Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Stereotyped Behavior: Relatively invariant mode of behavior elicited or determined by a particular situation; may be verbal, postural, or expressive.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Agonistic Behavior: Any behavior associated with conflict between two individuals.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Appetitive Behavior: Animal searching behavior. The variable introductory phase of an instinctive behavior pattern or sequence, e.g., looking for food, or sequential courtship patterns prior to mating.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Social Behavior Disorders: Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.Behavior, Addictive: The observable, measurable, and often pathological activity of an organism that portrays its inability to overcome a habit resulting in an insatiable craving for a substance or for performing certain acts. The addictive behavior includes the emotional and physical overdependence on the object of habit in increasing amount or frequency.Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Drinking Behavior: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of water and other liquids; includes rhythmic patterns of drinking (time intervals - onset and duration), frequency and satiety.Illness Behavior: Coordinate set of non-specific behavioral responses to non-psychiatric illness. These may include loss of APPETITE or LIBIDO; disinterest in ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING; or withdrawal from social interaction.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Compulsive Behavior: The behavior of performing an act persistently and repetitively without it leading to reward or pleasure. The act is usually a small, circumscribed behavior, almost ritualistic, yet not pathologically disturbing. Examples of compulsive behavior include twirling of hair, checking something constantly, not wanting pennies in change, straightening tilted pictures, etc.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Risk Reduction Behavior: Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.Consummatory Behavior: An act which constitutes the termination of a given instinctive behavior pattern or sequence.Infant Behavior: Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.Grooming: An animal's cleaning and caring for the body surface. This includes preening, the cleaning and oiling of feathers with the bill or of hair with the tongue.Reinforcement (Psychology): The strengthening of a conditioned response.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Escape Reaction: Innate response elicited by sensory stimuli associated with a threatening situation, or actual confrontation with an enemy.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Paternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a father.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Dangerous Behavior: Actions which have a high risk of being harmful or injurious to oneself or others.Conditioning, Operant: Learning situations in which the sequence responses of the subject are instrumental in producing reinforcement. When the correct response occurs, which involves the selection from among a repertoire of responses, the subject is immediately reinforced.Spatial Behavior: Reactions of an individual or groups of individuals with relation to the immediate surrounding area including the animate or inanimate objects within that area.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Copulation: Sexual union of a male and a female in non-human species.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Drug-Seeking Behavior: Activities performed to obtain licit or illicit substances.Unsafe Sex: Sexual behaviors which are high-risk for contracting SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES or for producing PREGNANCY.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Decerebrate State: A condition characterized by abnormal posturing of the limbs that is associated with injury to the brainstem. This may occur as a clinical manifestation or induced experimentally in animals. The extensor reflexes are exaggerated leading to rigid extension of the limbs accompanied by hyperreflexia and opisthotonus. This condition is usually caused by lesions which occur in the region of the brainstem that lies between the red nuclei and the vestibular nuclei. In contrast, decorticate rigidity is characterized by flexion of the elbows and wrists with extension of the legs and feet. The causative lesion for this condition is located above the red nuclei and usually consists of diffuse cerebral damage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p358)Competitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Reward: An object or a situation that can serve to reinforce a response, to satisfy a motive, or to afford pleasure.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Maze Learning: Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Information Seeking Behavior: How information is gathered in personal, academic or work environments and the resources used.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Sexual Partners: Married or single individuals who share sexual relations.Avoidance Learning: A response to a cue that is instrumental in avoiding a noxious experience.Juvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Sucking Behavior: Any suction exerted by the mouth; response of the mammalian infant to draw milk from the breast. Includes sucking on inanimate objects. Not to be used for thumb sucking, which is indexed under fingersucking.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Extinction, Psychological: The procedure of presenting the conditioned stimulus without REINFORCEMENT to an organism previously conditioned. It refers also to the diminution of a conditioned response resulting from this procedure.