A plant genus of the family MALPIGHIACEAE which includes an Amazonian psychoactive plant that contains the beta-carboline harmine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine.
The study of the actions and properties of medicinal agents, often derived from PLANTS, indigenous to populations or ETHNIC GROUPS.
A beta-carboline alkaloid isolated from seeds of PEGANUM.
Alkaloid isolated from seeds of Peganum harmala L., Zygophyllaceae. It is identical to banisterine, or telepathine, from Banisteria caapi and is one of the active ingredients of hallucinogenic drinks made in the western Amazon region from related plants. It has no therapeutic use, but (as banisterine) was hailed as a cure for postencephalitic Parkinson disease in the 1920's.
Dimers (homo and hetero) of FLAVONOIDS.
The above-ground plant without the roots.
Dimers and oligomers of flavan-3-ol units (CATECHIN analogs) linked mainly through C4 to C8 bonds to leucoanthocyanidins. They are structurally similar to ANTHOCYANINS but are the result of a different fork in biosynthetic pathways.
Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of naturally occurring monoamines. It is a flavin-containing enzyme that is localized in mitochondrial membranes, whether in nerve terminals, the liver, or other organs. Monoamine oxidase is important in regulating the metabolic degradation of catecholamines and serotonin in neural or target tissues. Hepatic monoamine oxidase has a crucial defensive role in inactivating circulating monoamines or those, such as tyramine, that originate in the gut and are absorbed into the portal circulation. (From Goodman and Gilman's, The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p415) EC 1.4.3.4.
Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)
Hereditary and sporadic conditions which are characterized by progressive nervous system dysfunction. These disorders are often associated with atrophy of the affected central or peripheral nervous system structures.
An antioxidant flavonoid, occurring especially in woody plants as both (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin (cis) forms.
Organic nitrogenous bases. Many alkaloids of medical importance occur in the animal and vegetable kingdoms, and some have been synthesized. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
A basis of value established for the measure of quantity, weight, extent or quality, e.g. weight standards, standard solutions, methods, techniques, and procedures used in diagnosis and therapy.
A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)

Topographic pharmaco-EEG mapping of the effects of the South American psychoactive beverage ayahuasca in healthy volunteers. (1/7)

AIMS: Ayahuasca is a traditional South American psychoactive beverage used in Amazonian shamanism, and in the religious ceremonies of Brazilian-based syncretic religious groups with followers in the US and several European countries. This tea contains measurable amounts of the psychotropic indole N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), and beta-carboline alkaloids with MAO-inhibiting properties. In a previous report we described a profile of stimulant and psychedelic effects for ayahuasca as measured by subjective report self-assessment instruments. In the present study the cerebral bioavailability and time-course of effects of ayahuasca were assessed in humans by means of topographic quantitative-electroencephalography (q-EEG), a noninvasive method measuring drug-induced variations in brain electrical activity. METHODS: Two doses (one low and one high) of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca, equivalent to 0.6 and 0.85 mg DMT kg(-1) body weight, were administered to 18 healthy volunteers with previous experience in psychedelic drug use in a double-blind crossover placebo-controlled clinical trial. Nineteen-lead recordings were undertaken from baseline to 8 h after administration. Subjective effects were measured by means of the Hallucinogen Rating Scale (HRS). RESULTS: Ayahuasca induced a pattern of psychoactive effects which resulted in significant dose-dependent increases in all subscales of the HRS, and in significant and dose-dependent modifications of brain electrical activity. Absolute power decreased in all frequency bands, most prominently in the theta band. Mean absolute power decreases (95% CI) at a representative lead (P3) 90 min after the high dose were -20.20+/-15.23 microV2 and -2.70+/-2.21 microV2 for total power and theta power, respectively. Relative power decreased in the delta (-1.20+/-1.31% after 120 min at P3) and theta (-3.30+/-2.59% after 120 min at P3) bands, and increased in the beta band, most prominently in the faster beta-3 (1.00+/-0.88% after 90 min at P3) and beta-4 (0.30+/-0.24% after 90 min at P3) subbands. Finally, an increase was also seen for the centroid of the total activity and its deviation. EEG modifications began as early as 15-30 min, reached a peak between 45 and 120 min and decreased thereafter to return to baseline levels at 4-6 h after administration. CONCLUSIONS: The central effects of ayahuasca could be objectively measured by means of q-EEG, showing a time pattern which closely paralleled that of previously reported subjective effects. The modifications seen for the individual q-EEG variables were in line with those previously described for other serotonergic psychedelics and share some features with the profile of effects shown by pro-serotonergic and pro-dopaminergic drugs. The q-EEG profile supports the role of 5-HT2 and dopamine D2-receptor agonism in mediating the effects of ayahuasca on the central nervous system.  (+info)

Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics. (2/7)

The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system.  (+info)

A fatal intoxication following the ingestion of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine in an ayahuasca preparation. (3/7)

A case of a 25-year-old white male who was found dead the morning after consuming herbal extracts containing beta-carbolines and hallucinogenic tryptamines is presented. No anatomic cause of death was found at autopsy. Toxicologic analysis of the heart blood identified N,N-dimethyltryptamine (0.02 mg/L), 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (1.88 mg/L), tetrahydroharmine (0.38 mg/L), harmaline (0.07 mg/L), and harmine (0.17 mg/L). All substances were extracted by a single-step n-butyl chloride extraction following alkalinization with borate buffer. Detection and quantitation was performed using liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. The medical examiner ruled that the cause of death was hallucinogenic amine intoxication, and the manner of death was undetermined.  (+info)

Ayahuasca versus violence--a case report. (4/7)

