Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Back: The rear surface of an upright primate from the shoulders to the hip, or the dorsal surface of tetrapods.Back Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the posterior part of the trunk. It includes injuries to the muscles of the back.Amnion: The innermost membranous sac that surrounds and protects the developing embryo which is bathed in the AMNIOTIC FLUID. Amnion cells are secretory EPITHELIAL CELLS and contribute to the amniotic fluid.Advance Directives: Declarations by patients, made in advance of a situation in which they may be incompetent to decide about their own care, stating their treatment preferences or authorizing a third party to make decisions for them. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Advance Care Planning: Discussions with patients and/or their representatives about the goals and desired direction of the patient's care, particularly end-of-life care, in the event that the patient is or becomes incompetent to make decisions.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Right to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Advance Directive Adherence: Compliance by health personnel or proxies with the stipulations of ADVANCE DIRECTIVES (or similar directives such as RESUSCITATION ORDERS) when patients are unable to direct their own care.Resuscitation Orders: Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus: The type species of KAPPAPAPILLOMAVIRUS. It is reported to occur naturally in cottontail rabbits in North America.Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Rabbit: A species in the genus LAGOVIRUS which causes hemorrhagic disease, including hemorrhagic septicemia, in rabbits.Living Wills: Written, witnessed declarations in which persons request that if they become disabled beyond reasonable expectation of recovery, they be allowed to die rather than be kept alive by extraordinary means. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A condition of persistent pain and discomfort in the BACK and the LEG following lumbar surgery, often seen in patients enrolled in pain centers.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Projective Techniques: Techniques to reveal personality attributes by responses to relatively unstructured or ambiguous stimuli.Immune Sera: Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary: Active euthanasia of a patient at the patient's request and/or with the patient's consent.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Lumbosacral Region: Region of the back including the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, SACRUM, and nearby structures.Lifting: Moving or bringing something from a lower level to a higher one. The concept encompasses biomechanic stresses resulting from work done in transferring objects from one plane to another as well as the effects of varying techniques of patient handling and transfer.Terminally Ill: Persons with an incurable or irreversible illness at the end stage that will result in death within a short time. (From O'Leary et al., Lexikon: Dictionary of Health Care Terms, Organizations, and Acronyms for the Era of Reform, 1994, p780)Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Patient Preference: Individual's expression of desirability or value of one course of action, outcome, or selection in contrast to others.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Cholesterol, Dietary: Cholesterol present in food, especially in animal products.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Reticulocytes: Immature ERYTHROCYTES. In humans, these are ERYTHROID CELLS that have just undergone extrusion of their CELL NUCLEUS. They still contain some organelles that gradually decrease in number as the cells mature. RIBOSOMES are last to disappear. Certain staining techniques cause components of the ribosomes to precipitate into characteristic "reticulum" (not the same as the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM), hence the name reticulocytes.Chronic Pain: Aching sensation that persists for more than a few months. It may or may not be associated with trauma or disease, and may persist after the initial injury has healed. Its localization, character, and timing are more vague than with acute pain.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Persistent Vegetative State: Vegetative state refers to the neurocognitive status of individuals with severe brain damage, in whom physiologic functions (sleep-wake cycles, autonomic control, and breathing) persist, but awareness (including all cognitive function and emotion) is abolished.Time-to-Pregnancy: Time interval, or number of non-contraceptive menstrual cycles that it takes for a couple to conceive.