Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Blood Vessels: Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Joint Prosthesis: Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Penile Prosthesis: Rigid, semi-rigid, or inflatable cylindric hydraulic devices, with either combined or separate reservoir and pumping systems, implanted for the surgical treatment of organic ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Artificial Limbs: Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.Visual Prosthesis: Artificial device such as an externally-worn camera attached to a stimulator on the RETINA, OPTIC NERVE, or VISUAL CORTEX, intended to restore or amplify vision.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Balloon Occlusion: Use of a balloon CATHETER to block the flow of blood through an artery or vein.Prosthesis Fitting: The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping: Counterpulsation in which a pumping unit synchronized with the patient's electrocardiogram rapidly fills a balloon in the aorta with helium or carbon dioxide in early diastole and evacuates the balloon at the onset of systole. As the balloon inflates, it raises aortic diastolic pressure, and as it deflates, it lowers aortic systolic pressure. The result is a decrease in left ventricular work and increased myocardial and peripheral perfusion.Neural Prostheses: Medical devices which substitute for a nervous system function by electrically stimulating the nerves directly and monitoring the response to the electrical stimulation.Ossicular Prosthesis: An implant used to replace one or more of the ear ossicles. They are usually made of plastic, Gelfoam, ceramic, or stainless steel.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)Gastric Balloon: An inflatable device implanted in the stomach as an adjunct to therapy of morbid obesity. Specific types include the silicone Garren-Edwards Gastric Bubble (GEGB), approved by the FDA in 1985, and the Ballobes Balloon.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported: A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Lymphatic Vessels: Tubular vessels that are involved in the transport of LYMPH and LYMPHOCYTES.Retinal Vessels: The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.AmputeesMaxillofacial Prosthesis: A prosthetic appliance for the replacement of areas of the maxilla, mandible, and face, missing as a result of deformity, disease, injury, or surgery. When the prosthesis replaces portions of the mandible only, it is referred to as MANDIBULAR PROSTHESIS.Larynx, Artificial: A device, activated electronically or by expired pulmonary air, which simulates laryngeal activity and enables a laryngectomized person to speak. Examples of the pneumatic mechanical device are the Tokyo and Van Hunen artificial larynges. Electronic devices include the Western Electric electrolarynx, Tait oral vibrator, Cooper-Rand electrolarynx and the Ticchioni pipe.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Eye, Artificial: A ready-made or custom-made prosthesis of glass or plastic shaped and colored to resemble the anterior portion of a normal eye and used for cosmetic reasons. It is attached to the anterior portion of an orbital implant (ORBITAL IMPLANTS) which is placed in the socket of an enucleated or eviscerated eye. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Balloon Valvuloplasty: Widening of a stenosed HEART VALVE by the insertion of a balloon CATHETER into the valve and inflation of the balloon.Penile Implantation: Surgical insertion of cylindric hydraulic devices for the treatment of organic ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Prosthesis Coloring: Coloring, shading, or tinting of prosthetic components, devices, and materials.Neovascularization, Physiologic: The development of new BLOOD VESSELS during the restoration of BLOOD CIRCULATION during the healing process.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bioprosthesis: Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Aortic Valve Stenosis: A pathological constriction that can occur above (supravalvular stenosis), below (subvalvular stenosis), or at the AORTIC VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.Angioplasty, Balloon, Laser-Assisted: Techniques using laser energy in combination with a balloon catheter to perform angioplasty. These procedures can take several forms including: 1, laser fiber delivering the energy while the inflated balloon centers the fiber and occludes the blood flow; 2, balloon angioplasty immediately following laser angioplasty; or 3, laser energy transmitted through angioplasty balloons that contain an internal fiber.Silicone Elastomers: Polymers of silicone that are formed by crosslinking and treatment with amorphous silica to increase strength. They have properties similar to vulcanized natural rubber, in that they stretch under tension, retract rapidly, and fully recover to their original dimensions upon release. They are used in the encapsulation of surgical membranes and implants.Polyethylene Terephthalates: Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Carotid Artery Injuries: Damages to the CAROTID ARTERIES caused either by blunt force or penetrating trauma, such as CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; THORACIC INJURIES; and NECK INJURIES. Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1997, 18:251; J Trauma 1994, 37:473)Prosthesis Retention: Holding a PROSTHESIS in place.Dental Prosthesis Retention: Holding a DENTAL PROSTHESIS in place by its design, or by the use of additional devices or adhesives.