Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry: Abnormally rapid heartbeats caused by reentry of atrial impulse into the dual (fast and slow) pathways of ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE. The common type involves a blocked atrial impulse in the slow pathway which reenters the fast pathway in a retrograde direction and simultaneously conducts to the atria and the ventricles leading to rapid HEART RATE of 150-250 beats per minute.Tachycardia, Supraventricular: A generic expression for any tachycardia that originates above the BUNDLE OF HIS.Tachycardia, Sinoatrial Nodal Reentry: Abnormally rapid heartbeats caused by reentry circuit in or around the SINOATRIAL NODE. It is characterized by sudden onset and offset episodes of tachycardia with a HEART RATE of 100-150 beats per minute. The P wave is identical to the sinus P wave but with a longer PR interval.Cryosurgery: The use of freezing as a special surgical technique to destroy or excise tissue.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Atrioventricular Node: A small nodular mass of specialized muscle fibers located in the interatrial septum near the opening of the coronary sinus. It gives rise to the atrioventricular bundle of the conduction system of the heart.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Tachycardia, Paroxysmal: Abnormally rapid heartbeats with sudden onset and cessation.Tachycardia, Ectopic Atrial: Abnormally rapid heartbeats originating from one or more automatic foci (nonsinus pacemakers) in the HEART ATRIUM but away from the SINOATRIAL NODE. Unlike the reentry mechanism, automatic tachycardia speeds up and slows down gradually. The episode is characterized by a HEART RATE between 135 to less than 200 beats per minute and lasting 30 seconds or longer.Tachycardia, Sinus: Simple rapid heartbeats caused by rapid discharge of impulses from the SINOATRIAL NODE, usually between 100 and 180 beats/min in adults. It is characterized by a gradual onset and termination. Sinus tachycardia is common in infants, young children, and adults during strenuous physical activities.Tachycardia, Reciprocating: Abnormally rapid heartbeats caused by reentrant conduction over the accessory pathways between the HEART ATRIA and the HEART VENTRICLES. The impulse can also travel in the reverse direction, as in some cases, atrial impulses travel to the ventricles over the accessory pathways and back to the atria over the BUNDLE OF HIS and the ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE.Tachycardia, Ectopic Junctional: A rare form of supraventricular tachycardia caused by automatic, not reentrant, conduction initiated from sites at the atrioventricular junction, but not the ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE. It usually occurs during myocardial infarction, after heart surgery, or in digitalis intoxication with a HEART RATE ranging from 140 to 250 beats per minute.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Electrophysiologic Techniques, Cardiac: Methods to induce and measure electrical activities at specific sites in the heart to diagnose and treat problems with the heart's electrical system.Body Surface Potential Mapping: Recording of regional electrophysiological information by analysis of surface potentials to give a complete picture of the effects of the currents from the heart on the body surface. It has been applied to the diagnosis of old inferior myocardial infarction, localization of the bypass pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, recognition of ventricular hypertrophy, estimation of the size of a myocardial infarct, and the effects of different interventions designed to reduce infarct size. The limiting factor at present is the complexity of the recording and analysis, which requires 100 or more electrodes, sophisticated instrumentation, and dedicated personnel. (Braunwald, Heart Disease, 4th ed)Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Bundle of His: Small band of specialized CARDIAC MUSCLE fibers that originates in the ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE and extends into the membranous part of the interventricular septum. The bundle of His, consisting of the left and the right bundle branches, conducts the electrical impulses to the HEART VENTRICLES in generation of MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION.Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome: A syndrome of ORTHOSTATIC INTOLERANCE combined with excessive upright TACHYCARDIA, and usually without associated ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION. All variants have in common an excessively reduced venous return to the heart (central HYPOVOLEMIA) while upright.Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: A form of ventricular pre-excitation characterized by a short PR interval and a long QRS interval with a delta wave. In this syndrome, atrial impulses are abnormally conducted to the HEART VENTRICLES via an ACCESSORY CONDUCTING PATHWAY that is located between the wall of the right or left atria and the ventricles, also known as a BUNDLE OF KENT. The inherited form can be caused by mutation of PRKAG2 gene encoding a gamma-2 regulatory subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase.Atrial Flutter: Rapid, irregular atrial contractions caused by a block of electrical impulse conduction in the right atrium and a reentrant wave front traveling up the inter-atrial septum and down the right atrial free wall or vice versa. Unlike ATRIAL FIBRILLATION which is caused by abnormal impulse generation, typical atrial flutter is caused by abnormal impulse conduction. As in atrial fibrillation, patients with atrial flutter cannot effectively pump blood into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES).Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Pharmacies: Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.Pharmacy: The practice of compounding and dispensing medicinal preparations.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.TextilesThyrotoxicosis: A hypermetabolic syndrome caused by excess THYROID HORMONES which may come from endogenous or exogenous sources. The endogenous source of hormone may be thyroid HYPERPLASIA; THYROID NEOPLASMS; or hormone-producing extrathyroidal tissue. Thyrotoxicosis is characterized by NERVOUSNESS; TACHYCARDIA; FATIGUE; WEIGHT LOSS; heat intolerance; and excessive SWEATING.Pericarditis: Inflammation of the PERICARDIUM from various origins, such as infection, neoplasm, autoimmune process, injuries, or drug-induced. Pericarditis usually leads to PERICARDIAL EFFUSION, or CONSTRICTIVE PERICARDITIS.Rheumatic Diseases: Disorders of connective tissue, especially the joints and related structures, characterized by inflammation, degeneration, or metabolic derangement.Sick Sinus Syndrome: A condition caused by dysfunctions related to the SINOATRIAL NODE including impulse generation (CARDIAC SINUS ARREST) and impulse conduction (SINOATRIAL EXIT BLOCK). It is characterized by persistent BRADYCARDIA, chronic ATRIAL FIBRILLATION, and failure to resume sinus rhythm following CARDIOVERSION. This syndrome can be congenital or acquired, particularly after surgical correction for heart defects.Radiation Oncology: A subspecialty of medical oncology and radiology concerned with the radiotherapy of cancer.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Pre-Excitation, Mahaim-Type: A form of ventricular pre-excitation characterized by a normal PR interval and a long QRS interval with an initial slow deflection (delta wave). In this syndrome, the atrial impulse travel to the ventricle via the MAHAIM FIBERS which connect ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE directly to the right ventricle wall (NODOVENTRICULAR ACCESSORY PATHWAY) or to the RIGHT BUNDLE BRANCH OF HIS (nodofascicular accessory pathway).Pre-Excitation Syndromes: A group of conditions in which HEART VENTRICLE activation by the atrial impulse is faster than the normal impulse conduction from the SINOATRIAL NODE. In these pre-excitation syndromes, atrial impulses often bypass the ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE delay and travel via ACCESSORY CONDUCTING PATHWAYS connecting the atrium directly to the BUNDLE OF HIS.Iontophoresis: Therapeutic introduction of ions of soluble salts into tissues by means of electric current. In medical literature it is commonly used to indicate the process of increasing the penetration of drugs into surface tissues by the application of electric current. It has nothing to do with ION EXCHANGE; AIR IONIZATION nor PHONOPHORESIS, none of which requires current.Electroosmosis: The motion of a liquid through a membrane (or plug or capillary) consequent upon the application of an electric field across the membrane. (Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)Electrodes: Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.Rats, Hairless: Mutant strains of rats that produce little or no hair. Several different homozygous recessive mutations can cause hairlessness in rats including rnu/rnu (Rowett nude), fz/fz (fuzzy), shn/shn (shorn), and nznu/nznu (New Zealand nude). Note that while NUDE RATS are often hairless, they are most characteristically athymic.Administration, Cutaneous: The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.Needles: Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.Skin Absorption: Uptake of substances through the SKIN.
Atrioventricular origin (junctional tachycardia): AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) or junctional reciprocating ... Atrial flutter, is caused by a re-entry rhythm in the atria, with a regular atrial rate often of about 300 beats per minute. On ... AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) involves a reentry circuit forming next to, or within, the AV node. The circuit most ... Atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT), also results from a reentry circuit, although one physically much larger ...
"Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry Tachycardia (AVNRT)". eMedicine. WebMD. Retrieved 24 December 2009. "Andersen-Tawil syndrome". ... Ashman beats) Atrial fibrillation Atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response Atrial flutter Atrial tachycardia ... Cardiac electrophysiology AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia) Accelerated ... First-degree atrioventricular block (First-degree AV block, PR prolongation) Heart block Inappropriate sinus tachycardia ...
AV nodal reentrant tachycardia and orthodromic atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia. It can also evaluate the risk in people ... re-entry, triggered) or duration (isolated premature beats; couplets; runs, that is 3 or more beats; non-sustained= less than ... Re-entry is also responsible for most paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, and dangerous ventricular tachycardia. These ... In adults and children over 15, resting heart rate faster than 100 beats per minute is labelled tachycardia. Tachycardia may ...
