Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Hybrid Vigor: The adaptive superiority of the heterozygous GENOTYPE with respect to one or more characters in comparison with the corresponding HOMOZYGOTE.Least-Squares Analysis: A principle of estimation in which the estimates of a set of parameters in a statistical model are those quantities minimizing the sum of squared differences between the observed values of a dependent variable and the values predicted by the model.Weaning: Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.United States Department of Agriculture: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.Tuberculosis, Bovine: An infection of cattle caused by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. It is transmissible to man and other animals.Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Meat-Packing Industry: The aggregate enterprise of technically producing packaged meat.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Dystocia: Slow or difficult OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Goats: Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.Animals, Inbred Strains: Animals produced by the mating of progeny over multiple generations. The resultant strain of animals is virtually identical genotypically. Highly inbred animal lines allow the study of certain traits in a relatively pure form. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Trypanosomiasis, Bovine: Infection in cattle caused by various species of trypanosomes.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Wool: The hair of SHEEP or other animals that is used for weaving.Lactation: The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Sheep, Domestic: A species of sheep, Ovis aries, descended from Near Eastern wild forms, especially mouflon.Animal Identification Systems: Procedures for recognizing individual animals and certain identifiable characteristics pertaining to them; includes computerized methods, ear tags, etc.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Fertility: The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.Buffaloes: Ruminants of the family Bovidae consisting of Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer. This concept is differentiated from BISON, which refers to Bison bison and Bison bonasus.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Meat Products: Articles of food which are derived by a process of manufacture from any portion of carcasses of any animal used for food (e.g., head cheese, sausage, scrapple).Silage: Fodder converted into succulent feed for livestock through processes of anaerobic fermentation (as in a silo).Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: A multifactorial disease of CATTLE resulting from complex interactions between environmental factors, host factors, and pathogens. The environmental factors act as stressors adversely affecting the IMMUNE SYSTEM and other host defenses and enhancing transmission of infecting agents.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Inbreeding: The mating of plants or non-human animals which are closely related genetically.Litter Size: The number of offspring produced at one birth by a viviparous animal.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Postpartum Period: In females, the period that is shortly after giving birth (PARTURITION).Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Fats: The glyceryl esters of a fatty acid, or of a mixture of fatty acids. They are generally odorless, colorless, and tasteless if pure, but they may be flavored according to origin. Fats are insoluble in water, soluble in most organic solvents. They occur in animal and vegetable tissue and are generally obtained by boiling or by extraction under pressure. They are important in the diet (DIETARY FATS) as a source of energy. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Rhipicephalus: A genus of TICKS, in the family IXODIDAE, widespread in Africa. Members of the genus include many important vectors of animal and human pathogens.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Insemination, Artificial: Artificial introduction of SEMEN or SPERMATOZOA into the VAGINA to facilitate FERTILIZATION.Sus scrofa: A species of SWINE, in the family Suidae, comprising a number of subspecies including the domestic pig Sus scrofa domestica.Scrotum: A cutaneous pouch of skin containing the testicles and spermatic cords.Escherichia coli O157: A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.Pregnancy, Animal: The process of bearing developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero in non-human mammals, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Food Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for processed and raw foods and beverages. It includes packaging intended to be used for storage and also used for preparation of foods such as microwave food containers versus COOKING AND EATING UTENSILS. Packaging materials may be intended for food contact or designated non-contact, for example, shipping containers. FOOD LABELING is also available.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Estrus Synchronization: Occurrence or induction of ESTRUS in all of the females in a group at the same time, applies only to non-primate mammals with ESTROUS CYCLE.Brucellosis, Bovine: A disease of cattle caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA leading to abortion in late pregnancy. BRUCELLA ABORTUS is the primary infective agent.Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Equidae: A family of hoofed MAMMALS consisting of HORSES, donkeys, and zebras. Members of this family are strict herbivores and can be classified as either browsers or grazers depending on how they feed.Sexual Maturation: Achievement of full sexual capacity in animals and in humans.Encephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform: A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle associated with abnormal prion proteins in the brain. Affected animals develop excitability and salivation followed by ATAXIA. This disorder has been associated with consumption of SCRAPIE infected ruminant derived protein. This condition may be transmitted to humans, where it is referred to as variant or new variant CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME. (Vet Rec 1998 Jul 25;143(41):101-5)Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Animals, Suckling: Young, unweaned mammals. Refers to nursing animals whether nourished by their biological mother, foster mother, or bottle fed.Trimethylsilyl Compounds: Organic silicon derivatives used to characterize hydroxysteroids, nucleosides, and related compounds. Trimethylsilyl esters of amino acids are used in peptide synthesis.