We have limited resources available for the treatment and prevention of violent behavior. The usefulness of the most commonly used medications, namely the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor [SSRI] agents for the above purpose is a debated issue in the psychiatric literature. The aim of this case report is to add an ethnopharmacological perspective to the management of human aggression. Particularly, attention is called to the potential prosocial effect of the Amazonian beverage, ayahuasca--a decoctum, which has been used traditionally for multiple medico-religious purposes by numerous indigenous groups of the Upper Amazon--and has been found to be useful in crisis intervention, achieving redemption, as well as eliciting cathartic feelings with moral content.  (+info)

Banisteriopsis caapi, a unique combination of MAO inhibitory and antioxidative constituents for the activities relevant to neurodegenerative disorders and Parkinson's disease. (5/7)

 (+info)

Composition, standardization and chemical profiling of Banisteriopsis caapi, a plant for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders relevant to Parkinson's disease. (6/7)

 (+info)

Personality, psychopathology, life attitudes and neuropsychological performance among ritual users of Ayahuasca: a longitudinal study. (7/7)

 (+info)

Banisteriopsis is a genus of flowering plants in the family Malpighiaceae, native to tropical America. The most well-known species is Banisteriopsis caapi, which is used to prepare a psychoactive beverage called ayahuasca, also known as yage. Ayahuasca is traditionally used for spiritual and religious purposes by indigenous peoples of the Amazon basin.

The active components in Banisteriopsis caapi are harmala alkaloids, including harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine, which act as reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAOIs). When combined with DMT-containing plants, such as Psychotria viridis, the MAOIs allow the DMT to be orally active, resulting in a powerful psychedelic experience.

It is important to note that the use of ayahuasca and other substances containing DMT and MAOIs can have serious health consequences and should only be undertaken under the guidance of experienced practitioners in a safe and controlled setting.

Ethnopharmacology is a branch of pharmacology that focuses on the study of traditional medicines and their active components, as well as the cultural, historical, and social practices surrounding their use. It involves the interdisciplinary investigation of indigenous knowledge, beliefs, and customs related to medicinal plants and other natural remedies.

The main objectives of ethnopharmacology include:

1. Identifying and documenting traditional medicines and healing practices used by various cultures around the world.
2. Investigating the pharmacological properties and mechanisms of action of these traditional remedies, often through laboratory experiments and clinical trials.
3. Evaluating the safety, efficacy, and quality of traditional medicines to establish their potential therapeutic value in modern healthcare settings.
4. Promoting the sustainable use of natural resources and preserving indigenous knowledge and cultural heritage related to traditional medicine.
5. Fostering collaboration between scientists, healthcare professionals, and local communities to develop new drugs, therapies, and treatment approaches based on traditional medicines.

Examples of ethnopharmacological research include studying the active ingredients in Ayurvedic herbs, evaluating the effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formulations, and investigating the potential benefits of psychoactive plants used in shamanic rituals.

Harmane, also known as harmaline, is a naturally occurring psychoactive compound found in several plants, including the seeds of the Syrian rue (Peganum harmala) and the bark of the African pinwheel cactus (Adenium obesum). It is an alkaloid with beta-carboline structure.

In a medical context, harmaline has been studied for its potential effects on the central nervous system. It acts as a reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), which means it can increase the levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain by preventing their breakdown. This property has led to some research into its use as a treatment for depression and other neurological disorders, although it is not currently approved for medical use in this capacity due to potential side effects and toxicity concerns.

It's important to note that harmaline can have dangerous interactions with certain medications and foods, particularly those containing tyramine, which can lead to a hypertensive crisis. Therefore, its use should only be under the supervision of a qualified medical professional.

Harmine is defined medically as an alpha-carboline derivative that is present in various plants including the seeds of Peganum harmala and the bark of Banisteriopsis caapi. It functions as an monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) and has been used in traditional medicine for its psychoactive properties. It has also been studied for potential anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective effects.

Biflavonoids are a type of flavonoid, which are plant-based compounds with antioxidant properties. Biflavonoids are unique because they consist of two flavonoid molecules joined together. They can be found in various plants, including fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Some research suggests that biflavonoids may have potential health benefits, such as reducing inflammation and protecting against oxidative stress. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and determine the optimal dosages for human consumption.

Aerial parts of plants refer to the above-ground portions of a plant, including leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits. These parts are often used in medicine, either in their entirety or as isolated extracts, to take advantage of their medicinal properties. The specific components of aerial parts that are used in medicine can vary depending on the plant species and the desired therapeutic effects. For example, the leaves of some plants may contain active compounds that have anti-inflammatory or analgesic properties, while the flowers of others may be rich in antioxidants or compounds with sedative effects. In general, aerial parts of plants are used in herbal medicine to treat a wide range of conditions, including respiratory, digestive, and nervous system disorders, as well as skin conditions and infections.

Proanthocyanidins are a type of polyphenolic compound that are found in various plants, including fruits, vegetables, and bark. They are also known as condensed tannins or oligomeric procyanidins (OPCs). These compounds are characterized by their ability to form complex structures through the linkage of flavan-3-ol units.

Proanthocyanidins have been studied for their potential health benefits, which may include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cardiovascular protective effects. They have also been shown to have a positive impact on collagen stability, which may contribute to their potential role in promoting skin and joint health.

Foods that are rich in proanthocyanidins include grapes (and red wine), berries, apples, cocoa, and green tea. These compounds can be difficult for the body to absorb, but supplements containing standardized extracts of proanthocyanidins are also available.

It's important to note that while proanthocyanidins have shown promise in laboratory and animal studies, more research is needed to fully understand their potential health benefits and safety profile in humans. As with any supplement, it's always a good idea to talk to your healthcare provider before starting to take proanthocyanidins.