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Mitral Valve Stenosis: Narrowing of the passage through the MITRAL VALVE due to FIBROSIS, and CALCINOSIS in the leaflets and chordal areas. This elevates the left atrial pressure which, in turn, raises pulmonary venous and capillary pressure leading to bouts of DYSPNEA and TACHYCARDIA during physical exertion. RHEUMATIC FEVER is its primary cause.Endothelial Cells: Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Amputation Stumps: The part of a limb or tail following amputation that is proximal to the amputated section.Denture, Partial, Fixed: A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Maxillofacial Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of an appliance for the replacement of areas of the maxilla, mandible, and face. When only portions of the mandible are replaced, it is referred to as MANDIBULAR PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Pulmonary Valve Stenosis: The pathologic narrowing of the orifice of the PULMONARY VALVE. This lesion restricts blood outflow from the RIGHT VENTRICLE to the PULMONARY ARTERY. When the trileaflet valve is fused into an imperforate membrane, the blockage is complete.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A: The original member of the family of endothelial cell growth factors referred to as VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTORS. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A was originally isolated from tumor cells and referred to as "tumor angiogenesis factor" and "vascular permeability factor". Although expressed at high levels in certain tumor-derived cells it is produced by a wide variety of cell types. In addition to stimulating vascular growth and vascular permeability it may play a role in stimulating VASODILATION via NITRIC OXIDE-dependent pathways. Alternative splicing of the mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor A results in several isoforms of the protein being produced.Chromium Alloys: Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Palatal Obturators: Appliances that close a cleft or fissure of the palate.Amputation: The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Capillaries: The minute vessels that connect the arterioles and venules.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Pericytes: Unique slender cells with multiple processes extending along the capillary vessel axis and encircling the vascular wall, also called mural cells. Pericytes are imbedded in the BASEMENT MEMBRANE shared with the ENDOTHELIAL CELLS of the vessel. Pericytes are important in maintaining vessel integrity, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Dilatation: The act of dilating.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Polyethylenes: Synthetic thermoplastics that are tough, flexible, inert, and resistant to chemicals and electrical current. They are often used as biocompatible materials for prostheses and implants.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Femoral NeoplasmsStapes Surgery: Surgery performed in which part of the STAPES, a bone in the middle ear, is removed and a prosthesis is placed to help transmit sound between the middle ear and inner ear.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Antigens, CD31: Cell adhesion molecules present on virtually all monocytes, platelets, and granulocytes. CD31 is highly expressed on endothelial cells and concentrated at the junctions between them.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Denture Retention: The retention of a denture in place by design, device, or adhesion.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Total Disc Replacement: The replacement of intervertebral discs in the spinal column with artificial devices. The procedure is done in the lumbar or cervical spine to relieve severe pain resulting from INTERVERTEBRAL DISC DEGENERATION.Balloon Embolectomy: The use of balloon CATHETERS to remove emboli by retraction of the balloon that is inflated behind the EMBOLUS.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Aortic Valve Insufficiency: Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).Dental Abutments: Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.Denture, Overlay: Removable prosthesis constructed over natural teeth or implanted studs.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Denture Design: The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Polyethylene: A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.Denture, Partial, Removable: A partial denture designed and constructed to be removed readily from the mouth.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Lymphatic System: A system of organs and tissues that process and transport immune cells and LYMPH.Mandibular Prosthesis: A prosthetic appliance for the replacement of areas of the mandible missing or defective as a result of deformity, disease, injury, or surgery.Orbital Implants: Rounded objects made of coral, teflon, or alloplastic polymer and covered with sclera, and which are implanted in the orbit following enucleation. An artificial eye (EYE, ARTIFICIAL) is usually attached to the anterior of the orbital implant for cosmetic purposes.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Jaw, Edentulous, Partially: Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Durapatite: The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Angiogenesis Inhibitors: Agents and endogenous substances that antagonize or inhibit the development of new blood vessels.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Aortic Coarctation: A birth defect characterized by the narrowing of the AORTA that can be of varying degree and at any point from the transverse arch to the iliac bifurcation. Aortic coarctation causes arterial HYPERTENSION before the point of narrowing and arterial HYPOTENSION beyond the narrowed portion.