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Gene Frequency: The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Zeranol: A non-steroidal estrogen analog.Neospora: A genus of protozoan parasites of the subclass COCCIDIA. Its species are parasitic in dogs, cattle, goats, and sheep, among others. N. caninum, a species that mainly infects dogs, is intracellular in neural and other cells of the body, multiplies by endodyogeny, has no parasitophorous vacuole, and has numerous rhoptries. It is known to cause lesions in many tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord as well as abortion in the expectant mother.Housing, AnimalDrug Implants: Small containers or pellets of a solid drug implanted in the body to achieve sustained release of the drug.PortugalOvulation: The discharge of an OVUM from a rupturing follicle in the OVARY.Estrus: The period in the ESTROUS CYCLE associated with maximum sexual receptivity and fertility in non-primate female mammals.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Abortion, Veterinary: Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.Chromosomes, Mammalian: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of MAMMALS.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Bison: A genus of the family Bovidae having two species: B. bison and B. bonasus. This concept is differentiated from BUFFALOES, which refers to Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer.Coccidiosis: Protozoan infection found in animals and man. It is caused by several different genera of COCCIDIA.Abomasum: The fourth stomach of ruminating animals. It is also called the "true" stomach. It is an elongated pear-shaped sac lying on the floor of the abdomen, on the right-hand side, and roughly between the seventh and twelfth ribs. It leads to the beginning of the small intestine. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)HornsRuminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Progesterone: The major progestational steroid that is secreted primarily by the CORPUS LUTEUM and the PLACENTA. Progesterone acts on the UTERUS, the MAMMARY GLANDS and the BRAIN. It is required in EMBRYO IMPLANTATION; PREGNANCY maintenance, and the development of mammary tissue for MILK production. Progesterone, converted from PREGNENOLONE, also serves as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of GONADAL STEROID HORMONES and adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Tick Infestations: Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.Cereals: Seeds from grasses (POACEAE) which are important in the diet.Theileriasis: Infection of cattle, sheep, or goats with protozoa of the genus THEILERIA. This infection results in an acute or chronic febrile condition.Dietary Proteins: Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Bacterial Shedding: The expelling of bacteria from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Manure: Accumulations of solid or liquid animal excreta usually from stables and barnyards with or without litter material. Its chief application is as a fertilizer. (From Webster's 3d ed)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Melengestrol Acetate: A 6-methyl PROGESTERONE acetate with reported glucocorticoid activity and effect on ESTRUS.Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease: Acute disease of cattle caused by the bovine viral diarrhea viruses (DIARRHEA VIRUSES, BOVINE VIRAL). Often mouth ulcerations are the only sign but fever, diarrhea, drop in milk yield, and loss of appetite are also seen. Severity of clinical disease varies and is strain dependent. Outbreaks are characterized by low morbidity and high mortality.Mustelidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long, slender bodies, long tails, and anal scent glands. They include badgers, weasels, martens, FERRETS; MINKS; wolverines, polecats, and OTTERS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Food Quality: Ratings of the characteristics of food including flavor, appearance, nutritional content, and the amount of microbial and chemical contamination.Fatty Acids, Volatile: Short-chain fatty acids of up to six carbon atoms in length. They are the major end products of microbial fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract and have also been implicated in the causation of neurological diseases in humans.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Foot-and-Mouth DiseaseParasitic Diseases, Animal: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Trypanosoma congolense: A species of Trypanosome hemoflagellates that is carried by tsetse flies and causes severe anemia in cattle. These parasites are also found in horses, sheep, goats, and camels.Medicago sativa: A plant species of the family FABACEAE widely cultivated for ANIMAL FEED.Enzootic Bovine Leukosis: A lymphoid neoplastic disease in cattle caused by the bovine leukemia virus. Enzootic bovine leukosis may take the form of lymphosarcoma, malignant lymphoma, or leukemia but the presence of malignant cells in the blood is not a consistent finding.Food Additives: Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.Goat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.Dietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.Food Preservation: Procedures or techniques used to keep food from spoiling.Trenbolone Acetate: An anabolic steroid used mainly as an anabolic agent in veterinary practice.Mycobacterium bovis: The bovine variety of the tubercle bacillus. It is called also Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis.Cooking: The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Festuca: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The common name of fescue is also used with some other grasses.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.DairyingEscherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.