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.United StatesPlay and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Sedentary Lifestyle: Usual level of physical activity that is less than 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most days of the week.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Punishment: The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Condoms: A sheath that is worn over the penis during sexual behavior in order to prevent pregnancy or spread of sexually transmitted disease.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Immunodeficiency Virus, Feline: A species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus feline lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, FELINE) isolated from cats with a chronic wasting syndrome, presumed to be immune deficiency. There are 3 strains: Petaluma (FIP-P), Oma (FIP-O) and Puma lentivirus (PLV). There is no antigenic relationship between FIV and HIV, nor does FIV grow in human T-cells.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Reinforcement Schedule: A schedule prescribing when the subject is to be reinforced or rewarded in terms of temporal interval in psychological experiments. The schedule may be continuous or intermittent.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.Courtship: Activities designed to attract the attention or favors of another.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Animal Communication: Communication between animals involving the giving off by one individual of some chemical or physical signal, that, on being received by another, influences its behavior.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Diseases due to or propagated by sexual contact.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Conditioning (Psychology): A general term referring to the learning of some particular response.Felidae: The cat family in the order CARNIVORA comprised of muscular, deep-chested terrestrial carnivores with a highly predatory lifestyle.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Self Administration: Administration of a drug or chemical by the individual under the direction of a physician. It includes administration clinically or experimentally, by human or animal.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Rats, Long-Evans: An outbred strain of rats developed in 1915 by crossing several Wistar Institute white females with a wild gray male. Inbred strains have been derived from this original outbred strain, including Long-Evans cinnamon rats (RATS, INBRED LEC) and Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty rats (RATS, INBRED OLETF), which are models for Wilson's disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, respectively.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Chloramphenicol O-Acetyltransferase: An enzyme that catalyzes the acetylation of chloramphenicol to yield chloramphenicol 3-acetate. Since chloramphenicol 3-acetate does not bind to bacterial ribosomes and is not an inhibitor of peptidyltransferase, the enzyme is responsible for the naturally occurring chloramphenicol resistance in bacteria. The enzyme, for which variants are known, is found in both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. EC 2.3.1.28.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Bartonella henselae: A species of gram-negative bacteria that is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (ANGIOMATOSIS, BACILLARY). This organism can also be a cause of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE in immunocompetent patients.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Genetics, Behavioral: The experimental study of the relationship between the genotype of an organism and its behavior. The scope includes the effects of genes on simple sensory processes to complex organization of the nervous system.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: A disorder characterized by episodes of vigorous and often violent motor activity during REM sleep (SLEEP, REM). The affected individual may inflict self injury or harm others, and is difficult to awaken from this condition. Episodes are usually followed by a vivid recollection of a dream that is consistent with the aggressive behavior. This condition primarily affects adult males. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p393)Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Homing Behavior: Instinctual patterns of activity related to a specific area including ability of certain animals to return to a given place when displaced from it, often over great distances using navigational clues such as those used in migration (ANIMAL MIGRATION).Cocaine: An alkaloid ester extracted from the leaves of plants including coca. It is a local anesthetic and vasoconstrictor and is clinically used for that purpose, particularly in the eye, ear, nose, and throat. It also has powerful central nervous system effects similar to the amphetamines and is a drug of abuse. Cocaine, like amphetamines, acts by multiple mechanisms on brain catecholaminergic neurons; the mechanism of its reinforcing effects is thought to involve inhibition of dopamine uptake.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Intention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Self Mutilation: The act of injuring one's own body to the extent of cutting off or permanently destroying a limb or other essential part of a body.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Reinforcement, Social: The strengthening of a response with a social reward such as a nod of approval, a parent's love or attention.Dopamine: One of the catecholamine NEUROTRANSMITTERS in the brain. It is derived from TYROSINE and is the precursor to NOREPINEPHRINE and EPINEPHRINE. Dopamine is a major transmitter in the extrapyramidal system of the brain, and important in regulating movement. A family of receptors (RECEPTORS, DOPAMINE) mediate its action.