A species of gram-positive bacteria that is a common soil and water saprophyte.
Heat and stain resistant, metabolically inactive bodies formed within the vegetative cells of bacteria of the genera Bacillus and Clostridium.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
A species of rod-shaped bacteria that is a common soil saprophyte. Its spores are widespread and multiplication has been observed chiefly in foods. Contamination may lead to food poisoning.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
A species of bacteria that causes ANTHRAX in humans and animals.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.
A protein which is a subunit of RNA polymerase. It effects initiation of specific RNA chains from DNA.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
A species of gram-positive bacteria which may be pathogenic for certain insects. It is used for the biological control of the Gypsy moth.
Viruses whose hosts are bacterial cells.
A species of bacteria whose spores vary from round to elongate. It is a common soil saprophyte.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The reproductive elements of lower organisms, such as BACTERIA; FUNGI; and cryptogamic plants.
The heritable modification of the properties of a competent bacterium by naked DNA from another source. The uptake of naked DNA is a naturally occuring phenomenon in some bacteria. It is often used as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
Change brought about to an organisms genetic composition by unidirectional transfer (TRANSFECTION; TRANSDUCTION, GENETIC; CONJUGATION, GENETIC, etc.) and incorporation of foreign DNA into prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells by recombination of part or all of that DNA into the cell's genome.
Picolinic acid is an organic compound that belongs to the class of pyridine derivatives, acting as a chelating agent in mammals, primarily found in the liver and kidneys, and playing a significant role in the metabolism of proteins, vitamins, and minerals.
A genus of BACILLACEAE that are spore-forming, rod-shaped cells. Most species are saprophytic soil forms with only a few species being pathogenic.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Viruses whose host is Bacillus. Frequently encountered Bacillus phages include bacteriophage phi 29 and bacteriophage phi 105.
Enzymes that catalyze the endohydrolysis of 1,4-alpha-glycosidic linkages in STARCH; GLYCOGEN; and related POLYSACCHARIDES and OLIGOSACCHARIDES containing 3 or more 1,4-alpha-linked D-glucose units.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.
Enzymes that catalyze DNA template-directed extension of the 3'-end of an RNA strand one nucleotide at a time. They can initiate a chain de novo. In eukaryotes, three forms of the enzyme have been distinguished on the basis of sensitivity to alpha-amanitin, and the type of RNA synthesized. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992).
Inhibitor of DNA replication in gram-positive bacteria.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.
Bacterial polysaccharides that are rich in phosphodiester linkages. They are the major components of the cell walls and membranes of many bacteria.
Peptidoglycan is a complex, cross-linked polymer of carbohydrates and peptides that forms the rigid layer of the bacterial cell wall, providing structural support and protection while contributing to the bacterium's susceptibility or resistance to certain antibiotics.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.
In eukaryotes, a genetic unit consisting of a noncontiguous group of genes under the control of a single regulator gene. In bacteria, regulons are global regulatory systems involved in the interplay of pleiotropic regulatory domains and consist of several OPERONS.
An autolytic enzyme bound to the surface of bacterial cell walls. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of the link between N-acetylmuramoyl residues and L-amino acid residues in certain cell wall glycopeptides, particularly peptidoglycan. EC 3.5.1.28.
An antibiotic first isolated from cultures of Streptomyces venequelae in 1947 but now produced synthetically. It has a relatively simple structure and was the first broad-spectrum antibiotic to be discovered. It acts by interfering with bacterial protein synthesis and is mainly bacteriostatic. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 29th ed, p106)
Rupture of bacterial cells due to mechanical force, chemical action, or the lytic growth of BACTERIOPHAGES.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
Thymine is a pyrimidine nucleobase, one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid of DNA (the other three being adenine, guanine, and cytosine), where it forms a base pair with adenine.
Compounds consisting of a short peptide chain conjugated with an acyl chain.
The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the genetic mechanisms and processes of microorganisms.
Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The phenomenon by which a temperate phage incorporates itself into the DNA of a bacterial host, establishing a kind of symbiotic relation between PROPHAGE and bacterium which results in the perpetuation of the prophage in all the descendants of the bacterium. Upon induction (VIRUS ACTIVATION) by various agents, such as ultraviolet radiation, the phage is released, which then becomes virulent and lyses the bacterium.
The protoplasm and plasma membrane of plant, fungal, bacterial or archaeon cells without the CELL WALL.
A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).
The in vitro fusion of GENES by RECOMBINANT DNA techniques to analyze protein behavior or GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, or to merge protein functions for specific medical or industrial uses.
Uracil is a nitrogenous base, specifically a pyrimidine derivative, which constitutes one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid of RNA (ribonucleic acid), pairing with adenine via hydrogen bonds during base-pairing. (25 words)
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Genes which regulate or circumscribe the activity of other genes; specifically, genes which code for PROTEINS or RNAs which have GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION functions.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of hexose groups. EC 2.4.1.-.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.
The transfer of bacterial DNA by phages from an infected bacterium to another bacterium. This also refers to the transfer of genes into eukaryotic cells by viruses. This naturally occurring process is routinely employed as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
A commonly used x-ray contrast medium. As DIATRIZOATE MEGLUMINE and as Diatrizoate sodium, it is used for gastrointestinal studies, angiography, and urography.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
The interference in synthesis of an enzyme due to the elevated level of an effector substance, usually a metabolite, whose presence would cause depression of the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.
Hydrolases that specifically cleave the peptide bonds found in PROTEINS and PEPTIDES. Examples of sub-subclasses for this group include EXOPEPTIDASES and ENDOPEPTIDASES.
Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen (specifically, hydrogen-3) that contains one proton and two neutrons in its nucleus, making it radioactive with a half-life of about 12.3 years, and is used in various applications including nuclear research, illumination, and dating techniques due to its low energy beta decay.
Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.
A peptide that is a homopolymer of glutamic acid.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.
A complex of cyclic peptide antibiotics produced by the Tracy-I strain of Bacillus subtilis. The commercial preparation is a mixture of at least nine bacitracins with bacitracin A as the major constituent. It is used topically to treat open infections such as infected eczema and infected dermal ulcers. (From Goodman and Gilman, The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1140)
DNA sequences recognized as signals to end GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION.
Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.
An acute infection caused by the spore-forming bacteria BACILLUS ANTHRACIS. It commonly affects hoofed animals such as sheep and goats. Infection in humans often involves the skin (cutaneous anthrax), the lungs (inhalation anthrax), or the gastrointestinal tract. Anthrax is not contagious and can be treated with antibiotics.
An essential amino acid that is necessary for normal growth in infants and for NITROGEN balance in adults. It is a precursor of INDOLE ALKALOIDS in plants. It is a precursor of SEROTONIN (hence its use as an antidepressant and sleep aid). It can be a precursor to NIACIN, albeit inefficiently, in mammals.
A non-essential amino acid that occurs in high levels in its free state in plasma. It is produced from pyruvate by transamination. It is involved in sugar and acid metabolism, increases IMMUNITY, and provides energy for muscle tissue, BRAIN, and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
A product of fermentation. It is a component of the butanediol cycle in microorganisms. In mammals it is oxidized to carbon dioxide.
A basic enzyme that is present in saliva, tears, egg white, and many animal fluids. It functions as an antibacterial agent. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-linkages between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in peptidoglycan and between N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in chitodextrin. EC 3.2.1.17.
A non-metabolizable galactose analog that induces expression of the LAC OPERON.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
The bacterial sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) that catalyzes the transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphoenolpyruvate to its sugar substrates (the PTS sugars) concomitant with the translocation of these sugars across the bacterial membrane. The phosphorylation of a given sugar requires four proteins, two general proteins, Enzyme I and HPr and a pair of sugar-specific proteins designated as the Enzyme II complex. The PTS has also been implicated in the induction of synthesis of some catabolic enzyme systems required for the utilization of sugars that are not substrates of the PTS as well as the regulation of the activity of ADENYLYL CYCLASES. EC 2.7.1.-.
Nitrosoguanidines are organic compounds containing a nitroso group (-NO) and a guanidine group (-R1R2N-CN-), known for their alkylating properties and potential use as therapeutic agents or carcinogenic substances, depending on the specific compound and context.
Compounds consisting of glucosamine and lactate joined by an ether linkage. They occur naturally as N-acetyl derivatives in peptidoglycan, the characteristic polysaccharide composing bacterial cell walls. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The genetic unit consisting of three structural genes, an operator and a regulatory gene. The regulatory gene controls the synthesis of the three structural genes: BETA-GALACTOSIDASE and beta-galactoside permease (involved with the metabolism of lactose), and beta-thiogalactoside acetyltransferase.
Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.
Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.
Glycoside Hydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds, resulting in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates and oligosaccharides into simpler sugars.
Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
Separation of particles according to density by employing a gradient of varying densities. At equilibrium each particle settles in the gradient at a point equal to its density. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Enzymes which catalyze the hydrolases of ester bonds within DNA. EC 3.1.-.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Mutation process that restores the wild-type PHENOTYPE in an organism possessing a mutationally altered GENOTYPE. The second "suppressor" mutation may be on a different gene, on the same gene but located at a distance from the site of the primary mutation, or in extrachromosomal genes (EXTRACHROMOSOMAL INHERITANCE).
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.
Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of beta-aspartyl phosphate from aspartic acid and ATP. Threonine serves as an allosteric regulator of this enzyme to control the biosynthetic pathway from aspartic acid to threonine. EC 2.7.2.4.
The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)

Influence of crossdrafts on the performance of a biological safety cabinet. (1/8455)

A biological safety cabinet was tested to determine the effect of crossdrafts (such as those created by normal laboratory activity or ventilation) upon the ability of the cabinet to protect both experiments and investigators. A simple crossdraft, controllable from 50 to 200 feet per min (fpm; 15.24 to 60.96 m/min), was created across the face of the unit. Modifications of standardized procedures involving controlled bacterial aerosol challenges provided stringent test conditions. Results indicated that, as the crossflow velocities exceeded 100 fpm, the ability of the cabinet to protect either experiments or investigators decreased logarithmically with increasing crossdraft speed. Because 100 fpm is an airspeed easily achieved by some air conditioning and heating vents (open windows and doorways may create velocities far in excess of 200 fpm), the proper placement of a biological safety cabinet within the laboratory--away from such disruptive air currents--is essential to satisfactory cabinet performance.  (+info)

Carcinogenicity of triethanolamine in mice and its mutagenicity after reaction with sodium nitrite in bacteria. (2/8455)

Mice fed a diet containing 0.3 or 0.03% triethanolamine developed malignant tumors. Females showed a high incidence of tumors in lymphoid tissues, while this type was absent in males. Tumors in other tissues were produced at a considerable rate in both sexes, but no hepatoma was found. Triethanolamine was not mutagenic to Bacillus subtilis by itself, but it became mutagenic after reacting with sodium nitrite under acidic conditions or when the mixture was heated. Although N-nitrosodiethanolamine, a known carcinogen and mutagen, was detected in the reaction mixture by thin-layer chromatography, it may not be the main mutagenic product, because the product was a stable and direct mutagen and its mutagenic activity was destroyed by liver enzymes, unlike N-nitrosodiethanolamine. The lethal and mutagenic DNA damages produced by this unidentified product were susceptible to some extent to the repair functions of the bacteria.  (+info)

Prodigious substrate specificity of AAC(6')-APH(2"), an aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance determinant in enterococci and staphylococci. (3/8455)

BACKGROUND: High-level gentamicin resistance in enterococci and staphylococci is conferred by AAC(6')-APH(2"), an enzyme with 6'-N-acetyltransferase and 2"-O-phosphotransferase activities. The presence of this enzyme in pathogenic gram-positive bacteria prevents the successful use of gentamicin C and most other aminoglycosides as therapeutic agents. RESULTS: In an effort to understand the mechanism of aminoglycoside modification, we expressed AAC(6')-APH(2") in Bacillus subtilis. The purified enzyme is monomeric with a molecular mass of 57 kDa and displays both the expected aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase and O-phosphotransferase activities. Structure-function analysis with various aminoglycosides substrates reveals an enzyme with broad specificity in both enzymatic activities, accounting for AAC(6')-APH(2")'s dramatic negative impact on clinical aminoglycoside therapy. Both lividomycin A and paromomycin, aminoglycosides lacking a 6'-amino group, were acetylated by AAC(6')-APH(2"). The infrared spectrum of the product of paromomycin acetylation yielded a signal consistent with O-acetylation. Mass spectral and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the products of neomycin phosphorylation indicated that phosphoryl transfer occurred primarily at the 3'-OH of the 6-aminohexose ring A, and that some diphosphorylated material was also present with phosphates at the 3'-OH and the 3"'-OH of ring D, both unprecedented observations for this enzyme. Furthermore, the phosphorylation site of lividomycin A was determined to be the 5"-OH of the pentose ring C. CONCLUSIONS: The bifunctional AAC(6')-APH(2") has the capacity to inactivate virtually all clinically important aminoglycosides through N- and O-acetylation and phosphorylation of hydroxyl groups. The extremely broad substrate specificity of this enzyme will impact on future development of aminoglycosides and presents a significant challenge for antibiotic design.  (+info)

In vivo and in vitro processing of the Bacillus subtilis transcript coding for glutamyl-tRNA synthetase, serine acetyltransferase, and cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase. (4/8455)

In Bacillus subtilis, the adjacent genes gltX, cysE, and cysS encoding respectively glutamyl-tRNA synthetase, serine acetyl-transferase, and cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase, are transcribed as an operon but a gltX probe reveals only the presence of a monocistronic gltX mRNA (Gagnon et al., 1994, J Biol Chem 269:7473-7482). The transcript of the gltX-cysE intergenic region contains putative alternative secondary structures forming a p-independent terminator or an antiterminator, and a conserved sequence (T-box) found in the leader of most aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and many amino acid biosynthesis genes in B. subtilis and in other Gram-positive eubacteria. The transcription of these genes is initiated 45 nt upstream from the first codon of gltX and is under the control of a sigmaA-type promoter. Analysis of the in vivo transcript of this operon revealed a cleavage site immediately downstream from the p-independent terminator structure. In vitro transcription analysis, using RNA polymerases from Escherichia coli, B. subtilis, and that encoded by the T7 phage, in the presence of various RNase inhibitors, shows the same cleavage. This processing generates mRNAs whose 5'-end half-lives differ by a factor of 2 in rich medium, and leaves putative secondary structures at the 3' end of the gltX transcript and at the 5' end of the cysE/S mRNA, which may be involved in the stabilization of these mRNAs. By its mechanism and its position, this cleavage differs from that of the other known transcripts encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in B. subtilis.  (+info)

