Rupture of bacterial cells due to mechanical force, chemical action, or the lytic growth of BACTERIOPHAGES.
The natural bactericidal property of BLOOD due to normally occurring antibacterial substances such as beta lysin, leukin, etc. This activity needs to be distinguished from the bactericidal activity contained in a patient's serum as a result of antimicrobial therapy, which is measured by a SERUM BACTERICIDAL TEST.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Switzerland" is a country located in Europe and not a term used in medical definitions. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I'd be happy to help answer those!
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Systems consisting of two enzymes, a modification methylase and a restriction endonuclease. They are closely related in their specificity and protect the DNA of a given bacterial species. The methylase adds methyl groups to adenine or cytosine residues in the same target sequence that constitutes the restriction enzyme binding site. The methylation renders the target site resistant to restriction, thereby protecting DNA against cleavage.
The study of those aspects of energy and matter in terms of elementary principles and laws. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
"In the context of medicine, 'History' refers to the detailed narrative account of a patient's past and present health conditions, symptoms, treatments, lifestyle, and other relevant information, obtained through interviewing the patient or their significant others."
Methylases that are specific for CYTOSINE residues found on DNA.
The collection, preparation, and distribution of news and related commentary and feature materials through such media as pamphlets, newsletters, newspapers, magazines, radio, motion pictures, television, and books. While originally applied to the reportage of current events in printed form, specifically newspapers, with the advent of radio and television the use of the term has broadened to include all printed and electronic communication dealing with current affairs.

Complete genomic sequence of the lytic bacteriophage DT1 of Streptococcus thermophilus. (1/1064)

Streptococcus thermophilus lytic bacteriophage DT1, isolated from a mozzarella whey, was characterized at the microbiological and molecular levels. Phage DT1 had an isometric head of 60 nm and a noncontractile tail of 260 x 8 nm, two major structural proteins of 26 and 32 kDa, and a linear double-stranded DNA genome with cohesive ends at its extremities. The host range of phage DT1 was limited to 5 of the 21 S. thermophilus strains tested. Using S. thermophilus SMQ-301 as a host, phage DT1 had a burst size of 276 +/- 36 and a latent period of 25 min. The genome of phage DT1 contained 34,820 bp with a GC content of 39.1%. Forty-six open reading frames (ORFs) of more than 40 codons were found and putative functions were assigned to 20 ORFs, mostly in the late region of phage DT1. Comparative genomic analysis of DT1 with the completely sequenced S. thermophilus temperate phage O1205 revealed two large homologous regions interspersed by two heterologous segments. The homologous regions consisted of the early replication genes, the late morphogenesis genes, and the lysis cassette. The divergent segments contained the DNA packaging machinery, the major structural proteins, and remnants of a lysogeny module.  (+info)

Purification and properties of bacteriolytic enzymes from Bacillus licheniformis YS-1005 against Streptococcus mutans. (2/1064)

To find a novel lytic enzyme against cariogenic Streptococci, strains showing strong lytic activity have been screened from soil using Streptococcus mutans. A strain identified as Bacillus licheniformis secreted two kinds of lytic enzymes, which were purified by methanol precipitation, CM-cellulose chromatography, gel filtration, and hydroxyapatite chromatography. The molecular weights of these two enzymes, L27 and L45, were 27,000 and 45,000, respectively. Optimum pH and temperature of both enzymes for lytic activity were pH 8 and 37 degrees C. L27 and L45 digest the peptide linkage between L-Ala and D-Glu in peptidoglycan of Streptococcus mutans. The lytic activity was highly specific for Streptococcus mutans, suggesting their potential use as a dental care product.  (+info)

Structural and functional analysis of pCI65st, a 6.5 kb plasmid from Streptococcus thermophilus NDI-6. (3/1064)