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Allantois: An extra-embryonic membranous sac derived from the YOLK SAC of REPTILES; BIRDS; and MAMMALS. It lies between two other extra-embryonic membranes, the AMNION and the CHORION. The allantois serves to store urinary wastes and mediate exchange of gas and nutrients for the developing embryo.Catheters: A flexible, tubular device that is used to carry fluids into or from a blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Laryngectomy: Total or partial excision of the larynx.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Heart Valve Diseases: Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Lymphangiogenesis: The formation of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Metal-on-Metal Joint Prostheses: Types of prosthetic joints in which both wear surfaces of the joint coupling are metallic.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Humeral Head: The portion of the upper rounded extremity fitting into the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA. (from Stedman, 27th ed)Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Coronary Restenosis: Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Capillary Permeability: The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Mice, Inbred C57BLAngiopoietin-1: The first to be discovered member of the angiopoietin family. It may play a role in increasing the sprouting and branching of BLOOD VESSELS. Angiopoietin-1 specifically binds to and stimulates the TIE-2 RECEPTOR. Several isoforms of angiopoietin-1 occur due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of its mRNA.Receptor, TIE-2: A TIE receptor tyrosine kinase that is found almost exclusively on ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. It is required for both normal embryonic vascular development (NEOVASCULARIZATION, PHYSIOLOGIC) and tumor angiogenesis (NEOVASCULARIZATION, PATHOLOGIC).Arterioles: The smallest divisions of the arteries located between the muscular arteries and the capillaries.Endothelial Growth Factors: These growth factors are soluble mitogens secreted by a variety of organs. The factors are a mixture of two single chain polypeptides which have affinity to heparin. Their molecular weight are organ and species dependent. They have mitogenic and chemotactic effects and can stimulate endothelial cells to grow and synthesize DNA. The factors are related to both the basic and acidic FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTORS but have different amino acid sequences.Speech, Esophageal: A method of speech used after laryngectomy, with sound produced by vibration of the column of air in the esophagus against the contracting cricopharyngeal sphincter. (Dorland, 27th ed)Jaw, Edentulous: The total absence of teeth from either the mandible or the maxilla, but not both. Total absence of teeth from both is MOUTH, EDENTULOUS. Partial absence of teeth in either is JAW, EDENTULOUS, PARTIALLY.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2: A 200-230-kDa tyrosine kinase receptor for vascular endothelial growth factors found primarily in endothelial and hematopoietic cells and their precursors. VEGFR-2 is important for vascular and hematopoietic development, and mediates almost all endothelial cell responses to VEGF.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Atherectomy, Coronary: Percutaneous transluminal procedure for removing atheromatous plaque from the coronary arteries. Both directional (for removing focal atheromas) and rotational (for removing concentric atheromatous plaque) atherectomy devices have been used.Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Neointima: The new and thickened layer of scar tissue that forms on a PROSTHESIS, or as a result of vessel injury especially following ANGIOPLASTY or stent placement.Kyphoplasty: Procedures to restore vertebrae to their original shape following vertebral compression fractures by inflating a balloon inserted into the vertebrae, followed by removal of the balloon and injection of BONE CEMENTS to fill the cavity.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Amputation, Traumatic: Loss of a limb or other bodily appendage by accidental injury.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors: A family of angiogenic proteins that are closely-related to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR A. They play an important role in the growth and differentiation of vascular as well as lymphatic endothelial cells.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Collateral Circulation: Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Venules: The minute vessels that collect blood from the capillary plexuses and join together to form veins.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.
... blood vessel prosthesis implantation MeSH E04.650.210 --- breast implantation MeSH E04.650.220 --- cochlear implantation MeSH ... balloon MeSH E04.100.814.050.060.080 --- angioplasty, balloon, laser-assisted MeSH E04.100.814.050.060.100 --- angioplasty, ... blood vessel prosthesis implantation MeSH E04.100.814.300 --- cerebral revascularization MeSH E04.100.814.445 --- embolectomy ... maxillofacial prosthesis implantation MeSH E04.545.510.500 --- mandibular prosthesis implantation MeSH E04.545.550 --- oral ...
... or the visceral vessels can be separately revascularized. Because of collateral blood flow from the SMA via the marginal artery ... June 1999). "Descending aorta substitution with expandable ends prosthesis. Case report". J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino). 40 (3): ... balloon perfusion catheter placement in the visceral arteries, selective spinal drainage and cold crystalloid renal perfusion. ... If visceral vessels are involved in the diseased aortic segment, a branched graft can be used with branches sewn directly to ...