Structural basis of multidrug recognition by BmrR, a transcription activator of a multidrug transporter. (5/8455)

Multidrug-efflux transporters demonstrate an unusual ability to recognize multiple structurally dissimilar toxins. A comparable ability to bind diverse hydrophobic cationic drugs is characteristic of the Bacillus subtilis transcription regulator BmrR, which upon drug binding activates expression of the multidrug transporter Bmr. Crystal structures of the multidrug-binding domain of BmrR (2.7 A resolution) and of its complex with the drug tetraphenylphosphonium (2.8 A resolution) revealed a drug-induced unfolding and relocation of an alpha helix, which exposes an internal drug-binding pocket. Tetraphenylphosphonium binding is mediated by stacking and van der Waals contacts with multiple hydrophobic residues of the pocket and by an electrostatic interaction between the positively charged drug and a buried glutamate residue, which is the key to cation selectivity. Similar binding principles may be used by other multidrug-binding proteins.  (+info)

Comparison of synonymous codon distribution patterns of bacteriophage and host genomes. (6/8455)

Synonymous codon usage patterns of bacteriophage and host genomes were compared. Two indexes, G + C base composition of a gene (fgc) and fraction of translationally optimal codons of the gene (fop), were used in the comparison. Synonymous codon usage data of all the coding sequences on a genome are represented as a cloud of points in the plane of fop vs. fgc. The Escherichia coli coding sequences appear to exhibit two phases, "rising" and "flat" phases. Genes that are essential for survival and are thought to be native are located in the flat phase, while foreign-type genes from prophages and transposons are found in the rising phase with a slope of nearly unity in the fgc vs. fop plot. Synonymous codon distribution patterns of genes from temperate phages P4, P2, N15 and lambda are similar to the pattern of E. coli rising phase genes. In contrast, genes from the virulent phage T7 or T4, for which a phage-encoded DNA polymerase is identified, fall in a linear curve with a slope of nearly zero in the fop vs. fgc plane. These results may suggest that the G + C contents for T7, T4 and E. coli flat phase genes are subject to the directional mutation pressure and are determined by the DNA polymerase used in the replication. There is significant variation in the fop values of the phage genes, suggesting an adjustment to gene expression level. Similar analyses of codon distribution patterns were carried out for Haemophilus influenzae, Bacillus subtilis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and their phages with complete genomic sequences available.  (+info)

Esterases in serum-containing growth media counteract chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in vitro. (7/8455)

The spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi was unexpectedly found to be as susceptible to diacetyl chloramphenicol, the product of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, as it was to chloramphenicol itself. The susceptibilities of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, as well as that of B. burgdorferi, to diacetyl chloramphenicol were then assayed in different media. All three species were susceptible to diacetyl chloramphenicol when growth media were supplemented with rabbit serum or, to a lesser extent, human serum. Susceptibility of E. coli and B. subtilis to diacetyl chloramphenicol was not observed in the absence of serum, when horse serum was used, or when the rabbit or human serum was heated first. In the presence of 10% rabbit serum, a strain of E. coli bearing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene had a fourfold-lower resistance to chloramphenicol than in the absence of serum. A plate bioassay for chloramphenicol activity showed the conversion by rabbit, mouse, and human sera but not bacterial cell extracts or heated serum of diacetyl chloramphenicol to an inhibitory compound. Deacetylation of acetyl chloramphenicol by serum components was demonstrated by using fluorescent substrates and thin-layer chromatography. These studies indicate that esterases of serum can convert diacetyl chloramphenicol back to an active antibiotic, and thus, in vitro findings may not accurately reflect the level of chloramphenicol resistance by cat-bearing bacteria in vivo.  (+info)

Transient gene asymmetry during sporulation and establishment of cell specificity in Bacillus subtilis. (8/8455)

Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis is initiated by an asymmetric division generating two cells of different size and fate. During a short interval, the smaller forespore harbors only 30% of the chromosome until the remaining part is translocated across the septum. We demonstrate that moving the gene for sigmaF, the forespore-specific transcription factor, in the trapped region of the chromosome is sufficient to produce spores in the absence of the essential activators SpoIIAA and SpoIIE. We propose that transient genetic asymmetry is the device that releases SpoIIE phosphatase activity in the forespore and establishes cell specificity.  (+info)

'Bacillus subtilis' is a gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in soil and vegetation. It is a facultative anaerobe, meaning it can grow with or without oxygen. This bacterium is known for its ability to form durable endospores during unfavorable conditions, which allows it to survive in harsh environments for long periods of time.

'Bacillus subtilis' has been widely studied as a model organism in microbiology and molecular biology due to its genetic tractability and rapid growth. It is also used in various industrial applications, such as the production of enzymes, antibiotics, and other bioproducts.

Although 'Bacillus subtilis' is generally considered non-pathogenic, there have been rare cases of infection in immunocompromised individuals. It is important to note that this bacterium should not be confused with other pathogenic species within the genus Bacillus, such as B. anthracis (causative agent of anthrax) or B. cereus (a foodborne pathogen).

I believe there might be a slight confusion in your question. Bacteria do not produce spores; instead, it is fungi and other types of microorganisms that produce spores for reproduction and survival purposes. Spores are essentially reproductive cells that are resistant to heat, radiation, and chemicals, allowing them to survive under harsh conditions.

If you meant to ask about endospores, those are produced by some bacteria as a protective mechanism during times of stress or nutrient deprivation. Endospores are highly resistant structures containing bacterial DNA, ribosomes, and some enzymes. They can survive for long periods in extreme environments and germinate into vegetative cells when conditions improve.

Here's the medical definition of endospores:

Endospores (also called bacterial spores) are highly resistant, dormant structures produced by certain bacteria belonging to the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. They contain a core of bacterial DNA, ribosomes, and some enzymes surrounded by a protective layer called the spore coat. Endospores can survive under harsh conditions for extended periods and germinate into vegetative cells when favorable conditions return. Common examples of endospore-forming bacteria include Bacillus species (such as B. anthracis, which causes anthrax) and Clostridium species (such as C. difficile, which can cause severe diarrhea).

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

'Bacillus cereus' is a gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in soil and food. It can produce heat-resistant spores, which allow it to survive in a wide range of temperatures and environments. This bacterium can cause two types of foodborne illnesses: a diarrheal type and an emetic (vomiting) type.

The diarrheal type of illness is caused by the consumption of foods contaminated with large numbers of vegetative cells of B. cereus. The symptoms typically appear within 6 to 15 hours after ingestion and include watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and nausea. Vomiting may also occur in some cases.

The emetic type of illness is caused by the consumption of foods contaminated with B. cereus toxins. This type of illness is characterized by nausea and vomiting that usually occur within 0.5 to 6 hours after ingestion. The most common sources of B. cereus contamination include rice, pasta, and other starchy foods that have been cooked and left at room temperature for several hours.

Proper food handling, storage, and cooking practices can help prevent B. cereus infections. It is important to refrigerate or freeze cooked foods promptly, reheat them thoroughly, and avoid leaving them at room temperature for extended periods.

Gene expression regulation in bacteria refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins from specific genes. This regulation allows bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions and ensure the appropriate amount of protein is produced at the right time.

Bacteria have a variety of mechanisms for regulating gene expression, including:

1. Operon structure: Many bacterial genes are organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule. The expression of these genes can be coordinately regulated by controlling the transcription of the entire operon.
2. Promoter regulation: Transcription is initiated at promoter regions upstream of the gene or operon. Bacteria have regulatory proteins called sigma factors that bind to the promoter and recruit RNA polymerase, the enzyme responsible for transcribing DNA into RNA. The binding of sigma factors can be influenced by environmental signals, allowing for regulation of transcription.
3. Attenuation: Some operons have regulatory regions called attenuators that control transcription termination. These regions contain hairpin structures that can form in the mRNA and cause transcription to stop prematurely. The formation of these hairpins is influenced by the concentration of specific metabolites, allowing for regulation of gene expression based on the availability of those metabolites.
4. Riboswitches: Some bacterial mRNAs contain regulatory elements called riboswitches that bind small molecules directly. When a small molecule binds to the riboswitch, it changes conformation and affects transcription or translation of the associated gene.
5. CRISPR-Cas systems: Bacteria use CRISPR-Cas systems for adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids. These systems incorporate short sequences from foreign DNA into their own genome, which can then be used to recognize and cleave similar sequences in invading genetic elements.

Overall, gene expression regulation in bacteria is a complex process that allows them to respond quickly and efficiently to changing environmental conditions. Understanding these regulatory mechanisms can provide insights into bacterial physiology and help inform strategies for controlling bacterial growth and behavior.

A bacterial gene is a segment of DNA (or RNA in some viruses) that contains the genetic information necessary for the synthesis of a functional bacterial protein or RNA molecule. These genes are responsible for encoding various characteristics and functions of bacteria such as metabolism, reproduction, and resistance to antibiotics. They can be transmitted between bacteria through horizontal gene transfer mechanisms like conjugation, transformation, and transduction. Bacterial genes are often organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that the term "bacterial gene" is used to describe genetic elements found in bacteria, but not all genetic elements in bacteria are considered genes. For example, some DNA sequences may not encode functional products and are therefore not considered genes. Additionally, some bacterial genes may be plasmid-borne or phage-borne, rather than being located on the bacterial chromosome.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

'Bacillus anthracis' is the scientific name for the bacterium that causes anthrax, a serious and potentially fatal infectious disease. This gram-positive, spore-forming rod-shaped bacterium can be found in soil and commonly affects animals such as sheep, goats, and cattle. Anthrax can manifest in several forms, including cutaneous (skin), gastrointestinal, and inhalation anthrax, depending on the route of infection.

The spores of Bacillus anthracis are highly resistant to environmental conditions and can survive for years, making them a potential agent for bioterrorism or biowarfare. When inhaled, ingested, or introduced through breaks in the skin, these spores can germinate into vegetative bacteria that produce potent exotoxins responsible for anthrax symptoms and complications.

It is essential to distinguish Bacillus anthracis from other Bacillus species due to its public health significance and potential use as a biological weapon. Proper identification, prevention strategies, and medical countermeasures are crucial in mitigating the risks associated with this bacterium.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

An operon is a genetic unit in prokaryotic organisms (like bacteria) consisting of a cluster of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule, which then undergoes translation to produce multiple proteins. This genetic organization allows for the coordinated regulation of genes that are involved in the same metabolic pathway or functional process. The unit typically includes promoter and operator regions that control the transcription of the operon, as well as structural genes encoding the proteins. Operons were first discovered in bacteria, but similar genetic organizations have been found in some eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast.

A sigma factor is a type of protein in bacteria that plays an essential role in the initiation of transcription, which is the first step of gene expression. Sigma factors recognize and bind to specific sequences on DNA, known as promoters, enabling the attachment of RNA polymerase, the enzyme responsible for synthesizing RNA.

In bacteria, RNA polymerase is made up of several subunits, including a core enzyme and a sigma factor. The sigma factor confers specificity to the RNA polymerase by recognizing and binding to the promoter region of the DNA, allowing transcription to begin. Once transcription starts, the sigma factor is released from the RNA polymerase, which then continues to synthesize RNA until it reaches the end of the gene.

Bacteria have multiple sigma factors that allow them to respond to different environmental conditions and stresses by regulating the expression of specific sets of genes. For example, some sigma factors are involved in the regulation of genes required for growth and metabolism under normal conditions, while others are involved in the response to heat shock, starvation, or other stressors.

Overall, sigma factors play a crucial role in regulating gene expression in bacteria, allowing them to adapt to changing environmental conditions and maintain cellular homeostasis.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

'Bacillus thuringiensis' (Bt) is a gram-positive, soil-dwelling bacterium that produces crystalline parasporal proteins during sporulation. These proteins are insecticidal and have the ability to kill certain insects when ingested. Different strains of Bt produce different types of insecticidal proteins, allowing them to target specific insect pests.

Bt is widely used in organic farming and integrated pest management programs as a natural alternative to chemical pesticides. It can be applied as a spray or incorporated into the genetic material of crops through biotechnology, producing transgenic plants known as Bt crops. These crops express the insecticidal proteins and protect themselves from specific pests, reducing the need for external applications of Bt formulations.

Bt is considered safe for humans, animals, and non-target organisms when used properly, as the parasporal proteins are not toxic to them. However, misuse or overreliance on Bt can lead to resistance development in target pests, reducing its effectiveness.

Bacteriophages, often simply called phages, are viruses that infect and replicate within bacteria. They consist of a protein coat, called the capsid, that encases the genetic material, which can be either DNA or RNA. Bacteriophages are highly specific, meaning they only infect certain types of bacteria, and they reproduce by hijacking the bacterial cell's machinery to produce more viruses.

Once a phage infects a bacterium, it can either replicate its genetic material and create new phages (lytic cycle), or integrate its genetic material into the bacterial chromosome and replicate along with the bacterium (lysogenic cycle). In the lytic cycle, the newly formed phages are released by lysing, or breaking open, the bacterial cell.

Bacteriophages play a crucial role in shaping microbial communities and have been studied as potential alternatives to antibiotics for treating bacterial infections.

'Bacillus megaterium' is a species of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in the environment, including in soil, water, and air. They are known for their large size, with individual cells often measuring 1-2 micrometers in length and 0.5 micrometers in diameter.

'Bacillus megaterium' is a facultative anaerobe, which means that it can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. It forms endospores, which are highly resistant to heat, radiation, and chemicals, allowing the bacteria to survive under harsh conditions for long periods of time.

These bacteria have been used in various industrial applications, such as the production of enzymes, vitamins, and other bioproducts. They are generally considered to be non-pathogenic, although there have been rare reports of infections associated with this species in immunocompromised individuals.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Bacterial chromosomes are typically circular, double-stranded DNA molecules that contain the genetic material of bacteria. Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA housed within a nucleus, bacterial chromosomes are located in the cytoplasm of the cell, often associated with the bacterial nucleoid.

Bacterial chromosomes can vary in size and structure among different species, but they typically contain all of the genetic information necessary for the survival and reproduction of the organism. They may also contain plasmids, which are smaller circular DNA molecules that can carry additional genes and can be transferred between bacteria through a process called conjugation.