The 6.5 kb cryptic plasmid pCI65st from Streptococcus thermophilus NDI-6, a strain isolated from the Indian fermented milk dahi, was subcloned and sequenced. Five putative ORFs were identified. ORF1 could encode a 315 aa polypeptide almost identical to the RepA protein of previously sequenced S. thermophilus plasmids, indicating that pCI65st is one of the pC194 group of small gram-positive rolling-circle plasmids. ORFs 2 and 4 were virtually identical and could specify proteins of approximately 150 aa with significant similarity to the small heat-shock proteins described from a variety of gram-positive bacteria. ORF3 could encode a 415 aa protein similar to enolase, an enzyme involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. ORF5 could encode a 412 aa protein which had high similarity to the HsdS (specificity) proteins of type I restriction-modification systems. Variants of strain NDI-6 which lacked pCI65st were readily isolated after subculture of the parent strain at 32 degrees C. The plasmid-bearing parent culture was significantly more resistant to a temperature shift from 42 degrees C to 62 degrees C than its plasmid-free variant and expressed proteins which corresponded with the predicted translation products from ORF2 and ORF4. In addition, plasmid-free mutants were lysed in broth by bacteriophages to which the parent culture was resistant.  (+info)

Partial characterization of a major autolysin from Mycobacterium phlei. (4/1064)

Autolytic enzyme profiles of fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria were examined using SDS-PAGE zymography with incorporated mycobacterial peptidoglycan sacculi as substrate. Each species tested (Mycobacterium phlei, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium aurum, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium kansasii) appeared to produce a different set of enzymes on the basis of differing number and molecular masses. A major autolysin from M. phlei was purified to apparent homogeneity by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, preparative gel electrophoresis and Mono Q FPLC. This enzyme had an estimated molecular mass of 38 kDa, an isoelectric point of 5.5 and a pH optimum of pH 7.5. Digestion of purified peptidoglycan by the enzyme resulted in the appearance of reducing sugars, suggesting that the 38 kDa autolysin is a beta-glycosidase. Partial internal amino acid sequence of the autolysin was determined and should facilitate identification, cloning and overexpression of the encoding gene.  (+info)

Bacillus subtilis 168 gene lytF encodes a gamma-D-glutamate-meso-diaminopimelate muropeptidase expressed by the alternative vegetative sigma factor, sigmaD. (5/1064)

A gamma-D-glutamate-meso-diaminopimelate muropeptidase was detected in the vegetative growth phase of Bacillus subtilis 168. It is encoded by the monocistronic lytF operon expressed by the alternative vegetative sigma factor, sigmaD. Sequence analysis of LytF revealed two domains, an organization common to exoproteins of B. subtilis as well as to those from other organisms. The N-terminal domain contains a fivefold-repeated motif attributed to cell wall binding, whilst the C-terminal domain is probably endowed with the catalytic activity. Overexpression of LytF allowed its purification and biochemical characterization. Inactivation of lytF led to the loss of the cell-wall-bound protein 49' (CWBP49') and of the corresponding lytic activity as revealed by renaturation gel assay. Native cell walls prepared from the multiple lytC lytD lytE lytF-deficient mutant did not exhibit any autolysis, whereas walls prepared from a strain endowed with LytF but not with the other three enzymes underwent a slight lysis. Analysis of degradation products of cell wall devoid of teichoic-acid-bound O-esterified D-alanine unambiguously confirmed that LytF cuts the gamma-D-glutamate-mesodiaminopimelate bond.  (+info)

A theoretical and empirical investigation of the invasion dynamics of colicinogeny. (6/1064)