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Neurons, Afferent: Neurons which conduct NERVE IMPULSES to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Social Dominance: Social structure of a group as it relates to the relative social rank of dominance status of its members. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Homosexuality, Male: Sexual attraction or relationship between males.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Schools: Educational institutions.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Eating Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physiological and psychological disturbances in appetite or food intake.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Nucleus Accumbens: Collection of pleomorphic cells in the caudal part of the anterior horn of the LATERAL VENTRICLE, in the region of the OLFACTORY TUBERCLE, lying between the head of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and the ANTERIOR PERFORATED SUBSTANCE. It is part of the so-called VENTRAL STRIATUM, a composite structure considered part of the BASAL GANGLIA.Social Isolation: The separation of individuals or groups resulting in the lack of or minimizing of social contact and/or communication. This separation may be accomplished by physical separation, by social barriers and by psychological mechanisms. In the latter, there may be interaction but no real communication.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Leukemia Virus, Feline: A species of GAMMARETROVIRUS causing leukemia, lymphosarcoma, immune deficiency, or other degenerative diseases in cats. Several cellular oncogenes confer on FeLV the ability to induce sarcomas (see also SARCOMA VIRUSES, FELINE).Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Mice, Inbred C57BLTelevision: The transmission and reproduction of transient images of fixed or moving objects. An electronic system of transmitting such images together with sound over a wire or through space by apparatus that converts light and sound into electrical waves and reconverts them into visible light rays and audible sound. (From Webster, 3rd ed)Territoriality: Behavior in defense of an area against another individual or individuals primarily of the same species.Contraception Behavior: Behavior patterns of those practicing CONTRACEPTION.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Cat-Scratch Disease: A self-limiting bacterial infection of the regional lymph nodes caused by AFIPIA felis, a gram-negative bacterium recently identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and by BARTONELLA HENSELAE. It usually arises one or more weeks following a feline scratch, with raised inflammatory nodules at the site of the scratch being the primary symptom.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Education of Intellectually Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with subnormal intellectual functioning.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
Behaviors of networks[edit]. Biological neurons are connected to each other in a complex, recurrent fashion. These connections ... "Receptive fields, binocular interaction and functional architecture in the cat's visual cortex". J. Physiol. 160 (1): 106-54. ...
"Why Do Cats Have Whiskers?". Vetinfo.com. Retrieved 2013-06-24.. *^ "Cat Behaviour Explained". Cat-behavior-explained.com. 2013 ... The cat holds on until the prey stops wriggling.". Anecdotally, it is often stated that cats use their whiskers to gauge ... The Mysterious Whiskers of Cats, Blog-post about the functions of cat whiskers, April 7, 2012. ... so it seems likely that cats can use their whiskers for this purpose. However, reports of cats, particularly kittens, with ...
In another study of 275 cats, 11 cats (4%) developed or had worse behavior problems post-declawing; 5 clients (less than 1%) ... In another study, 16% of declawed cats developed behavior problems (12% biting), and more declawed (55%) than clawed (45%) cats ... "Indoor Cats, Scratching, and the Debate over Declawing: When Normal Pet Behavior Becomes a Problem." from The State of the ... Behavior problems are a primary cause of cats being relinquished to shelters. Proponents of declawing argue that declawing ...
Paul Leyhausen in Cat Behavior: The Predatory and Social Behavior of Domestic and Wild Cats, translated by Barbara A. Tonkin. ... No cat can both purr and roar. The subdivision of the Felidae into "purring cats" on the one hand and "roaring cats" on the ... and domestic cat (Felis silvestris f. catus). Journal of Anatomy, vol. 201, pp. 195-209. Why do cats purr? Why do Cheshire cats ... Cats often purr when distressed or in pain, such as in labour. This purring may trigger a cat's brain to release a hormone ...
The Cat's Paw Nebula lies inside the Milky Way Galaxy and is located in the constellation Scorpius.. Green areas show regions ... as well as to certain large PAHs also exhibiting semi-conducting and other behaviors. ... "Environmental contaminant-mixture effects on CNS development, plasticity, and behavior". Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology ...
This is especially significant in male cats due to the extreme undesirability of these male cat sexual behaviors for many pet ... In male cats, occurrence of abscesses, aggression toward veterinarians, sexual behaviors, and urine spraying was decreased, ... Non-neutered cats in the U.S. are three times more likely to require treatment for an animal bite. Having a cat neutered ... In terms of behavior in dogs, separation anxiety, aggression, escape behavior and inappropriate elimination are reduced while ...