One crewmember during Apollo 15 experienced a 22-beat nodal bigeminal rhythm, which was followed by premature atrial beats. ... an isolated incident of a non-sustained 14-beat ventricular tachycardia (Figure 1), with a maximum heart rate of 215 beats per ... In fact, reentry often is not the mechanism of arrhythmia development in these clinical cases: the arrhythmias may be caused by ... These included two consecutive PVCs in one astronaut during exercise and an episode of atrioventricular dissociation preceded ...
AV nodal reentrant tachycardia Atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia Junctional ectopic tachycardia Atrial tachycardia Ectopic ... The former introduces problems in interpretation since there may be beat-to-beat changes in the rhythm that makes it unwise to ... as well as terminate supraventricular tachycardia caused by re-entry. An intracardiac electrogram (ICEG) is essentially an ECG ... AV nodal reentrant tachycardia and orthodromic atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia. It can also evaluate the risk in people ...
AV nodal reentrant tachycardia and orthodromic atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia.[26] It can also evaluate the risk in ... The former introduces problems in interpretation since there may be beat-to-beat changes in the rhythm, which makes it unwise ... as well as terminate supraventricular tachycardia caused by re-entry.[26] ... Sick sinus syndrome: bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome. *Supraventricular tachycardia *Atrial fibrillation with rapid ...
Other rarer phenomena include Ashman beats and antedromic atrioventricular re-entry tachycardias.[citation needed] ... Tachycardia. (paroxysmal and sinus). Supraventricular. *Atrial *Multifocal. *Junctional *AV nodal reentrant. *Junctional ... Polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, on the other hand, has beat-to-beat variations in morphology. This may appear as a ... Another way to classify ventricular tachycardias is the duration of the episodes: Three or more beats in a row on an ECG that ...
AV nodal reentrant tachycardia and orthodromic atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia.[25] It can also evaluate the risk in ... re-entry, triggered) or duration (isolated premature beats; couplets; runs, that is 3 or more beats; non-sustained= less than ... TachycardiasEdit. In adults and children over 15, resting heart rate faster than 100 beats per minute is labelled tachycardia. ... Re-entry is also responsible for most paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, and dangerous ventricular tachycardia. These ...
Pacemaker - Dual ChamberA pacemaker is a battery-powered device that sends electrical signals to your heart to help it beat at ... Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry Tachycardia, or AVNRT, is a type of heart arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat. In AVNRT, ... Supraventricular Tachycardia OverviewSupraventricular tachycardias are heart conditions with a fast heart rhythm and an ... Supraventricular Tachycardia OverviewSupraventricular tachycardias are heart conditions with a fast heart rhythm and an ...
Atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT). *Heart block or atrioventricular block. *Paroxysmal supraventricular ... This includes beating too fast (tachycardia), beating too slow (bradycardia), or beating irregularly. ... Supraventricular tachycardia is less dangerous than ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation. *The general pumping ... Palpitations - feelings that the heart skipped a beat, fluttering, or beating too hard/fast. ...
In those who require long-term pharmacotherapy, atrioventricular nodal blocking agents or class IC or III antiarrhythmics can ... It is unusual for supraventricular tachycardia to be caused by structurally abnormal hearts. Diagnosis is often delayed because ... Catheter ablation is an option in patients with persistent or recurrent supraventricular tachycardia who are unable to tolerate ... The most common types of supraventricular tachycardia are caused by a reentry phenomenon producing accelerated heart rates. ...
What is junctional tachycardia? Meaning of junctional tachycardia medical term. What does junctional tachycardia mean? ... Looking for online definition of junctional tachycardia in the Medical Dictionary? junctional tachycardia explanation free. ... It has two common mechanisms, atrioventricular nodal reentry and circus movement that uses the atrioventricular node ... formerly called nodal tachycardia).. junctional tachycardia. a junctional rhythm with a rate greater than 100 beats/min. The ...
Atrioventricular origin (junctional tachycardia): AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) or junctional reciprocating ... Atrial flutter, is caused by a re-entry rhythm in the atria, with a regular atrial rate often of about 300 beats per minute. On ... AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) involves a reentry circuit forming next to, or within, the AV node. The circuit most ... Atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT), also results from a reentry circuit, although one physically much larger ...
... a retrograde direction and simultaneously conducts to the atria and the ventricles leading to rapid HEART RATE of 150-250 beats ... Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry" by people in this website by year, and whether "Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry" ... "Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary ... Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry*Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry. *Tachycardia, AV Nodal Reentrant ...