A mathematical model describing the dynamics of a colicinogenic and a colicin-sensitive population propagated under serial transfer culture conditions was formulated. In addition, a series of in vitro invasion experiments using six representatives of the E colicin group was undertaken, together with the estimation of the growth rates and colicinogenic characteristics of the strains. Growth rates among the strains varied by up to 44%. There were 14-fold differences among strains in their lysis rates and there were up to 10-fold differences in the amount of colicin produced per lysed cell. The in vitro serial transfer invasion experiments revealed that regardless of initial frequency all colicinogenic strains succeeded in displacing the sensitive cell populations. The amount of time required for the colicin-sensitive cell population to be displaced declined as the initial frequency of the colicinogenic population increased and strains producing higher titres of colicin tended to displace the sensitive strain more rapidly. Overall, the observed dynamics of the invasion of colicinogenic strains was adequately described by the theoretical model. However, despite there being substantial differences among the strains in their growth rates and colicinogenic characteristics there were relatively few differences, observed or predicted, in the invasion dynamics of the six colicinogenic strains. These results suggest that the characteristics of different colicinogenic strains cannot be used to explain the extensive variation in the relative abundance of different colicins in natural populations of bacteria.  (+info)

The C-terminal sequence of the lambda holin constitutes a cytoplasmic regulatory domain. (7/1064)

The C-terminal domains of holins are highly hydrophilic and contain clusters of consecutive basic and acidic residues, with the overall net charge predicted to be positive. The C-terminal domain of lambda S was found to be cytoplasmic, as defined by protease accessibility in spheroplasts and inverted membrane vesicles. C-terminal nonsense mutations were constructed in S and found to be lysis proficient, as long as at least one basic residue is retained at the C terminus. In general, the normal intrinsic scheduling of S function is deranged, resulting in early lysis. However, the capacity of each truncated lytic allele for inhibition by the S107 inhibitor product of S is retained. The K97am allele, when incorporated into the phage context, confers a plaque-forming defect because its early lysis significantly reduces the burst size. Finally, a C-terminal frameshift mutation was isolated as a suppressor of the even more severe early lysis defect of the mutant SA52G, which causes lysis at or before the time when the first phage particle is assembled in the cell. This mutation scrambles the C-terminal sequence of S, resulting in a predicted net charge increase of +4, and retards lysis by about 30 min, thus permitting a viable quantity of progeny to accumulate. Thus, the C-terminal domain is not involved in the formation of the lethal membrane lesion nor in the "dual-start" regulation conserved in lambdoid holins. Instead, the C-terminal sequence defines a cytoplasmic regulatory domain which affects the timing of lysis. Comparison of the C-terminal sequences of within holin families suggests that these domains have little or no structure but act as reservoirs of charged residues that interact with the membrane to effect proper lysis timing.  (+info)

Characterization of a chromosomally encoded glycylglycine endopeptidase of Staphylococcus aureus. (8/1064)

The authors previously reported the cloning of a lytic-enzyme-encoding gene, lytM, from an autolysis-defective mutant of Staphylococcus aureus. In the present work, the lytM gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the product was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography and HPLC. Biochemical analysis of LytM-cleaved peptidoglycan fragments indicated that LytM is a glycylglycine endopeptidase. Immunoelectron microscopic studies with anti-LytM rabbit IgG showed that LytM is expressed during the early exponential phase and is overexpressed in an autolysis-defective mutant compared with the parent strain. Also, a uniform distribution of gold particles on the surface of actively growing bacterial cells indicates that LytM plays a role in cell growth. Northern blot analyses of lytM expression in two global regulatory mutants, agr and sar, showed that expression of lytM is increased about twofold in these mutants as compared with the parents. Protein homology searches revealed that LytM could be a member of the zinc protease family, as it contained a homologous 38-amino-acid motif, Tyr-X-His-X11-Val-X12/20-Gly-X5-6-His. Atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of LytM revealed the presence of 0.9 mol zinc (mol LytM)(-1).  (+info)

Bacteriolysis is the breaking down or destruction of bacterial cells. This process can occur naturally or as a result of medical treatment, such as when antibiotics target and destroy bacteria by disrupting their cell walls. The term "bacteriolysis" specifically refers to the breakdown of the bacterial cell membrane, which can lead to the release of the contents of the bacterial cell and ultimately result in the death of the organism.

Blood bactericidal activity refers to the ability of an individual's blood to kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. This is an important aspect of the body's immune system, as it helps to prevent infection and maintain overall health. The bactericidal activity of blood can be influenced by various factors, including the presence of antibodies, white blood cells (such as neutrophils), and complement proteins.