One important feature of bacterial chromosomes is their ability to replicate rapidly, allowing bacteria to divide quickly and reproduce in large numbers. The replication of the bacterial chromosome begins at a specific origin point and proceeds in opposite directions until the entire chromosome has been copied. This process is tightly regulated and coordinated with cell division to ensure that each daughter cell receives a complete copy of the genetic material.

Overall, the study of bacterial chromosomes is an important area of research in microbiology, as understanding their structure and function can provide insights into bacterial genetics, evolution, and pathogenesis.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

In the context of medicine, spores are typically discussed in relation to certain types of infections and diseases caused by microorganisms such as bacteria or fungi. Spores are a dormant, resistant form of these microorganisms that can survive under harsh environmental conditions, such as extreme temperatures, lack of nutrients, and exposure to chemicals.

Spores can be highly resistant to heat, radiation, and disinfectants, making them difficult to eliminate from contaminated surfaces or medical equipment. When the conditions are favorable, spores can germinate and grow into mature microorganisms that can cause infection.

Some examples of medically relevant spores include those produced by Clostridioides difficile (C. diff), a bacterium that can cause severe diarrhea and colitis in hospitalized patients, and Aspergillus fumigatus, a fungus that can cause invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals.

It's worth noting that spores are not unique to medical contexts and have broader relevance in fields such as botany, mycology, and biology.

Bacterial transformation is a natural process by which exogenous DNA is taken up and incorporated into the genome of a bacterial cell. This process was first discovered in 1928 by Frederick Griffith, who observed that dead virulent bacteria could transfer genetic material to live avirulent bacteria, thereby conferring new properties such as virulence to the recipient cells.

The uptake of DNA by bacterial cells typically occurs through a process called "competence," which can be either naturally induced under certain environmental conditions or artificially induced in the laboratory using various methods. Once inside the cell, the exogenous DNA may undergo recombination with the host genome, resulting in the acquisition of new genes or the alteration of existing ones.

Bacterial transformation has important implications for both basic research and biotechnology. It is a powerful tool for studying gene function and for engineering bacteria with novel properties, such as the ability to produce valuable proteins or degrade environmental pollutants. However, it also poses potential risks in the context of genetic engineering and biocontainment, as transformed bacteria may be able to transfer their newly acquired genes to other organisms in the environment.

Bacterial RNA refers to the genetic material present in bacteria that is composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Unlike higher organisms, bacteria contain a single circular chromosome made up of DNA, along with smaller circular pieces of DNA called plasmids. These bacterial genetic materials contain the information necessary for the growth and reproduction of the organism.

Bacterial RNA can be divided into three main categories: messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA). mRNA carries genetic information copied from DNA, which is then translated into proteins by the rRNA and tRNA molecules. rRNA is a structural component of the ribosome, where protein synthesis occurs, while tRNA acts as an adapter that brings amino acids to the ribosome during protein synthesis.

Bacterial RNA plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including gene expression, protein synthesis, and regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding the structure and function of bacterial RNA is essential for developing new antibiotics and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

A plasmid is a small, circular, double-stranded DNA molecule that is separate from the chromosomal DNA of a bacterium or other organism. Plasmids are typically not essential for the survival of the organism, but they can confer beneficial traits such as antibiotic resistance or the ability to degrade certain types of pollutants.

Plasmids are capable of replicating independently of the chromosomal DNA and can be transferred between bacteria through a process called conjugation. They often contain genes that provide resistance to antibiotics, heavy metals, and other environmental stressors. Plasmids have also been engineered for use in molecular biology as cloning vectors, allowing scientists to replicate and manipulate specific DNA sequences.

Plasmids are important tools in genetic engineering and biotechnology because they can be easily manipulated and transferred between organisms. They have been used to produce vaccines, diagnostic tests, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for various applications, including agriculture, medicine, and industry.

Genetic transformation is the process by which an organism's genetic material is altered or modified, typically through the introduction of foreign DNA. This can be achieved through various techniques such as:

* Gene transfer using vectors like plasmids, phages, or artificial chromosomes
* Direct uptake of naked DNA using methods like electroporation or chemically-mediated transfection
* Use of genome editing tools like CRISPR-Cas9 to introduce precise changes into the organism's genome.

The introduced DNA may come from another individual of the same species (cisgenic), from a different species (transgenic), or even be synthetically designed. The goal of genetic transformation is often to introduce new traits, functions, or characteristics that do not exist naturally in the organism, or to correct genetic defects.

This technique has broad applications in various fields, including molecular biology, biotechnology, and medical research, where it can be used to study gene function, develop genetically modified organisms (GMOs), create cell lines for drug screening, and even potentially treat genetic diseases through gene therapy.

Picolinic acid is not specifically classified as a medical term, but it is a type of organic compound that belongs to the class of molecules known as pyridinecarboxylic acids. These are carboxylic acids derived from pyridine by the substitution of a hydrogen atom with a carboxyl group.

Picolinic acid, specifically, is a pyridine derivative with a carboxyl group at the 2-position of the ring. It is naturally produced in the body and can be found in various tissues and fluids, including the brain, where it plays a role in the metabolism of amino acids, particularly tryptophan.

In addition to its physiological functions, picolinic acid has been studied for its potential therapeutic applications. For example, it has been shown to have antibacterial and antifungal properties, and may also play a role in heavy metal chelation and neuroprotection. However, more research is needed to fully understand the medical significance of this compound.

'Bacillus' is a genus of rod-shaped, gram-positive bacteria that are commonly found in soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals. Many species of Bacillus are capable of forming endospores, which are highly resistant to heat, radiation, and chemicals, allowing them to survive for long periods in harsh environments. The most well-known species of Bacillus is B. anthracis, which causes anthrax in animals and humans. Other species of Bacillus have industrial or agricultural importance, such as B. subtilis, which is used in the production of enzymes and antibiotics.

Culture media is a substance that is used to support the growth of microorganisms or cells in an artificial environment, such as a petri dish or test tube. It typically contains nutrients and other factors that are necessary for the growth and survival of the organisms being cultured. There are many different types of culture media, each with its own specific formulation and intended use. Some common examples include blood agar, which is used to culture bacteria; Sabouraud dextrose agar, which is used to culture fungi; and Eagle's minimum essential medium, which is used to culture animal cells.

A cell wall is a rigid layer found surrounding the plasma membrane of plant cells, fungi, and many types of bacteria. It provides structural support and protection to the cell, maintains cell shape, and acts as a barrier against external factors such as chemicals and mechanical stress. The composition of the cell wall varies among different species; for example, in plants, it is primarily made up of cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin, while in bacteria, it is composed of peptidoglycan.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Bacillus phages are viruses that infect and replicate within bacteria of the genus Bacillus. These phages, also known as bacteriophages or simply phages, are a type of virus that is specifically adapted to infect and multiply within bacteria. They use the bacterial cell's machinery to produce new copies of themselves, often resulting in the lysis (breakdown) of the bacterial cell. Bacillus phages are widely studied for their potential applications in biotechnology, medicine, and basic research.

Alpha-amylases are a type of enzyme that breaks down complex carbohydrates, such as starch and glycogen, into simpler sugars like maltose, maltotriose, and glucose. These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds in these complex carbohydrates, making them more easily digestible.

Alpha-amylases are produced by various organisms, including humans, animals, plants, and microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi. In humans, alpha-amylases are primarily produced by the salivary glands and pancreas, and they play an essential role in the digestion of dietary carbohydrates.

Deficiency or malfunction of alpha-amylases can lead to various medical conditions, such as diabetes, kidney disease, and genetic disorders like congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency. On the other hand, excessive production of alpha-amylases can contribute to dental caries and other oral health issues.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Chromosome mapping, also known as physical mapping, is the process of determining the location and order of specific genes or genetic markers on a chromosome. This is typically done by using various laboratory techniques to identify landmarks along the chromosome, such as restriction enzyme cutting sites or patterns of DNA sequence repeats. The resulting map provides important information about the organization and structure of the genome, and can be used for a variety of purposes, including identifying the location of genes associated with genetic diseases, studying evolutionary relationships between organisms, and developing genetic markers for use in breeding or forensic applications.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

Restriction mapping is a technique used in molecular biology to identify the location and arrangement of specific restriction endonuclease recognition sites within a DNA molecule. Restriction endonucleases are enzymes that cut double-stranded DNA at specific sequences, producing fragments of various lengths. By digesting the DNA with different combinations of these enzymes and analyzing the resulting fragment sizes through techniques such as agarose gel electrophoresis, researchers can generate a restriction map - a visual representation of the locations and distances between recognition sites on the DNA molecule. This information is crucial for various applications, including cloning, genome analysis, and genetic engineering.

DNA-directed RNA polymerases are enzymes that synthesize RNA molecules using a DNA template in a process called transcription. These enzymes read the sequence of nucleotides in a DNA molecule and use it as a blueprint to construct a complementary RNA strand.

The RNA polymerase moves along the DNA template, adding ribonucleotides one by one to the growing RNA chain. The synthesis is directional, starting at the promoter region of the DNA and moving towards the terminator region.

In bacteria, there is a single type of RNA polymerase that is responsible for transcribing all types of RNA (mRNA, tRNA, and rRNA). In eukaryotic cells, however, there are three different types of RNA polymerases: RNA polymerase I, II, and III. Each type is responsible for transcribing specific types of RNA.

RNA polymerases play a crucial role in gene expression, as they link the genetic information encoded in DNA to the production of functional proteins. Inhibition or mutation of these enzymes can have significant consequences for cellular function and survival.

Hydroxyphenylazourea (also known as Hydroxyphenylazouracil) is not a commonly used medical term, and it does not have a specific medical definition in the context of clinical medicine. However, it is a chemical compound that has been studied in various biochemical and pharmacological research settings.

Hydroxyphenylazourea is an aromatic azourea compound, which contains a phenyl group (a benzene ring with a hydroxy group) and an azourea group (-N=N-). It has been used in some laboratory studies as a photosensitizer, a substance that can produce singlet oxygen or other reactive oxygen species when exposed to light. This property has made it a subject of interest in photodynamic therapy, a type of cancer treatment that uses light-activated drugs to kill cancer cells.

It is important to note that Hydroxyphenylazourea is not a drug approved for medical use by regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Its use in research and experimental settings should be conducted under appropriate supervision and safety protocols.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

In a medical context, "hot temperature" is not a standard medical term with a specific definition. However, it is often used in relation to fever, which is a common symptom of illness. A fever is typically defined as a body temperature that is higher than normal, usually above 38°C (100.4°F) for adults and above 37.5-38°C (99.5-101.3°F) for children, depending on the source.

Therefore, when a medical professional talks about "hot temperature," they may be referring to a body temperature that is higher than normal due to fever or other causes. It's important to note that a high environmental temperature can also contribute to an elevated body temperature, so it's essential to consider both the body temperature and the environmental temperature when assessing a patient's condition.

Teichoic acids are complex polymers of glycerol or ribitol linked by phosphate groups, found in the cell wall of gram-positive bacteria. They play a crucial role in the bacterial cell's defense against hostile environments and can also contribute to virulence by helping the bacteria evade the host's immune system. Teichoic acids can be either linked to peptidoglycan (wall teichoic acids) or to membrane lipids (lipoteichoic acids). They can vary in structure and composition among different bacterial species, which can have implications for the design of antibiotics and other therapeutics.

Peptidoglycan is a complex biological polymer made up of sugars and amino acids that forms a crucial component of the cell walls of bacteria. It provides structural support and protection to bacterial cells, contributing to their shape and rigidity. Peptidoglycan is unique to bacterial cell walls and is not found in the cells of other organisms, such as plants, animals, or fungi.

The polymer is composed of linear chains of alternating units of N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) and N-acetylmuramic acid (NAM), which are linked together by glycosidic bonds. The NAM residues contain short peptide side chains, typically consisting of four amino acids, that cross-link adjacent polysaccharide chains, forming a rigid layer around the bacterial cell.

The composition and structure of peptidoglycan can vary between different species of bacteria, which is one factor contributing to their diversity. The enzymes responsible for synthesizing and degrading peptidoglycan are important targets for antibiotics, as inhibiting these processes can weaken or kill the bacterial cells without affecting host organisms.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Beta-galactosidase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of beta-galactosides into monosaccharides. It is found in various organisms, including bacteria, yeast, and mammals. In humans, it plays a role in the breakdown and absorption of certain complex carbohydrates, such as lactose, in the small intestine. Deficiency of this enzyme in humans can lead to a disorder called lactose intolerance. In scientific research, beta-galactosidase is often used as a marker for gene expression and protein localization studies.

A regulon is a group of genes that are regulated together in response to a specific signal or stimulus, often through the action of a single transcription factor or regulatory protein. This means that when the transcription factor binds to specific DNA sequences called operators, it can either activate or repress the transcription of all the genes within the regulon.

This type of gene regulation is important for coordinating complex biological processes, such as cellular metabolism, stress responses, and developmental programs. By regulating a group of genes together, cells can ensure that they are all turned on or off in a coordinated manner, allowing for more precise control over the overall response to a given signal.

It's worth noting that the term "regulon" is not commonly used in clinical medicine, but rather in molecular biology and genetics research.

N-Acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase (also known as NAM Amidase or MurNAc-LAA Amidase) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the bacterial cell wall metabolism. It is responsible for cleaving the amide bond between N-acetylmuramic acid (NAM) and L-alanine (L-Ala) in the peptidoglycan, which is a major component of the bacterial cell wall.

The enzyme's systematic name is N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, but it can also be referred to as:

* N-acetylmuramic acid lyase
* Peptidoglycan N-acetylmuramoylhydrolase
* N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine glycohydrolase
* N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidohydrolase

N-Acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase is an essential enzyme for bacterial cell division and morphogenesis, as it facilitates the separation of daughter cells by cleaving peptidoglycan crosslinks. This enzyme has been studied extensively due to its potential as a target for developing new antibiotics that can selectively inhibit bacterial cell wall biosynthesis without affecting human cells.

Chloramphenicol is an antibiotic medication that is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections. It works by inhibiting the ability of bacteria to synthesize proteins, which essential for their growth and survival. This helps to stop the spread of the infection and allows the body's immune system to clear the bacteria from the body.