Aronson, L. R.; Cooper, M. L. (1967). "Penile spines of the domestic cat: their endocrine-behavior relations" (PDF). Anat. Rec ... Domestic cats have barbed penises, with about 120-150 one millimeter long backwards-pointing spines. Upon withdrawal of the ... Cats of Africa. Struik. 2005. ISBN 978-1-77007-063-9. Retrieved 23 July 2013. Philip Caputo (1 June 2003). Ghosts of Tsavo: ... One type of scent-marking behavior in elk is known as "thrash-urination, which typically involves palpitation of the erect ...
Cats of Africa: Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006. Hunter, Luke, Susan ... Wild Cats of the World. London ; New York : Bloomsbury Natural History,, 2015 Hunter, Luke, and Priscilla Barrett. Carnivores ... Prior to that, he headed the Great Cats Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society, and held positions at universities in ... Big cats take pride of place at Taronga Zoo Profile at Panthera. ... to the range-wide conservation of the world's wild cat species ...
Cat flea Cat health Cat skin disorders Feather-plucking Trichotillomania: a compulsive hair-pulling behavior in humans that can ... Grooming is a natural behavior for cats. Cats spend 5%-25% of their waking hours grooming. Grooming becomes excessive when it ... and it predominantly affects purebred cats of oriental breeds, but can develop in any feline. Female cats appear more ... "Feline Compulsive Behavior" (PDF). Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine. Retrieved 2011-12-21. CS1 maint: Multiple ...
"Big Cat Hunting Strategies". Living Library. "Cheetah Hunting Behaviors". Archived from the original on 2012-03-25. ... Big cat "Life in the Slow(er) Lane: Revisiting the Long-Lost Giant Cheetah". Phenomena. 2015-08-28. Retrieved 2017-11-24. " ... The modern cheetah uses a specific hunting style seen nowhere else in the cat family: on open plains, it locates prey and walks ... Alan Turner (1997). The Big Cats And Their Fossil Relatives; An Illustrated Guide To Their Evolution And Natural History: 87 ...
Specialist in cat behavior; resides in Buckhannon National Register of Historic Places listings in Upshur County, West Virginia ...
Tynes, V.V.; Sinn, L.; Koch, C.S. (2015). "Chapter 4 - The relationship between physiology and behavior in cats and dogs". In ... "Systematic review of the use of pheromones for treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs". Journal of the American ... Animal Behavior for Shelter Veterinarians and Staff. John Wiley and Sons. p. 94. ISBN 978-1-118-92283-5.. ... Animal Behavior for Shelter Veterinarians and Staff. John Wiley and Sons. p. 160. ISBN 978-1-118-92283-5.. ...
CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) IUCN Cat Specialist Group. "A revised taxonomy of the Felidae" (PDF). Cat News. ... Luigi Boitani (23 November 2003). Wolves: Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation. University of Chicago Press. pp. 265-. ISBN 978- ... IUCN/SSC Cat Specialist Group Eurasian Lynx Online Information System for Europe About the Eurasian Lynx from the Wild Cats: ... As with other cats, the scent marks may consist of faeces, urine, or scrape marks, with the former often being left in ...
Journal of Mind and Behavior, Incorporated. 1980. p. 262. "The invasion of compulsory sex-morality.". World Cat Book excerpt: [ ... 304-. ISBN 978-0-9567587-0-5. The Journal of Mind and Behavior. ...
IUCN/SSC Cat Specialist Group, Kristin Nowell, Peter Jackson. (1996). Wild Cats: Status survey and conservation action plan. ... "Foraging Behavior of North American Bears" (PDF). Southwest Biological Science Center. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007 ... Frasef, A. (2012). Feline Behaviour and Welfare. CABI. pp. 72-77. ISBN 978-1-84593-926-7. Seryodkin; et al. (2003). "Denning ... The extent of hunting behavior differs by region. For example, in Slovenia, ungulate meat was four times more likely to be ...
"Histopathology and biologic behavior of pleomorphic cutaneous mast cell tumors in fifteen cats". Vet Pathol. 39 (4): 452-7. doi ... Young Siamese cats are at an increased risk for the histiocytic type, although the mast cell type is the most common in all ... Up to 25 percent of skin tumors in dogs are mast cell tumors, with a similar number in cats. Mast cell tumors are known among ... Mast Cell Tumors from The Pet Health Library Mast Cell Tumors in Dogs from Pet Cancer Center Mast Cell Tumors in Cats from Pet ...