A plant stem is not typically defined in a medical context, but rather in the field of botany. However, I can certainly provide a general biological definition for you.

In plants, stems are organs that serve primarily as support structures, holding leaves, flowers, and fruits aloft where they can receive sunlight and exchange gases. They also act as conduits, transporting water, nutrients, and sugars made during photosynthesis between the roots and shoots of a plant.

The stem is usually composed of three main tissue systems: dermal, vascular, and ground. The dermal tissue system forms the outermost layer(s) of the stem, providing protection and sometimes participating in gas exchange. The vascular tissue system contains the xylem (which transports water and nutrients upward) and phloem (which transports sugars and other organic compounds downward). The ground tissue system, located between the dermal and vascular tissues, is responsible for food storage and support.

While not a direct medical definition, understanding the structure and function of plant stems can be relevant in fields such as nutrition, agriculture, and environmental science, which have implications for human health.

Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme found on the outer membrane of mitochondria in cells throughout the body, but primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and central nervous system. It plays a crucial role in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and dietary amines by catalyzing the oxidative deamination of monoamines. This enzyme exists in two forms: MAO-A and MAO-B, each with distinct substrate preferences and tissue distributions.

MAO-A preferentially metabolizes serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, while MAO-B is mainly responsible for breaking down phenethylamines and benzylamines, as well as dopamine in some cases. Inhibition of these enzymes can lead to increased neurotransmitter levels in the synaptic cleft, which has implications for various psychiatric and neurological conditions, such as depression and Parkinson's disease. However, MAO inhibitors must be used with caution due to their potential to cause serious adverse effects, including hypertensive crises, when combined with certain foods or medications containing dietary amines or sympathomimetic agents.

A beverage is a drink intended for human consumption. The term is often used to refer to any drink that is not alcoholic or, in other words, non-alcoholic beverages. This includes drinks such as water, juice, tea, coffee, and soda. However, it can also include alcoholic drinks like beer, wine, and spirits.

In a medical context, beverages are often discussed in relation to their impact on health. For example, sugary drinks like soda and energy drinks have been linked to obesity, diabetes, and other health problems. On the other hand, drinks like water and unsweetened tea can help to keep people hydrated and may have other health benefits.

It's important for individuals to be mindful of their beverage choices and to choose options that are healthy and support their overall well-being. This may involve limiting sugary drinks, choosing water or unsweetened tea instead of soda, and avoiding excessive caffeine intake.

Neurodegenerative diseases are a group of disorders characterized by progressive and persistent loss of neuronal structure and function, often leading to cognitive decline, functional impairment, and ultimately death. These conditions are associated with the accumulation of abnormal protein aggregates, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and genetic mutations in the brain. Examples of neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). The underlying causes and mechanisms of these diseases are not fully understood, and there is currently no cure for most neurodegenerative disorders. Treatment typically focuses on managing symptoms and slowing disease progression.

A catechin is a type of plant phenol and antioxidant found in various foods and beverages, such as tea, cocoa, and certain fruits and vegetables. Chemically, catechins are flavan-3-ols, which are a subclass of flavonoids. They have several potential health benefits, including reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Catechins are known to have anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, and antidiabetic properties. They can also help improve oral health by inhibiting the growth of harmful bacteria in the mouth. The most well-known catechin is epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is found in high concentrations in green tea and has been extensively studied for its potential health benefits.

In summary, a catechin is a type of antioxidant compound found in various plant-based foods and beverages that may have several health benefits, including reducing the risk of chronic diseases and improving oral health.

Alkaloids are a type of naturally occurring organic compounds that contain mostly basic nitrogen atoms. They are often found in plants, and are known for their complex ring structures and diverse pharmacological activities. Many alkaloids have been used in medicine for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and therapeutic properties. Examples of alkaloids include morphine, quinine, nicotine, and caffeine.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Plant leaves" are not a medical term, but rather a general biological term referring to a specific organ found in plants.

Leaves are organs that are typically flat and broad, and they are the primary site of photosynthesis in most plants. They are usually green due to the presence of chlorophyll, which is essential for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through photosynthesis.

While leaves do not have a direct medical definition, understanding their structure and function can be important in various medical fields, such as pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) or environmental health. For example, certain plant leaves may contain bioactive compounds that have therapeutic potential, while others may produce allergens or toxins that can impact human health.

Reference standards in a medical context refer to the established and widely accepted norms or benchmarks used to compare, evaluate, or measure the performance, accuracy, or effectiveness of diagnostic tests, treatments, or procedures. These standards are often based on extensive research, clinical trials, and expert consensus, and they help ensure that healthcare practices meet certain quality and safety thresholds.

For example, in laboratory medicine, reference standards may consist of well-characterized samples with known concentrations of analytes (such as chemicals or biological markers) that are used to calibrate instruments and validate testing methods. In clinical practice, reference standards may take the form of evidence-based guidelines or best practices that define appropriate care for specific conditions or patient populations.

By adhering to these reference standards, healthcare professionals can help minimize variability in test results, reduce errors, improve diagnostic accuracy, and ensure that patients receive consistent, high-quality care.

Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement. It is characterized by the death of dopamine-producing cells in the brain, specifically in an area called the substantia nigra. The loss of these cells leads to a decrease in dopamine levels, which results in the motor symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease. These symptoms can include tremors at rest, stiffness or rigidity of the limbs and trunk, bradykinesia (slowness of movement), and postural instability (impaired balance and coordination). In addition to these motor symptoms, non-motor symptoms such as cognitive impairment, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances are also common in people with Parkinson's disease. The exact cause of Parkinson's disease is unknown, but it is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. There is currently no cure for Parkinson's disease, but medications and therapies can help manage the symptoms and improve quality of life.