Chloramphenicol is a broad-spectrum antibiotic, which means that it is effective against many different types of bacteria. It is often used to treat serious infections that have not responded to other antibiotics. However, because of its potential for serious side effects, including bone marrow suppression and gray baby syndrome, chloramphenicol is usually reserved for use in cases where other antibiotics are not effective or are contraindicated.

Chloramphenicol can be given by mouth, injection, or applied directly to the skin in the form of an ointment or cream. It is important to take or use chloramphenicol exactly as directed by a healthcare provider, and to complete the full course of treatment even if symptoms improve before all of the medication has been taken. This helps to ensure that the infection is fully treated and reduces the risk of antibiotic resistance.

Bacteriolysis is the breaking down or destruction of bacterial cells. This process can occur naturally or as a result of medical treatment, such as when antibiotics target and destroy bacteria by disrupting their cell walls. The term "bacteriolysis" specifically refers to the breakdown of the bacterial cell membrane, which can lead to the release of the contents of the bacterial cell and ultimately result in the death of the organism.

A genetic complementation test is a laboratory procedure used in molecular genetics to determine whether two mutated genes can complement each other's function, indicating that they are located at different loci and represent separate alleles. This test involves introducing a normal or wild-type copy of one gene into a cell containing a mutant version of the same gene, and then observing whether the presence of the normal gene restores the normal function of the mutated gene. If the introduction of the normal gene results in the restoration of the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at different loci and can complement each other's function. However, if the introduction of the normal gene does not restore the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at the same locus and represent different alleles of the same gene. This test is commonly used to map genes and identify genetic interactions in a variety of organisms, including bacteria, yeast, and animals.

Thymine is a pyrimidine nucleobase that is one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid double helix of DNA (the other three being adenine, guanine, and cytosine). It is denoted by the letter T in DNA notation and pairs with adenine via two hydrogen bonds. Thymine is not typically found in RNA, where uracil takes its place pairing with adenine. The structure of thymine consists of a six-membered ring (pyrimidine) fused to a five-membered ring containing two nitrogen atoms and a ketone group.

Lipopeptides are a type of molecule that consists of a lipid (fatty acid) tail attached to a small peptide (short chain of amino acids). They are produced naturally by various organisms, including bacteria, and play important roles in cell-to-cell communication, signaling, and as components of bacterial membranes. Some lipopeptides have also been found to have antimicrobial properties and are being studied for their potential use as therapeutic agents.

A bacterial genome is the complete set of genetic material, including both DNA and RNA, found within a single bacterium. It contains all the hereditary information necessary for the bacterium to grow, reproduce, and survive in its environment. The bacterial genome typically includes circular chromosomes, as well as plasmids, which are smaller, circular DNA molecules that can carry additional genes. These genes encode various functional elements such as enzymes, structural proteins, and regulatory sequences that determine the bacterium's characteristics and behavior.

Bacterial genomes vary widely in size, ranging from around 130 kilobases (kb) in Mycoplasma genitalium to over 14 megabases (Mb) in Sorangium cellulosum. The complete sequencing and analysis of bacterial genomes have provided valuable insights into the biology, evolution, and pathogenicity of bacteria, enabling researchers to better understand their roles in various diseases and potential applications in biotechnology.

'Escherichia coli (E. coli) proteins' refer to the various types of proteins that are produced and expressed by the bacterium Escherichia coli. These proteins play a critical role in the growth, development, and survival of the organism. They are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, translation, repair, and regulation.

E. coli is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that is commonly found in the intestines of warm-blooded organisms. It is widely used as a model organism in scientific research due to its well-studied genetics, rapid growth, and ability to be easily manipulated in the laboratory. As a result, many E. coli proteins have been identified, characterized, and studied in great detail.

Some examples of E. coli proteins include enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as lactase, sucrase, and maltose; proteins involved in DNA replication such as the polymerases, single-stranded binding proteins, and helicases; proteins involved in transcription such as RNA polymerase and sigma factors; proteins involved in translation such as ribosomal proteins, tRNAs, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases; and regulatory proteins such as global regulators, two-component systems, and transcription factors.

Understanding the structure, function, and regulation of E. coli proteins is essential for understanding the basic biology of this important organism, as well as for developing new strategies for combating bacterial infections and improving industrial processes involving bacteria.

Microbial genetics is the study of heredity and variation in microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. It involves the investigation of their genetic material (DNA and RNA), genes, gene expression, genetic regulation, mutations, genetic recombination, and genome organization. This field is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis, evolution, ecology, and biotechnological applications. Research in microbial genetics has led to significant advancements in areas such as antibiotic resistance, vaccine development, and gene therapy.

Repressor proteins are a type of regulatory protein in molecular biology that suppress the transcription of specific genes into messenger RNA (mRNA) by binding to DNA. They function as part of gene regulation processes, often working in conjunction with an operator region and a promoter region within the DNA molecule. Repressor proteins can be activated or deactivated by various signals, allowing for precise control over gene expression in response to changing cellular conditions.

There are two main types of repressor proteins:

1. DNA-binding repressors: These directly bind to specific DNA sequences (operator regions) near the target gene and prevent RNA polymerase from transcribing the gene into mRNA.
2. Allosteric repressors: These bind to effector molecules, which then cause a conformational change in the repressor protein, enabling it to bind to DNA and inhibit transcription.

Repressor proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as development, metabolism, and stress response, by controlling gene expression patterns in cells.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Lysogeny is a process in the life cycle of certain viruses, known as bacteriophages or phages, which can infect bacteria. In lysogeny, the viral DNA integrates into the chromosome of the host bacterium and replicates along with it, remaining dormant and not producing any new virus particles. This state is called lysogeny or the lysogenic cycle.

The integrated viral DNA is known as a prophage. The bacterial cell that contains a prophage is called a lysogen. The lysogen can continue to grow and divide normally, passing the prophage onto its daughter cells during reproduction. This dormant state can last for many generations of the host bacterium.

However, under certain conditions such as DNA damage or exposure to UV radiation, the prophage can be induced to excise itself from the bacterial chromosome and enter the lytic cycle. In the lytic cycle, the viral DNA replicates rapidly, producing many new virus particles, which eventually leads to the lysis (breaking open) of the host cell and the release of the newly formed virions.

Lysogeny is an important mechanism for the spread and survival of bacteriophages in bacterial populations. It also plays a role in horizontal gene transfer between bacteria, as genes carried by prophages can be transferred to other bacteria during transduction.

A protoplast is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions, but rather it is a term commonly used in cell biology and botany. A protoplast refers to a plant or bacterial cell that has had its cell wall removed, leaving only the plasma membrane and the cytoplasmic contents, including organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, ribosomes, and other cellular structures.

Protoplasts can be created through enzymatic or mechanical means to isolate the intracellular components for various research purposes, such as studying membrane transport, gene transfer, or cell fusion. In some cases, protoplasts may be used in medical research, particularly in areas related to plant pathology and genetic engineering of plants for medical applications.

An open reading frame (ORF) is a continuous stretch of DNA or RNA sequence that has the potential to be translated into a protein. It begins with a start codon (usually "ATG" in DNA, which corresponds to "AUG" in RNA) and ends with a stop codon ("TAA", "TAG", or "TGA" in DNA; "UAA", "UAG", or "UGA" in RNA). The sequence between these two points is called a coding sequence (CDS), which, when transcribed into mRNA and translated into amino acids, forms a polypeptide chain.

In eukaryotic cells, ORFs can be located in either protein-coding genes or non-coding regions of the genome. In prokaryotic cells, multiple ORFs may be present on a single strand of DNA, often organized into operons that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that not all ORFs necessarily represent functional proteins; some may be pseudogenes or result from errors in genome annotation. Therefore, additional experimental evidence is typically required to confirm the expression and functionality of a given ORF.

Artificial gene fusion refers to the creation of a new gene by joining together parts or whole sequences from two or more different genes. This is achieved through genetic engineering techniques, where the DNA segments are cut and pasted using enzymes called restriction endonucleases and ligases. The resulting artificial gene may encode for a novel protein with unique functions that neither of the parental genes possess. This approach has been widely used in biomedical research to study gene function, create new diagnostic tools, and develop gene therapies.

Uracil is not a medical term, but it is a biological molecule. Medically or biologically, uracil can be defined as one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that is linked to a ribose sugar by an N-glycosidic bond. It forms base pairs with adenine in double-stranded RNA and DNA. Uracil is a pyrimidine derivative, similar to thymine found in DNA, but it lacks the methyl group (-CH3) that thymine has at the 5 position of its ring.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Regulator genes are a type of gene that regulates the activity of other genes in an organism. They do not code for a specific protein product but instead control the expression of other genes by producing regulatory proteins such as transcription factors, repressors, or enhancers. These regulatory proteins bind to specific DNA sequences near the target genes and either promote or inhibit their transcription into mRNA. This allows regulator genes to play a crucial role in coordinating complex biological processes, including development, differentiation, metabolism, and response to environmental stimuli.

There are several types of regulator genes, including:

1. Constitutive regulators: These genes are always active and produce regulatory proteins that control the expression of other genes in a consistent manner.
2. Inducible regulators: These genes respond to specific signals or environmental stimuli by producing regulatory proteins that modulate the expression of target genes.
3. Negative regulators: These genes produce repressor proteins that bind to DNA and inhibit the transcription of target genes, thereby reducing their expression.
4. Positive regulators: These genes produce activator proteins that bind to DNA and promote the transcription of target genes, thereby increasing their expression.
5. Master regulators: These genes control the expression of multiple downstream target genes involved in specific biological processes or developmental pathways.

Regulator genes are essential for maintaining proper gene expression patterns and ensuring normal cellular function. Mutations in regulator genes can lead to various diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and metabolic dysfunctions.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Hexosyltransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a hexose (a type of sugar molecule made up of six carbon atoms) from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule. This transfer results in the formation of a glycosidic bond between the two molecules.

Hexosyltransferases are involved in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of complex carbohydrates, such as glycoproteins and glycolipids, which play important roles in cell recognition, signaling, and communication. These enzymes can transfer a variety of hexose sugars, including glucose, galactose, mannose, fucose, and N-acetylglucosamine, to different acceptor molecules, such as proteins, lipids, or other carbohydrates.

Hexosyltransferases are classified based on the type of donor molecule they use, the type of sugar they transfer, and the type of glycosidic bond they form. Some examples of hexosyltransferases include:

* Glycosyltransferases (GTs): These enzymes transfer a sugar from an activated donor molecule, such as a nucleotide sugar, to an acceptor molecule. GTs are involved in the biosynthesis of various glycoconjugates, including proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids.
* Fucosyltransferases (FUTs): These enzymes transfer fucose, a type of hexose sugar, to an acceptor molecule. FUTs are involved in the biosynthesis of various glycoconjugates, including blood group antigens and Lewis antigens.
* Galactosyltransferases (GALTs): These enzymes transfer galactose, another type of hexose sugar, to an acceptor molecule. GALTs are involved in the biosynthesis of various glycoconjugates, including lactose in milk and gangliosides in the brain.
* Mannosyltransferases (MTs): These enzymes transfer mannose, a type of hexose sugar, to an acceptor molecule. MTs are involved in the biosynthesis of various glycoconjugates, including N-linked glycoproteins and yeast cell walls.

Hexosyltransferases play important roles in many biological processes, including cell recognition, signaling, and adhesion. Dysregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of hexosyltransferases is crucial for developing new therapeutic strategies.

A gene is a specific sequence of nucleotides in DNA that carries genetic information. Genes are the fundamental units of heredity and are responsible for the development and function of all living organisms. They code for proteins or RNA molecules, which carry out various functions within cells and are essential for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs.

Each gene has a specific location on a chromosome, and each person inherits two copies of every gene, one from each parent. Variations in the sequence of nucleotides in a gene can lead to differences in traits between individuals, including physical characteristics, susceptibility to disease, and responses to environmental factors.

Medical genetics is the study of genes and their role in health and disease. It involves understanding how genes contribute to the development and progression of various medical conditions, as well as identifying genetic risk factors and developing strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Insertional mutagenesis is a process of introducing new genetic material into an organism's genome at a specific location, which can result in a change or disruption of the function of the gene at that site. This technique is often used in molecular biology research to study gene function and regulation. The introduction of the foreign DNA is typically accomplished through the use of mobile genetic elements, such as transposons or viruses, which are capable of inserting themselves into the genome.

The insertion of the new genetic material can lead to a loss or gain of function in the affected gene, resulting in a mutation. This type of mutagenesis is called "insertional" because the mutation is caused by the insertion of foreign DNA into the genome. The effects of insertional mutagenesis can range from subtle changes in gene expression to the complete inactivation of a gene.

This technique has been widely used in genetic research, including the study of developmental biology, cancer, and genetic diseases. It is also used in the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for agricultural and industrial applications.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

Microbial drug resistance is a significant medical issue that refers to the ability of microorganisms (such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites) to withstand or survive exposure to drugs or medications designed to kill them or limit their growth. This phenomenon has become a major global health concern, particularly in the context of bacterial infections, where it is also known as antibiotic resistance.

Drug resistance arises due to genetic changes in microorganisms that enable them to modify or bypass the effects of antimicrobial agents. These genetic alterations can be caused by mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes through horizontal gene transfer. The resistant microbes then replicate and multiply, forming populations that are increasingly difficult to eradicate with conventional treatments.

The consequences of drug-resistant infections include increased morbidity, mortality, healthcare costs, and the potential for widespread outbreaks. Factors contributing to the emergence and spread of microbial drug resistance include the overuse or misuse of antimicrobials, poor infection control practices, and inadequate surveillance systems.

To address this challenge, it is crucial to promote prudent antibiotic use, strengthen infection prevention and control measures, develop new antimicrobial agents, and invest in research to better understand the mechanisms underlying drug resistance.

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

DNA restriction enzymes, also known as restriction endonucleases, are a type of enzyme that cut double-stranded DNA at specific recognition sites. These enzymes are produced by bacteria and archaea as a defense mechanism against foreign DNA, such as that found in bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria).

Restriction enzymes recognize specific sequences of nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA) and cleave the phosphodiester bonds between them. The recognition sites for these enzymes are usually palindromic, meaning that the sequence reads the same in both directions when facing the opposite strands of DNA.