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Presumed Consent: An institutional policy of granting authority to health personnel to perform procedures on patients or to remove organs from cadavers for transplantation unless an objection is registered by family members or by the patient prior to death. This also includes emergency care of minors without prior parental consent.Proxy: A person authorized to decide or act for another person, for example, a person having durable power of attorney.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Neck Pain: Discomfort or more intense forms of pain that are localized to the cervical region. This term generally refers to pain in the posterior or lateral regions of the neck.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Chiropractic: An occupational discipline founded by D.D. Palmer in the 1890's based on the relationship of the spine to health and disease.Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Cross Reactions: Serological reactions in which an antiserum against one antigen reacts with a non-identical but closely related antigen.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Spinal DiseasesInjections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Aqueous Humor: The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)Immunodiffusion: Technique involving the diffusion of antigen or antibody through a semisolid medium, usually agar or agarose gel, with the result being a precipitin reaction.Hypercholesterolemia: A condition with abnormally high levels of CHOLESTEROL in the blood. It is defined as a cholesterol value exceeding the 95th percentile for the population.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Intervertebral Disc: Any of the 23 plates of fibrocartilage found between the bodies of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Ethics Committees, Clinical: Hospital or other institutional ethics committees established to consider the ethical dimensions of patient care. Distinguish from ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH, which are established to monitor the welfare of patients or healthy volunteers participating in research studies.Manipulation, Spinal: Adjustment and manipulation of the vertebral column.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Vitreous Body: The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Human Engineering: The science of designing, building or equipping mechanical devices or artificial environments to the anthropometric, physiological, or psychological requirements of the people who will use them.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Diet, Atherogenic: A diet that contributes to the development and acceleration of ATHEROGENESIS.Antibody Specificity: The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Ear: The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Ciliary Body: A ring of tissue extending from the scleral spur to the ora serrata of the RETINA. It consists of the uveal portion and the epithelial portion. The ciliary muscle is in the uveal portion and the ciliary processes are in the epithelial portion.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Great BritainProspective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Iris: The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Antigen-Antibody Reactions: The processes triggered by interactions of ANTIBODIES with their ANTIGENS.Pseudopregnancy: An acyclic state that resembles PREGNANCY in that there is no ovarian cycle, ESTROUS CYCLE, or MENSTRUAL CYCLE. Unlike pregnancy, there is no EMBRYO IMPLANTATION. Pseudopregnancy can be experimentally induced to form DECIDUOMA in the UTERUS.Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.United StatesEthical Theory: A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Immunoelectrophoresis: A technique that combines protein electrophoresis and double immunodiffusion. In this procedure proteins are first separated by gel electrophoresis (usually agarose), then made visible by immunodiffusion of specific antibodies. A distinct elliptical precipitin arc results for each protein detectable by the antisera.Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Degenerative changes in the INTERVERTEBRAL DISC due to aging or structural damage, especially to the vertebral end-plates.Sacroiliac Joint: The immovable joint formed by the lateral surfaces of the SACRUM and ILIUM.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Dinoprostone: The most common and most biologically active of the mammalian prostaglandins. It exhibits most biological activities characteristic of prostaglandins and has been used extensively as an oxytocic agent. The compound also displays a protective effect on the intestinal mucosa.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Back Muscles: Musculature of the BACK.