... acapulcencis Banisteriopsis basifixa Banisteriopsis calcicola Banisteriopsis caapi Banisteriopsis dugandii ... Banisteriopsis elegans Banisteriopsis ferruginea Banisteriopsis grandifolia Banisteriopsis harleyi Banisteriopsis irwinii ... Banisteriopsis krukoffii Banisteriopsis lucida Banisteriopsis metallicolor Banisteriopsis muricata Banisteriopsis nummifera ... Banisteriopsis pulchra Banisteriopsis quitensis Banisteriopsis stellaris Banisteriopsis valvata Banisteriopsis williamsii ...
It resembles Banisteriopsis membranifolia and Banisteriopsis muricata, both of which are related to caapi. The vine can grow up ... Other names include Banisteria quitensis, Banisteriopsis inebrians, and Banisteriopsis quitensis. Caapi is a giant vine with ... Banisteriopsis caapi, also known as, caapi, soul vine, or yagé (yage), is a South American liana of the family Malpighiaceae. ... Banisteriopsis caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) Morton". Plants of the World Online. Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, ...
2: 16 1912 Banisteriopsis elegans at The Plant List Banisteriopsis elegans at Tropicos v t e (Articles with short description, ... Banisteriopsis elegans is a species of flowering plants in the family Malpighiaceae. It is found in Colombia and Mexico. ...
Banisteriopsis campestris (A.Juss.) Little Banisteriopsis clausseniana (A.Juss.) W.R.Anderson et B.Gates Banisteriopsis ... gardneriana (A.Juss.) W.R.Anderson et B.Gates Banisteriopsis pubipetala (Juss) Cuatrec. Byrsonima crassa Nied. Byrsonima ...
Banisteriopsis membranifolia (A. Juss.) B. Gates Byrsonima laevigata (Poir.) DC. Byrsonima laxiflora Griseb. Byrsonima ...
Banisteriopsis oxyclada (A. Juss.) Gates Banisteriopsis pubipetala (A. Juss.) Gates Banisteriopsis stellaris (Gris.) Gates ...
Banisteriopsis also references Banister's name; the two genera are very close relatives and are sometimes merged under the ...
Lafoensia replicata Pohl Banisteriopsis adenopoda (A.Juss.) B.Gates Banisteriopsis campestris (A.Juss.) Settle Banisteriopsis ...
Sections of Banisteriopsis caapi vine are macerated and boiled alone or with leaves from any of a number of other plants, ... This word refers both to the liana Banisteriopsis caapi, and to the brew prepared from it. In the Quechua languages, aya means ... Ayahuasca is commonly made by the prolonged decoction of the stems of the Banisteriopsis caapi vine and the leaves of the ... Traditional ayahuasca brews are usually made with Banisteriopsis caapi as an MAOI, while dimethyltryptamine sources and other ...
... (THH) is a fluorescent indole alkaloid that occurs in the tropical liana species Banisteriopsis caapi. THH, ... Ayahuasca Coronaridine Callaway JC (June 2005). "Various alkaloid profiles in decoctions of Banisteriopsis caapi". Journal of ... "The alkaloids of Banisteriopsis caapi, the plant source of the Amazonian hallucinogen Ayahuasca, stimulate adult neurogenesis ...
Beta-carbolines Banisteriopsis lutea, Harmine, telepathine Banisteriopsis metallicolor, Harmine, telepathine Banisteriopsis ... "Silbrige Ayahuasca-Liane (Banisteriopsis muricata) im GIFTPFLANZEN.COMpendium". Giftpflanzen.com. Retrieved 2008-04-18. "Erowid ... Callaway, JC; Brito, GS; Neves, ES (2005). "Phytochemical analyses of Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis". Journal of ... Shepherdia pulchellum, Beta-carbolines Strychnos melinoniana, Beta-carbolines Strychnos usambarensis, Harman Banisteriopsis ...
It has occasionally been reported that C. antifebrile is used as a hallucinogen in the same manner as Banisteriopsis caapi, but ... The psychotropic Banisteriopsis among the Sibundoy of Colombia. Botanical Museum Leaflets Harvard University 21(5): 113-140. ... Banisteriopsis quitensis (at present, B. quitensis is regarded as a synonym of B. caapi, but Niedenzu treated them as separate ...
It occurs in a number of different plants, most notably the Syrian rue and Banisteriopsis caapi. Harmine reversibly inhibits ... In addition to B. caapi, at least three members of the Malpighiaceae contain harmine, including two more Banisteriopsis species ... 2015). "Banisteriopsis caapi, a Forgotten Potential Therapy for Parkinson's Disease?". Movement Disorders Clinical Practice. 3 ... Medically significant amounts of harmine occur in the plants Syrian rue and Banisteriopsis caapi. These plants also contain ...
It is made from two or more plants, one a woody vine (Ayahuasca vine or Jagube; generally Banisteriopsis caapi), and the others ...
"The Cultural Context of an Aboriginal Hallucinogen: Banisteriopsis Caapi.. Flesh of the Gods: The Ritual Use of Hallucinogens. ...
The extract of the liana Banisteriopsis caapi has been used by the tribes of the Amazon as an entheogen and was described as a ... In-vivo and rodent studies have shown that extracts of Banisteriopsis caapi and also Peganum harmala lead to striatal dopamine ... February 2010). "Banisteriopsis caapi, a unique combination of MAO inhibitory and antioxidative constituents for the activities ... Schwarz MJ, Houghton PJ, Rose S, Jenner P, Lees AD (June 2003). "Activities of extract and constituents of Banisteriopsis caapi ...
4 (banisteriopsis caapi). Schultes and Raffauf (1992) define yajé as "vine of the soul, Banisteriopsis Caapi" which is also ... This jungle vine is identified as being the plant Banisteriopsis caapi. Ott at 199-200. Lamb (1971, 3d 1974) at 23-40 (nixi ... The scientific name of the ayahuasca vine is Banisteriopsis caapi (at 22, 26). B. caapi when brewed for consumption is often ... The active ingredient in the Banisteriopsis species, especially B. caapi (i.e., ayahuasca), is harmine, as well as harmaline ...