Restriction enzymes are widely used in molecular biology research for various applications such as genetic engineering, genome mapping, and DNA fingerprinting. They allow scientists to cut DNA at specific sites, creating precise fragments that can be manipulated and analyzed. The use of restriction enzymes has been instrumental in the development of recombinant DNA technology and the Human Genome Project.

Genetic transduction is a process in molecular biology that describes the transfer of genetic material from one bacterium to another by a viral vector called a bacteriophage (or phage). In this process, the phage infects one bacterium and incorporates a portion of the bacterial DNA into its own genetic material. When the phage then infects a second bacterium, it can transfer the incorporated bacterial DNA to the new host. This can result in the horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of traits such as antibiotic resistance or virulence factors between bacteria.

There are two main types of transduction: generalized and specialized. In generalized transduction, any portion of the bacterial genome can be packaged into the phage particle, leading to a random assortment of genetic material being transferred. In specialized transduction, only specific genes near the site where the phage integrates into the bacterial chromosome are consistently transferred.

It's important to note that genetic transduction is not to be confused with transformation or conjugation, which are other mechanisms of HGT in bacteria.

Sequence homology in nucleic acids refers to the similarity or identity between the nucleotide sequences of two or more DNA or RNA molecules. It is often used as a measure of biological relationship between genes, organisms, or populations. High sequence homology suggests a recent common ancestry or functional constraint, while low sequence homology may indicate a more distant relationship or different functions.

Nucleic acid sequence homology can be determined by various methods such as pairwise alignment, multiple sequence alignment, and statistical analysis. The degree of homology is typically expressed as a percentage of identical or similar nucleotides in a given window of comparison.

It's important to note that the interpretation of sequence homology depends on the biological context and the evolutionary distance between the sequences compared. Therefore, functional and experimental validation is often necessary to confirm the significance of sequence homology.

Diatrizoate is a type of contrast medium that is used during X-ray examinations, such as CT scans and urography, to help improve the visibility of internal body structures. It is a type of iodinated compound, which means it contains iodine atoms. Diatrizoate works by blocking the absorption of X-rays, causing the areas where it is injected or introduced to appear white on X-ray images. This can help doctors to diagnose a variety of medical conditions, including problems with the urinary system and digestive tract.

Like all medications and contrast agents, diatrizoate can have side effects, including allergic reactions, kidney damage, and thyroid problems. It is important for patients to discuss any potential risks and benefits of using this agent with their healthcare provider before undergoing an X-ray examination.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

DNA replication is the biological process by which DNA makes an identical copy of itself during cell division. It is a fundamental mechanism that allows genetic information to be passed down from one generation of cells to the next. During DNA replication, each strand of the double helix serves as a template for the synthesis of a new complementary strand. This results in the creation of two identical DNA molecules. The enzymes responsible for DNA replication include helicase, which unwinds the double helix, and polymerase, which adds nucleotides to the growing strands.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Gene deletion is a type of mutation where a segment of DNA, containing one or more genes, is permanently lost or removed from a chromosome. This can occur due to various genetic mechanisms such as homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining, or other types of genomic rearrangements.

The deletion of a gene can have varying effects on the organism, depending on the function of the deleted gene and its importance for normal physiological processes. If the deleted gene is essential for survival, the deletion may result in embryonic lethality or developmental abnormalities. However, if the gene is non-essential or has redundant functions, the deletion may not have any noticeable effects on the organism's phenotype.

Gene deletions can also be used as a tool in genetic research to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes. For example, researchers may use gene deletion techniques to create genetically modified animal models to investigate the impact of gene deletion on disease progression or development.

Enzyme repression is a type of gene regulation in which the production of an enzyme is inhibited or suppressed, thereby reducing the rate of catalysis of the chemical reaction that the enzyme facilitates. This process typically occurs when the end product of the reaction binds to the regulatory protein, called a repressor, which then binds to the operator region of the operon (a group of genes that are transcribed together) and prevents transcription of the structural genes encoding for the enzyme. Enzyme repression helps maintain homeostasis within the cell by preventing the unnecessary production of enzymes when they are not needed, thus conserving energy and resources.

Peptide hydrolases, also known as proteases or peptidases, are a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of peptide bonds in proteins and peptides. They play a crucial role in various biological processes such as protein degradation, digestion, cell signaling, and regulation of various physiological functions. Based on their catalytic mechanism and the specificity for the peptide bond, they are classified into several types, including serine proteases, cysteine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. These enzymes have important clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases, such as cancer, viral infections, and inflammatory disorders.

Tritium is not a medical term, but it is a term used in the field of nuclear physics and chemistry. Tritium (symbol: T or 3H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with two neutrons and one proton in its nucleus. It is also known as heavy hydrogen or superheavy hydrogen.

Tritium has a half-life of about 12.3 years, which means that it decays by emitting a low-energy beta particle (an electron) to become helium-3. Due to its radioactive nature and relatively short half-life, tritium is used in various applications, including nuclear weapons, fusion reactors, luminous paints, and medical research.

In the context of medicine, tritium may be used as a radioactive tracer in some scientific studies or medical research, but it is not a term commonly used to describe a medical condition or treatment.

Amino acids are organic compounds that serve as the building blocks of proteins. They consist of a central carbon atom, also known as the alpha carbon, which is bonded to an amino group (-NH2), a carboxyl group (-COOH), a hydrogen atom (H), and a variable side chain (R group). The R group can be composed of various combinations of atoms such as hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon, which determine the unique properties of each amino acid.

There are 20 standard amino acids that are encoded by the genetic code and incorporated into proteins during translation. These include:

1. Alanine (Ala)
2. Arginine (Arg)
3. Asparagine (Asn)
4. Aspartic acid (Asp)
5. Cysteine (Cys)
6. Glutamine (Gln)
7. Glutamic acid (Glu)
8. Glycine (Gly)
9. Histidine (His)
10. Isoleucine (Ile)
11. Leucine (Leu)
12. Lysine (Lys)
13. Methionine (Met)
14. Phenylalanine (Phe)
15. Proline (Pro)
16. Serine (Ser)
17. Threonine (Thr)
18. Tryptophan (Trp)
19. Tyrosine (Tyr)
20. Valine (Val)

Additionally, there are several non-standard or modified amino acids that can be incorporated into proteins through post-translational modifications, such as hydroxylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. These modifications expand the functional diversity of proteins and play crucial roles in various cellular processes.

Amino acids are essential for numerous biological functions, including protein synthesis, enzyme catalysis, neurotransmitter production, energy metabolism, and immune response regulation. Some amino acids can be synthesized by the human body (non-essential), while others must be obtained through dietary sources (essential).

Polyglutamic acid (PGA) is not a medical term per se, but it is a term used in biochemistry and cosmetics. Medically, it may be mentioned in the context of certain medical conditions or treatments. Here's a definition:

Polyglutamic acid is a polymer of glutamic acid, a type of amino acid. It is a natural substance found in various foods such as natto, a traditional Japanese fermented soybean dish. In the human body, it is produced by certain bacteria during fermentation processes.

PGA has been studied for its potential medical applications due to its unique properties, including its ability to retain moisture and form gels. It has been explored as a wound dressing material, drug delivery vehicle, and anti-aging cosmetic ingredient. However, it is not a widely used or recognized medical treatment at this time.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

Nucleic acid conformation refers to the three-dimensional structure that nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) adopt as a result of the bonding patterns between the atoms within the molecule. The primary structure of nucleic acids is determined by the sequence of nucleotides, while the conformation is influenced by factors such as the sugar-phosphate backbone, base stacking, and hydrogen bonding.

Two common conformations of DNA are the B-form and the A-form. The B-form is a right-handed helix with a diameter of about 20 Å and a pitch of 34 Å, while the A-form has a smaller diameter (about 18 Å) and a shorter pitch (about 25 Å). RNA typically adopts an A-form conformation.

The conformation of nucleic acids can have significant implications for their function, as it can affect their ability to interact with other molecules such as proteins or drugs. Understanding the conformational properties of nucleic acids is therefore an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Bacitracin is an antibiotic drug that is primarily used topically, in the form of ointments or creams, to prevent and treat skin infections caused by bacteria. It works by inhibiting the bacterial protein synthesis necessary for their growth and multiplication. Bacitracin is not typically used systemically due to its potential nephrotoxicity (kidney toxicity) when given internally.

The medical definition of 'Bacitracin' is:

A polypeptide antibiotic derived from a strain of Bacillus subtilis, with a molecular weight of about 1450 daltons. It is used topically for its antibacterial properties and is often combined with other agents such as neomycin and polymyxin B in ointments or creams to treat skin infections. Bacitracin inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis by blocking the transfer of amino acids during peptidoglycan formation, thereby exerting a bacteriostatic effect on susceptible organisms. It is not used systemically due to its potential nephrotoxicity.

"Terminator regions" is a term used in molecular biology and genetics to describe specific sequences within DNA that control the termination of transcription, which is the process of creating an RNA copy of a sequence of DNA. These regions are also sometimes referred to as "transcription termination sites."

In the context of genetic terminators, the term "terminator" refers to the sequence of nucleotides that signals the end of the gene and the beginning of the termination process. The terminator region typically contains a specific sequence of nucleotides that recruits proteins called termination factors, which help to disrupt the transcription bubble and release the newly synthesized RNA molecule from the DNA template.

It's important to note that there are different types of terminators in genetics, including "Rho-dependent" and "Rho-independent" terminators, which differ in their mechanisms for terminating transcription. Rho-dependent terminators rely on the action of a protein called Rho, while Rho-independent terminators form a stable hairpin structure that causes the transcription machinery to stall and release the RNA.

In summary, "Terminator regions" in genetics are specific sequences within DNA that control the termination of transcription by signaling the end of the gene and recruiting proteins or forming structures that disrupt the transcription bubble and release the newly synthesized RNA molecule.

Hemolysins are a type of protein toxin produced by certain bacteria, fungi, and plants that have the ability to damage and destroy red blood cells (erythrocytes), leading to their lysis or hemolysis. This results in the release of hemoglobin into the surrounding environment. Hemolysins can be classified into two main categories:

1. Exotoxins: These are secreted by bacteria and directly damage host cells. They can be further divided into two types:
* Membrane attack complex/perforin-like proteins (MACPF): These hemolysins create pores in the membrane of red blood cells, disrupting their integrity and causing lysis. Examples include alpha-hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus and streptolysin O from Streptococcus pyogenes.
* Enzymatic hemolysins: These hemolysins are enzymes that degrade specific components of the red blood cell membrane, ultimately leading to lysis. An example is streptolysin S from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is a thiol-activated, oxygen-labile hemolysin.
2. Endotoxins: These are part of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and can cause indirect hemolysis by activating the complement system or by stimulating the release of inflammatory mediators from host cells.

Hemolysins play a significant role in bacterial pathogenesis, contributing to tissue damage, impaired immune responses, and disease progression.

Anthrax is a serious infectious disease caused by gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria called Bacillus anthracis. This bacterium produces spores that can survive in the environment for many years. Anthrax can be found naturally in soil and commonly affects animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats. Humans can get infected with anthrax by handling contaminated animal products or by inhaling or coming into contact with contaminated soil, water, or vegetation.

There are three main forms of anthrax infection:

1. Cutaneous anthrax: This is the most common form and occurs when the spores enter the body through a cut or abrasion on the skin. It starts as a painless bump that eventually develops into a ulcer with a black center.
2. Inhalation anthrax (also known as wool-sorter's disease): This occurs when a person inhales anthrax spores, which can lead to severe respiratory symptoms and potentially fatal illness.
3. Gastrointestinal anthrax: This form is rare and results from consuming contaminated meat. It causes nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, which may be bloody.

Anthrax can be treated with antibiotics, but early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for a successful outcome. Preventive measures include vaccination and avoiding contact with infected animals or contaminated animal products. Anthrax is also considered a potential bioterrorism agent due to its ease of dissemination and high mortality rate if left untreated.

Tryptophan is an essential amino acid, meaning it cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources. Its chemical formula is C11H12N2O2. Tryptophan plays a crucial role in various biological processes as it serves as a precursor to several important molecules, including serotonin, melatonin, and niacin (vitamin B3). Serotonin is a neurotransmitter involved in mood regulation, appetite control, and sleep-wake cycles, while melatonin is a hormone that regulates sleep-wake patterns. Niacin is essential for energy production and DNA repair.

Foods rich in tryptophan include turkey, chicken, fish, eggs, cheese, milk, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. In some cases, tryptophan supplementation may be recommended to help manage conditions related to serotonin imbalances, such as depression or insomnia, but this should only be done under the guidance of a healthcare professional due to potential side effects and interactions with other medications.

Alanine is an alpha-amino acid that is used in the biosynthesis of proteins. The molecular formula for alanine is C3H7NO2. It is a non-essential amino acid, which means that it can be produced by the human body through the conversion of other nutrients, such as pyruvate, and does not need to be obtained directly from the diet.

Alanine is classified as an aliphatic amino acid because it contains a simple carbon side chain. It is also a non-polar amino acid, which means that it is hydrophobic and tends to repel water. Alanine plays a role in the metabolism of glucose and helps to regulate blood sugar levels. It is also involved in the transfer of nitrogen between tissues and helps to maintain the balance of nitrogen in the body.

In addition to its role as a building block of proteins, alanine is also used as a neurotransmitter in the brain and has been shown to have a calming effect on the nervous system. It is found in many foods, including meats, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, and legumes.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Acetoin is a chemical compound that is produced as a metabolic byproduct in certain types of bacteria, including some species of streptococcus and lactobacillus. It is a colorless liquid with a sweet, buttery odor and is used as a flavoring agent in the food industry. In addition to its use as a flavoring, acetoin has been studied for its potential antibacterial properties and its possible role in the development of biofilms. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential uses and implications of this compound.

Muramidase, also known as lysozyme, is an enzyme that hydrolyzes the glycosidic bond between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine in peptidoglycan, a polymer found in bacterial cell walls. This enzymatic activity plays a crucial role in the innate immune system by contributing to the destruction of invading bacteria. Muramidase is widely distributed in various tissues and bodily fluids, such as tears, saliva, and milk, and is also found in several types of white blood cells, including neutrophils and monocytes.

