Barbarea: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE. Members contain glucobrassicin.Berberis: A plant genus in the family BERBERIDACEAE. The common names of Barberry or Oregon Grape are also used for MAHONIA. The similar-named Bayberry is the unrelated MYRICA. Oregon Grape was classified by Pursh as a Berberis but Nuttall claimed it is different enough to call it a new genus, MAHONIA. Botanists insist on this name while horticulturists stay with Mahonia. They are shrubs with yellow wood and usually three-branched spines at the base of leafstalks. Flowers are yellow, six-petaled and fruit is a berry with one to several seeds. Members contain BERBERINE.Black Pepper: A common spice from fruit of PIPER NIGRUM. Black pepper is picked unripe and heaped for a few days to ferment. White Pepper is the ripe fruit dehulled by maceration in water. Piperine is a key component used medicinally to increase gastrointestinal assimilation of other supplements and drugs.Balsams: Resinous substances which most commonly originate from trees. In addition to resins, they contain oils, cinnamic acid and BENZOIC ACID.Begoniaceae: A plant family of the order Violales (by some in Begoniales), subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. Members are found throughout tropical and warm temperate habitats. Most are perennial herbs with monoecious flowers (both sexes on the same plant). Fruits are usually capsules containing many tiny seeds.Ranunculus: A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE that contains protoanemonin, anemonin, and ranunculin.Rosaceae: The rose plant family in the order ROSALES and class Magnoliopsida. They are generally woody plants. A number of the species of this family contain cyanogenic compounds.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase (Quinone): A flavoprotein that reversibly catalyzes the oxidation of NADH or NADPH by various quinones and oxidation-reduction dyes. The enzyme is inhibited by dicoumarol, capsaicin, and caffeine.Quinone Reductases: NAD(P)H:(quinone acceptor) oxidoreductases. A family that includes three enzymes which are distinguished by their sensitivity to various inhibitors. EC 1.6.99.2 (NAD(P)H DEHYDROGENASE (QUINONE);) is a flavoprotein which reduces various quinones in the presence of NADH or NADPH and is inhibited by dicoumarol. EC 1.6.99.5 (NADH dehydrogenase (quinone)) requires NADH, is inhibited by AMP and 2,4-dinitrophenol but not by dicoumarol or folic acid derivatives. EC 1.6.99.6 (NADPH dehydrogenase (quinone)) requires NADPH and is inhibited by dicoumarol and folic acid derivatives but not by 2,4-dinitrophenol.Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Quinones: Hydrocarbon rings which contain two ketone moieties in any position. They can be substituted in any position except at the ketone groups.Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter: A plasma membrane exchange glycoprotein transporter that functions in intracellular pH regulation, cell volume regulation, and cellular response to many different hormones and mitogens.Sequence Analysis, Protein: A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.Mustard Plant: Any of several BRASSICA species that are commonly called mustard. Brassica alba is white mustard, B. juncea is brown or Chinese mustard, and B. nigra is black, brown, or red mustard. The plant is grown both for mustard seed from which oil is extracted or used as SPICES, and for its greens used as VEGETABLES or ANIMAL FEED. There is no relationship to MUSTARD COMPOUNDS.Brassica: A plant genus of the family Cruciferae. It contains many species and cultivars used as food including cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, collard greens, MUSTARD PLANT; (B. alba, B. junica, and B. nigra), turnips (BRASSICA NAPUS) and rapeseed (BRASSICA RAPA).Brassica napus: A plant species of the family BRASSICACEAE best known for the edible roots.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Brassica rapa: A plant species cultivated for the seed used as animal feed and as a source of canola cooking oil.Plant Infertility: The failure of PLANTS to complete fertilization and obtain seed (SEEDS) as a result of defective POLLEN or ovules, or other aberrations. (Dict. of Plant Genet. and Mol. Biol., 1998)Taenia: A genus of large tapeworms.Snow: Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Entomology: A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Saskatchewan: A province of Canada, lying between the provinces of Alberta and Manitoba. Its capital is Regina. It is entirely a plains region with prairie in the south and wooded country with many lakes and swamps in the north. The name was taken from the Saskatchewan River from the Cree name Kisiskatchewani Sipi, meaning rapid-flowing river. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1083 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p486)Cemeteries: Areas set apart as burial grounds.IndianaBurial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Mortuary Practice: Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.Embalming: Process of preserving a dead body to protect it from decay.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Funeral Rites: Those customs and ceremonies pertaining to the dead.Africa, Southern: The geographical area of Africa comprising ANGOLA; BOTSWANA; LESOTHO; MALAWI; MOZAMBIQUE; NAMIBIA; SOUTH AFRICA; SWAZILAND; ZAMBIA; and ZIMBABWE.Introduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)AfricaBiodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Sex Attractants: Pheromones that elicit sexual attraction or mating behavior usually in members of the opposite sex in the same species.Moths: Insects of the suborder Heterocera of the order LEPIDOPTERA.Oviposition: The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.Spodoptera: A genus of owlet moths of the family Noctuidae. These insects are used in molecular biology studies during all stages of their life cycle.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Forensic Sciences: Disciplines that apply sciences to law. Forensic sciences include a wide range of disciplines, such as FORENSIC TOXICOLOGY; FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY; FORENSIC MEDICINE; FORENSIC DENTISTRY; and others.Oleanolic Acid: A pentacyclic triterpene that occurs widely in many PLANTS as the free acid or the aglycone for many SAPONINS. It is biosynthesized from lupane. It can rearrange to the isomer, ursolic acid, or be oxidized to taraxasterol and amyrin.Botany: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.TriterpenesIntramolecular Transferases: Enzymes of the isomerase class that catalyze the transfer of acyl-, phospho-, amino- or other groups from one position within a molecule to another. EC 5.4.Lycopersicon esculentum: A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.Solanum: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain SOLANACEOUS ALKALOIDS. Some species in this genus are called deadly nightshade which is also a common name for ATROPA BELLADONNA.Squalene

In vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of a seed preparation containing phenethylisothiocyanate. (1/7)

Winter cress (Barbarea verna) seed preparations rich in phenethylisothiocyanate (PEITC) had strong in vivo and in vitro anti-inflammatory activity, significantly reducing the size of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. This in vivo effect was comparable with that of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug aspirin. The seed preparation, in a concentration-dependent manner, reduced the mRNA levels of inflammation-related genes such as the inducible forms of cyclooxygenase and nitric-oxide synthase and the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Activity of the seed preparation was similar to that of the synthetic PEITC. PEITC was the most active of five different forms of isothiocyanate tested for their effects on in vitro proinflammatory gene expression. In vitro activity of the seed preparation was also compared with that of two known anti-inflammatory drugs. We conclude that Barbarea verna seed preparation may function as a potent anti-inflammatory agent, interfering with the transcription of proinflammatory genes.  (+info)

AFLP markers for the R-gene in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum, conferring resistance to defenses in Barbarea vulgaris. (2/7)

A so-called R-gene renders the yellow-striped flea beetle Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticinae) resistant to the defenses of the yellow rocket Barbarea vulgaris R.Br. (Brassicacea) and enables it to use it as a host plant in Denmark. In this study, genetic markers for an autosomal R-gene, inherited as a single, dominant locus in flea beetles from the Danish locality "Kvaerkeby" are described, and a genetic linkage map around this particular R-gene is constructed, using the technique of AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism).  (+info)

Barbarea vulgaris glucosinolate phenotypes differentially affect performance and preference of two different species of lepidopteran herbivores. (3/7)

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Identification of defense compounds in Barbarea vulgaris against the herbivore Phyllotreta nemorum by an ecometabolomic approach. (4/7)

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Genetic differentiation between resistance phenotypes in the phytophagous flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum. (5/7)

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UDP-glycosyltransferases from the UGT73C subfamily in Barbarea vulgaris catalyze sapogenin 3-O-glucosylation in saponin-mediated insect resistance. (6/7)

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Transcriptome analysis of Barbarea vulgaris infested with diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) larvae. (7/7)

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Barbarea vulgaris is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.4 m (1ft 4in). It is hardy to zone (UK) 6 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to August, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Flies, bees, beetles, self.The plant is self-fertile. It is noted for attracting wildlife. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Its when you are crossing by foot that you may have your purchases inspected. • Tasbakan MI, lumigan uk buy Pullukcu H, Sipahi OR, Yamazhan T, Ulusoy S. 1H NMR spectrum (D 2O), δ, ppm: 247 (4H, t, 2×CH 2(meldon)); 259 (4H, s, -CH 2-CH 2- (succinac)); 329 (4H, t, 2×CH 2(meldon)); 335 (18H, s, 2×Me 3N −))! Ive loaded your blog in 3 completely different web browsers and I must say this blog loads a lot faster then most? Methods for quantifying the transport of drugs across brain barrier systems! Disciform keratitis and other stromal inflammations (to the viral coat proteins described earlier) will go unresolved without immunosuppression. Human studies have mostly used adenoma tissue derived from prostate resection? This effect was seen at all anatomic sites and in both men and women! Multiple interactions of cimetidine and probenecid with valaciclovir and its metabolite acyclovir? Gemma dovrebbe combattere del barbarea, lumigan uk buy ma al informant & malore inoltre hanno bienni! Wanneer ...
NEW TAXA AND NOMENCLATURAL NOVELTIES IN THE BRASSICACEAE (CRUCIFERAE) (Total: 427 novelties as of 11 October 2004). Alyssum dahuricum (Peschkova) Al-Shehbaz, Novon 14: 153. 2004.. A. klimesii Al-Shehbaz, Novon 12: 309. 2002.. Aphragmus bouffordii Al-Shehbaz, Harvard Pap. Bot. 8: 26. 2003.. A. ladakianus Al-Shehbaz, Novon 12: 310. 2002.. A. nepalensis (H. Hara) Al-Shehbaz, Harvard Pap. Bot. 5(1): 112. 2000. Arabis setosifolia Al-Shehbaz, Novon 12: 310. 2002.. Armoracia lacustris (A. Gray) Al-Shehbaz & V. Bates, J. Arnold Arbor. 68: 357. 1987.. Aschersoniodoxa cachensis (Spegazzini) Al-Shehbaz, Syst. Bot. 15: 392. 1990.. A. pilosa Al-Shehbaz, Syst. Bot. 15: 390. 1990.. Baimashania Al-Shehbaz, Novon 10: 321. 2000.. B. pulvinata Al-Shehbaz, Novon 10: 321. 2000.. B. wangii Al-Shehbaz, Novon 10: 322. 2000. Barbarea hongii Al-Shehbaz & G. Yang, Acta Phytotax. Sin. 38: 71. 2000.. B. macrocarpa (Boissier) Al-Shehbaz & Jacquemoud, Candollea 55: 201-203. 2000.. Beringia R. A. Price, Al-Shehbaz & OKane, ...
Flea beetle (Phyllotreta sp.) jumping from part of a flower, high-speed photograph. This beetle is an important pest of garden and commercial plants, most often brassicas (such as cabbage and broccoli), but any young seedlings may be attacked. The beetle eats holes in leaves and stems, which can be fatal to a young plant. The flea beetle takes its name from the quick jump it uses to escape from predators. This beetle has jumped off the plant and opened its wings ready for flight. - Stock Image Z330/0552
Flea beetles (Phyllotreta spp.): For some of the early seeded canola, the insecticide portion of the seed treatments broke down to levels where they were no longer controlling flea beetles while the plants were still quite susceptible to flea beetle feeding. This happened even for seed treatments with higher rates of insecticide. Early season growth of canola was slow in many areas, so the canola took a long time to reach stages that are more tolerant to feeding by flea beetles.. Foliar spraying to control flea beetles was common in many areas again this year. Areas where foliar insecticides were applied to control flea beetles in canola fields include Swan River (NW), Hamiota (SW), Tilston (SW), Carberry (SW), Neepawa (SW), Gladstone (C), Portage la Prairie (C), Notre Dame (C), Starbuck (C), Elm Creek (C), Carman (C), Miami (C), Homewood (C), Sperling (C), Roland (C), Pilot Mound (C), Morris (C), Altona (E), and Riverton (I). Some fields in the Southwest were sprayed 2-3 times to control flea ...