... s from Banisteriopsis caapi have been used to treat Parkinson's disease[citation needed]. As a benzodiazepine ... Telepathine was originally thought to be the active chemical constituent of Banisteriopsis caapi, a key plant ingredient in the ... Harmala alkaloids are also found in the Banisteriopsis caapi vine, the key plant ingredient in the sacramental beverage ... Callaway JC, Brito GS & Neves ES (2005). Phytochemical analyses of Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis Journal of ...
Occasionally Banisteriopsis caapi is found mixed in with the snuff. Anadenanthera colubrina Cohoba List of plants of Caatinga ... Some tribes use yopo along with Banisteriopsis caapi to increase and prolong the visionary effects, creating an experience ... Some South American tribes have been documented to use various bean preparations along with Banisteriopsis caapi, an herb ... containing monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Typically Banisteriopsis caapi is chewed in the mouth while the Anadenanthera ...
Schwarz MJ, Houghton PJ, Rose S, Jenner P, Lees AD (June 2003). "Activities of extract and constituents of Banisteriopsis caapi ... which is traditionally brewed using Banisteriopsis caapi. Present at 3% by dry weight, the harmala alkaloids may be extracted ...
Psychotria viridis contains the psychedelic drug DMT, while Banisteriopsis caapi contains harmala alkaloids, which act as ... Amazonian tribes use the psychedelic infusion, ayahuasca, made from Psychotria viridis and Banisteriopsis caapi. ...
Hoasca tea made from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis (the only two ingredients used in the UDV's preparation of ... This beverage is made by boiling two plants, mariri (Banisteriopsis caapi) and chacrona (Psychotria viridis), both of which are ... The UDV prepares Hoasca tea using only the two plants Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. Third Way (magazine), ... Plants, animals, and humans containing DMT are not.[citation needed] Neither Banisteriopsis caapi nor Psychotria viridis are ...
Rodd, Robin (September 2002). "Snuff Synergy: Preparation, Use and Pharmacology of Yopo and Banisteriopsis Caapi Among the ...
"The alkaloids of Banisteriopsis caapi, the plant source of the Amazonian hallucinogen Ayahuasca, stimulate adult neurogenesis ...
Among the Ese Eja people, the plant is mixed with Banisteriopsis for use as an element in shamanistic rituals. According to ...
Harmaline found in Peganum harmala, Banisteriopsis caapi, and Passiflora incarnata is a reversible inhibitor of monoamine ...
Bonplandia (Corrientes) 8: 55, 1994 Harpalyce macedoi R.S.Cowan - Brittonia 10: 31,1958 Malpighiaceae Banisteriopsis macedoana ...
Traditional ayahuasca is made by brewing the MAOI-containing Banisteriopsis caapi vine with a DMT-containing plant, such as ...
Banisteriopsis caapi). The Pumé consider the tohé dance to be one of the central institutions of their culture along with their ...
It is known to forage on a number of plant species including Eugenia uniflora fruits, Banisteriopsis malifolia, and several ... B. lecheguana competes with the ant species Camponotus blandus for the plant Banisteriopsis maliflora, and, consequently, the ... on Banisteriopsis malifolia (Malpighiaceae): Extrafloral nectar consumption and herbivore predation in a tending ant system". ... lecheguana has been reported as a visitor of extrafloral nectaries on such species as Banisteriopsis malifolia. This wasp does ...
Banisteriopsis acapulcencis Banisteriopsis basifixa Banisteriopsis calcicola Banisteriopsis caapi Banisteriopsis dugandii ... Banisteriopsis elegans Banisteriopsis ferruginea Banisteriopsis grandifolia Banisteriopsis harleyi Banisteriopsis irwinii ... Banisteriopsis krukoffii Banisteriopsis lucida Banisteriopsis metallicolor Banisteriopsis muricata Banisteriopsis nummifera ... Banisteriopsis pulchra Banisteriopsis quitensis Banisteriopsis stellaris Banisteriopsis valvata Banisteriopsis williamsii ...
Ayahuasca is a decoction of the Amazonian vine Banisteriopsis caapi. Its chemical ingredients are known as harmalines. Some ...
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Banisteriopsis caapi (ayahuasca, soulvine, caapi). Family: Malpighiaceae. High Risk Traits:. *Elevation range exceeds 1000 m, ...
Banisteriopsis caapi plants needs muggy - tropical climate, the plant is drought and frost tender We cannot ship Banisteriopsis ... Banisteriopsis caapi, Yage plant, magical and medicinal plant Cultivation: ... We cannot ship Banisteriopsis caapi plants in freezing weather (yours or ours). We will hold it until the weather is favorable ... Botanical name: Banisteriopsis caapi. Common name: Yagé, ayahuasca. Family: Malpighiaceae. Native to: Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador ...
Aya Vine Drops Banisteriopsis Caapi. £20.00. - £50.00. Banisteriopsis caapi may help treat adult neurological disorders by ... Aya Vine Drops Banisteriopsis Caapi , Aya Vine Drops (Banisteriopsis Caapi) For Sale In The UK. ... There are no documented side-effects for micro-dosing Banisteriopsis Caapi alone. However, Banisteriopsis Caapi contains MAO ... SKU: N/A Category: PSYCHEDELIC DRUGS FOR SALE UK Tags: Aya Vine Drops (Banisteriopsis Caapi) for sale in Belfast, Aya Vine ...
