed against a component of myelin found in peripheral nerves. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1313; Neurology 1987 Sep;37(9):1493-8)Dementia, Vascular: An imprecise term referring to dementia associated with CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS, including CEREBRAL INFARCTION (single or multiple), and conditions associated with chronic BRAIN ISCHEMIA. Diffuse, cortical, and subcortical subtypes have been described. (From Gerontol Geriatr 1998 Feb;31(1):36-44)Maze Learning: Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)Retinal Vessels: The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.Retinal DiseasesMississippiMicrovessels: The finer blood vessels of the vasculature that are generally less than 100 microns in internal diameter.BaltimoreBibliography of Medicine: A list of works, documents, and other publications on medical subjects and topics of interest to the field of medicine.Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: Telephone surveys are conducted to monitor prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature MORBIDITY and MORTALITY. The data collected is in regard to actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1984.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Epilepsy, Generalized: Recurrent conditions characterized by epileptic seizures which arise diffusely and simultaneously from both hemispheres of the brain. Classification is generally based upon motor manifestations of the seizure (e.g., convulsive, nonconvulsive, akinetic, atonic, etc.) or etiology (e.g., idiopathic, cryptogenic, and symptomatic). (From Mayo Clin Proc, 1996 Apr;71(4):405-14)Anticonvulsants: Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe: A localization-related (focal) form of epilepsy characterized by recurrent seizures that arise from foci within the temporal lobe, most commonly from its mesial aspect. A wide variety of psychic phenomena may be associated, including illusions, hallucinations, dyscognitive states, and affective experiences. The majority of complex partial seizures (see EPILEPSY, COMPLEX PARTIAL) originate from the temporal lobes. Temporal lobe seizures may be classified by etiology as cryptogenic, familial, or symptomatic (i.e., related to an identified disease process or lesion). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p321)Tourette Syndrome: A neuropsychological disorder related to alterations in DOPAMINE metabolism and neurotransmission involving frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits. Both multiple motor and one or more vocal tics need to be present with TICS occurring many times a day, nearly daily, over a period of more than one year. The onset is before age 18 and the disturbance is not due to direct physiological effects of a substance or a another medical condition. The disturbance causes marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. (From DSM-IV, 1994; Neurol Clin 1997 May;15(2):357-79)Play Therapy: A treatment technique utilizing play as a medium for expression and communication between patient and therapist.Tics: Habitual, repeated, rapid contraction of certain muscles, resulting in stereotyped individualized actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods. They often involve the face, vocal cords, neck, and less often the extremities. Examples include repetitive throat clearing, vocalizations, sniffing, pursing the lips, and excessive blinking. Tics tend to be aggravated by emotional stress. When frequent they may interfere with speech and INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS. Conditions which feature frequent and prominent tics as a primary manifestation of disease are referred to as TIC DISORDERS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp109-10)Adolescent Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in individuals 13-18 years.Neuropsychology: A branch of psychology which investigates the correlation between experience or behavior and the basic neurophysiological processes. The term neuropsychology stresses the dominant role of the nervous system. It is a more narrowly defined field than physiological psychology or psychophysiology.Tic Disorders: Disorders characterized by recurrent TICS that may interfere with speech and other activities. Tics are sudden, rapid, nonrhythmic, stereotyped motor movements or vocalizations which may be exacerbated by stress and are generally attenuated during absorbing activities. Tic disorders are distinguished from conditions which feature other types of abnormal movements that may accompany another another condition. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Occupational Therapy: Skilled treatment that helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. It assists in the development of skills needed for independent living.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Group Practice: Any group of three or more full-time physicians organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of health care services, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Capitation Fee: A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.MassachusettsBostonSouth Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Brachyura: An infraorder of chiefly marine, largely carnivorous CRUSTACEA, in the order DECAPODA, including the genera Cancer, Uca, and Callinectes.Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.