IsoPROPYL THIO-galacto-side (IPTG) is a chemical compound used in molecular biology as an inducer of gene transcription. It is a synthetic analog of allolactose, which is the natural inducer of the lac operon in E. coli bacteria. The lac operon contains genes that code for enzymes involved in the metabolism of lactose, and its expression is normally repressed when lactose is not present. However, when lactose or IPTG is added to the growth medium, it binds to the repressor protein (lac repressor) and prevents it from binding to the operator region of the lac operon, thereby allowing transcription of the structural genes.

IPTG is often used in laboratory experiments to induce the expression of cloned genes that have been placed under the control of the lac promoter. When IPTG is added to the bacterial culture, it binds to the lac repressor and allows for the transcription and translation of the gene of interest. This can be useful for producing large quantities of a particular protein or for studying the regulation of gene expression in bacteria.

It's important to note that IPTG is not metabolized by E.coli, so it remains active in the growth medium throughout the experiment and can be added at any point during the growth cycle.

Electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel (EPG) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures of proteins or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) based on their size and electrical charge. This technique utilizes a matrix made of cross-linked polyacrylamide, a type of gel, which provides a stable and uniform environment for the separation of molecules.

In this process:

1. The polyacrylamide gel is prepared by mixing acrylamide monomers with a cross-linking agent (bis-acrylamide) and a catalyst (ammonium persulfate) in the presence of a buffer solution.
2. The gel is then poured into a mold and allowed to polymerize, forming a solid matrix with uniform pore sizes that depend on the concentration of acrylamide used. Higher concentrations result in smaller pores, providing better resolution for separating smaller molecules.
3. Once the gel has set, it is placed in an electrophoresis apparatus containing a buffer solution. Samples containing the mixture of proteins or nucleic acids are loaded into wells on the top of the gel.
4. An electric field is applied across the gel, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode (anode) while positively charged molecules move toward the negative electrode (cathode). The rate of migration depends on the size, charge, and shape of the molecules.
5. Smaller molecules move faster through the gel matrix and will migrate farther from the origin compared to larger molecules, resulting in separation based on size. Proteins and nucleic acids can be selectively stained after electrophoresis to visualize the separated bands.

EPG is widely used in various research fields, including molecular biology, genetics, proteomics, and forensic science, for applications such as protein characterization, DNA fragment analysis, cloning, mutation detection, and quality control of nucleic acid or protein samples.

The Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) is not exactly a "sugar," but rather a complex molecular machinery used by certain bacteria for the transport and phosphorylation of sugars. The PTS system is a major carbohydrate transport system in many gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, which allows them to take up and metabolize various sugars for energy and growth.

The PTS system consists of several protein components, including the enzyme I (EI), histidine phosphocarrier protein (HPr), and sugar-specific enzymes II (EII). The process begins when PEP transfers a phosphate group to EI, which then passes it on to HPr. The phosphorylated HPr then interacts with the sugar-specific EII complex, which is composed of two domains: the membrane-associated domain (EIIA) and the periplasmic domain (EIIC).

When a sugar molecule binds to the EIIC domain, it induces a conformational change that allows the phosphate group from HPr to be transferred to the sugar. This phosphorylation event facilitates the translocation of the sugar across the membrane and into the cytoplasm, where it undergoes further metabolic reactions.

In summary, the Phosphoenolpyruvate Sugar Phosphotransferase System (PEP-PTS) is a bacterial transport system that utilizes phosphoryl groups from phosphoenolpyruvate to facilitate the uptake and phosphorylation of sugars, allowing bacteria to efficiently metabolize and utilize various carbon sources for energy and growth.

Nitrosoguanidines are a type of organic compound that contain a nitroso (NO) group and a guanidine group. They are known to be potent nitrosating agents, which means they can release nitrous acid or related nitrosating species. Nitrosation is a reaction that leads to the formation of N-nitroso compounds, some of which have been associated with an increased risk of cancer in humans. Therefore, nitrosoguanidines are often used in laboratory studies to investigate the mechanisms of nitrosation and the effects of N-nitroso compounds on biological systems. However, they are not typically used as therapeutic agents due to their potential carcinogenicity.

Muramic acids are not a medical condition or diagnosis. They are actually a type of chemical compound that is found in the cell walls of certain bacteria. Specifically, muramic acid is a derivative of amino sugars and forms a part of peptidoglycan, which is a major component of bacterial cell walls.

Peptidoglycan provides structural support and protection to bacterial cells, helping them maintain their shape and resist osmotic pressure. Muramic acids are unique to bacteria and are not found in the cell walls of human or animal cells, making them potential targets for antibiotic drugs that can selectively inhibit bacterial growth without harming host cells.

The lac operon is a genetic regulatory system found in the bacteria Escherichia coli that controls the expression of genes responsible for the metabolism of lactose as a source of energy. It consists of three structural genes (lacZ, lacY, and lacA) that code for enzymes involved in lactose metabolism, as well as two regulatory elements: the lac promoter and the lac operator.

The lac repressor protein, produced by the lacI gene, binds to the lac operator sequence when lactose is not present, preventing RNA polymerase from transcribing the structural genes. When lactose is available, it is converted into allolactose, which acts as an inducer and binds to the lac repressor protein, causing a conformational change that prevents it from binding to the operator sequence. This allows RNA polymerase to bind to the promoter and transcribe the structural genes, leading to the production of enzymes necessary for lactose metabolism.

In summary, the lac operon is a genetic regulatory system in E. coli that controls the expression of genes involved in lactose metabolism based on the availability of lactose as a substrate.

Carbon isotopes are variants of the chemical element carbon that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^{12}C), which contains six protons and six neutrons. However, carbon can also come in other forms, known as isotopes, which contain different numbers of neutrons.

Carbon-13 (^{13}C) is a stable isotope of carbon that contains seven neutrons in its nucleus. It makes up about 1.1% of all carbon found on Earth and is used in various scientific applications, such as in tracing the metabolic pathways of organisms or in studying the age of fossilized materials.

Carbon-14 (^{14}C), also known as radiocarbon, is a radioactive isotope of carbon that contains eight neutrons in its nucleus. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere through the interaction of cosmic rays with nitrogen gas. Carbon-14 has a half-life of about 5,730 years, which makes it useful for dating organic materials, such as archaeological artifacts or fossils, up to around 60,000 years old.

Carbon isotopes are important in many scientific fields, including geology, biology, and medicine, and are used in a variety of applications, from studying the Earth's climate history to diagnosing medical conditions.

Biological pest control, also known as biocontrol, is a method of managing or eliminating pests such as insects, mites, weeds, and plant diseases using natural enemies or other organisms. These biological control agents include predators, parasites, pathogens, and competitors that regulate pest populations and reduce the need for chemical pesticides. Biological pest control is a key component of integrated pest management (IPM) programs and has minimal impact on the environment compared to traditional pest control methods.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Bacterial toxins are poisonous substances produced and released by bacteria. They can cause damage to the host organism's cells and tissues, leading to illness or disease. Bacterial toxins can be classified into two main types: exotoxins and endotoxins.

Exotoxins are proteins secreted by bacterial cells that can cause harm to the host. They often target specific cellular components or pathways, leading to tissue damage and inflammation. Some examples of exotoxins include botulinum toxin produced by Clostridium botulinum, which causes botulism; diphtheria toxin produced by Corynebacterium diphtheriae, which causes diphtheria; and tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani, which causes tetanus.

Endotoxins, on the other hand, are components of the bacterial cell wall that are released when the bacteria die or divide. They consist of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and can cause a generalized inflammatory response in the host. Endotoxins can be found in gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Bacterial toxins can cause a wide range of symptoms depending on the type of toxin, the dose, and the site of infection. They can lead to serious illnesses or even death if left untreated. Vaccines and antibiotics are often used to prevent or treat bacterial infections and reduce the risk of severe complications from bacterial toxins.

Glycoside hydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds found in various substrates such as polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, and glycoproteins. These enzymes break down complex carbohydrates into simpler sugars by cleaving the glycosidic linkages that connect monosaccharide units.

Glycoside hydrolases are classified based on their mechanism of action and the type of glycosidic bond they hydrolyze. The classification system is maintained by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB). Each enzyme in this class is assigned a unique Enzyme Commission (EC) number, which reflects its specificity towards the substrate and the type of reaction it catalyzes.

These enzymes have various applications in different industries, including food processing, biofuel production, pulp and paper manufacturing, and biomedical research. In medicine, glycoside hydrolases are used to diagnose and monitor certain medical conditions, such as carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome, a rare inherited disorder affecting the structure of glycoproteins.

Gram-positive bacteria are a type of bacteria that stain dark purple or blue when subjected to the Gram staining method, which is a common technique used in microbiology to classify and identify different types of bacteria based on their structural differences. This staining method was developed by Hans Christian Gram in 1884.

The key characteristic that distinguishes Gram-positive bacteria from other types, such as Gram-negative bacteria, is the presence of a thick layer of peptidoglycan in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process. Additionally, Gram-positive bacteria lack an outer membrane found in Gram-negative bacteria.

Examples of Gram-positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bacillus subtilis. Some Gram-positive bacteria can cause various human diseases, while others are beneficial or harmless.

Centrifugation, Density Gradient is a medical laboratory technique used to separate and purify different components of a mixture based on their size, density, and shape. This method involves the use of a centrifuge and a density gradient medium, such as sucrose or cesium chloride, to create a stable density gradient within a column or tube.

The sample is carefully layered onto the top of the gradient and then subjected to high-speed centrifugation. During centrifugation, the particles in the sample move through the gradient based on their size, density, and shape, with heavier particles migrating faster and further than lighter ones. This results in the separation of different components of the mixture into distinct bands or zones within the gradient.

This technique is commonly used to purify and concentrate various types of biological materials, such as viruses, organelles, ribosomes, and subcellular fractions, from complex mixtures. It allows for the isolation of pure and intact particles, which can then be collected and analyzed for further study or use in downstream applications.

In summary, Centrifugation, Density Gradient is a medical laboratory technique used to separate and purify different components of a mixture based on their size, density, and shape using a centrifuge and a density gradient medium.

Deoxyribonucleases (DNases) are a group of enzymes that cleave, or cut, the phosphodiester bonds in the backbone of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules. DNases are classified based on their mechanism of action into two main categories: double-stranded DNases and single-stranded DNases.

Double-stranded DNases cleave both strands of the DNA duplex, while single-stranded DNases cleave only one strand. These enzymes play important roles in various biological processes, such as DNA replication, repair, recombination, and degradation. They are also used in research and clinical settings for applications such as DNA fragmentation analysis, DNA sequencing, and treatment of cystic fibrosis.

It's worth noting that there are many different types of DNases with varying specificities and activities, and the medical definition may vary depending on the context.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

Genetic suppression is a concept in genetics that refers to the phenomenon where the expression or function of one gene is reduced or silenced by another gene. This can occur through various mechanisms such as:

* Allelic exclusion: When only one allele (version) of a gene is expressed, while the other is suppressed.
* Epigenetic modifications: Chemical changes to the DNA or histone proteins that package DNA can result in the suppression of gene expression.
* RNA interference: Small RNAs can bind to and degrade specific mRNAs (messenger RNAs), preventing their translation into proteins.
* Transcriptional repression: Proteins called transcription factors can bind to DNA and prevent the recruitment of RNA polymerase, which is necessary for gene transcription.

Genetic suppression plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression and maintaining proper cellular function. It can also contribute to diseases such as cancer when genes that suppress tumor growth are suppressed themselves.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Genetic recombination is the process by which genetic material is exchanged between two similar or identical molecules of DNA during meiosis, resulting in new combinations of genes on each chromosome. This exchange occurs during crossover, where segments of DNA are swapped between non-sister homologous chromatids, creating genetic diversity among the offspring. It is a crucial mechanism for generating genetic variability and facilitating evolutionary change within populations. Additionally, recombination also plays an essential role in DNA repair processes through mechanisms such as homologous recombinational repair (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ).

Electron microscopy (EM) is a type of microscopy that uses a beam of electrons to create an image of the sample being examined, resulting in much higher magnification and resolution than light microscopy. There are several types of electron microscopy, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and reflection electron microscopy (REM).

In TEM, a beam of electrons is transmitted through a thin slice of the sample, and the electrons that pass through the sample are focused to form an image. This technique can provide detailed information about the internal structure of cells, viruses, and other biological specimens, as well as the composition and structure of materials at the atomic level.

In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of the sample, and the electrons that are scattered back from the surface are detected to create an image. This technique can provide information about the topography and composition of surfaces, as well as the structure of materials at the microscopic level.

REM is a variation of SEM in which the beam of electrons is reflected off the surface of the sample, rather than scattered back from it. This technique can provide information about the surface chemistry and composition of materials.

Electron microscopy has a wide range of applications in biology, medicine, and materials science, including the study of cellular structure and function, disease diagnosis, and the development of new materials and technologies.

Mutagenesis is the process by which the genetic material (DNA or RNA) of an organism is changed in a way that can alter its phenotype, or observable traits. These changes, known as mutations, can be caused by various factors such as chemicals, radiation, or viruses. Some mutations may have no effect on the organism, while others can cause harm, including diseases and cancer. Mutagenesis is a crucial area of study in genetics and molecular biology, with implications for understanding evolution, genetic disorders, and the development of new medical treatments.

Aspartate kinase is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the biosynthesis of several amino acids, including aspartate, methionine, and threonine. This enzyme catalyzes the phosphorylation of aspartic acid to form phosphoaspartate, which is the first step in the synthesis of these essential amino acids.

Aspartate kinase exists in different forms or isozymes in various organisms, and it can be regulated by feedback inhibition. This means that the enzyme's activity can be suppressed when the concentration of one or more of the amino acids it helps to synthesize becomes too high, preventing further production and maintaining a balanced level of these essential nutrients in the body.

In humans, aspartate kinase is involved in several metabolic pathways and is an essential enzyme for normal growth and development. Defects or mutations in the genes encoding aspartate kinase can lead to various genetic disorders and metabolic imbalances.