In medical terms, the term "bactericidal" specifically refers to an agent or substance that is capable of killing bacteria. Therefore, when we talk about blood bactericidal activity, we are referring to the collective ability of various components in the blood to kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. This is often measured in laboratory tests as a way to assess a person's immune function and their susceptibility to infection.

It's worth noting that not all substances in the blood are bactericidal; some may simply inhibit the growth of bacteria without killing them. These substances are referred to as bacteriostatic. Both bactericidal and bacteriostatic agents play important roles in maintaining the body's defense against infection.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Switzerland" is not a medical term or concept. Switzerland is a country in Europe, known officially as the Swiss Confederation. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to try and help answer those for you!

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

DNA restriction-modification enzymes are a type of bacterial enzyme that cut double-stranded DNA at specific recognition sites and modify the DNA by methylating it to protect it from being cut by the same enzyme. These enzymes play a crucial role in bacterial defense against foreign DNA, such as viruses and plasmids.

Restriction enzymes recognize specific palindromic sequences of nucleotides in double-stranded DNA and cleave the phosphodiester bond between them, resulting in restriction fragments. There are three types of restriction enzymes based on their cleavage pattern: Type I, Type II, and Type III. Type II restriction enzymes are the most commonly used in molecular biology research because they make precise cuts at specific recognition sites.

Modification enzymes, on the other hand, methylate specific nucleotides within the recognition site of the restriction enzyme to prevent the DNA from being cut. This modification process ensures that the host bacterial DNA is protected from being cleaved by its own restriction enzymes.

Together, these two enzymes form a restriction-modification system that provides bacteria with an immune system against foreign DNA while allowing them to maintain their own genetic integrity. These enzymes have been widely used in molecular biology research for various applications such as gene cloning, DNA mapping, and genome analysis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "physics" is not a term that has a medical definition. Physics is a branch of science that deals with the study of matter, energy, and their interactions. It may be studied in the context of medical physics, which involves the application of physical principles to medicine, such as in the use of radiation therapy for cancer treatment or imaging techniques like MRI and CT scans. However, "physics" itself is not a medical term with a specific definition within the field of medicine.

In the context of medical terminology, "history" refers to the detailed narrative of the patient's symptoms, illnesses, treatments, and other related information gathered during a medical consultation or examination. This is usually obtained by asking the patient a series of questions about their past medical conditions, current health status, family medical history, lifestyle habits, and any medications they are taking. The information collected in the medical history helps healthcare professionals to diagnose, treat, and manage the patient's health concerns more effectively. It is also an essential part of continuity of care, as it provides valuable insights into the patient's health over time.

DNA cytosine methylases are a type of enzyme that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group (-CH3) to the carbon-5 position of the cytosine ring in DNA, forming 5-methylcytosine. This process is known as DNA methylation and plays an important role in regulating gene expression, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and suppression of transposable elements in eukaryotic organisms.

In mammals, the most well-studied DNA cytosine methylases are members of the DNMT (DNA methyltransferase) family, including DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B. DNMT1 is primarily responsible for maintaining existing methylation patterns during DNA replication, while DNMT3A and DNMT3B are involved in establishing new methylation patterns during development and differentiation.

Abnormal DNA methylation patterns have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, where global hypomethylation and promoter-specific hypermethylation can contribute to genomic instability, chromosomal aberrations, and silencing of tumor suppressor genes.

I'm afraid there seems to be a misunderstanding. "Journalism" is not a medical term. It refers to the production and distribution of reports on recent events, considered as a form of mass communication. Journalists gather, assess, create, and present news and information through various media platforms, such as newspapers, magazines, television, radio, and online publications. They play a crucial role in providing citizens with the information they need to make informed decisions about their communities, governments, and societies.