Not all cats are affected by catnip; roughly one third are not affected by the plant.[12][13] The behavior is hereditary. ... "Cat-World.com.au. Cat World. 2014. Retrieved 2015-01-02.. *↑ Turner, Ramona (May 29, 2007). "How does catnip work its magic on ... Arden Moore (20 July 2007). The cat behavior answer book. Storey. ISBN 978-1-60342-179-9. . Retrieved 18 July 2013.. ... Cats rub on the plant, roll on the ground, paw at it, lick it, and chew it. Some leap about and purr, some cry out.[5] Cats do ...
The behavior of a dog can not always be an indication its friendliness. This is because when a dog wags its tail, most people ... Some cats learn to add a purr to the vocalization, which makes it less harmonious and more dissonant to humans, and therefore ... Domestic male cats also have variable attitudes towards their family members, for example, older male siblings tend not to go ... Individual cats learn to make these vocalizations through trial-and-error; when a particular vocalization elicits a positive ...
Missing or empty ,url= (help) "Nocturnal Behavior in Cats". Animal-World. "Catfish". Animal World. Kate Wong. "How Nocturnal ... "Tarsiers - The Big-Eyed, Ancient, Nocturnal Mammal". based on work of Peter Jackson - Chairman, Cat Specialist Group "Bengal ... Diurnality, plant or animal behavior characterized by activity during the day and sleeping at night. Cathemeral, a ... "Oncilla or 'Little Spotted Cat'". FelineConserveation.org Archived 2011-10-14 at the Wayback Machine. "Opossum FAQ". Craton.net ...
Aronson, L. R.; Cooper, M. L. (1967). "Penile Spines of the Domestic Cat: Their Endocrine-behavior Relations" (PDF). Anat. Rec ... Felines, especially domestic cats, are well known for having penile spines. Upon withdrawal of a cat's penis, the spines rake ... Dixson, A. F. "Sexual selection, genital morphology, and copulatory behavior in male galagos." International Journal of ...
These observations led ethologist John Bowlby (1969) to suggest that infantile sexual behavior may be the rule in mammals, not ... Edward C. Feldman; Richard Richard William Nelson (2004). Canine and feline endocrinology and reproduction. Elsevier Health ... R. D. Estes (1991). The Behavior Guide to African Mammals: Including Hoofed Mammals, Carnivores, Primates. University of ... Katherine A. Houpt (25 January 2011). Domestic Animal Behavior for Veterinarians and Animal Scientists. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN ...
Cats also display pica behavior in their natural environments and there is evidence to support that this behavior has a ... This type of behavior occurs through the first four years of a cat's life but it is primarily observed during the first two ... Some breeds (such as the Siamese cat) are more predisposed to showing this type of behavior than other breeds, but several ... Pica is also observed predominately during 6-8 months of a cat's life when territorial and sexual behaviors emerge. Pica may be ...
A single study has shown that T. terrestris can alter sexual behavior in castrated rats.[22] It appears to do so by stimulating ... cat's-head,[1][3] devil's eyelashes,[5] devil's-thorn,[1][5] devil's-weed,[1] puncture vine,[2] puncturevine,[1][6] and ...
A classmate accused him of killing her cat with a BB gun. After the shooting, Johnson claimed that Golden approached him and ... Golden was a sixth grader at the school, where schoolmates said he displayed troublesome behavior. He would often engage other ...
27: 74-78 Dinets, V. Play behavior in crocodilians. Animal Behavior & Cognition 2: 49-55 Feb2017 Dinets_HH(7)_final.pdf Dinets ... IUCN/SSC Cat News 38: 5. Dinets, V. Observations of the woolly flying squirrel Eupetaurus cinereus in Pakistan. Mammalia 75(3 ... Animal Behavior and Cognition 4:24-29. Dinets, V. Tracking the mystery animal. Vokrug Sveta 2012(2) (in Russian) Dinets, V. ... Reptile Social Behavior In press, Johns Hopkins University Press. 15/dinets.html Dinets V. Spontaneous development of hunting- ...