Reminder - Flea Beetles (Chrysomelidae: Phyllotreta species) - Remember, the Action Threshold for flea beetles on canola is 25% of cotyledon leaf area consumed. Shot-hole feeding is the traditional damage in seedling canola but watch the growing point and stems of seedlings. ...
The name flea beetle describes many species of small beetles that chew tiny shot-holes in plant foliage and jump around like fleas when disturbed. Although some species feed on a wide range of plants, most FB species attack a single species or family of related plants. New Hampshire garden crops most likely to suffer early-season FB attack include cabbagefamily crops, potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, beets, corn, grapes and spinach ...
You may have noticed some small holes on the leaves of your plants and are wondering what kind of pest caused these holes. Flea beetles are the culprit, and this article can help.
i did a little googling and turned up two strategies. one is trap crops of giant mustard or radishes. the other is keeping the plants seperated to make it harder for them to travel. so maybe I need to do like I prefer with my squashplants and hide my eggplant in amongst other things. and since all my early plantings make for yummy flea beetle food I need to find some things to plant in spring that can help hide my other plantings ...
Update 7/3/2014: I planted radishes again near the zucchini and again it seems to be working. We have flea beetles once more but it doesnt seem to be nearly as bad as last year. I did happen to come across a new article from Grit Magazine about dealing with the pests and how to fight them ...
window.onload = function() { var elements = document.getElementsByTagName(span); for (var i = 0; i < elements.length; i++) { var element = elements[i]; var id = element.getAttribute(rel) || ; if (id.length > 0) { element.onclick = function() { var oToShow = document.getElementById(this.getAttribute(rel)); if (oToShow) document.getElementById(HiddenTextContainer).innerHTML = oToShow.innerHTML; }; } }};function ShowHiddenText() { document.getElementById(HiddenTextContainer).style.display = block; document.getElementById(readlink).style.display = none;} 4 Pests 4! (And one Pest That ISNT a Problem!) Question. Mike: My husbands beloved eggplants fell prey to pestilence. I told him you said the best way to get rid of those flea beetles was to buy eggplant in the supermarket, but am hoping you have another suggestion. Thanks! ---Barbara; Malvern, PA
FLEA BEETLES: PLANT LATE BRASSICAS FAR FROM SPRING CROPS. (from Mass. Veg. Notes) Mid July is often a time of year when adult FB numbers decline, because a large part of the population is underground, in larval and pupal stages. After larvae feed on roots, they pupate in the soil, then emerge again into the light as adults-ready to feed on foliage. The time when you will first see these new adults depends on when eggs were first laid on spring Brassica crops, and on soil temperatures since then. Dissections of flea beetles collected from the field in the Connecticut Valley in April and May detected eggs present in early May this year; hence new adults are likely to be emerging now. In fields where Brassica crops are always present, because succession crops are planted close together, it may appear that flea beetles never go away all summer. In fact, they are likely to increase dramatically and feed heavily in early August because of the new summer adults. If you plant fall brassicas close to ...
The ornamental sweet potato vine is sometimes attacked by flea beetles; these make smaller sized holes and are active for about a month. As long as the plant is growing well, they will not kill it although the damage can be unsightly. Flea beetles can be treated with carbaryl (Sevin). Larger holes could be the work of a caterpillar, these can be controlled by handpicking or with Bt (such as Dipel) or spinosad. There are occasionally beetles that attack this plant, they can be handpicked or try carbaryl (such as Sevin.) You can certainly try the garlic and see if it helps ...
It didnt take me long to establish a self-imposed rule when writing these pieces - dont talk about the weather, because between the date of writing and the date it appears in print you can guarantee it will go from one extreme to the other.
Today something from the real quick and easy department again. Vegan pasta with veggie stripes and crunchy hemp seeds preparation time: ca. 20 minutes difficulty: simple ingredients for 1-2 people: spelt fusilli OR rice fusilli (gluten free) however much you want to eat handful of broccoli florets 1 large OR 2 small carrots 1 ca.…
Grow the right flowers to attract these Top 10 beneficial insects to your garden to minimize damage from aphids, caterpillars, flea beetles and other pests.
Grow the right flowers to attract these Top 10 beneficial insects to your garden to minimize damage from aphids, caterpillars, flea beetles and other pests.
Just when gardening seems to be rolling along fine, insect season begins. The first bugs of summer to arrive are the flea beetles. I planted mizuna, a tasty oriental green, under lights in February and had large, healthy transplants to place in the ...
I have been reading a lot about what to do with my flea beetle problem, and I have read about these three ways to control them. I would prefer to use the least toxic method possible. Any opinions on which of these three work the best and are also
Description: Black, often with a curved yellow or white stripe on either side of its back. Flea beetles are seldom actually seen; they hop away before you get close enough to see them. They eat nearly all garden crops. The adults are very troublesome when seedlings are set out. Leaves become riddled with little holes, chewed through from the underside of the leaf. Larvae chew on roots of most vegetables, weakening the plant. Solutions: We have obtained excellent results using Super-Light Insect Barriers on crops where pollination is not required. Apply kaolin clay products on young plants and continue coverage every 7-14 days until harvest. Otherwise, use pyrethrins and rotenone on adults beetles and Grub-Away Nematodes on larvae. We recommend Surround® At Home® Crop Protectant, Pyola® Insect Spray and Liquid Rotenone/Pyrethrins Spray.