Kellenberger, G.; Kellenberger, E. (1952-01-01). "[Bacteriolysis of a strain of bacillus cereus; evidence in electronic ...
CHS is a disease causing impaired bacteriolysis due to failure of phagolysosome formation. As a result of disordered ...
He called this bacteriolysis and it became known as the Pfeiffer Phenomenon, or Isayev-Pfeiffer phenomenon. Working with Robert ... particularly for the phenomenon of bacteriolysis. In 1894 he found that live cholera bacteria could be injected without ill ...
... bacteriolysis). To combat pathogens that replicate outside cells, antibodies bind to pathogens to link them together, causing ...
... aeruginosa microbes were shown to fuse with outer membrane of other gram negative microbes causing their bacteriolysis; these ...
Bacteriolysis in hypoxic tumor parts can be combined with chemotherapy and/or radiation that are more effective in ...
... such as antibody-initiated complement-dependent bacteriolysis, opsonoization, phagocytosis and killing, as occurs for some ...
Bacteriolysis (Richard Pfeiffer) 1896 - An antibacterial, heat-labile serum component (complement) is described (Jules Bordet) ...
... bacteriolysis MeSH G04.185.515.120.600 - nitrogen fixation MeSH G04.185.515.286 - drug resistance, microbial MeSH G04.185. ...
... monocytogenes by causing bacteriolysis within the host cytosol. Current research in the Liang Tong's lab focuses on enzymes ...
WhyD tailors surface polymers to prevent premature bacteriolysis and direct cell elongation in Streptococcus pneumoniae. ... WhyD tailors surface polymers to prevent premature bacteriolysis and direct cell elongation in Streptococcus pneumoniae ... WhyD tailors surface polymers to prevent premature bacteriolysis and direct cell elongation in Streptococcus pneumoniae ...
Kellenberger, G.; Kellenberger, E. (1952-01-01). "[Bacteriolysis of a strain of bacillus cereus; evidence in electronic ...
Bacteriolysis * Biofilms / growth & development* * DNA, Bacterial / metabolism* * Enterococcus faecalis / genetics * ...
These late complement components are required for the bacteriolysis of meningococci.. An estimated 50-60% of individuals with ...
... bacteriolysis).[37] ...
a direct effect upon a pathogen, such as antibody-initiated complement-dependent bacteriolysis, opsonoization, phagocytosis and ...
... complement-dependent bacteriolysis. On the basis of the chemical structure of the capsular polysaccharides, H. influenzae are ... which activate the classical complement pathway leading to bacteriolysis (32). Because CRF patients often suffer protein loss ...
They exclusively attack bacteria and lyse (video: phage induced bacteriolysis) them ("bacteria eaters"). More ... ...
It is a disease with impaired bacteriolysis due to failure of phagolysosome formation. As a result of disordered intracellular ...
... and to activate bacteriolysis, bacteriophagy and rivustatic activity. It can significantly make healthcare and disease solution ...
Snake venom in relation to haemolysis, bacteriolysis, and toxicity.. J. exp. Med., 6, 277-301, 1902. ... Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › Bacteriolysis, HEMATOLOGY › Anticoagulation, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Antibiotics, TOXICOLOGY ...
Bacteriolyses use Bacteriolysis Bacteriolysis Bacteriophage use Bacteriophages Bacteriophage fd use Bacteriophage M13 ...
Bacteriolyses use Bacteriolysis Bacteriolysis Bacteriophage use Bacteriophages Bacteriophage fd use Bacteriophage M13 ...
Bacteriolyses use Bacteriolysis Bacteriolysis Bacteriophage use Bacteriophages Bacteriophage fd use Bacteriophage M13 ...
Bacteriolyses use Bacteriolysis Bacteriolysis Bacteriophage use Bacteriophages Bacteriophage fd use Bacteriophage M13 ...
Bacteriolyses use Bacteriolysis Bacteriolysis Bacteriophage use Bacteriophages Bacteriophage fd use Bacteriophage M13 ...
Bacteriolysis : جراثیم تحلیل کرنا ... Bacteriolysis: dissolution or destruction of bacteria.. Related ...
Search results for words starting with b using the WORdER multilingual word finder.