Balloon septostomy. creation of septal defect in heart Blalock-Hanlon procedure. shunt from heart chamber to blood vessel. ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... Cardiac vessels. CHD. Angioplasty. Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent ... for transposition of great vessels Arterial switch operation. Mustard procedure. Senning procedure. for univentricular defect ...
Balloon septostomy. creation of septal defect in heart Blalock-Hanlon procedure. shunt from heart chamber to blood vessel. ... Many other types of prostheses are used.. *creation of a stoma, a permanent or semi-permanent opening in the body ... shunt from blood vessel to blood vessel. systemic circulation to pulmonary artery shunt Blalock-Taussig shunt. SVC to the right ... Blood or blood expanders may be administered to compensate for blood lost during surgery. Once the procedure is complete, ...
Balloon vaginoplasty[edit]. In this procedure, a foley catheter is laparoscopically inserted to the rectouterine pouch ... the repair of a cystocele using a graft or prosthesis[3][6] ... Blood vessels. *Angiogenesis *Intussusception. *Vasculogenesis ...
... incision and then tuck the reservoir into the retropubic space while carefully avoiding the juxtaposed nerves and blood vessels ... Retropubic Dilation With a Foley Catheter Balloon: A Novel Technique for Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Placement. The Journal of ... Retropubic Dilation With a Foley Catheter Balloon: A Novel Technique for Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Placement. J Am Osteopath ... Patient Status After Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Placement Using a Foley Catheter Balloon for Retropubic Dilation (N=15) ...
Balloon Dilation. Blood Vessel Prosthesis*. Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation / instrumentation*. Coagulants / ... Regional Blood Flow. Salvage Therapy. Stents*. Subclavian Artery / injuries*, physiopathology, radiography. Thrombin / ...
Balloon Occlusion. Blood Vessel Prosthesis*. Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation / adverse effects*, instrumentation. ... Prosthesis Design. Recurrence. Renal Dialysis. Reoperation. Stents*. Thrombin / administration & dosage*. Treatment Failure. ...
The inflated balloon is deflated and regroomed to a low profile configuration in the body lumen, and the balloon catheter is ... and has a regrooming sheath member configured to slidably receive the deflated balloon therein to regroom the balloon. ... The balloon catheter has a recovery distal tip for collapsing an expanded device, ... A method of using a balloon catheter to perform a medical procedure at a treatment site in a patients body lumen and to ...
Also provided is a method for deploying the stents of the present invention within tubular organs, blood vessels, or other ... blood vessels, or other tubular body lumens. Such stents comprise a stent body comprising an elastic material, the stent body ... A61F2/00-Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body ... A61F2/00-Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body ...
Angioplasty, Balloon. *Arteriovenous Anastomosis. *Bioprosthesis. *Blood Vessel Prosthesis. *Carotid Artery Diseases ( ...
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary * Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation / adverse effects * Coronary Angiography * Coronary ...
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation * Heart Block * Myocardial Infarction * Balloon Angioplasty (Coronary Angioplasty) ...
... cover to portions of the vessel on respective sides of the aneurysm to preclude the ingress of blood between the outer balloon ... The prosthesis basically comprises an expandable sleeve, an outer balloon, a pair of sealing rings or a sealing cover, a pair ... The anchoring stents fixedly secure the prosthesis to the interior of the vessel, with the ends of the sleeve being sealed by ... from between the outer balloon and the interior of the vessel at the situs of the aneurysm. ...
An intraluminal prosthesis comprising polymeric material is immersed in a mixture of carrier fluid and pharmacological agent(s ... Intraluminal prostheses and methods of impregnating same with pharmacological agents for delivery within a body of a subject ... and pharmacological agent is pressurized for a time sufficient to cause the polymeric material of the intraluminal prosthesis ... in the treatment of occluded or partially occluded arteries and other blood vessels. As an example of a balloon angioplasty ...
... having a higher radiopacity than the stent provides for more precise placement and post-procedural visualization in a vessel, ... Recently, transluminal prostheses have been widely used in the medical arts for implantation in blood vessels, biliary ducts, ... In this procedure, the angioplasty balloon is inflated within the stenosed vessel, or body passageway, in order to shear and ... and a first diameter for insertion into a lumen of a vessel and a second diameter for anchoring in the lumen of the vessel and ...