The Yellow-tibia Parchicola flea beetle was discovered as a cryptic species using genetic barcoding analysis. See notes on the Black-tibia Parchicola species for this history. The Pa. yellow tibia are dominant on P. oerstedii, but may also be found on P. ambigua, P. vitifolia, P. quadrangularis and even more rarely on species of Decaloba such as P. auriculata. This pattern is analogous to Heliconius hecale and H. ismenius, preferring subgenus Passiflora, but sometimes using Decaloba. It may be that, as proposed for Heliconius, the ability to consume subgenus Passiflora pre-adapts this species for eating Decaloba species. These flea beetles became rarer during the rainy season in November and December 2012, and then numbers rose again in March and April, 2013. They have been consistently common in late 2013 and early 2014. In August 2015 after two months of intense rainy conditions, I did not see any on P. oerstedii or P. ambigua. They did recover on P. oerstedii during October.. The majority ...
Although we might wish that insects were more sedentary, one of the more startling, even entertaining, things they do is jump. Grasshoppers, fleas, praying mantises, katydids, flea beetles, crickets and click beetles are some of the insects that can hop out of harms way or to a new host.
Mint: the menthol content in mints that acts as an insect repellant and tiny flowers attract Braconid and Icheumonid wasps, and Tachnid and Syrid flies; bees and other good guys love it; deters white cabbage moths, ants, rodents, flea beetles, fleas, aphids. Earthworms are quite attracted to mint plantings, and it may deter ground squirrels and mice from tunneling in the area ...
Though little black bugs on tomato plants may not seem like much of a problem, if left unchecked the issue can become quite serious. These small pests likely belong to a family of bugs called flea beetles. There are a few different options on how to control them, though some type of pesticide will likely be necessary.
Pulled up the four cuke plants that were in pots and tossed them, after getting the last two cukes off. They werent really doing much, Cukezilla is producing a lot more, and that gave me two less pots to water. Also ripped out the flea beetle damaged bush beans. They were starting to produce again, but not enough to make a difference with the pole beans going crazy. Right, outta there. Had to pull up one of the sunflowers. Thing 1 was a little careless with a garbage bag and damaged the stalk too bad for it to survive. Sigh. At least it wasnt the rust one, and the other sunflowers are doing fine ...
Growing up, the shift to autumn was marked by Labor Day, and the end of county fair season. On the farm, the calendar is different. Last week marked that shift. Our work of the spring is coming to fruition and, at the same time, we are in the midst of the planting for the winter market. Last week, the chicories and chards were planted and are now beginning to emerge. Next week the turnips, rutabagas, winter radishes and kales will be planted. We will have over a half dozen turnip and rutabaga varieties planted this year and hope to dodge the flea beetle infestations which have been pretty strong this year. No bigger than the head of a pin, hundreds congregate on any radish or other brassica available and leave but a skeleton. The showers last night reminded us that summer has passed the apex (Who would have guessed?) and that sometimes we dont get to enjoy a long "Indian Summer." Heeding Aesops fable of the ant and grasshopper, we are scurrying to get everything in place lest we are deprived ...
Corn flea beetles, Chaetocnema pulicaria, vector Erwinia stewartii (synamorph Pantoea stewartii), which causes Stewarts bacterial wilt of corn (Zea mays). A seed treatment insecticide, imidacloprid, killed flea beetles and reduced the number of feeding wounds and Stewarts wilt symptoms per leaf in greenhouse studies. The objective of our research was to evaluate the ability of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam seed treatments to control Stewarts wilt on sweet corn hybrids under field conditions with naturally occurring populations of the corn flea beetle. Six field trials were planted at four locations in 1998. Eleven field trials were planted at nine locations in 1999. The treatment design was a factorial of sweet corn hybrids and seed treatments. Stewarts wilt incidence ranged from 0 to 54% in the 1998 trials. Incidence of Stewarts wilt in nontreated plots of the susceptible hybrid Jubilee ranged from 2% at the 8-leaf stage to 77% 1 week after mid-silk in the 1999 trials. Seed treatment ...
P. lobata is one of the most common forest edge, and forest tree fall gap species of Passiflora at La Selva. It is very fast growing and more likely to flower, fruit and set seeds than most other species. The stems are triangular in cross-section. Its leaves are covered with tiny velcro-like hooked trichomes that kill soft-bodied caterpillars, including most species of Heliconius. The exception is Heliconius charithonia, whose cuticle allows it to walk across the hooks unharmed (Gilbert 1971). These trichomes do not seem to have any effect on adult flea beetles, who find this to be one of their favorite host plants. P. lobata is the most likely Passiflora to be defoliated by flea beetles, and plants often die after being infected by groups of flea beetles. This species has the greatest rate of demographic turnover of any species at La Selva, and few P. lobata live longer than 1-2 years. P. lobata belongs in subgenus Decaloba, supersection Bryonioides. Range: not widely distributed, from ...
Epitrix fuscula: hirtipennis attacks tobacco plants, and E. fuscula eats tomatoes and potatoes. The flea beetle Aphthona flava has been released in the United States and Canada as a biological control for the weed leafy spurge.
Carrot Pests , Identification and control of common varieties of insects that attack carrot plants. Nematodes, Leaf Miners, Flea beetles, Carrot Weevil, Flies and maggots, wireworms, celery worm, aphids.
Transgenic lines of silver birch (Betula pendula) carrying the sugar beet chitinase IV gene were used to study the effects of the heterologous expression of a transgenic chitinase on the performance of lepidopteran herbivores. The effect of wo...
Insecticides- A number of insecticides are available to kill Japanese beetles. by spraying the affected plants with Japanese beetle killer withn ingredients such as carbaryl or pyrethrin). Pyrethrin-based insecticide is a safe and effective way to control these pests on vegetables, grapes, raspberries, flowers, roses, trees and shrubs. In addition to controlling Japanese beetles, it also controls cucumber beetles, flea beetles, cabbageworms, and more. As soon as you notice beetles, begin spraying. The beetles release chemicals called pheromones into the air. These pheromones attract other beetles. So if you see a few of the bugs, theyll probably attract more. Get rid of Japanese beetles early, before they can invite more of their friends to feed on your plants. ...