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Isoenzymes: Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Western World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across the wide geographical area of Europe, as opposed to the East, Asia, and Africa. The term was used by scholars through the late medieval period. Thereafter, with the impact of colonialism and the transmission of cultures, Western World was sometimes expanded to include the Americas. (Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Sick Leave: An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Immunization: Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).Psoas Muscles: A powerful flexor of the thigh at the hip joint (psoas major) and a weak flexor of the trunk and lumbar spinal column (psoas minor). Psoas is derived from the Greek "psoa", the plural meaning "muscles of the loin". It is a common site of infection manifesting as abscess (PSOAS ABSCESS). The psoas muscles and their fibers are also used frequently in experiments in muscle physiology.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Fertility Preservation: A method of providing future reproductive opportunities before a medical treatment with known risk of loss of fertility. Typically reproductive organs or tissues (e.g., sperm, egg, embryos and ovarian or testicular tissues) are cryopreserved for future use before the medical treatment (e.g., chemotherapy, radiation) begins.Kidney Cortex: The outer zone of the KIDNEY, beneath the capsule, consisting of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; KIDNEY TUBULES, DISTAL; and KIDNEY TUBULES, PROXIMAL.Chromatography, Gel: Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.Myosins: A diverse superfamily of proteins that function as translocating proteins. They share the common characteristics of being able to bind ACTINS and hydrolyze MgATP. Myosins generally consist of heavy chains which are involved in locomotion, and light chains which are involved in regulation. Within the structure of myosin heavy chain are three domains: the head, the neck and the tail. The head region of the heavy chain contains the actin binding domain and MgATPase domain which provides energy for locomotion. The neck region is involved in binding the light-chains. The tail region provides the anchoring point that maintains the position of the heavy chain. The superfamily of myosins is organized into structural classes based upon the type and arrangement of the subunits they contain.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.BelgiumMuscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.SwitzerlandEye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Philosophy, MedicalRandom Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
  • It is a sad departure, but Rabbit's friends make one last wish, and send an astronomical gift. (scholastic.com)
  • And if one or two of those rabbits also are allowed to breed, the statistics tell us that within 2 generations, some of your rabbit's descendants are guaranteed to end up dead at a shelter. (rabbit.org)
  • Mr. right proposed marriage to her one year later as she had previously stroked the rabbit's foot for her next wish. (writerscafe.org)
  • First, you need to bring your rabbit's immune system that has been so severely suppressed back up and into good working condition. (beaglesunlimited.com)
  • This herbal remedy tincture with the synergy of the specifically Rabbit formulated herbs has been shown to aid rabbit's with serious health conditions in a relatively short period of time. (beaglesunlimited.com)
  • What you do is to give your rabbit these herbs--usually five to seven drops at a time--either directly in your rabbit's mouth or mixed in its food a minimum of three to six times daily for as long as it takes to bring your rabbit back to health and then some just to make sure. (beaglesunlimited.com)
  • The idea of the rabbit comes from the connection between its silhouette and the silhouette of a chair, where the rabbit's ears become seat back. (designboom.com)
  • Based on David Lindsay-Abaire's Pulitzer Prize winning play of the same name, director John Cameron Mitchell's 'Rabbit Hole' is an absolute wallop of a drama, featuring plaintive performances that never even begin to border on being too schlocky or too Hollywood, some really idyllic camerawork and imagery throughout, and - most importantly - a supremely fascinating and unique take on the thematic topic of grieving process, closure, and death. (rottentomatoes.com)
  • Quickly using my finger to clear the hole, I spotted 5 baby rabbits. (capecodonline.com)
  • This story contains spoilers for the Dec. 16 episode of Outlander, 'Down the Rabbit Hole. (hollywoodreporter.com)
  • Sunday's flashback-laden hour, 'Down the Rabbit Hole,' followed two timelines as Bree and Roger both went through the stones and journeyed to America to try and meet up with Claire and Jamie (Sam Heughan). (hollywoodreporter.com)