Bacteriolysis. Rupture of bacterial cells due to mechanical force, chemical action, or the lytic growth of BACTERIOPHAGES.. ... Amino AcidIndustrial MicrobiologyCholatesBacteriolysisAminopeptidasesLactobacillus plantarumCaseinsDNA Transposable Elements ... Amino AcidBacteriolysisDNA Transposable ElementsTransformation, Bacterial ...
bacteriolysis ,bækˌtiːriːˈɑːlɪsɪs, - dissolution or destruction of bacteria. bacterium ,bækˈtɪrɪəm, - (microbiology) single- ...
Bacteriolysis 1 * Baghdad - Description and travel 1 * Baghdad - Social life and customs 1 ...
Beta-lactam antibiotics induced bacteriolysis on LSPR sensors for assessment of antimicrobial resistance and quantification of ...
Bad Blood ★½ 1994 (R)Travis Blackstone (Lamas) will use any methods to protect his brother Franklin, whos targeted for death by a ruthless drug lord. Lots of action and violence. 90m/C VHS . Lorenzo Lamas, Hank Cheyne, Frankie Thorn, Kimberley Kates, Joe Son; D: Tibor Takacs; W: Neil Ruttenberg; C: Berhard Salzmann. Source for information on Bad Blood 1994: VideoHounds Golden Movie Retriever dictionary.
Propolis causes partial bacteriolysis and inhibits protein synthesis. In addition, propolis appears to enhance the ...
In this concept cloud, the sizes of the concepts are based not only on the number of corresponding publications, but also how relevant the concepts are to the overall topics of the publications, how long ago the publications were written, whether the person was the first or senior author, and how many other people have written about the same topic. The largest concepts are those that are most unique to this person ...
It is highly effective against microbes as it causes bacteriolysis and agglutination. It has a molecular weight: 900,000 KD. ...
iframe src="https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/person/med-sss?embed=1&hide_pagination=1&hide_info=1&hide_options=1" ...
of bacteriolysis, put forth the view that complement acts as a catalyst to the antibody, the latter then exerting an enzymic ... The discovery that immune hemolysis is in every way analogous to immune bacteriolysis led to the common use of erythrocyte- ... The observation that complement is apparently consumed in the process of hemolysis or bacteriolysis led workers to investigate ... the capacity to kill sensitized bacteria in the absence of bacteriolysis (61); (4) the opsonization of bacteria in the absence ...
This protein enzyme is responsible for bacteriolysis action against all types of bacteria. It hydrolyzes mucopolysaccharides ...
  • Some strains express a polysaccharide capsule, a principal virulence factor that protects bacteria from immune defenses, e.g., complement-dependent bacteriolysis. (cdc.gov)
  • In the cases of botulism, diphtheria and tetanus, the main objective of immunotherapy is to neutralize toxins, but also to opsonize the bacteria, promoting complement-dependent bacteriolysis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This protein enzyme is responsible for bacteriolysis action against all types of bacteria. (topcookery.com)
  • Fever generates many actions in the body of a child.First is simply the thermal action of raised body temperatures.Elevated body temperatures do not provide a beneficial environment for bacterial growth and survival.A temperature of 103.1° F is bacteriostatic meaning that it prevents bacteria from replicating.When body temperature reaches 104.9° F bacteria are killed (bacteriolysis).Body cells begin to die at 107.6° F. (drmattreddy.com)
  • It can strongly activate Cell Actin Cytoskeleton, T-LAK (T-Lymphokine-Activated Killer) and PMN (Polymorphonuclear) Leukocytes involved in tumor rejection, suppress tumor cell proliferation, mediate antitumor and oncocytic activity, and to activate bacteriolysis, bacteriophagy and rivustatic activity. (hum-molgen.org)
  • Some strains express a polysaccharide capsule, a principal virulence factor that protects bacteria from immune defenses, e.g., complement-dependent bacteriolysis. (cdc.gov)