  • The SCORE clinic is staffed by neuropsychologists and neuropsychology post-doctoral fellows who specialize in precise identification, monitoring and management of children, adolescents and college student-athletes, ages 4 to 22, who have sustained a concussion. (childrensnational.org)
  • Dr. Knopman earned his M.D. degree from the University of Minnesota (UM) Medical School, where he also completed his neurology residency. (alz.org)
  • I had spent several weeks as a resident rotating in the memory clinic and had a very clear sense of its many strengths. (stanford.edu)
  • Equally important is the continuum of care for East Texans, with ETMC hospitals, clinics and rehabilitation facilities located throughout the region. (kltv.com)
  • The newly created health system under Ardent Health Services - to include all the ETMC hospitals and clinics as well as those of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler (UT Health Northeast) - is targeted to begin operations on March 1. (kltv.com)
  • All clinical services and programs are part of University of Utah Health Hospitals and Clinics. (utah.edu)
  • A multisite, assessor-masked, parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted in 20 psychiatric clinics and hospitals in Japan. (jmir.org)
  • Search de-identified data from clinic visits at several Harvard-affiliated hospitals. (harvard.edu)
  • Clinics at one of the state charity hospitals in Vicksburg were held for a number of years. (umc.edu)
  • The psychologist focuses on family and patient adjustment, patient adaptive coping, behavioral assessment and mental health screening to address and treat difficulties in these areas. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • With cognitive behavioral therapy, people talk with a therapist to identify the negative thoughts and feelings that cause them problems, and to learn ways to solve their problems, according to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health. (blogspot.com)
  • Paola Sandroni MD, Professor of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic of Minnesota, says that there isn't a certain way to say cell phones are causing this for sure, but it is possible, "I haven't seen the younger generation yet with this issue but we will know over the next 5 to 10 years or so," she said. (thebehavioralhealthhour.com)
  • Mayo Clinic in the News is a weekly highlights summary of major media coverage. (mayoclinic.org)
  • If you would like to be added to the weekly distribution list, send a note to Emily Blahnik with this subject line: SUBSCRIBE to Mayo Clinic in the News. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Note: This edition of Mayo Clinic in the News will be the last issue of 2015. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Dr. Frye is also funded by the National Institutes of Health to study brain function in individuals with dyslexia and is the medical director of the University of Texas medically-based autism clinic. (autismone.org)
  • A Health System in Wisconsin is expanding its neurology service line at its Southeast Wisconsin location with the addition of several neurologists. (aan.com)
  • In addition to coordinating memory clinic initiatives, the Division directs and coordinates many of the activities of the Trauma, Concussion, and Sports (TRACS) Neuromedicine (TRACS) program and the newly formed UF Brain Health program. (ufl.edu)
  • We have 20 clinics conveniently located in Tulsa and the surrounding areas to better serve you and your families health care needs. (osumedicine.com)
  • BUMC-P Neurobehavioral Service Line is a comprehensive and integrated team comprised of neurologists, neurosurgeons, neurorehabilitation, and behavioral health, offering leading-edge care for all subspecialties in neurology and behavioral health. (accfl.org)
  • Rogers Behavioral Health has earned The Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval. (rogersbh.org)
  • LegitScript certification demonstrates that Rogers Behavioral Health complies with LegitScript's certification standards, which help ensure transparency and compliance with applicable laws and regulations. (rogersbh.org)
  • Rogers Behavioral Health Foundation is registered as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. (rogersbh.org)
  • Gary Gronstedt, DO, is a board-certified psychiatrist who works with children, adolescents, and adults in the intensive outpatient and partial hospitalization care at Rogers Behavioral Health in St. Paul. (rogersbh.org)
  • It is thought that MS is a two-stage process," says Christopher Lock, M.D., a clinical associate professor of Neurology at Stanford Health Care. (healthcentral.com)
  • The Community and Behavioral Health Student Association was established to provide opportunities for professional development, service oriented outreach and social events for students. (uiowa.edu)
  • CBHSA aims to create unity among all students in the Department of Community and Behavioral Health by serving as a means of communication between students, faculty, the College of Public Health, and the community. (uiowa.edu)
  • All CBHSA sponsored events are open to students studying Community and Behavioral Health. (uiowa.edu)