Detoxification of plant toxins is a necessity for most herbivorous insects to successfully feed on their host plants. The cabbage stem flea beetle Psylliodes chrysocephala is a serious pest of many Brassicaceae. These plants produce glucosinolates, which are converted to toxic isothiocyanates upon tissue damage. A recent study on the metabolic fate of 4-methylsulfinylbutyl (4MSOB) glucosinolate in P. chrysocephala has shown that P. chrysocephala uses different ways to cope with this plant defense compound. Besides sequestration of intact glucosinolates and the production of desulfo-glucosinolates, P. chrysocephala metabolizes toxic isothiocyanates by conjugation to glutathione via the conserved mercapturic acid pathway. In this project I will investigate the role of glutathione S -transferases in the detoxification of isothiocyanates in P. chrysocephala ...
These two pests will destroy plants if given the chance. Flea beetles are tiny, shiny black, and invade in large numbers, hopping from leaf to leaf sucking the juices from the foliage, leaving behind a mass of pock marks. (Read more about these pests here.) To reduce populations, clean old plant debris in fall (where these pests overwinter), till beds in spring, and plant eggplant in late spring to early summer to avoid spring hatches of this pest. Spraying with insecticidal soap or pyrethrin sprays will kill adult beetles and protect plants from summer damage.. Striped Colorado potato beetles lay masses of yellow eggs on the undersides of eggplant leaves in spring. Brownish orange larvae emerge that aggressively feed on leaves. As they grow larger, they cause more damage and can completely defoliate young eggplants. The best protection is to inspect plants for egg masses and remove them on sight. The beetles and larvae are also easy to remove by hand. (Learn more about these pests here.). Most ...
These two pests will destroy plants if given the chance. Flea beetles are tiny, shiny black, and invade in large numbers, hopping from leaf to leaf sucking the juices from the foliage, leaving behind a mass of pock marks. (Read more about these pests here.) To reduce populations, clean old plant debris in fall (where these pests overwinter), till beds in spring, and plant eggplant in late spring to early summer to avoid spring hatches of this pest. Spraying with insecticidal soap or pyrethrin sprays will kill adult beetles and protect plants from summer damage.. Striped Colorado potato beetles lay masses of yellow eggs on the undersides of eggplant leaves in spring. Brownish orange larvae emerge that aggressively feed on leaves. As they grow larger, they cause more damage and can completely defoliate young eggplants. The best protection is to inspect plants for egg masses and remove them on sight. The beetles and larvae are also easy to remove by hand. (Learn more about these pests here.). Most ...
Sowing: For early planting, start seeds indoors with soil temperatures around 60°; plant about 1/4″ in soil; harden off transplants at around 4-5 weeks; transplant when 3-4 true leaves have shown; in cooler climates seeds can be direct-sown after the soil warms to 55°-60°;. Plant Spacing: Plant seeds 4″-6″ but thin to 14″-24″;. Plant Height: 14″-18″. Harvest: 60 days from transplant; if head feels firm like softball when squeezed, it is ready; can remain unharvested but watch for splitting down the center-an indication the cabbage is trying to flower;. Grows Well With: Dill; celery; chamomile; sage; peppermint; rosemary; potatoes; beets; onions;. Grows Poorly With: Tomatoes; pole beans; strawberries; hyssop; thyme; wormwood; southernwood;. Potential Problems: Heat stress; seedlings must have enough light or they will get leggy and develop improperly after transplant; aphids; cabbage worms; loopers; root maggots; flea beetles; symphylans; white cabbage butterfly; clubroot;. ...
Sowing: For early planting, start seeds indoors with soil temperatures around 60°; plant about 1/4″ in soil; harden off transplants at around 4-5 weeks; transplant when 3-4 true leaves have shown; in cooler climates seeds can be direct-sown after the soil warms to 55°-60°;. Plant Spacing: Plant seeds 4″-6″ but thin to 14″-24″;. Plant Height: 14″-18″. Harvest: 85 days from transplant; if head feels firm like softball when squeezed, it is ready; can remain unharvested but watch for splitting down the center-an indication the cabbage is trying to flower;. Grows Well With: Dill; celery; chamomile; sage; peppermint; rosemary; potatoes; beets; onions;. Grows Poorly With: Tomatoes; pole beans; strawberries; hyssop; thyme; wormwood; southernwood;. Potential Problems: Heat stress; seedlings must have enough light or they will get leggy and develop improperly after transplant; aphids; cabbage worms; loopers; root maggots; flea beetles; symphylans; white cabbage butterfly; clubroot;. ...
Rainfall amounts across the Southwest Region were variable, ranging from 5 to 30 mm, with heavier amounts and pea-sized hail reported in isolated thundershowers. Damage from the hail was negligible due to the early growth stages of most crops. These recent rains were beneficial to emerging oilseeds that were damaged by earlier frost events and the severe flea beetle pressure being experienced throughout much of the region. Soil moisture is generally adequate across the region but surplus along the Manitoba/U.S. border. Seeding in the extreme southern portions of the region is now virtually complete with most acres being planted. Weed control spraying operations continued to make significant progress early last week due to several calm days. Weed control measures in spring wheat are now 75 to 80% complete, field peas 85 to 90%, malt barley 75 to 80%, flax and oats 50 to 60% complete and Liberty canola 40 to 50% complete. First pass glyphosate applications on canola, corn and soybeans are ...
If you are in Internet for a Dr. Goodpet Outside Flea Relief Non-Toxic Yard Spray Diatomaceous Earth 1.5 lbs this {product,item} is really good. Dr. Goodpet Outside Flea Relief Non-Toxic Yard Spray Diatomaceous Earth 1.5 lbs Below specifications and details that you can read from this page. Perhaps you will find the product you are finding for at a price that suits your budget To be able to critters to the exoskeleton not mollusks (snail but additionally slugs) , Diatomaceous Terrain will be a fatal powder your incorporates fossilized stays on coming from all diatoms (microscopic shells) . their directed attributes peel on the insects exoskeleton not their mollusks outside walls cells lining travel the item at risk from desiccation (drying out) . Diatomaceous Terrain enable you to wrists and hands fleas, presses, flies, millipedes, centipedes, porno flea beetles, sawfly, coddling moth, twig borer, thrips, mites, cockroaches, silverfish, slugs, Compare / Check Price ». ...