  • Suitable for the cattle farmer, animal husbandry enthusiast or livestock historian, this book features a variety of information that is still of practical use today. (abebooks.com)
  • Tostenson Bred Heifer Sale Hub City Livestock, Saturday 12-22-18 Purebred Black Angus, Fancy & Gentle Disposition, Weigh 1200lbs Bred RBM, Low Birth Weight & Calving Ease 92 head Calve February 18 for 21 days Extensive Shot Program, Scour Bos and Poured Contact Jeremy Tostenson at 605-949-1315 to receive pictures, video, Vet shot records, & Bull EPD's. (farmforum.net)
  • In the old days, the word "cattle" was not in reference to bovines at … all, but rather an Old French term, "catel" (derived from the Latin word "caput") for moveable personal property such as livestock of any kind. (answers.com)
  • In older English sources such as from the King James Version of the Bible, "cattle" refers to livestock, as opposed to "deer" which refers to wildlife. (answers.com)
  • You'll find the net's best cattle news, free livestock classified ads, free ranch listing, the latest USDA livestock market report, free ranch email, Baxter Black, and a free newsletter just for ranchers. (cattle-today.com)
  • Breed and Composite Defined A common definition of a breed is a genetic strain or type of domestic livestock that has consistent and inherited characteristics such as coat color or pattern, presence or absence of horns, or other qualitative criteria. (sportdocbox.com)
  • In simple terms, these common characteristics are the performance traits that are often associated with a breed as its reputation has grown over time and represent the core traits for which a breed of livestock has been selected for over time. (sportdocbox.com)
  • Scotland's beef and dairy farmers could soon be feeding their cattle seaweed as part of efforts by scientists to develop more environmentally-sustainable livestock diets. (pressandjournal.co.uk)
  • Livestock without horns, the result of selective breeding. (thecanadianencyclopedia.ca)
  • The course aims at providing students with knowledge on the rearing techniques of the different animal species (dairy and beef cattle, poultry, pigs, sheep, goats, equines) underlining some of the effects of the farming systems on livestock production, the quality of products of animal origin, the environment, and animal welfare. (unimi.it)
  • There is never 'one size fits all,' in my opinion, and there are so many different segments within the Hereford industry on how you can market cattle," said Jason Barber of Superior Livestock. (hereford.org)
  • No matter what you are marketing - whether it is fed cattle or feeder cattle or purebred livestock or whatever widget you might be selling - when you're working with someone, just treat them fairly," Johnson said. (hereford.org)
  • Welcome to Wagonhound Land & Livestock, the leader in Wyoming horse breeding , red angus cattle sales, hay sales and outfitting. (top20sites.com)
  • Welcome to Wagonhound Land and Livestock, a working ranch with some of the top American Quarter Horses and Red Angus cattle in the country, and operations spanning more than 200,000 acres. (top20sites.com)
  • Work on breeding the Hays Converter began in 1959, and it was officially recognized by the Canadian beef industry under the Canada Livestock Pedigree Act in December 1975. (wikipedia.org)
  • educational visits at two livestock farms, one for cattle and one for pigs, to verify in the field the information and the knowledge gained in classroom. (unimi.it)
  • The Shorthorn cattle breed is one of Great Britain's native livestock breeds and has had a considerable impact on the beef industry from very early days. (infobarrel.com)
  • His ideas revolutionised livestock breeding methods. (infobarrel.com)
  • Genome analysis of 234 bulls has put researchers, including several from Wageningen Livestock Research, on the trail of DNA variants which influence particular characteristics in breeding bulls. (wur.nl)
  • MYANMAR - Live cattle exports have been on the rise since the trade was legalised last year, said U Moe Zaw, a director from the Livestock Breeding & Veterinary Department under the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Irrigation. (thedairysite.com)