  • Abby Hellem is a second-year MPH student in the Department of Community and Behavioral Health. (uiowa.edu)
  • Emily Shaw is a second year MPH student in the Community and Behavioral Health Department from Lisle, IL. (uiowa.edu)
  • She worked as a Clinical Research Assistant in Psychiatry, Neurology, and Ophthalmology before recognizing her interest in Public Health and deciding to come back to school. (uiowa.edu)
  • She earned her BAs in Biology Research, Spanish, and Music at the University of Northern Iowa in 2015, and her MPH in Community and Behavioral Health at the University of Iowa in 2020. (uiowa.edu)
  • Bikere Ikoba is a second-year MPH student in the Community & Behavioral Health department, and she grew up in the Quad Cities. (uiowa.edu)
  • In this program, Bikere now works with the Native Center for Behavioral Health as a Graduate Research Assistant alongside her studies. (uiowa.edu)
  • Call Capital Health - Behavioral Health Specialists today to make an appointment. (capitalhealth.org)
  • Baptist Neurology Group is one of the largest private health system integrated neurology groups in the Southeast United States. (illinoispsychology.org)
  • Here's where you could pick up extra OB, more procedures, transgender health, behavioral health, I mean literally anything depending on what's available. (ipromo.com)
  • Every program is opt-out, so if you don't want to do abortions you will never be required to, Sports med: if your program has a sports med fellowship/track that's probably a good indicator that they have at least one faculty who is sports med certified and can teach you everything about injuries and joint injections you'd ever want to know, Behavioral health: some programs let you get CBT training. (ipromo.com)
  • I don't mean this to say you "punt" all patients with mental health needs, but think of it as, your patient deserves to see a certified mental health professional and not just a compassionate doctor, bc you cannot give an hour of your time during clinic and your therapists can! (ipromo.com)
  • John has experienced various experiences in his nursing career including family practice, neurology, and behavioral health. (uicfla.com)
  • Nurse Practitioner - Fayette Family Health Clinic ANCC or AANP) as a Nurse Practitioner, Family or Adult. (nursingjobs.org)
  • Health care is moving to make care more convenient and local to where patients live and work, and retail-based clinics are playing a larger role. (aanp.org)
  • The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Multispecialty Center and Stark Diabetes Clinic, League City, Primary and Specialty Care, Clear Lake Campus, Surgery and Cancer Clinics, League City Campus, Referring Physician/Health Care Professional, Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD). (psa-consulting.com)
  • Utmb Health Neurology Office Locations The Emergency Department is staffed 24/7 and is a Level 1 trauma center for nine counties. (psa-consulting.com)
  • The person hired for this position would be a part of the Behavioral Health Department in Duluth, MN. (physemp.com)
  • intensive outpatient/partial hospitalization, inpatient psychiatric care, outpatient behavioral health clinic, growing Integrated Behavioral Health, and hospital consult/liaison. (physemp.com)
  • There is a trainee assigned to the general neurology and epilepsy services and a second trainee assigned to the neurocritical care service which includes NICU and PICU consultations. (northwestern.edu)
  • During her time as a medical student at UICOM-Peoria, she participated in the Rural Student Physician Program where she completed a scholarly project mapping the availability of medication-assisted treatment and behavioral counseling services to pregnant women with substance use disorder as part of the statewide Illinois perinatal initiative. (makeplayscoaching.com)
  • Clinic LPN/RMA Physician / FNP / Clinic Manager or Supervisor. (nursingjobs.org)
  • Fellows attend clinics 1-2 times weekly throughout the training program. (elcoiasi.ro)
  • Fellows complete a one-month rotation on the Stony Brook University Neurology consultation service, aimed to strengthen their skills in neurological assessment and differential diagnoses. (stonybrookmedicine.edu)
  • TimelyMD's telehealth programs optimize clinic resources and support clinic staff in delivering quality care to the right students at the right times. (doximity.com)
  • Occupational therapy helps children to develop the underlying skills necessary for learning and performing specific tasks, but it also addresses social and behavioral skills. (handtohold.org)
  • She earned her B.A. in Psychology from the University of Iowa in 2015, and spent time after graduation working at The University of Iowa's Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC) in research. (uiowa.edu)
  • A well-known academic program in Philadelphia is growing its main campus and community-based neurology faculty. (aan.com)
  • An academically affiliated program in Western Michigan is excited to welcome a Neuro-behavioral leader and a neuro-oncologist to their growing prog. (aan.com)