RADISH: One of the workhorses for the garden. Companions for radishes are: radish, beet, bush beans, pole beans, carrots, chervil, cucumber, lettuce, melons, nasturtium, parsnip, peas, spinach and members of the squash family. Why plant radishes with your squash plants? Radishes may protect them from squash borers. Anything that will help keep them away is worth a try. Radishes are a deterrent against cucumber beetles and rust flies. Chervil and nasturtium improve radish growth and flavor. Planting them around corn and letting them go to seed will also help fight corn borers. Chinese Daikon and Snow Belle radishes are favorites of flea beetles. Plant these at 6 to 12 inch intervals amongst broccoli. In one trial, this measurably reduced damage to broccoli. Radishes will lure leafminers away from spinach. The damage the leafminers do to radish leaves does not stop the radish roots from growing, a win-win situation. Keep radishes away from hyssop plants, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and ...
The appearance and increase of a population of Sidalcea hirtipes (hairy-stemmed checker-mallow) in an abandoned pasture on the Oregon coast prompted research into how and why a rare plant suddenly appeared and increased its population in a once inhospitable environment. (See the NPSO Bulletin, September, 1995, for the first article on this research).. The successful biological control of Senecio jacobaea (tansy ragwort) in 1983 at a coastal pasture site in Oregon used three biological control agents: ragwort flea beetle (Longitarsus jacobaeae), cinnabar moth (Tyria jacobaeae) and ragwort seedfly (Botanophila seneciella). Following a drastic decline in tansy ragwort at this pasture site, Sidalcea hirtipes appeared in one area of the pasture. Since the appearance of S. hirtipes in the pasture in 1985, the plant population has expanded from three distinct patches to seven distinct patches. The objectives of the 1996 research included mapping new and old patches of S. hirtipes at the site; ...
Burgess L. 1977. Flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) attacking rape crops in the Canadian prairie provinces. The Canadian Entomologist 109:21-32. Busso C, Attia T, Röbbelen G. 1987. Trigenomic combinations for the analysis of meiotic control in the cultivated Brassica species. Genome 29:331-333.. CAB International. 2007. Crop Protection Compendium. CAB International, Wallingford, UK. [Online] http://www.cabicompendium.org/cpc/home.asp. CABI. 2015. Diaretiella rapae Datasheet. Crop Protection Compendium. CAB International, Wallingford, UK. http://www.cabi.org/cpc/datasheet/18686. Canada Department of Agriculture. 1951. The Canadian Insect Pest Review. Canada Department of Agriculture. Scientific Service Division, Entomology 29: 175A.. Canada Gazette. 2016. Weed Seeds Order. Government of Canada: Part I: Notices and Proposed Regulations, vol. 150. Canadian Seed Growers Association. 2005. Canadian Regulations and Procedures for Pedigreed Seed Crop Production. Revision 1.9-2014, February 1, ...
In human cancer cells, BAG3 protein is known to sustain cell survival. Here, for the first time, we demonstrated the expression of BAG3 protein in equine sarcoids in vivo as well as in an in vitro model of sarcoid-derived equine fibroblasts. Evidence of a possible involvement of BAG3 in equine sarcoid carcinogenesis was obtained by immunohistochemistry analysis of tumour samples. We found that the most of tumour samples stained positive for BAG3, even though to a different grade, while normal dermal fibroblasts from a healthy horse displayed very weak staining pattern for BAG3 expression. By siRNA technology, we demonstrated the role of BAG3 in counteracting basal as well as chemical-triggered pro-death signals. BAG3 down-modulation in EqSO4b, a sarcoid-derived fully transformed cell line harbouring bovine papilloma virus (BPV)-1 genome, promotes cell death and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. In addition, we found that BAG3 silencing sensitized cells to phenethylisothiocyanate (PEITC), a promising ...
This year, Oxford is delighted to present the Glycobiology Significant Achievement Award to Dr. Hamed Jafar-Nejad, Associate Professor in the Department of Molecular and Human Genetics at Baylor College of Medicine. The award will be given to Dr. Jafar-Nejad at the Society for Glycobiology Annual meeting this November in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Jafar-Nejad has made significant contributions in multiple areas, including our understanding of O-glucosylation of the Notch receptor and of molecular mechanisms affected in patients with NGLY1 deficiency. Regarding O-glucosylation of Notch, Dr. Jafar-Nejad demonstrated that the enzyme which adds O-glucose to EGF repeats in the extracellular domain of the Notch receptor (Rumi in flies, POGLUT1 in mice) is essential for development in both flies and mice, and that addition of O-glucose is not only essential for Notch activity, but for proper function of other proteins as well (e.g. a fly protein called Eyes shut, mutations in whose human homolog cause ...
Four titerpenoids were isolated from the roots of Dipsacus asper. On the basis of chemical and spectral evidence, the structures of these compounds have been elucidated to be hederagenin(1), hederagenin $3-O-\alpha-L-$ arabinoside(2). $3-O-\alpha-$ L-arabinopyranosyl hederagenin $2B-O-\beta$ -...
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Bittercress (Barbarea vulgaris) also produces triterpenoid saponins. These adaptations and counter adaptations probably have ...
"Phylloplane location of glucosinolates in Barbarea spp. (Brassicaceae) and misleading assessment of host suitability by a ...
Host plants are: herb Cruciferae - Arabis glabra, Armoracia lapthifolia, Armoracia aquatica, Barbarea vulgaris, Barbarea ... orthoceras, Barbarea verna, Brassica oleracea, Brassica rapa, Brassica caulorapa, Brassica napus, Brassica juncea, Brassica ...
Barbarea (creson de iarnă). *Barkeria (un gen de orhidee). *Barleria. *Barklya. *Barnadesia ...