The most common supraventricular tachycardias are atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and atrioventricular nodal reentry ... When the heart beats faster than normal, it is called tachycardia. Bradycardia is a slower-than-normal rhythm.. The electrical ... Tachycardia that originates in the atria is called supraventricular tachycardia, and ventricular tachycardia when it originates ... Fast or slow heart beat (palpitations). Skipping beats. Fainting. Light-headedness, dizziness. Chest pain. Shortness of breath ...
... that does not require the atrioventricular (AV) junction, accessory pathways, or ventricular tissue for its initiation and ... Atrial tachycardia can be observed in persons with normal hearts and in those with structurally abnormal hearts, including ... Atrial tachycardia is defined as a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) ... These features essentially exclude atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia and atrioventricular tachycardia via an accessory ...
... that does not require the atrioventricular (AV) junction, accessory pathways, or ventricular tissue for its initiation and ... Atrial tachycardia can be observed in persons with normal hearts and in those with structurally abnormal hearts, including ... Atrial tachycardia is defined as a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) ... These features essentially exclude atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia and atrioventricular tachycardia via an accessory ...
... Supraventricular tachycardiaClassification & external resources ICD-10 I47.1 ICD-9 427.89 MeSH ... Atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT) also results from a reentry circuit, although one physically much larger than ... AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) is also sometimes referred to as a junctional reciprocating tachycardia. It involves a ... Atrial flutter, is caused by a re-entry rhythm in the atria, with a regular rate of about 300 beats per minute. On the EKG, ...
What is nonsustained ventricular tachycardia? Meaning of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia medical term. What does ... Looking for online definition of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the Medical Dictionary? nonsustained ventricular ... atrioventricular (AV) nodal tachycardia junctional t.. atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia that resulting from reentry ... tachycardia. Cardiology A rapid heart rate, usually defined as a rate over 100 beats/min. See Atrioventricular nodal reentrant ...
Atrial tachycardia. *Atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT). *Multifocal atrial tachycardia. *Paroxysmal ... Supraventricular arrhythmia characterized by extremely rapid (atrial rate of 400-600 beats/min) and disorganized atrial ... Predominant mechanism is reentry, usually associated with organic heart disease causing atrial distention (e.g., ischemia or ...
The heart can beat too fast (tachycardia), too slow (bradycardia), or irregularly. ... Atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT). *Heart block or atrioventricular block. *Multifocal atrial tachycardia ... The heart can beat too fast (tachycardia), too slow (bradycardia), or irregularly. ... Irregular, uneven, possibly with extra or skipped beats An arrhythmia may be present all of the time or it may come and go. You ...
atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia (AVURT, atrioventricular nodal rientri tachycardia -. The most common form of ... ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia (tachycardia - increased heart rate by 90 beats per minute ... in the ventricles from the atria patient with nodal tachycardia atrioventricular node may be two ways of -. slow and fast ... atrioventricular connection and paroxysmal atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia, which occurs as a resultmechanism for ...
The classical re-entry dysrhythmias are AVNRT (atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia) and those associated with WPW ( ... Second degree AVB: everything else, 2 to 1, 3 to 1, Wenckebach AVB (increasing PR until beat is dropped). ... Multiple types: focal ectopic tachycardia, multifocal atrial tachycardia but the most common is AVNRT. ... In many others re-entry may play a role, VT and AF are good examples. ...
... most commonly atrial fibrillation or supraventricular tachycardias. The initial management of atrial fibrillation includes ... The rate is usually between 160 and 190 beats per minute. In a less common form of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia ... Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry Causing PSVT. Atrioventricular nodal reentry, the most common mechanism of PSVT, occurs when two ... It is important to note that atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia can result in a wide-complex tachycardia if the ...
SVT is most often due to the junctional tachycardias, atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia (AVNRT) or atrioventricular ... Atrial tachycardia. A series of 3 or more consecutive atrial premature beats occurring at a frequency >100/min; usually due to ... Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). Usually caused by reentry currents within the atria or between ventricles and atria ... Re-entrant tachycardias (the most common type): *Atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia (AVNRT) Due to the presence of ...
... for simultaneous treatment of coexisting atrioventricular and nodal reciprocating tachycardias. Download Prime PubMed App to ... AV nodal "slow pathway" ablation may abolish both typical AV nodal reentry tachycardia and orthodromic AV reentry tachycardia ... and only single orthodromic AV echo beat inducible under baseline condition and pharmacological stress (atropine 0.02 mg/kg i.v ... CONCLUSION: AV nodal "slow pathway" ablation may abolish both typical AV nodal reentry tachycardia and orthodromic AV reentry ...