"Why Do Cats Eat Grass?". Pet MD. Retrieved 13 January 2017.. *^ Geiser, Fritz (2004). "Metabolic Rate and Body Temperature ... McKenna, R. J. (1972). "Some Effects of Anxiety Level and Food Cues on the Eating Behavior of Obese and Normal Subjects: A ... such as giraffes, camels, and cattle, will gnaw on bones to consume particular minerals and nutrients.[37] Also, cats, which ... Carlson, Neil (2010). Physiology of Behavior. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. pp. 412-426.. ...
We hope this page helps you find information on Dog Compulsive Behavior in San Jose. ... Looking for information on Dog Compulsive Behavior in San Jose? We have compiled a list of businesses and services around San ... Compulsive behavior Description: Compulsive behavior is a repeated behavior that is in excess, interferring with normal ... Dog Compulsive Behavior San Jose CA. Looking for information on Dog Compulsive Behavior in San Jose? We have compiled a list of ...
She will also ask you several questions regarding your cats health and behavior. Then, the doctor will do a complete physical ... How long do cats live?. The old folklore that a cat has 9 lives is not necessarily true; the number of lives a cat has actually ... Can cats give any diseases to me?. While most feline infectious diseases affecct only cats, it is important to be aware that ... Why do you sometimes need to sedate/anesthetize my cat?. We will sedate or anesthetize your cat if the procedure your cat needs ...
What is epigenetics and why do some researchers believe it is very important for understanding behavior? As in previous ... in this case ranging from calico cats to the human genetic disorders of Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes. ...
Complete FAQ List ] [ Feline WWW List ] [ Feline Mailing Lists ] [ FAQ Homepage ] [ Main Page ] Problem Behaviors in Cats FAQ. ... You can train your cat not to perform inappropriate behavior by training your cat to perform other behavior alternative to or ... The Outside World ] [ Behavior Problems in Cats ] [ Feline Leukemia Virus ] [ Feline Infectious Peritonitis ]. [ Miscellaneous ... Problem Behaviors in Cats. Note: Please see the Table of Contents FAQ for a complete list of topics. Cats Inside. You cannot ...
Your cats learning and memory may change, in addition to her sleep cycles, and other day-to-day behaviors. Learn more about ... As your cat ages, he or she may experience a decline in cognitive functioning. ... cognitive dysfunction in older cats, and how to treat it. ... Older Cats with Behavior Problems. cat-care_behavior-problems- ... Ruling Out Other Causes for Your Cats Behavior. If your cat shows any of the symptoms or changes listed above, your first step ...
If one cat is fearful it helps to medicate that cat as the the fearful behavior seems to incite things. If you cant identify ... Sometimes play behavior in cats can look pretty rough, too. Many cats do not become territorial until they are 2 to 5 years of ... Cat aggression Q: We had two cats, a male and a female. Two weeks ago, a stray female cat came to join the family. She was very ... Inter-cat aggression, new cat: Q: Hi, We have three cats, two females 4 and 5 years old, and a male, 2 years old. All have been ...
Most cats will outgrow this behavior by the time they are a couple of years old and are much better if given alternatives ... I think that she will probably put an end to overly aggressive behavior herself but not all cats do that. If she gets really ... Cat Attacks (Ankle Biting) Ankle biting and sudden attacks are most often associated with predatory aggression. Cats have a ... Extreme aggression toward owner - cat Q: Ive read your web page on cat attacks and aggression, but I think my situation is a ...
A cat will purr to calm itself. My cat knows to use her purr to calm me as well. As Im sure … ... Cats are a little odd. At least mine is. She seems to do the weirdest things. The latest one isnt new but she hasnt done it ... If you own a cat you know what a purr means. Happy, satisfied, comfortable, content and sometimes scared. ...
... by Mary Krenz 6 years ago. Cat behaviorIf there is anyone out there that knows anything about cats, I would like ... Cat behavior is driving me NUTS! by UnknownAuthor72 5 years ago. We are a rescue/foster home for cats and dogs. We have now 10 ... Cat behavior. My nuetered male cat is acting very bad after I got a female kitten who is not spayed. He eats his and her food. ... Curious cat behavior. by writtendreamz 8 years ago. My male neutered cat Thomas has such an interest in my 14-year-old female ...