... alyssum Barbarea orthoceras, American winter-cress Berteroa incana, hoary false-alyssum Boechera calderi, Calder's rockcress ...
Flowers visited include white umbellifers, Anemone nemorosa, Barbarea, Cardamine flexuosa, Crataegus, Meum, Prunus cerasus, ...
Barbarea verna, Campanula rotundifolia, Ceratophylum demersum, Ceterach Officinarum, Drosera rotundifolia, Gnaphalium ...
... or Bitter-cress may refer to: Barbarea vulgaris Any plant in the Cardamine genus, especially Cardamine bulbosa, ...
The leaves have a large end-lobe and only few side lobes, much like the leaf-shape of Barbarea stricta and Barbarea orthoceras ... Barbarea australis is a morphologically and ecologically typical Barbarea species with an unusual distribution: it is an ... "Barbarea australis - Native Wintercress, Riverbed Wintercress". Threatened Species & Ecological Communities. Department of ... "Isoferuloyl derivatives of five seed glucosinolates in the crucifer genus Barbarea". Phytochemistry. 72 (7): 610-623. doi: ...
Alyssum Arabis Barbarea Brassica rapa Cardamine Draba verna Erysimum Isatis tinctoria Lepidium campestre Lepidium virginicum ...
One plant species that contains the egg-laying cues is wintercress, Barbarea vulgaris. Indeed, diamondback moth females lay ... Barbarea vulgaris, as a feeding deterrent to the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella". Journal of Chemical Ecology. 28 (3): ... "Phylloplane location of glucosinolates in Barbarea spp. (Brassicaceae) and misleading assessment of host suitability by a ...
They feed on flower nectar from various species, including Vaccinium, Sanicula arctopoides, Lindera, Salix, Barbarea and Prunus ...
The larvae feed on Brassicaceae species, especially Barbarea vulgaris. waarneming.nl (in Dutch) Lepidoptera of Belgium ...
... (also known as Balkan yellow rocket) is a perennial herb of the genus Barbarea from the family Brassicaceae / ... K. Uzundzhalieva; G. Economou; V. Stevanović & S. P. Kell (2011). "Barbarea balcana". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. ...
... yellow wild-indigo Barbarea N Barbarea orthoceras - erect-fruit wintercress X Barbarea vulgaris - yellow rocket, common ...
Lasioglossum cressoni has been observed pollinating the following species of flower: Apocynum, Azalea, Barbarea, Berteroa, ...
"The genome sequence of Barbarea vulgaris facilitates the study of ecological biochemistry". Scientific Reports. 7: 40728. doi: ...
Mouse-ear Cress Arabis lyrata L. - Lyre-leaved Rock Cress Barbarea vulgaris R. Br. - Winter Cress Camelina microcarpa Andrz. - ...
... australis Barbarea balcana Barbarea bosniaca Barbarea bracteosa Barbarea conferta Barbarea hongii Barbarea intermedia ... Barbarea lepuznica Barbarea longirostris Barbarea orthoceras Barbarea rupicola Barbarea sicula Barbarea stricta Barbarea ... Flora Europaea: Barbarea Flora of China: Barbarea Data related to Barbarea at Wikispecies. ... Barbarea verna, also known as upland cress, early winter cress, American cress, Belle Isle cress and scurvy grass, is used in ...
Barbarea, Stevenia, Braya, Turritis, Arabis, Macropodium, Cardamine, Pteroneurum, Dentaria, Neuroloma Tribe 2. Alyssineae Genus ...
Barbarea, Boechera, Draba (of which he revised many South American members ), Erucastrum, Nasturtium, Raphanus, Rorippa, ...
... is a biennial or perennial herb up to 100 cm tall. Leaves are up to 7 cm long, pinnately lobed with 1-3 pairs ... Barbarea stricta, the small-flowered winter-cress, is a plant species first described in 1822 from Podolia, what is now the ... The genus Barbarea R. Br. (Cruciferae) in Britain and Ireland. Watsonia 16:389-396. Fernald, M. L. 1909. The North American ... Nature Gate, Luontto Porti, Helsinki Tela Botanica, Le Réseau de la botanique francophone, Barbarea stricta Rich, TCG. 1987. ...
... may refer to: Bambusa vulgaris, an open clump type bamboo species Barbarea vulgaris, the bittercress, a biennial ...
The company also grows Barbarea verna, also known as Upland Cress and early yellowrocket. Tomatoes, arugula and watercress have ...
Barbarea rupicola, Bellium bellidioides, Bellium crassifolium, Borago pygmaea, Bryonia marmorata, Carlina macrocephala, ...
Barbarea orthoceras, Hypericum perforatum, Cornus species, Lupinus albifrons, Thermopsis macrophylla, Eriodictyon californicum ...
Barbarea australis Barbarea balcana Barbarea bosniaca Barbarea bracteosa Barbarea conferta Barbarea hongii Barbarea intermedia ... Barbarea lepuznica Barbarea longirostris Barbarea orthoceras Barbarea rupicola Barbarea sicula Barbarea stricta Barbarea ... Flora Europaea: Barbarea Flora of China: Barbarea Data related to Barbarea at Wikispecies. ... Barbarea verna, also known as upland cress, early winter cress, American cress, Belle Isle cress and scurvy grass, is used in ...
Barbarea balcana (also known as Balkan yellow rocket) is a perennial herb of the genus Barbarea from the family Brassicaceae / ... K. Uzundzhalieva; G. Economou; V. Stevanović & S. P. Kell (2011). "Barbarea balcana". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. ...
Barbarea hongii Al-Shehbaz & G. Yang*Barbarea intermedia Boreau*Barbarea orthoceras Ledebour*Barbarea taiwaniana Ohwi*Barbarea ... Barbarea R. Brown in W. T. Aiton, Hortus Kew. 4: 109. 1812. [nom. cons.] 山芥属 shan jie shu Herbs biennial or perennial, with ...