  • And do not click on this incredible site of television tropes (like the Department of Redundancy Department ) unless you have a lot of time on your hands because it is Delightful Rabbit Hole City in there. (fluentself.com)
  • I'm sure Delightful Rabbit Hole City has some good tunes. (fluentself.com)
  • Can cancer actually lift an individual out of the 'rabbit hole' of despair? (curetoday.com)
  • But the naked truth is that if I go down a rabbit hole of thinking bad thoughts and being negative, I will never come back up for air. (curetoday.com)
  • Whether it is a dog, a cat or even a rabbit, companion animals have a special way of showing unconditional love & affection that can lift the spirit no matter the circumstances - especially for those in hospice. (volunteermatch.org)
  • Against the background of Marcus' (very reasonable) prices, the investment of $5.95 (only $2.99 in paperback) to make sure you get the right rabbit, the right hutch and provide proper care seems an equally reasonable way of benefitting pets and publishers alike. (booksforkeeps.co.uk)
  • This two-story wood-and-wire rabbit hutch provides comfortable living quarters for rabbits and easy access for the breeder. (backwoodshome.com)
  • The front of the hutch (doors) and one or two sides of the cage should be covered in heavy wire so the rabbits get daily light and air, and can enjoy the outdoor scenery while being protected from predators. (backwoodshome.com)
  • On this journey, the rabbit must use his wits to decipher puzzles inspired by classic point-and-clicks to continue his adventure. (microsoft.com)
  • Since it's already snowing and they're predicting rain too, I wish enough of it would accummulate so they cancel school tomorrow. (absolutewrite.com)
  • And with the first starless sky, Rabbit realizes it's time to make the journey home. (scholastic.com)
  • During a time when one can take a photo, edit it and upload it in almost the same breath, there's a certain magic that comes when taking a step back from fast-paced modern electronics and breaking out a 35 mm film camera. (orlandosentinel.com)
  • Looking back, I hate that I devoted any time to helping advance their agenda. (lookingcloser.org)
  • Or I hope that I re-trap the rabbit, and next time I remember to secure the doors! (maydreamsgardens.com)
  • After spending some time in the city of Mir, Shach moved back to Kletsk to join the yeshiva again. (wikipedia.org)
  • If any adopter decides at any time not to keep a rabbit, you will need to take back the rabbit. (rabbit.org)
  • The more time you spend with a rabbit, down at ground level where she feels most comfortable and confident, the more responsive and loving she will become - regardless of her breeding. (rabbit.org)
  • If you believe your item is faulty after the 30 day time criteria, Peter's of Kensington may require you to send the item back at your expense for assessment. (petersofkensington.com.au)
  • It was Memorial Day weekend when God woke me up again, quite literally this time, and called me back to the writing of my book. (rabbitroom.com)
  • But unfortunately the head of our hair and makeup department has told us since she started working with us that beards were not common back in this time. (hollywoodreporter.com)
  • But Graham-Q attempts to hide by whisking himself and Voyager away from de Lancie-Q, first sending the ship back to the time of the creation of the universe, then shrinking it to the size of a subatomic particle, and finally, as one hilarious in-joke, hiding the Voyager on a Christmas tree as an ornament (it fun to see the franchise poke fun at itself). (jammersreviews.com)
  • The VP is a controversial figure dating back to his time as Indiana's governor. (presidentialpetmuseum.com)
  • Time to hit the streets with an empty stomach and an open mind - Interpret Durban is back. (mahala.co.za)
  • He was a chef who loved cocaine and Desmond Dekker, and he would stuff his ears with cotton every time I turned on my favorite album, The Midnight Organ Fight by Frightened Rabbit. (therumpus.net)
  • Sounds that sound like the time my father left my mother the day after we got back from Hawaii. (therumpus.net)
  • How Many Rabbits Can A Rabbit Make? (rabbit.org)
  • The stomps and handclaps in "The Loneliness and the Scream" merely make an already great song that much more fun, while "The Wrestle" is a good bet for third single, transitioning brilliantly from sparse verses to a colossal chorus and back to a barely-there bridge. (treblezine.com)
  • That Rabbit made so much money as to make Bill Gates jealous. (booksie.com)
  • This lovely hand knitted small rabbit soft toy is crafted from pure organic cotton is sure to make a cute and cuddly addition to any nursery. (houseofbruar.com)