  • When applying for a permit to export cattle, they need to register for a temporary holding station at the Livestock Breeding and Veterinary Department. (thedairysite.com)
  • Once the Livestock Breeding & Veterinary Department has certified the cattle as healthy, the exporter must apply for approval to export from the government following which the Department of Trade under the Ministry of Commerce will issue an export license. (thedairysite.com)
  • Beef prices are set by the quality of the carcass, and that's determined by the works. (lifestyleblock.co.nz)
  • US beef carcass specifications have changed only slightly over the past 50 years. (agriland.ie)
  • The current specifications require cattle under 36 months and 470kg carcass weight. (agriland.ie)
  • Previously, the carcass weight limit was 425kg but, due to a persistent drought over the last five years which has reduced cattle supply, the weight limit has increased to 470kg in an effort to meet the shortfall. (agriland.ie)
  • When boned and cut by a butcher or packing house this carcass then makes about 430 lb (200 kg) of beef. (wikipedia.org)
  • One that has good udder attachment, excellent feet and correct leg structure and provide high quality beef and carcass yields. (top20sites.com)
  • As such, the selection of the right breed(s) to use in a breeding program is an important decision for commercial beef producers. (sportdocbox.com)
  • Over the past two decades commercial beef producers and feedlots in South Africa have indicated a preference for polled breeds, due to increased awareness of animal welfare and market preferences. (rmrdsaonline.co.za)
  • Provides Chiangus cattle to the beef industry and provides producers with genetically superior cattle. (botw.org)
  • A number of projects are conducted in collaboration with other leading research groups in New Zealand and throughout the world, and the group regularly consults with industry professionals and cattle producers. (beef.org.nz)
  • He adds, "Many of the producers we work with on synchronization programs have shortened their breeding seasons and have up to 90% of their cows bred in less than 30 days. (beefmagazine.com)
  • In the coming months, the Canadian Cattlemen's Association will be setting up meetings with parliamentarians from all parties as soon as possible to make progress on issues that matter to beef producers. (canadiancattlemen.ca)
  • As an organization, the Canadian Cattlemen's Association (CCA) does not take political sides and works with the government of the day to advance the interests of Canadian beef producers. (canadiancattlemen.ca)
  • Cattle producers who work year-round to set their animals up for success - through nutrition management, for example - strive for the best possible outcome. (hereford.org)
  • Cattle producers who feed field pea grain or forage comment positively on the palatability and have been very satisfied with animal performance. (ndsu.edu)
  • Beef cattle producers who use our recommended management practices improve their beef cattle efficiency and profits. (uaex.edu)
  • On arrival, Charolais immediately demonstrated its superiority over native breeds in terms of growth rate, conformation and killing out percentage, not only to dairy producers but also to key players in the beef industry. (charolais.co.uk)
  • In beef production there are three main stages: cow-calf operations, backgrounding, and feedlot operations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The technology is also used to treat anestrus beef cows that do not cycle because the physical demands of a suckling calf cause a negative energy balance. (highbeam.com)
  • Factors Affecting Calf Crop: Biotechnology of Reproduction provides a detailed compilation of current and forthcoming technology for managing reproduction in cattle. (routledge.com)
  • In more intensive dairy farming , cows can easily be bred and fed to produce far more milk than one calf can drink. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the 2003 Farm Financial Survey (FFS), the majority of beef cattle farms were cow-calf operations in 2002 viz: 72%, 17% were feedlots, 4% a combination of the two and 7% were other types. (slideshare.net)