... blood vessel prosthesis implantation MeSH E04.650.210 --- breast implantation MeSH E04.650.220 --- cochlear implantation MeSH ... balloon MeSH E04.100.814.050.060.080 --- angioplasty, balloon, laser-assisted MeSH E04.100.814.050.060.100 --- angioplasty, ... blood vessel prosthesis implantation MeSH E04.100.814.300 --- cerebral revascularization MeSH E04.100.814.445 --- embolectomy ... maxillofacial prosthesis implantation MeSH E04.545.510.500 --- mandibular prosthesis implantation MeSH E04.545.550 --- oral ...
The prosthesis/stent combination assures a secure anchor of the prosthesis 10 to the inner lumen surface of the blood vessel ... The ends of the prosthesis include collapsible circular stents or annular balloons affixed thereto. The stents expand to seal ... Access port of artificial blood vessels and artificial blood vessels US9737400B2 (en) 2010-12-14. 2017-08-22. Colibri Heart ... The prosthesis of the present invention may be used in a method of implanting a prosthesis in a body vessel, comprising: * ...
A tubular prosthesis may be implanted in blood vessels, particularly to protect aneurysms. ... The sealing layer occludes at least a circumferential band within an interface region between the prosthesis body and the inner ... The sealing layer may be introduced prior to or simultaneously with the prosthesis body. ... A tubular prosthesis is implanted at a target location within a body lumen by transluminally placing and embedding an ...
... a method for delivering into the vasculature a straight or bifurcated stent or prosthesis; a method of treating and ... An introducer for delivering into the vasculature a straight or bifurcated stent or prosthesis; ... b) inflating said balloon to at least partially block blood flow in said blood vessel; ... A balloon inflation conduit 110 a connects balloon inflation orifice 110 to balloon inflation site 111 (FIG. 8(e)). Balloon 107 ...
A method for making such stent prosthesis is also disclosed. In the method, at least one tube or mandrel is placed in contact ... A method of treating an afflicted area of a body lumen by implanting the stent prosthesis is also disclosed. ... An implantable stent prosthesis comprises a sidewall and at least one channel for containing a biologically active material. ... to open blocked vessels and restore normal levels of blood flow. However, although once a blocked vessel is opened, the treated ...
A stent-graft prosthesis includes a generally tubular outer PTFE layer, a generally tubular helical stent, a generally tubular ... engagement and friction by the outward radial force imparted on the wall of the blood vessel by the self-expanding or balloon ... A stent-graft prosthesis is particularly useful to isolate aneurysms or other blood vessel abnormalities from normal blood ... Embodiments hereof also relate to a stent-graft prosthesis for implantation within a blood vessel. The stent-graft prosthesis ...
... stent delivery by simultaneous kissing balloon inflation, and optimal main branch (MB) and SB ostium scaffolding... ... blood vessel prosthesis*stents*prosthesis design*reoperation*aortic rupture*vascular patency*aortic diseases*risk assessment*x ... blood vessel prosthesis implantation. Summary. Summary: Surgical insertion of synthetic or biological material to repair ... Vascular smooth muscle enhances functionality of tissue-engineered blood vessels in vivo. Lucas P Neff. Wake Forest Institute ...
"Restenosis" refers to the reoccurrence of stenosis in a blood vessel or heart valve after it has been treated (as by balloon ... 0022] There is a need to develop a prosthesis for treating peripheral blood vessels that possesses the desirable qualities of a ... Stents implanted in peripheral blood vessels, or blood vessels outside the coronary arteries, e.g., iliac, femoral, popliteal, ... support a peripheral blood vessel; a low crossing profile; and a limited presence in the blood vessel. There is also a need for ...
Pulmonary Hypertension: increased pressure in the blood vessels within the lung.. Septal Hypertrophy: abnormal enlargement or ... Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty (BAV), also known as Valvotomy: inflation of a balloon positioned across a narrowed (stenotic) ... including coronary anatomy and size of the surgical prosthesis. For very small surgical prosthesis (≤19 mm), SAVR is preferred ... Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty (PBMV): inflation of a balloon positioned across a narrowed (stenotic) mitral valve ...
Methods of use are also provided, wherein the main portion of the self-expanding structure, when deployed in a trunk vessel, ... may be used to anchor the branch portion in a branch vessel. ... Balloon device for implanting an aortic intraluminal prosthesis ... within a vessel and gradually narrows the vessel to the degree that the vessel can no longer supply an adequate flow of blood. ... A number of vascular prostheses have been developed to re-expand and retain the patency of such afflicted vessels, for example ...