... cat. Recently, she will be her usual self and then will suddenly begin to hiss and sp... ... Sudden aggressive behavior in my cat? tophatjimmy I have a spayed 3 1/2 year old calico that up until recently has been a very ... Sudden aggressive behavior in my cat?. I have a spayed 3 1/2 year old calico that up until recently has been a very well ... You mention your cat being 3 y.o, so her behavior is not age related as some older kitties will become disoriented and the fear ...
The nonchalant behavior of cats is prevalent, and the cat has control over its domain and people. ... Cat lovers know the many characteristics of their felines. ... Cat Behavior. Cats: Some Cat Secrets and Tips for Understanding ... You got love cats to be allergic and have them. Lets hear it for our cats! I serve Amy. I ran out of cat food yesterday and the ... Our cats rule, too. It is so funny to watch one of our doxies antagonizing one of the cats. The cat will just sit there like, ...
This article is dedicated to our feline friends. ... Cats are precious creatures that add value to the lives of the ... Curious Cat Behaviors. Chattering at Birds. Have you ever heard your cat make a clacking sound when birds fly by the window? ... Although cats with territorial aggression often direct it towards other cats, some exhibit this behavior toward certain family ... Older cats are often found purring when they play with or approach other cats. They do this in order to let the other cat know ...
... behavior-cats-during-full-moon.html. 13 May 2017. Farricelli, Adrienne. (2017, May 13). Behavior of Cats During a Full Moon. . ... "Behavior of Cats During a Full Moon" last modified May 13, 2017. http://www.ehow.co.uk/info_8733180_behavior-cats-during-full- ... Reckless Behaviors. It may make sense to keep a watchful eye on your cat on a full moon. An interesting study conducted on the ... Aggressive Behaviors. If your cat appears to be moody on a full moon night, your observations can be actually on target. A ...
Our veterinarians and behaviorists offer you a library of solutions to improve the health and lifestyle of your feline ... Why does your feline do what she does? Find out more about common cat behavior issues. ... General Cat Care. Are you a new cat parent, or looking to brush up on your pet care skills? Here are our tips for keeping your ... Cat Care. Do you have a feline companion? Weve got you covered. Our ASPCA veterinarians and behaviorists offer up tips, ...
... there are dozens of ways in which a cat may become injured. Depending on the method of injury, an injured cat will often alter ... cat-behavior-after-injury.html. 13 May 2017. Martin, Emily. (2017, May 13). Cat Behavior After an Injury. . Retrieved from http ... "ASPCA Complete Cat Care Manual"; Dr. Andrew Edney; 2006 * "Psycho Kitty? Understanding Your Cats Crazy Behavior"; Pam ... If the cat is allowed outdoors, it is recommended to install a cat door and provide a "safe spot" so the cat can quickly ...
How to Deal with Aggressive Cat Behavior. August 28, 2012 by Jasmine Filed under All Posts, Pet Cats ... Tweet Is your cat nipping at your house guests or worse, you? There could be several reasons behind your cats biting and ... Cats are quite self-sufficient animals. They make a great house pet for the person who doesnt have a lot of […] ...
A recent survey suggests that cat lovers are less likely to call back after a date, dog lovers are willing to spend more on a ... Dog Lovers, Cat Lovers, and Human Dating Behavior. Dog lovers are more generous and more willing to have a one night stand.. ... So a cat is very low maintenance, you dont have to do a lot of work to keep the cat, but of dog lover has to be generous." ... Turning to the differences between the dating behaviors of dog and cat lovers, Moffit says "What we found in this study is that ...
... both from your veterinarian and from an animal behavior specialist who is knowledgeable in cat behavior. Cats with aggression ... or when a cat encounters neighborhood cats outside. Its not uncommon for a cat to be territorially aggressive toward one cat ... Aggression Between Family Cats and Feline Social Behavior. Its impossible to estimate how well any particular pair or group of ... Common types of aggressive behaviors between cats. Territorial aggression. Cats are very territorial, much more so than dogs. ...