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Banisteriopsis Caapi - Shredded Banisteriopsis Caapi Yellow (Cielo) from Brazil. ... Learn more about Banisteriopsis Caapi Yellow Brazil - Shredded / ... Banisteriopsis caapi is a South American vine from the ... Gender: Banisteriopsis. Species: caapi, inebriens, caapi, inebriens. The Herb here is strictly offered as a botanical specimen. ...
Below, youll find some typical scenarios in which weve found Caapi to be most beneficial, as well as recommendations for dosage, interactions, contraindications, and Caapis method of action. Dosage, Latency, Duration We recommend starting with a therapeutic dose of 64 mg, taken 1-2 times a day, and gradually adjusti
Banisteriopsis caapi seeds wanted By Rhyzobium, January 3, 2021. in Seed & Plant Sales ...
Banisteriopsis Caapi - The Banisteriopsis Caapi Red vine. For decades Caapi has been used as a means to e... ... Banisteriopsis Caapi - Red Vine (Muricata). Banisteriopsis caapi is a South American vine from the Malpighiaceae family. When ... The Banisteriopsis Caapi Red vine. For decades Caapi has been used as a means to enter divine worlds. This Caapi vine is ... Gender: Banisteriopsis. Species: caapi, inebriens, caapi, inebriens. The Herb here is strictly offered as a botanical specimen. ...
The red vine is often labelled as banisteriopsis caapi, but it is probably more accurately listed as […] ... Banisteriopsis caapi is a perennial vine native to the Amazon rainforest. The site of its thick, woody twists are quite ... Banisteriopsis Caapi (Yage, Peruvian Yellow) Vine Powder (WHOLESALE) Banisteriopsis Caapi "Sky Blue" (Red Yage) Whole Vine ... The red vine is often labelled as banisteriopsis caapi, but it is probably more accurately listed as banisteriopsis muricata. ...
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Experience the power of Banisteriopsis caapi vine with our potent B. Caapi 2.5:1 Tincture, sourced from the heart of the Amazon ... Experience the power of Banisteriopsis caapi vine with our potent B. Caapi 2.5:1 Tincture, sourced from the heart of the Amazon ...
... forming an aerenchyma layer not seen in Banisteriopsis. Besides the homogeneous structure of the pericarp of the Banisteriopsis ... formando um aerênquima não observado em Banisteriopsis. Além da homogeneidade estrutural do pericarpo das Banisteriopsis, todas ... Pericarp structure in Banisteriopsis C.B.Rob. and Diplopterys A.Juss. (Malpighiaceae): new data supporting generic segregation ... Os frutos de Banisteriopsis estudados apresentam estrutura muito similar entre si, enquanto que D. pubipetala mostra várias ...
Banisteriopsis caapi Viable Seeds, Brazil, Ethnobotanical Plant Seeds, Plants- Ethnobotanical, Plants and Seeds, Banisteriopsis ...
Huasca Combo (269), Banisteriopsis caapi (169), Mimosa tenuiflora (74), Mushrooms - Panaeolus cyanescens (185) : Small Group (2 ...
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Banisteriopsis caapi- Yellow Strain -BIG Hardwood Rooted Plant, Fl Grown, Ethnobotanical Rooted Plants, Plants- Ethnobotanical ... Banisteriopsis caapi- (Yellow Strain) -BIG Hardwood Rooted Plant. [Fl Grown]. $54.95. $35.10. ...
Ayahuasca is the Quechua name for a tea obtained from the vine Banisteriopsis caapi, and used for ritual purposes by the ... Ayahuasca is the Quechua name for a tea obtained from the vine Banisteriopsis caapi, and used for ritual purposes by the ...
Alabaster Banisteriopsis Chocolate. Lapis LSD Tung. Ignatia Nat Mur Aurum. Carcinosin Luna Phos Ac ...
Ayahuasca is often made from the plants Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. The chemicals in ayahuasca are of interest ...
Includes BOTH Ayahuasca Vine (Banisteriopsis caapi) & Chacruna Shrub (Psychotria viridis). The word "Ayahuasca", translated to ...
Plants include Salvia divinorum and Banisteriopsis caapi (ayahuasca vine). Seeds and cuttings can only be shipped in the U.S. ...
Scientific Name: Banisteriopsis caapi. The name Ayahuasca means "vine of the soul" in Quechuan, and the shamans of the ...
Still have my 18″ long spiral of my Banisteriopsis. Its been almost 21 years since we visited deeply together…... I had to ... Addiction / alberto varela / Amazon / art / Ayahuasca / banisteriopsis caapi / barquinha / chacruna / Cultivation / cultural ...
Ayahuasca also contains MAOIs, generally in the form of Banisteriopsis caapi or Syrian rue (harmine and harmaline).. ...
Made from the vine Banisteriopsis caapi and other plants, the exact ingredients can vary in depending on the location. Active ...
  • One well-known species is Banisteriopsis caapi, the source of ayahuasca. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ayahuasca is a decoction of the Amazonian vine Banisteriopsis caapi. (iceers.org)
  • The Ayahuasca plant can be brewed alone as Banisteriopsis Caapi, or in combination with the Chakruna plant which creates the psychoactive Ayahuasca often associated with South American Ayahuasca ceremonies, administered by Shamans for its purgative, cleansing and healing properties. (psychedelictherapystore.uk)
  • View cart "Banisteriopsis Caapi & Chacruna Ayahuasca Herbs" has been added to your cart. (trippypsychedelia.com)
  • Ayahuasca is the Quechua name for a tea obtained from the vine Banisteriopsis caapi, and used for ritual purposes by the indigenous populations of the Amazon. (nih.gov)
  • Ayahuasca is often made from the plants Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis. (webmd.com)