  • https://www.houseofbruar.com/sm-rabbit-pink/ CG19206PINK Small Rabbit Soft Toy /images/products/medium/CG19206PINK.jpg 11.20 GBP InStock cg-soft-toys/ This lovely hand knitted small rabbit soft toy is crafted from pure organic cotton is sure to make a cute and cuddly addition to any nursery. (houseofbruar.com)
  • The animal innocence we cite in our let's-all-come-together ideals can make those precious fur-balls a blank canvas for whatever political message you wish to portray. (presidentialpetmuseum.com)
  • So it was quite a surprise when we arrived on campus and I found, packed into the trunk like a pair of corpses in an Easter-themed mafia film, two large pink furry rabbit costumes. (thenervousbreakdown.com)
  • Because your Volkswagen Rabbit is 20+ years old, the paint may have faded, and we cannot guarantee a color match for any of the colors on this page. (paintscratch.com)
  • The Volkswagen Rabbit colors on this page may go by several different names and the color sample shown above for 1973 Volkswagen Rabbit is approximate. (paintscratch.com)
  • A team I need of ONYX-015, y. reliable role, made back to variety with Immunotherapy and chemotherapy email. (talkdemonic.com)
  • Sadly, another individual is involved who is aware of the problem but who does not wish to see an actual dead animal. (halfbakery.com)
  • These visits bring back happy memories of earlier days and can be especially meaningful to those who are no longer able to care for their own beloved pet. (volunteermatch.org)
  • 100% of donations we collect from GoFundMe go directly to the cost foster care and continuance of our mission of helping rabbits in Indiana. (indianahrs.org)
  • Your rabbit might have been diagnosed with diabetes, arthritis, auto-immune dysfunction, chronic wasting disease, this disease, that disease and the list goes on and on. (beaglesunlimited.com)
  • If your example had been that that junkie was totally desperate, hit rock bottom, and made a special effort to get back on his feet, then I may have conceded. (abovetopsecret.com)
  • This classic 'Virginie' fedora is made from rich dark-emerald rabbit-felt and finished with a tonal grosgrain ribbon. (net-a-porter.com)
  • A rabbit who does not know when a gift has made him safe is poorer than a slug, even though he may think otherwise himself. (lookingcloser.org)
  • She stroked it a few times and made a secret wish as if it was a magical genies lantern. (writerscafe.org)
  • This made him the most famous Rabbit ever. (booksie.com)
  • This version of Fraidy Cat Rabbit is very well made, of solid wood with bright painted design. (magictricks.com)
  • Not that that is in any way a trivial task, and I'm sure you would find it dull, having already made Mrs. Rabbit. (blogspot.com)
  • Back to the origins of design: here is Qeeboo's philosophy, a brand made of objects for daily use, expressly not bourgeois but suitable for all. (designboom.com)
  • A magical mix of technologies and industrial techniques, along with aesthetics and invention that offer not only poetic, but funny and hybrid objects such as Rabbit and Mexico, that can be used, respectively, in a personal way as a seat/lamp and as vase/stool/ lamp. (designboom.com)
  • The card lamp is available in a variety of different colors and fun, creative styles including star, rabbit, bulb, heart and more. (yoshop.com)
  • The Assad regime in Syria took away the citizenship of hundreds of thousands of Kurds, only recently partially giving it back under pressure from the Syrian Revolution. (anarkismo.net)
  • Utilizing solar power and a storage battery for nocturnal operation, a toaster big enough for a rabbit is partially buried in the garden. (halfbakery.com)
  • Black Lace Rabbit is $24, and you can find it now at Ulta Beauty , Barneys New York and Lipstick Queen . (makeupandbeautyblog.com)
  • We hope that you will find a way to cherish your rabbit, without breeding her. (rabbit.org)
  • Leaping back out of bed and yanking his curtains open, he looked out of his window to find what the source of the explosion he heard was. (booksie.com)
  • Reluctantly, Paul agrees to move ahead with Lily's wish, knowing that Conor is a strong climber and their best chance at winning. (goodreads.com)
  • After the rabbits' move from upstairs to downstairs, Cosette has determined that my office is her favorite room. (myhouserabbit.com)
  • My Brother Rabbit is a beautifully drawn adventure set in a surreal world that mixes reality with a child's imagination. (microsoft.com)
  • George distracts him with stories about rabbits and shoots him in the back of his head. (wikipedia.org)
  • The idea was to open up the floor and let people share their stories, but in case everyone shied away from the microphone, a few of us were to have a tale in our back-pockets ready to go. (rabbitroom.com)
  • The stories I've shared in the book can be emotionally taxing to revisit, so there are times when I've had to step back from it for a while. (rabbitroom.com)