Class name: Arterial prosthesis (i.e., blood vessel) stent structure having multiple connected bodies Publication date: 2011-11 ... Then the stent, disposed between ends of the balloon, is thermally insulated from the balloons ends. The ends of the balloon ... direction of travel through a vessel, that the stent-balloon is able to resist before dislodging the stent from the balloon. ... 20. The medical device of claim 19, wherein the balloon is a PEBAX balloon.. Description:. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION [0001] 1 ...
Adult; Aged; Americas; *Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary; Australia; Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation; Combined Modality ...
Intracoronary 166Holmium brachytherapy combined with cutting balloon angioplasty for the treatment of in-stent restenosis, doi ... Aged ; Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary* ; Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation ; Brachytherapy* ; Combined Modality Therapy ; ... For irradiation, a balloon approximately 10 mm longer than the initially deployed stent was filled with liquid 166Ho and placed ... Hence, in this study, we evaluated the efficacy, feasibility and safety of cutting balloon angioplasty followed by ...
... the diameter of a blood vessel is measured by first inflating a balloon catheter within the lumen until the balloon diameter ... The balloon includes at least one measurement element which indicates the expanded balloon cross-sectional area, circumference ... such as the diameter of a blood vessel. According to one exemplary method, ... The prosthesis is then partially released from the catheter into a blood vessel or other body lumen to allow the prosthesis to ...
  • Consisting of 2 corporal cylinders, 1 pump, and a fluid-filled reservoir, the prosthesis is placed by blunt dissection into the retropubic space. (jaoa.org)
  • The dissection for the reservoir is performed blindly into a space juxtaposed with nerves, vessels, and the bladder. (jaoa.org)
  • The penoscrotal approach allows surgeons to easily place all components of the IPP through a well-hidden incision and then tuck the reservoir into the retropubic space while carefully avoiding the juxtaposed nerves and blood vessels. (jaoa.org)
  • The invention of this application relates generally to medical devices and methods of use in vessels, ducts or lumens of living beings, and more particularly to expandable prostheses and methods of use for the treatment of aneurysmal arterial disease. (google.com)
  • In partial cases of arterial rupture, shock due to the rapid and excessive blood loss typically occurs. (docplayer.net)
  • The effect of sodium thiopental on mean arterial blood pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass was assessed in 150 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] after LMA insertion . (symptoma.com)
  • The stents, now Arterial's big seller (77% of revenues), are made of a stainless steel mesh fitted over a balloon. (siliconinvestor.com)
  • Two landmark studies have shown that slotted tube, stainless steel, balloon-expandable stents could significantly decrease restenosis rates in selected lesions (1,2) . (onlinejacc.org)
  • Self-expanding stents, in addition, must be prepared from metals with sufficient elasticity so they can be compressed and then expanded and retain sufficient radial hoop strength to prevent vessel recoil or closure once in place (3) . (onlinejacc.org)
  • When inserting stents to restore blood flow in heart disease patients, radial access has fewer complications and should be the default approach over femoral access, according to researchers. (cathlabdigest.com)
  • There is an increased risk of stroke in transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedures, as compared to balloon aortic valvuloplasty or other standard treatments. (edwards.com)
  • The percutaneous insertion of aortic valve prostheses are quickly becoming a viable treatment option for high-risk cases, while increasing experience and improved instrumentation will lead to its adoption in elective cases as well. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • In a cohort of such patients, the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) trial recently showed that transcatheter aortic valve replacement increased 12-month survival by an absolute margin of 20% but was associated with increased risks of vascular complications and stroke compared with standard therapy, which included balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the majority of subjects. (ahajournals.org)
  • Aortic valve replacement for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is a Class I ACC/AHA recommendation (Level of Evidence B). The surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) was the only available treatment option for severe AS until 2002, when Cribier et al described the first successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with a balloon-expandable valve by an antegrade, transseptal approach through the femoral vein. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The invention provides methods and apparatus for determining cross-sectional dimensions of body lumens, such as the diameter of a blood vessel. (google.ca)