X-ray crystallography is a technique used in structural biology to determine the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in a crystal lattice. In this method, a beam of X-rays is directed at a crystal and diffracts, or spreads out, into a pattern of spots called reflections. The intensity and angle of each reflection are measured and used to create an electron density map, which reveals the position and type of atoms in the crystal. This information can be used to determine the molecular structure of a compound, including its shape, size, and chemical bonds. X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for understanding the structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

... , known also as the hay bacillus or grass bacillus, is a Gram-positive, catalase-positive bacterium, found in ... Media related to Bacillus subtilis at Wikimedia Commons SubtiWiki "up-to-date information for all genes of Bacillus subtilis" ... Bacillus subtilis genome browser Type strain of Bacillus subtilis at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase (Wikipedia ... and renamed Bacillus subtilis by Ferdinand Cohn in 1872 (subtilis being the Latin for "fine, thin, slender"). B. subtilis cells ...
Bacillus+subtilis+ribonuclease at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Portal: Biology (EC 3.1 ... Bacillus subtilis ribonuclease (EC 3.1.27.2, Proteus mirabilis RNase, ribonucleate nucleotido-2'-transferase (cyclizing)) is an ... Yamasaki M, Arima K (May 1967). "Regulation of intracellular ribonuclease of Bacillus subtilis by ATP and ADP". Biochimica et ... Yamasaki M, Arima K (October 1969). "Intracellular ribonuclease of Bacillus subtilis; specific inhibition by ATP and dATP". ...
Bacillus subtilis - Parts Registry Video - Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis Portal: Biology (All articles with unsourced ... Bacillus Sporophyte Bacillus subtilis Stephens C (January 1998). "Bacterial sporulation: a question of commitment?". Current ... Bacillus subtilis is a rod-shaped, Gram-positive bacteria that is naturally found in soil and vegetation, and is known for its ... Jabbari S, Heap JT, King JR (January 2011). "Mathematical modelling of the sporulation-initiation network in Bacillus subtilis ...
In a screen of the Bacillus subtilis genome for genes encoding ncRNAs, Saito et al. focused on 123 intergenic regions (IGRs) ... Jahn N, Preis H, Wiedemann C, Brantl S (February 2012). "BsrG/SR4 from Bacillus subtilis--the first temperature-dependent type ... Irnov I, Sharma CM, Vogel J, Winkler WC (October 2010). "Identification of regulatory RNAs in Bacillus subtilis". Nucleic Acids ... "Novel small RNA-encoding genes in the intergenic regions of Bacillus subtilis". Gene. 428 (1-2): 2-8. doi:10.1016/j.gene. ...
Reif C, Löser C, Brantl S (February 2018). "Bacillus subtilis Type I antitoxin SR6 Promotes Degradation of Toxin yonT mRNA and ... Several type I TA systems have been described in B. subtilis. YonT/SR6 system is located on the SPβ prophage of the B. subtilis ... "Type I toxin-antitoxin systems in Bacillus subtilis". RNA Biology. 9 (12): 1491-1497. doi:10.4161/rna.22358. PMID 23059907. ...
Branda, SS; González-Pastor, JE; Ben-Yehuda, S; Losick, R; Kolter, R (2001). "Fruiting body formation by Bacillus subtilis". ... Shank, EA; Klepac-Ceraj, V; Collado-Torres, L; Powers, GE; Losick, R; Kolter (2011). "Bacillus subtilis forming biofilms are ... van Gestel, J; Vlamakis, H; Kolter; Collectives, Cell (2015). "Bacillus subtilis Uses Division of Labor to Migrate". PLOS Biol ... Lyons NA, Kolter R. Bacillus subtilis Protects Public Goods by Extending Kin Discrimination to Closely Related Species. mBio. ...
A common polypeptide antibiotic is bacitracin, derived from the bacteria; Bacillus subtilis. As a therapeutic drug, it has ... Bacitracin is a polypeptide antibiotic derived from a bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and acts against bacteria through the ...
In Bacillus subtilis, this riboswitch is found upstream of the gcvT operon which controls glycine degradation. It is thought ... Babina AM, Lea NE, Meyer MM (October 2017). "Bacillus subtilis". mBio. 8 (5). doi:10.1128/mBio.01602-17. PMC 5666159. PMID ...
Bacillus subtilis, etc.). Different types of such steam application are also available in practice, including substrate ...
ISBN 0-8412-0095-5. "Lichenase endo-1-3-1-4-beta-D-Glucanase Bacillus subtilis". megazyme.com. Retrieved 2019-06-25. McCleary, ... "Lichenase from Bacillus subtilis". Biomass Part A: Cellulose and Hemicellulose. Methods in Enzymology. Vol. 160. Academic Press ... 4-glucanase from Bacillus subtilis 168". Process Biochemistry. 46 (5): 1202-1206. doi:10.1016/j.procbio.2011.01.037. ISSN 1359- ... bonds The best-characterised variant of this of enzyme is Bacillus subtilis lichenase, which is used as a molecular biology ...
Recombinant Bacillus subtilis str. pBE2C1 and Bacillus subtilis str. pBE2C1AB were used in production of polyhydroxyalkanoates ... "Bioconversion of fish solid waste into PHB using Bacillus subtilis based submerged fermentation process". Environmental ... "Bacillus and biopolymer: Prospects and challenges". Biochemistry and Biophysics Reports. 12: 206-13. doi:10.1016/j.bbrep. ...
Essential Bacillus subtilis genes., in: Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100, 4678-4683 (April 15, 2003) Kowalski, Heather. "First Self- ... subtilis, where the data comes from Genome News Network The organisms listed in this table have been systematically tested for ...
Reeve, John N.; Mendelson, Neil H.; Coyne, Sheila I.; Hallock, Linda L. (1973-05-01). "Minicells of Bacillus subtilis". Journal ...
April 2003). "Essential Bacillus subtilis genes". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of ... Commichau FM, Pietack N, Stülke J (June 2013). "Essential genes in Bacillus subtilis: a re-evaluation after ten years". ...
Similar circumstances also occur for Bacillus subtilis, and even then competence develops only in certain media. ... Solomon, J M (1995). "Convergent sensing pathways mediate response to two extracellular competence factors in Bacillus subtilis ... Dubnau, D (1991). "Genetic competence in Bacillus subtilis". Microbiological Reviews. 55 (3): 395-424. doi:10.1128/mr.55.3.395- ...
Šrogl, M. (5 March 1965). "Intraspecific transformation in Bacillus subtilis". Folia Microbiologica. 11 (1): 39-42. doi:10.1007 ...
Job V, Marcone GL, Pilone MS, Pollegioni L (March 2002). "Glycine oxidase from Bacillus subtilis. Characterization of a new ... Nishiya Y, Imanaka T (November 1998). "Purification and characterization of a novel glycine oxidase from Bacillus subtilis". ...
"Shape determination in Bacillus subtilis." Current opinion in microbiology 10, no. 6 (2007): 611-616. "Rut Carballido-López, ... "The bacterial cytoskeleton: in vivo dynamics of the actin-like protein Mbl of Bacillus subtilis." Developmental cell 4, no. 1 ( ...
In nature, the Φ29 phage infects Bacillus subtilis, a species of gram-positive, endospore-forming bacteria that is found in ... Errington, Jeffery; van der Aart, Lizah T (2020-05-11). "Microbe Profile: Bacillus subtilis: model organism for cellular ... "Assembly of Bacillus subtilis Phage Phi29. 1. Mutants in the Cistrons Coding for the Structural Proteins". European Journal of ... Bacillus virus Φ29 (bacteriophage Φ29) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophage with a prolate icosahedral head and a ...
Experiments on Bacillus subtilis by Matsushita et al. Lacasta, A. M.; Cantalapiedra, I. R.; Auguet, C. E.; Peñaranda, A.; ... A large number of studies on pattern formation in bacterial colonies have been performed in Bacillus subtilis and in Proteus ... Employed models include: Reaction-diffusion system Cellular automata Colonies of Bacillus subtilis on a Petri dish can grow ... Reaction-diffusion model for Bacillus Subtilis. Some more images of patterns in bacterial growth can be found in: http://www. ...
For instance, transformation occurs near the end of logarithmic growth, when amino acids become limiting in Bacillus subtilis, ... Anagnostopoulos C, Spizizen J (May 1961). "Requirements for Transformation in Bacillus Subtilis". Journal of Bacteriology. 81 ( ...
Kearns, Daniel B.; Losick, Richard (2004). "Swarming motility in undomesticated Bacillus subtilis". Molecular Microbiology. 49 ... "Branched swarming patterns on a synthetic medium formed by wild-type Bacillus subtilis strain 3610: detection of different ... "Single-cell analysis in situ in a Bacillus subtilis swarming community identifies distinct spatially separated subpopulations ... Bacillus, Yersinia, Pseudomonas, Proteus, Vibrio and Escherichia. This multicellular behavior has been mostly observed in ...
Takahashi I, Ogura K, Seto S (1980). "Heptaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase from Bacillus subtilis". J. Biol. Chem. 255 (10): ...
Bacillus subtilis creates strong foot odor. The skin creates antimicrobial peptides such as cathelicidins that control the ... Bacillus oleronius, a Demodex associated microbe, is not typically found in the commensal skin microbiota but initiates ... and Bacilli) and many different types of rare bacteria. Other types of rare organisms were discovered inside the navels of the ...
... "myo-Inositol catabolism in Bacillus subtilis". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 283 (16): 10415-10424. doi:10.1074/jbc. ...
Anagnostopoulos C, Spizizen J (1961). "Requirements for Transformation in Bacillus Subtilis". J. Bacteriol. 81 (5): 741-6. doi: ... as in Bacillus subtilis and in other bacteria. Natural genetic transformation is a form of DNA transfer that appears to be an ...
Competence development in Bacillus subtilis requires expression of about 40 genes. The DNA integrated into the host chromosome ... Saito Y, Taguchi H, Akamatsu T (April 2006). "DNA taken into Bacillus subtilis competent cells by lysed-protoplast ... Anagnostopoulos C, Spizizen J (May 1961). "Requirements for Transformation in Bacillus Subtilis". Journal of Bacteriology. 81 ( ... Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus sanguinis and in Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. It has also been ...
Bacitracin, from Bacillus subtilis (Tracy strain). Gramicidin, from Brevibacillus brevis. Polymyxin, from Paenibacillus ...
Bacillus is utilized in the production of the chemotherapy medicine L-asparaginase. Bacillus subtilis is utilized in the ... Bacillus subtilis can biosynthesize silver nanoparticles. Bacillus badius can be used to cleaves penicillin G to 6-amino ... Bacillus sonorensis MT93. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2014 May;80(10):2981-90. doi: 10.1128/AEM.04259-13 Bacillus subtilis ... Wikispecies has information related to Bacillus. Biology portal Bacillus subtilis, a culinary/industrial bacterium used to ...
Bacillus subtilis). The experiment comprises two oak wooden boxes containing duplicate samples, to be kept at the University of ...
Bacillus subtilis, known also as the hay bacillus or grass bacillus, is a Gram-positive, catalase-positive bacterium, found in ... Media related to Bacillus subtilis at Wikimedia Commons SubtiWiki "up-to-date information for all genes of Bacillus subtilis" ... Bacillus subtilis genome browser Type strain of Bacillus subtilis at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase (Wikipedia ... and renamed Bacillus subtilis by Ferdinand Cohn in 1872 (subtilis being the Latin for "fine, thin, slender"). B. subtilis cells ...
POSITIVE REGULATION IN THE GRAM-POSITIVE BACTERIUM: Bacillus subtilis * A. Klier, T. Msadek, and G. Rapoport ... POSITIVE REGULATION IN THE GRAM-POSITIVE BACTERIUM: Bacillus subtilis, Page 1 of 1 ...
Hashimoto T, Hayakawa K, Mezaki K, Kutsuna S, Takeshita N, Yamamoto K, et al. Bacteremia due to Bacillus subtilis: a case ... subtilis does not (3). bioF and bioW are biotin biosynthetic operons in B. subtilis (4). Compared with the B. subtilis subsp. ... Bacillus subtilis cultures on E9 minimal medium agar plates with and without biotin. From left to right in each column, 0.5 ... Bacillus subtilis cultures on E9 minimal medium agar plates with and without biotin. From left to right in each column, 0.5 ...
273 aa; Sequence (Fasta) ; 2 identical sequences: Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis str. SMY: A0A6H0GZ30; Bacillus subtilis: ... P80878 (MCAT_BACSU) Bacillus subtilis (strain 168). Manganese catalase UniProtKBInterProSTRINGInteractive Modelling. ...
Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Bacillus subtilis. Previous Article in Special Issue. Monitoring of Fusarium Species and ...
Bacillus subtilis BPN. 1395-21-7 (BPN). 9014-01-1 (Carlsburg). CO9450000 (BPN),CO9550000 (Carlsburg). ... Bacillus subtilis Carlsburg. 1395-21-7 (BPN). 9014-01-1 (Carlsburg). CO9450000 (BPN),CO9550000 (Carlsburg). ... Bacillus subtilis. 1395-21-7 (BPN). 9014-01-1 (Carlsburg). CO9450000 (BPN),CO9550000 (Carlsburg). ...
In Bacillus subtilis, the anchor is a single polypeptide (SdhC) containing two heme groups [2]. The Fp and Ip subunits are post ... Why is Bacillus subtilis respiratory Complex II not assembled when produced in Escherichia coli?. A suggested MSc student ... Is subtilis Fp flavinylated in E. coli if SdhE and/or SdhB is missing? This is to test whether possibly SdhE or B. subtilis ... Hederstedt, L., Bergman, T. & Jornvall, H. (1987) Processing of Bacillus subtilis succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome b-558 ...
Celulase Aminoácidos Bacillus subtilis/genética Bacillus subtilis/metabolismo Domínio Catalítico Celulase/química Celulose/ ... EG5C-1, processive endoglucanase from Bacillus subtilis, is a typical bifunctional cellulase with endoglucanase and ... a distal amino acid residue pair affecting the catalytic activity of GH5 processive endoglucanase from Bacillus subtilis BS-5. ...
Detergent workers lung -Bacillus subtilis. * Epoxy-resin lung - Phthalic anhydride. * Wind instrument lung - Bacteria and/or ...
Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms The ISME Journal, 8 ... Metabolic efficiency and amino acid composition in the proteomes of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis Proceedings of the ... Kin discrimination between sympatric Bacillus subtilis isolates Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112 ... Antagonism influences assembly of a Bacillus guild in a local community and is depicted as a food-chain network The ISME ...
Inorganic Pyrophosphatase (Family II) from Bacillus subtilis. 1wpm. Structure of Bacillus subtilis inorganic pyrophosphatase. ... CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF BASILLUS SUBTILIS FAMILY II INORGANIC PYROPHOSPHATASE MUTANT, H98Q, IN COMPLEX WITH PNP. ...
Solution structure and dynamics of Crh, the Bacillus subtilis catabolite repression HPr. Journal of Molecular Biology (2002) ... Evidence for a dimerisation state of the Bacillus subtilis catabolite repression HPr-like protein, Crh. Journal of Molecular ... Dynamics induced by beta-lactam antibiotics in the active site of Bacillus subtilisl,d-transpeptidase.. Structure (2012) 20(5 ... A peptidoglycan fragment triggers beta-lactam resistance in Bacillus licheniformis.. PLoS Pathogens (2012) 8(3): e1002571 ...