... mystifying cat traits, as well as their meanings. From kneading to hiding, they make us appreciate being cat parents. ... Cats Natural Feeding Behavior , Hills Pet Among all cat species, only lions hunt and eat together. In a natural setting, cats ... What is a Senior Cat? How to Spot Signs of Aging in Cats - Hills Pet Your cat may not be a wound-up kitten anymore, but old ... Providing Care to Your Cat in Heat - Looking to Mate , Hills Pet Learn about why you cat is in heat and how to prevent a cat ...
Understanding Leopard Behavior. BCR , August 27, 2010 77 Views 0 Likes 0 Ratings ... Help Feed Big Cats. One of the best ways to help is through general donations that can be used however it is most needed at the ... Unlike other wild cats such as tigers, a large number of leopards live outside forests and protected areas. Their density ... This is the best way to give as it has the lowest credit card processing fees and is immediate help for the cats. ...
Maternal behavioral problems are classified as either the lack of maternal behavior when dealing with the mothers own young or ... excessive maternal behavior in the absence of newborn kittens. ... FEATUREDCat Yoga: Another Fitness Fad?. Cats and yoga…a crazy ... Mismothering in Female Cats. Maternal behavioral problems are classified as either the lack of maternal behavior when dealing ... Cats communicate with each other in various ways. One of the primary ways is through scent. Each cats urine and feces (stool) ...
Cat not using the litter box? No worries. This is just another in a line of common cat behavior problems. Scent is how cats ... Common Cat Behavior Problems. When cat behavior problems come about, they can usually be classified into a few different ... Aggressive Behavior. According to the ASPCA, "Aggression is the second most common feline behavior problem seen by animal ... Today, well be going through very common cat behavior problems and what you can do to help your cat overcome them. ...
Online shopping for Cat Training/Behavior Modification and other Pet Supplies. Same-day order processing and shipping. Compare ... Cat Training/Behavior Modification 1 items Orders placed by 2:30 PM Pacific Time on business weekdays are shipped the same day ...
Find out when your dog and cats behavior problems are causes of concern. ... These explanations for weird, but common, behaviors can help you understand your dog or cat better, and figure out when theres ... "Moving water is much more attractive to cats than stationary water," says Nicholas Dodman, BVMS, author of The Cat Who Cried ... Many cat breeds like to lick plastic bags, possibly because of the way the plastic smells and tastes, or they like the way the ...
Explore our articles for our experts best cat information and tips. ... Our cat articles cover everything from cat health and nutrition to behavior and training. ... Cat Health Cat Activities Cat Behavior Cat Care Cat Feeding Getting a Cat ... Bringing Your New Cat Home Bringing home a new cat? Follow these simple cat care tips to help your cat adjust easier when ...
  • Do you want to know how to prevent and treat the most common feline diseases with nutrition? (littlebigcat.com)
  • It's reasonable to suppose that cats have learned to bury their feces (and run from it) as an extra precautionary measure. (animalplanet.com)
  • Indeed, this theory takes into account the fact that not all cats bury their feces: A dominant cat who considers itself the cock of the walk often doesn't bury its waste, perhaps because it feels confident in its abilities to take on enemies. (animalplanet.com)
  • Mice are infected by being exposed to cat feces. (azfamily.com)
  • Despite popular belief, not all cats naturally choose to cover their feces. (globalanimal.org)
  • Some cats - especially unowned roaming felines - may not cover at all as uncovered feces can announce who owns the territory. (globalanimal.org)
  • This goes along with the theory of opioid activation, as opioids, in some species - cats and horses included - do cause stimulation of "go system" neurochemicals (a.k.a. catecholamines), as amphetamine does. (petplace.com)
  • Action of enpiprazole on emotional behavior elicited by hypothalamic stimulation in rats and cats was investigated and comparisons were made with effects of diazepam. (springer.com)
  • In cats, enpiprazole elevated the thresholds for affective-defensive responses induced by hypothalamic stimulation in 6 of 8 cases, but lowered them in 2 cases. (springer.com)
  • Redirecting your cat to perform these natural behaviors where and when you feel is appropriate is the best way to deal with these problems. (mspca.org)
  • First, a closed door is a challenge and an affront to a curious cat which is one reason why you'll see furry paws reaching under the door or cats racing to join their people in the bathroom. (globalanimal.org)
  • The least effective way to try to correct unwanted behavior is to physically or verbally punish your cat. (mspca.org)