  • 1915 ---N. Richards and C. Drinker (Philadelphia) report use of a screen oxygenator for perfusion of isolated organs in which venous blood flows by gravity down a cloth in an oxygen-rich atmosphere. (gmu.edu)
  • Better determination of the characteristics influencing biomaterial function will allow development of low-flow prostheses for small diameter arteries and venous reconstruction. (springer.com)
  • This can lead to inadequate blood supply to the spinal cord, resulting in paraplegia, when repairing thoracic aneurysms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surgical insertion of synthetic or biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels. (labome.org)
  • In patients presenting with a number of different conditions affecting the heart and/or blood vessels, it may be possible to combine surgical treatments in such a way as to perform them as part of one single procedure. (immanuel.de)
  • Congenital or surgical connection between two hollow organs or blood vessels e.g. (corience.org)
  • The penoscrotal approach allows surgeons to easily place all components of the IPP through a well-hidden incision and then tuck the reservoir into the retropubic space while carefully avoiding the juxtaposed nerves and blood vessels. (jaoa.org)
  • Modern minimally invasive techniques today allow for a very tissue-preserving intervention as nerves and blood vessels running through the spinal canal remain unhurt. (apex-spine.com)
  • Each implant was approached using a penoscrotal incision, and the retropubic space was dilated with a 30-mL Foley catheter balloon filled to 100-mL capacity before reservoir placement. (jaoa.org)
  • An expander implant is an empty bag with a small valve, like a balloon. (cancer.ca)
  • The use of balloon inflation to implant a prosthesis for intraluminal repair has proven to be an invaluable technique,'' said Jim Fitzsimmons, president and chief executive officer. (siliconinvestor.com)
  • Thanks to progress in the implant development modern spinal disk prostheses are optimally suited for anatomical and functional conditions within the cervical spine. (apex-spine.com)
  • The coarse capsule, which is formed instead of a natural, tender coating, contracts with time, sometimes over the course of several years, and the inherent implant becomes as hard as a bulging balloon in its leather covering. (blogspot.com)
  • However, it may be said that said controllability for catheters with respect to blood vessels can be secured by simultaneously using a catheter introducing guide wire which is highly flexible and which will not form a fixed bend (a so-called bending habit) even if subjected to an operating external force, said guide wire being inserted into a catheter and operated for piloting the catheter. (google.de)
  • Consisting of 2 corporal cylinders, 1 pump, and a fluid-filled reservoir, the prosthesis is placed by blunt dissection into the retropubic space. (jaoa.org)
  • The dissection for the reservoir is performed blindly into a space juxtaposed with nerves, vessels, and the bladder. (jaoa.org)
  • 1913 --- J.J. Abel, L.C. Rowntree and B.B. Turner at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore first describe in vivo hemodialysis of rabbits, dogs (and later a 400 ml blood exchange in a human) with an artificial kidney made of collodion and using hirudin anticoagulant. (gmu.edu)
  • Not only breast implants but also other implants, such as artificial hip joints, pacemakers, blood vessel prostheses, and stabilizing nets (for example, hernia operations) may be affected by a contracting fibrous capsule. (blogspot.com)
  • implanting a THV that is too small may lead to paravalvular leak, migration or embolization, whereas implanting a THV that is too large may lead to residual gradient (patient-prosthesis mismatch) or annular rupture. (edwards.com)
  • A stent or other intraluminal medical device having markers formed from housings integral with the stent and marker inserts having a higher radiopacity than the stent provides for more precise placement and post-procedural visualization in a vessel, by increasing the radiopacity of the stent under X-ray. (google.com.au)
  • Their device relies on a thin film of blood and included heating and cooling chambers, manometers, and sampling outlets, which permits monitoring of temperature, pressure, and blood gases during perfusion. (gmu.edu)
  • 1928 --- H.H. Dale and E.H.J. Schuster (Hampstead, UK) describe a double perfusion pump (for pulmonary and systemic circulations) relying on compressible diaphragms to circulate defibrinated blood during organ perfusion experiments. (gmu.edu)
  • assess myocardial perfusion (blood flow to the heart) and myocardial infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction of blood flow). (radiologyinfo.org)
  • An axillary-bifemoral bypass is another type of vascular bypass used to treat aortic pathology, however it is not true open aortic surgery as it reconstructs the flow of blood to the legs from the arm, rather than in the native location of the aorta. (wikipedia.org)
  • icleThe left ventricle gives a powerful pumping actionto send the oxygen enriched in blood into the aorta. (writework.com)
  • Blood goes through this tube to a machine, which serves the heart lung process like in the no ... ry involves taking a vein from some other part of your body (like your leg) and attaching it to the aorta to reroute blood flow past the blocked area. (writework.com)