Barbarea arcuata Rchb., more, Barbarea barbarea , Barbarea vulgaris var. arcuata , Barbarea vulgaris var. brachycarpa Rouy & ... gracilis , Barbarea vulgaris var. longisiliquosa Carion, Barbarea vulgaris var. sylvestris , Barbarea vulgarus var. arcuata ( ... brachycarpa Rouy & Foucaud, Barbarea vulgarus var. longisiliquosa Carion, Barbarea vulgarus var. sylvestris Fr., Campe barbarea ... Barbarea vulgaris W. T. Aiton (redirected from: Barbarea vulgaris var. brachycarpa Rouy & Foucaud) ...
3. Barbarea verna (P. Mill.) Aschers. E. early yellow-rocket. Campe verna (P. Mill.) Heller; Erysimum vernum P. Mill. • CT, MA ... Barbarea vulgaris:. basal leaves with 1-4 pairs of lateral lobes, siliques 15-30 mm long, and fruiting pedicels up to 1 mm ...
This protocol describes the extraction and acidic hydrolysis of metabolites from Barbarea vulgaris with special focus on ... Glucosylation reaction catalyzed by UGT73C10-UGT73C13 from Barbarea vulgaris (Augustin et al., 2012). All four enzymes utilize ... Usage of the protocol has been limited so far to rosette leaves of 1-3 month old Barbarea vulgaris plants with a typical weight ... Augustin, J. M., Olsen, C. E. and Bak, S. (2013). Extraction and Reglucosylation of Barbarea vulgaris Sapogenins. Bio-protocol ...
Barbarea vulgaris var variegata (Chiltern Seeds) leaf RNA was used for first-strand synthesis with the ZAP-cDNA Synthesis Kit ( ... 1999) Specificity of a Y-linked gene in the P. nemorum Phyllotreta nemorum for defences in Barbarea vulgaris. Entomol Exp Appl ... Barbarea vulgaris (winter cress) is a wild crucifer from the Cardamineae tribe of the Brassicaceae family. It is the only ... Barbarea vulgaris is the only crucifer known to produce saponins. Hederagenin and oleanolic acid cellobioside make some B. ...
Barbarea verna (American wintercress). This is a biennial species with medium green lobed leaves. The flowers are produced in ... To view Barbarea plants offered near you, enter your postcode or log in. Postcode. ... Barbarea verna (American wintercress). This is a biennial species with medium green lobed leaves. The flowers are produced in ...
Barbarea stricta (Small-flowered wintercress). This upright wild-flowering species will produce 1-2 pairs of side lobes. The ... To view Barbarea plants offered near you, enter your postcode or log in. Postcode. ... Barbarea stricta (Small-flowered wintercress). This upright wild-flowering species will produce 1-2 pairs of side lobes. The ...
Barbarea Vulgaris. The common names of Barbarea vulgaris are common winter cress, upland cress, and yellow rocket. The… ...
All national parks strive to preserve resources unimpaired for future generations. This mission includes protecting the ecological balance of lands in its care ...
Barbarea intermedia Common names: Mittleres Barbarakraut(AT), Mittleres Barbarakraut(DE), Treabhach meánach(IE), Bitter ...
Barbarea stricta. Small-flowered Wintercress. * Barbarea vulgaris. Wintercress. Page 1/7 Next » ...
Bittercress (Barbarea vulgaris) also produces triterpenoid saponins. These adaptations and counter adaptations probably have ...
Barbarea verna (Early yellowrocket). Loading... A4QKF7 NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase chain 4, chloroplastic. Barbarea verna ( ...
Barbarea verna. Land Cress, Early yellowrocket. Biennial. 0.3. 5-9 LMH. FSN. M. 3. 0. ...
Barbarea australis. 2. 1. Barbarea orthoceras. American Yellowrocket. 2. 0. Barbarea verna. Land Cress, Early yellowrocket. 3. ...
Barbarea australis. 2. 1. Barbarea orthoceras. American Yellowrocket. 2. 0. Barbarea verna. Land Cress, Early yellowrocket. 3. ...
Barbarea *Winter-cress, vulgaris R. Br. * 783x1044(~201Kb) Finland, Yl j rvi, Pikku-Ahvenisto, 29.5.2005, Photo Harri Arkkio, * ...
Barbarea vulgaris. 169. W/annual; Biennial. CMV, TurMV. Wild mustard. Brassica kaber (B. arvensis, Sinapis arvensis). 170. S/W ...
46 Barbarea. +. Upper cauline leaves not auriculate; stems usually terete.. (112). 112 (111). Fruit flattened; stigma entire; ...
and Turritis glabra L., Alliaria petiolata(Bieb.) Cavara & Grande, Barbarea vulgaris W.T. Aiton., Berteroa incana(L.) DC., ... Barbarea vulgaris is introduced across Canada except for Yukon, North West Territories and Nunavut (Brouillet et al. 2010). ...
BARBAREA VULGARIS W.T. Aiton; (Garden) Yellow Rocket, Bitter Winter Cress; Old-fields along S. Proctor Road and the RR track; ... The most common herbaceous plants in this field include Barbarea vulgaris, Cichorium intybus, all Cirsium spp., Daucus carota, ... Barbarea vulgaris, Brassica nigra, Cirsium arvense, C. vulgare, Conium maculaturn, Geranium dissectum, Glechoma hederacea, ...
Barbarea vulgaris W.T. Aiton; Yellow Rocket; C = 0; BSUH 16594. Campanulaceae (Bellflower Family) Campanulastrum americanum (L ... X Barbarea vulgaris X Bromus arvensis X Bromus inermis X X X Calystegia sepium X Calystegia spithamea X Carnpanulastrum ...
  • Glucosinolates, flea beetle resistance, and leaf pubescence as taxonomic characters in the genus Barbarea ( Brassicaceae ). (idseed.org)
  • Martínková J., Šmilauer P., Mihulka S., Latzel V. & Klimešová J. 2016: The effect of injury on whole-plant senescence: an experiment with two root-sprouting Barbarea species. (cas.cz)