  • Plants include Salvia divinorum and Banisteriopsis caapi ( ayahuasca vine). (celebstoner.com)
  • Ayahuasca also contains MAOIs, generally in the form of Banisteriopsis caapi or Syrian rue (harmine and harmaline). (erowid.org)
  • Ayahuasca is produced by mixing two plants from the Amazon: the ayahuasca vine (Banisteriopsis caapi) and the chacruna shrub (Psychotria viridis). (eurekalert.org)
  • Ayahuasca is prepared from the Psychotria viridis bush that contains the serotonergic 2A receptor agonist N , N -dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and the Banisteriopsis caapi liana that contains β-carboline alkaloids such as harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine (Palhano-Fontes et al. (springer.com)
  • As for Diplopterys Cabrerana, another primary Ayahuasca plant, is a liana similar in appearance to Banisteriopsis Caapi. (ayahuasca.com)
  • It is also present in the intoxicating beverage " ayahuasca " made from Banisteriopsis caapi, and it may have oral effectiveness due to the presence of several naturally occuring inhibitors of catabolic deamination. (deoxy.org)
  • Made from the Amazonian vine Banisteriopsis caapi and the DMT-laden leaf of Psychotria viridis , ayahuasca is regarded as the embodiment of intelligent plant beings who can offer spiritual teachings and healing knowledge to those who respectfully engage with them. (simonandschuster.com)
  • Ayahuasca (Banisteriopsis cacao) contains at minimum three MAOI components. (homestay-chiangrai.com)
  • Ayahuasca is a psychoactive drink of Amazonian origin prepared from vine known as jagube and/or mariri (Banisteriopsis caapi) and chacrona bush (Psychotria viridis). (bvsalud.org)
  • Species include: Banisteriopsis acapulcencis Banisteriopsis basifixa Banisteriopsis calcicola Banisteriopsis caapi Banisteriopsis dugandii Banisteriopsis elegans Banisteriopsis ferruginea Banisteriopsis grandifolia Banisteriopsis harleyi Banisteriopsis irwinii Banisteriopsis krukoffii Banisteriopsis lucida Banisteriopsis metallicolor Banisteriopsis muricata Banisteriopsis nummifera Banisteriopsis pulchra Banisteriopsis quitensis Banisteriopsis stellaris Banisteriopsis valvata Banisteriopsis williamsii Except for ornamental purposes, growing, selling or possessing Banisteriopsis spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Banisteriopsis muricata (Cav. (colplanta.org)
  • The red vine is often labelled as banisteriopsis caapi, but it is probably more accurately listed as banisteriopsis muricata. (worldseedsupply.com)
  • Banisteriopsis is a genus of flowering plants in the family Malpighiaceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Banisteriopsis caapi is a South American vine from the Malpighiaceae family. (nextlevelsmart.nl)
  • Experience the power of Banisteriopsis caapi vine with our potent B. Caapi 2.5:1 Tincture, sourced from the heart of the Amazon rainforest. (mn-nice-ethnobotanicals.com)
  • That night there was a ceremony with a brew made from the Banisteriopsis caapi vine that shamans use for visioning and healing. (spiritofchange.org)
  • And many of these plants also have a history of being used within the context of Yage (banisteriopsis caapi) based potions. (ayahuasca.com)
  • A bebida é feita por meio da decocção conjunta das plantas Banisteriopsis Caapi e Psychotria Viridis. (usp.br)
  • The tea is derived by boiling the bark of the liana Banisteriopsis Caapi (B. Caapi) together with the leaves of Psychotria Viridis (P.Viridis). (usp.br)
  • It is however slightly misleading as a name, since the vine Banisteriopsis caapi is only one of two essential ingredients in the hallucinogenic brew, the other one being the leafy plant Psychotria viridis , which contains the powerful psychoactive dimethyltryptamine (DMT). (simonandschuster.com)
  • Molecular studies have indicated that some species of Banisteriopsis would be more appropriately placed in Diplopterys. (scielo.br)
  • Ingredients: 100% Banisteriopsis Caapi and Distilled Water. (psychedelictherapystore.uk)
  • Made from the vine Banisteriopsis caapi and other plants, the exact ingredients can vary in depending on the location. (cdc.gov)
  • Banisteriopsis Caapi is a natural MAO-inhibitor and should not be taken while taking any MAO or SSR inhibitors, antidepressants, anti-anxiety, anti-psychotic, sleeping meds, or any supplements or herbs that contain MAOIs or SSRIs and breast feeding or pregnant. (psychedelictherapystore.uk)
  • Banisteriopsis Caapi, or 'Aya Vine' as it is commonly known, does not contain DMT, which is only present in the Chakruna plant. (psychedelictherapystore.uk)
  • In fact, banisteriopsis caapi is a powerful shamanistic plant teacher in its own right. (ayahuasca.com)
  • Banisteriopsis caapi is a perennial vine native to the Amazon rainforest. (worldseedsupply.com)
  • Os frutos de Banisteriopsis estudados apresentam estrutura muito similar entre si, enquanto que D. pubipetala mostra várias peculiaridades. (scielo.br)
  • Banisteriopsis caapi, commonly known as Ayahuasca, is a perennial vine of the Malpighiaceae family that possesses intriguing botanical characteristics. (maya-ethnobotanicals.com)
  • Bungalow eleven is right next door to where the ayahuasca is made, using the vine Banisteriopsis caapi and the leaf Psychotria viridis. (medicinehunter.com)
  • Ayahuasca/yagé is a psychoactive brew made from the Banisteriopsis caapi vine. (dictionary.com)
  • Plants include Salvia divinorum and Banisteriopsis caapi ( ayahuasca vine). (celebstoner.com)