Atrioventricular node reentry tachycardia (AV nodal reentry tachycardia or AVNRT) is an arrhythmia that occurs because of an ... strong,Atrial tachycardia. Atrial tachycardia is a rapid heartbeat (100 beats per minute or more) that originates in the atria. ... Types of arrhythmias include tachycardia (your heart beats too fast), and bradycardia (your heart beats too slowly). The ... Atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT), like AVNRT, causes an electrical signal to travel in a circular pattern from ...
... in atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT) is occasionally complicated with atrioventricular block (AVB) often ... Recovery of cardiomyopathy induced by ventricular premature beats of paraHisian origin after successful radiofrequency catheter ... Purpose: Atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT) is less common in pediatric patients than in adult patients. Thus, ... Radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia in children and adolescents: a single center ...
"Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry Tachycardia (AVNRT)". eMedicine. WebMD. Retrieved 24 December 2009. "Andersen-Tawil syndrome". ... Ashman beats) Atrial fibrillation Atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response Atrial flutter Atrial tachycardia ... Cardiac electrophysiology AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia) Accelerated ... First-degree atrioventricular block (First-degree AV block, PR prolongation) Heart block Inappropriate sinus tachycardia ...
Atrioventricular Nodal Re-entry Tachycardia [AVNRT] was found in 8 patients. RFCA was successful in abolishing inducible VT in ... Types of arrhythmia included sinus bradycardia, atrioventricular block and premature beat. Incidences of intraoperative ... Humans , Tachycardia, Paroxysmal/diagnosis , Tachycardia, Supraventricular/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac , Tachycardia, ... Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Cardiac Electrophysiology , Tachycardia/diagnosis , Tachycardia/physiopathology , Tachycardia/ ...
... atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia and atrioventricular reentry tachycardia). Adenosine, an ultrashort-acting AV nodal ... His HR is 180 beats per minute, BP is 110/65 mm Hg, and oxygen saturation is 99% on room air. An ECG reveals an HR of 180 beats ... The primary significance of WPW syndrome is that it predisposes the individual to the development of reentry tachycardias. The ... the term supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is conventionally used to denote those rhythms aside from sinus tachycardia, atrial ...
AV NODAL RE-ENTRY TACHYCARDIA (ANVRT). This involves a short circuit at the AV node. Instead of a single AV node connection ... ATRIOVENTRICULAR RE-ENTRY TACHYCARDIA (AVRT) AND WOLFF PARKINSON WHITE (WPW) SYNDROME. AVRT is an abnormal electrical circuit ... A single extra beat arising from anywhere in the heart may result in electrical conduction through this extra pathway. This ... FOCAL ATRIAL TACHYCARDIA. In patients with focal atrial tachycardia, a small cluster of cells in the hearts upper chambers ...
Supraventricular Tachycardia answers are found in the Select 5-Minute Pediatrics Topics powered by Unbound Medicine. Available ... is generally used to refer to atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT), atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia ( ... The heart rate in SVT in infants generally ranges from 220 to 320 beats per minute (bpm) and in older children from 150 to 250 ... is generally used to refer to atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT), atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia ( ...
  • This article is intended to provide an insight into the various causes and treatment options as well as the differential diagnosis of ventricular tachycardias. (bvsalud.org)
  • Magma of the preferred technique therefore makes diagnosis of theophylline tachycardia easy. (alko-grusha.ru)
  • The FAST Trial Registry is a prospective observational cohort study of fetuses with a new diagnosis of atrial flutter (AF) or supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) that is severe enough to consider prenatal treatment (see eligibility criteria below). (ucbraid.org)
  • Aims of the Registry include to establish a large clinical database to determine and compare the efficacy and safety of different prenatal treatment strategies including observation without immediate treatment, transplacental antiarrhythmic fetal treatment and direct fetal treatment from the time of tachycardia diagnosis to death, neonatal hospital discharge or to a maximum of 30 days after birth. (ucbraid.org)
  • In 9 patients with focal atrial tachycardia (AT) originating from the non-coronary aortic sinus (AS), mapping in the aorta demonstrated that an earliest atrial activation preceded the atrial activation at the His bundle (HB) by 12.2 ± 6.9 ms. Also, the His potentials were not found at the successful site in the non-coronary AS. (onlinejacc.org)
  • If the wave travels slowly enough to allow the blocked pathway to recover, the electrical activation can be retrogradely conducted to close the loop, resulting in a single beat of reentry called an echo beat. (webpin.com)
  • As the fast pathway is activated in the retrograde fashion during an echo beat, the slow pathway, with a shorter refractory period, is able to recover. (mitchmedical.us)