  • The words "cow", "bull" and "calf" are also used to describe some other large animals that are not related to cattle, such as elephants , moose and whales . (wikipedia.org)
  • Significant differences were found between different breeds in the age at first calving, culling age and longevity, moreover the calving, twining, weaning rate and weaning weight. (mtak.hu)
  • An increase in proportion Afrikaner breeding in dam resulted in longer calving intervals and a decline in cow productivity, but these differences were not always significant. (ajol.info)
  • Fatty acids of the phospholipid fraction were extracted and analysed for sex and breed differences. (edu.au)
  • The objective of this study was to characterize breed differences using SNP available on commonly-used marker panels compared to using genome-wide SNP haplotypes derived from the same markers. (iastate.edu)
  • The main nutrient requirements of cattle (dairy and beef) and pigs, in the different stages of growth and physiological phases, will be summarized.In the second part of the course, the main feed (forages and concentrates) will be described. (unimi.it)
  • He emphasises that the requirements for dairy and beef cattle are becoming ever more exacting: "Until the mid nineties, a cow primarily had to produce a lot of milk. (wur.nl)
  • Martin: We have at least 70,000 people that are working in the system between dairy and beef farmers. (alltech.com)
  • The added bonus for Charolais crossbred progeny is their distinct colour and markings which gives added confidence to store cattle buyers. (charolais.co.uk)
  • Pedigree completeness over six generations was higher than 88.5% in the first generation for all breeds, except for the Boran, which was introduced to South Africa only recently. (up.ac.za)
  • Inbreeding and effective population size for the Boran breed could not be accurately estimated, because it was introduced into South Africa only recently. (up.ac.za)
  • Here, the value of genomic prediction, on a trait-by-trait basis, is extended to explore the contribution of genomic prediction to selection for a multitrait breeding objective indicative of economic merit. (newprairiepress.org)
  • Genomic diversity and population structure of Mexican and Spanish bovine Lidia breed. (ucm.es)
  • Deregressed estimated breeding values were used as observations in a weighted analysis to derive direct genomic values for 3570 sires genotyped using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Bivariate animal models were used for each trait to estimate the genetic correlation between deregressed estimated breeding values and direct genomic values. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These results suggest that genomic estimates of genetic merit can be produced in beef cattle at a young age but the recurrent inclusion of genotyped sires in retraining analyses will be necessary to routinely produce for the industry the direct genomic values with the highest accuracy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In order to bring them together in a cow in the best and fastest way possible, genomic selection is important for breeding organisations such as CRV, and by means of genome analysis we want to improve this further", says Veerkamp. (wur.nl)
  • Accuracy of genomic selection for age at puberty in a multi-breed population of tropically adapted beef cattle. (nih.gov)
  • Estimation of genomic breeding values for residual feed intake in a multibreed cattle population. (nih.gov)
  • Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle futures gained modestly before the U.S. Independence Day holiday supported by higher wholesale beef prices, analysts and traders said. (albertafarmexpress.ca)
  • CME live cattle August finished at 121.95 cents, up 0.05 cent and October closed at 126.225 cents, or up 0.3 cent. (albertafarmexpress.ca)
  • According to The Myanmar Times , the reason for the rise in cattle exports though is that most exporters buy live cattle before reselling them. (thedairysite.com)
  • Currently, the export of live cattle has to be carried out by linking with the Department of Trade. (thedairysite.com)