  • Made from the vine Banisteriopsis caapi and other plants, the exact ingredients can vary in depending on the location. (cdc.gov)
  • Harmine is an alkaloid found in the seed coats of a plant ( Peganum harmala ) of the Mediterranean region and the Middle East and also in a South American vine ( Banisteriopsis caapi ). (britannica.com)
  • That's because on my visits to the Amazon over the years, I had learned that the fundamental basis of the Shuara Jivaro religion is the interpretation of visions induced by natema, a tea made from the banisteriopsis vine. (escapeartist.com)
  • Natives of western Amazon add DMT- and N-methyltryptamine containing leaves of the vine D. cabrerana to a drink made from Banisteriopsis caapi , which contains beta-carbolines harmine and harmaline (Schultes 1977, Smith 1977). (drugwiki.net)
  • Ayahuasca (Quechua) is one of the psychoactive infusions or decoctions prepared from the Banisteriopsis (vine), native to the Amazon Rainforest (which is also called ayahuasca). (spiritindia.com)
  • Although there are numerous admixtures, two plants indigenous to the Amazonian rain forest, Banisteriopsis caapi (vine) and Psychotria viridis (bush), most often make up this psychoactive, synergistic compound. (spiritindia.com)
  • The key ingredient of Ayahuasca is the Banisteriopsis caapi vine. (quantumhealingpathways.com)
  • Ayahuasca (aya-spirit/dead, waska-vine/rope) or Yage (ya-hey) are native Amazonian names for the jungle vine Banisteriopsis Caapi, and the medicinal (and visionary) tea prepared from it. (ayahuasca.com)
  • There, in the verdant, biodiverse sanctuary, she consumed ayahuasca, an extract used in healing ceremonies that is typically brewed from stalks of the Banisteriopsis caapi vine and leaves of the Psychotria viridis ( chacruna ) shrub native to the Amazon Basin. (nautil.us)
  • A tea made in the Amazon from a plant ( Psychotria viridis ) containing the hallucinogen DMT, along with another vine ( Banisteriopsis caapi ) that contains an MAO inhibitor preventing the natural breakdown of DMT in the digestive system, which enhances serotonergic activity. (nih.gov)
  • Banisteriopsis Caapi vine only (no DMT). (mysticplanet.shop)
  • The resulting brew made from this prepared vine is clean, thick, dark, and sweet, with a tolerable flavor that is uncommon to Banisteriopsis Caapi ayahuasca. (mysticplanet.shop)
  • Ayahuasca is a psychoactive drink of Amazonian origin prepared from vine known as jagube and/or mariri (Banisteriopsis caapi) and chacrona bush (Psychotria viridis). (bvsalud.org)
  • Banisteriopsis is a genus of flowering plants in the family Malpighiaceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • The alkaloids of Banisteriopsis caapi, the plant source of the Amazonian hallucinogen Ayahuasca, stimulate adult neurogenesis in vitro. (wakingherbs.com)
  • Mimosa Hostilis (or mimosa tenuiflora) is often combined with MAO-inhibiting herbs such as Banisteriopsis Caapi to prepare the psychedelic Amazonian-brew ayahuasca. (goldmedications.se)
  • This paste was made with clean water and freshly harvested Banisteriopsis Caapi Yellow + Chacruna + Chaliponga. (matsesherbs.com)
  • banisteriopsis caapi also known as Ayahuasca Tea is Brew from the Amazon that is a mixture of Chacruna and Caapi also use for over 5000 years by the shamans or healers or teachers. (psychomegasociety.com)
  • Used as common names for the Malpighiaceous Banisteriopsis caapi , Banisteriopsis elegans, Banisteriopsis inebrians , Banisteriopsis Martiniana var. (erowid.org)
  • That means 1 ML of extract, contains about 3 grams of dried Banisteriopsis caapi. (wakingherbs.com)
  • It could even be that the use of tryptamine snuffs concurrent with the oral consumption of Banisteriopsis caapi , such as is documented with the Guahibo, may have been what inspired the addition of trypt-amine-containing plants to ayahuasca brews to begin with. (erowid.org)
  • Firstly, Traditional ayahuasca brews are usually made with Banisteriopsis caapi as an MAOI, while dimethyltryptamine sources and other admixtures vary from region to region. (psychomegasociety.com)
  • With distinctively elongated shape and traces of deep reddish-brown hues on its bark, Banisteriopsis caapi stands as an emblematic botanical specimen deeply entwined with the cultural practices associated with Ayahuasca ceremonies throughout the Amazon basin region. (maya-ethnobotanicals.com)
  • Banisteriopsis Caapi is a liana from the Malpighiacea family that is found mainly in South America. (elephantos.com)
  • However, in light of the well-documented Guahibo practice of chewing Banisteriopsis bark in conjunction with taking snuff, we cannot dismiss the possibility that the Piaroa might have added it to their snuffs (Torres & Repke 2006). (erowid.org)
  • Banisteriopsis caapi contains MAO inhibitors and can be very dangerous in combination with certain psychoactive substances and food , which are usually not harmful when taken by their own. (elephantos.com)
  • 27. Antioxidant compounds from Banisteriopsis argyrophylla leaves as α-amylase, α-glucosidase, lipase, and glycation inhibitors. (nih.gov)
  • Munay Intention is an essence of Banisteriopsis caapi yellow. (wakingherbs.com)
  • In some native Amazon cultures, shamans brew a ceremonial drink of Banisteriopsis Caapi without the addition of a DMT-containing ingredient. (elephantos.com)
  • Banisteriopsis Caapi is used to make ayahuasca - a brew consumed by shamans to get in touch with the spirits. (organicshroomsusa.com)