Nonpathogenic Bacillus subtilis var. niger was chosen as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis. Three animal viruses; ... The collection efficiency of the filter media was calculated to be 96.5 - 1.5% for B. subtilis, however no collection ... An extraction efficiency of 105 - 19% was calculated for B. subtilis. The viruses were extracted at much lower efficiencies ( ...
Categories: Bacillus subtilis Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 7 ...
Bacillus subtilis. 3 [13], Weissella confusa. Strain PL9001 [14], Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. [15], and ... Bacillus subtilis. 3 is due to secretion of antibiotics. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. . 2001;45(11):3156-61.. ... 26]. Other than lactic acid bacteria, another probiotic strain of bacillus, B. subtilis. 3, has been reported to produce ... Unidentified curved bacilli in the stomach of patients with gastritis and peptic ulceration. Lancet. . 1984;1(8390):1311-5.. ...
Bacillus subtilis (CM-5 strain) a strong microbial competitor.. Vegetables - Strawberries - Flowers (with a growing period less ... Bacillus licheniformis (strain HB-2), Bacillus chitinosporus (strain CM-1), Bacillus laterosporus (strains CM-3 and CM-33) OMRI ... Serenade, Bacillus subtilis strain QST 713, 5 X 109 cfu/g, broad spectrum preventive for many plant diseases ... Bacillus chitinosporus (CM-1 strain) produces chitinase enzymes. *Bacillus laterosporus (CM-3 strain and CM-33 strain) sticks ...
Bacillus stearothermophilus for steam sterilizers and Bacillus subtilis for ethylene oxide and dry heat sterilizers). Category ... usually Bacillus subtilis var. niger. Because ethylene oxide gas is toxic, precautions (e.g., local exhaust ventilation) should ... The tubercle bacillus, lipid and nonlipid viruses, and other groups of microorganisms in Table 1 are used in the context of ... tubercle bacilli, and small nonlipid viruses is recommended. In most cases, meticulous physical cleaning followed by an ...
The toxicity test using three biological assays (Artemia salina L. larvae, Chlorella vulgaris Bejerinck and Bacillus subtilis) ... Isolation of Bacillus subtilis strains from rhizosphere of cereals and in vitro screening for antagonism against ... Chlorella vulgaris Bejerinck and Bacillus subtilis according to Korpinen (1974), Bean et al. (1992) and Földes et al. (2000), ...
Metal binding to Bacillus subtilis ferrochelatase and interaction between metal sites. Lecerof, David LU ; Fodje, Michel LU ; ...
... of wild-type Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii but not the growth of the Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis . ... subtilis or humans. To understand the basis for the compounds high selectivity for only some PheRS enzymes, we solved crystal ...
Effect of Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM-I 3799 and Bacillus subtilis CU-1 on Acute Watery Diarrhea: A Randomized Double-Blind ...
Bacillus Subtilis. Search .... *Home. *State*Vegetative State*Vegetative state Cytoscape. *Vegetative state Heatmap ...
... and the mutant no longer produces a previously reported lethal phenotype when overexpressed in Bacillus subtilis. In S. aureus ...
Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and the fungi, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Candida and Acetomyceta. Its ... subtilis and E. coli and fungi, A. niger, A. flavus, Candida and Acetomyceta. The culture media were prepared by dissolving ... subtilis and P. aeruginosa, respectively in contrast to zinc and copper complexes [50]. On the other hand, these nickel ... subtilis and P. aeruginosa, respectively as compared to ligand, standard drug and other complexes. It was observed from the ...
Creating a vaccine-like supplement against respiratory infection using recombinant bacillus subtilis spores expressing SARS-CoV ... subtilis on spore surface: A potential COVID-19 oral vaccine candidate. Vaccines (Basel). 10(2)2021.PubMed/NCBI View Article : ...
Amino acid metabolism in Bacillus subtilis  Meißner, Janek (2024-03-05) Amino acid metabolism is a a central field of research ...
  • Bacillus subtilis subsp. (atcc.org)
  • putative spore germination D protein [Bacillus subtilis subsp. (nih.gov)
  • Compared with the B. subtilis subsp. (cdc.gov)
  • Propagation of NtdR regulog to Bacillus subtilis subsp. (lbl.gov)
  • B. subtilis was also detected along with multiple other bacteria by culture of ascites fluid collected intraoperatively. (cdc.gov)
  • Bacillus subtilis", A potential cellulase producing bacteria was successfully isolated from cow dung as described earlier (Malik et al. (goodgraeff.com)
  • Among bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens is the best cellulase producer among the four followed by Bacillus subtilis, E. coli, and Serratia marscens. (goodgraeff.com)
  • B. subtilis is considered the best studied Gram-positive bacterium and a model organism to study bacterial chromosome replication and cell differentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • B. subtilis has proven highly amenable to genetic manipulation, and has become widely adopted as a model organism for laboratory studies, especially of sporulation, which is a simplified example of cellular differentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In terms of popularity as a laboratory model organism, B. subtilis is often considered as the Gram-positive equivalent of Escherichia coli, an extensively studied Gram-negative bacterium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacillus subtilis Expression Systems: With its ability to secrete proteins directly into culture media, amenability to medium- and large-scale fermentation, no significant bias in codon usage, and designation by the U.S. FDA as an organism that is Generally Regarded As Safe (GRAS), it's not surprising that the majority of industrially-produced enzymes are expressed in Bacillus subtilis. (mobitec.com)
  • Independent evaluations were conducted of the gypsum board where the organism B. subtilis were exposed to the aerosolized disinfectant. (nebraska.edu)
  • This study reports on the safety and putative probiotic properties of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens B-1895 and Bacillus subtilis KATMIRA1933. (scirp.org)
  • This study investigates several characteristics of Bacillus subtilis KATMIRA1933 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens B-1895, both of which are suspected to have probiotic properties. (scirp.org)
  • Six, rumen-fistulated, 3.5-year-old, non-lactating female Saanen goats (average initial body weight of 65 ± 8 kg) were assigned to two treatments: basal rations (CON) and basal rations supplemented with B. subtilis probiotic product (BS) in a cross-over design. (wur.nl)
  • The current result also provides a factual basis for future research involving any effects after supplementing probiotic B. subtilis in small ruminants. (wur.nl)
  • RestorFlora is a combination probiotic that contains widely used Saccharomyces Boulardii with Bacillus subtilis HU58 and Bacillus clausii . (dralexrinehart.com)
  • Why is Bacillus subtilis respiratory Complex II not assembled when produced in Escherichia coli? (lu.se)
  • SQR in E. coli and B. subtilis can be assembled in the membrane without covalently bound FAD but are enzymatically inactive [3, 4, 6]. (lu.se)
  • The B. subtilis Fp polypeptide was found to lack covalently bound FAD when produced in E. coli although E. coli Fp in the same cell was flavinylated [8]. (lu.se)
  • From these findings it was at the time concluded that B. subtilis Fp is not flavinylated in E. coli because one or more host-specific factors are required or flavinylation is somehow prevented. (lu.se)
  • It is unexpected that B. subtilis SQR without covalently bound FAD is not assembled in the E. coli membrane provided that all other aspects of assembly, including iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, are functional in the heterologous system. (lu.se)
  • The reason for the observed defective assembly in E. coli is probably not some unidentified mutation in the plasmid DNA because the same plasmid preparation complemented a B. subtilis sdhCAB deletion strain [7]. (lu.se)
  • An updated metabolic view of the Bacillus subtilis 168 genome. (nih.gov)
  • From a consortium sequence to a unified sequence: the Bacillus subtilis 168 reference genome a decade later. (nih.gov)
  • niger was chosen as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis. (cdc.gov)
  • Service, State Health Departments, universities and other organizations to identify, prioritize, and coordinate near-term Bacillus anthracis bioterrorism research for public health response. (cdc.gov)
  • Bacillus subtilis, known also as the hay bacillus or grass bacillus, is a Gram-positive, catalase-positive bacterium, found in soil and the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants, humans and marine sponges. (wikipedia.org)
  • Perhaps animals eating plants with B. subtilis biofilms can foster growth of the bacterium in their gastrointestinal tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been shown that the entire lifecycle of B. subtilis can be completed in the gastrointestinal tract, which provides credence to the idea that the bacterium enters the gut via plant consumption and stays present as a result of its ability to grow in the gut. (wikipedia.org)
  • We report a case of bacteremia caused by Bacillus subtilis variant natto after a gastrointestinal perforation in a patient in Japan. (cdc.gov)
  • Bacillus subtilis is a gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium temporarily present in the human gastrointestinal tract ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The study's objective was to demonstrate the ability of Bacillus subtilis to survive gastrointestinal transit after oral supplementation assessed in fecal samples is considered an inherent property of potential probiotics. (wur.nl)
  • Therefore, it was concluded that B. subtilis met a prerequisite of probiotics to survive the passage through the gastrointestinal tract. (wur.nl)
  • Bacillus subtilis, referred to likewise as the feed bacillus or grass bacillus, is a Gram-positive, catalase-positive bacterium, found in soil and the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants and people. (tsijournals.com)
  • The nucleotide sequence of the promotor and NH2-terminal signal peptide region of the alpha-amylase gene derived from the alpha-amylase hyperproducing strain B. subtilis NA64 was determined. (eurekamag.com)
  • In 1987 the sdhCAB operon of B. subtilis was cloned and sequenced. (lu.se)
  • Purification of surfactin compounds produced by a Bacillus subtilis strain by: Bartal Attila, et al. (u-szeged.hu)
  • According to the bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) test, cell-free supernatants of B. amyloliquefaciens B-1895 and B. subtilis KATMIRA1933 were not mutagenic. (scirp.org)
  • Endospores of B. amyloliquefaciens B-1895 and B. subtilis KATMIRA1933 were tolerant to 0.3% (w/v) bile salts and survived incubation for 4 h in MRS broth at pH 2.0 to 3.0. (scirp.org)
  • CHEN J M,ZHANG C H,AI T,et al.Study of the antibacterial peptides produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens KN-BL-1 and its fermented soybean meal[J].China Biotechnology,2014,34(10):61-66. (chvm.net)
  • On day 11, only B. subtilis was isolated from the culture by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, and the antimicrobial drugs were changed to ampicillin/sulbactam (12 g/d) as indicated by antimicrobial susceptibility testing by broth microdilution ( Appendix Table). (cdc.gov)
  • CAO D,HUANG K Y,LIN C W,et al.Research on the fermentation process of the bacillus producing antimicrobial peptides[J].Journal of Anhui Agricultural Sciences,2015,43(13):58-60. (chvm.net)
  • Colony, morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics of Bacillus subtilis are shown in the Table below. (wikipedia.org)
  • These isolates were preliminary identified as Bacillus based on morphological characteristics and biochemical tests (positive for catalase, oxidase, and citrate tests, and negative for indole and urease tests). (researchsquare.com)
  • The presence of B. subtilis in clinical specimens indicates contamination, but rare cases of bacteremia have been reported in Japan ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • As a member of the genus Bacillus, B. subtilis is rod-shaped, and can form a tough, protective endospore, allowing it to tolerate extreme environmental conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • As with other members of the genus Bacillus, it can form an endospore, to survive extreme environmental conditions of temperature and desiccation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Does Bacillus subtilis produce cellulase? (goodgraeff.com)
  • EG5C-1, processive endoglucanase from Bacillus subtilis , is a typical bifunctional cellulase with endoglucanase and exoglucanase activities. (bvsalud.org)
  • Bacillus subtilis can divide symmetrically to make two daughter cells (binary fission), or asymmetrically, producing a single endospore that can remain viable for decades and is resistant to unfavourable environmental conditions such as drought, salinity, extreme pH, radiation, and solvents. (wikipedia.org)
  • An individual from the sort Bacillus, B. subtilis is pole molded, and can frame an intense, defensive endospore, permitting it to endure outrageous natural conditions. (tsijournals.com)
  • Bacillus subtilis cultures on E9 minimal medium agar plates with and without biotin. (cdc.gov)
  • The Hydrocal™ with iodoform did not act against the cultures of Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis , but against Bacillus subtilis only. (bvsalud.org)
  • Bacillus subtilis is a Gram-positive bacterium, rod-shaped and catalase-positive. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacillus subtilis, the model Gram-positive bacterium: 20 years of annotation refinement. (nih.gov)
  • B. subtilis is viewed as the best examined Gram-positive bacterium and a model living being to contemplate bacterial chromosome replication and cell separation. (tsijournals.com)
  • subtilis standard strain, the 2 biotin genes of the isolate in this study and the B. subtilis var. (cdc.gov)
  • The optimum temperature for protease activity was 65 o C for Bacillus filamentosus and Lysinibacillus cresolivorans and 55 o C for Bacillus subtilis , and the optimum pH for activity was 9 for all the three strains. (researchsquare.com)
  • To download a certificate of analysis for Bacillus subtilis (Ehrenberg) Cohn ( 9799 ), enter the lot number exactly as it appears on your product label or packing slip. (atcc.org)
  • The certificate of analysis for that lot of Bacillus subtilis (Ehrenberg) Cohn ( 9799 ) is not currently available online. (atcc.org)
  • Flux balance analysis (FBA) of the γ-PGA producing B. subtilis indicated that a maximal theoretical γ-PGA yield is achieved on D -xylose/ D -glucose mixtures. (frontiersin.org)
  • DNA analysis showed that in the bioF region, the isolate was 100% homologous to the B. subtilis var. (cdc.gov)
  • The isolates K1, K5, and K7 were further identified as Bacillus filamentosus, Lysinibacillus cresolivorans , and Bacillus subtilis , respectively by phylogenetic analysis. (researchsquare.com)
  • Coevolutionary analysis reveals a distal amino acid residue pair affecting the catalytic activity of GH5 processive endoglucanase from Bacillus subtilis BS-5. (bvsalud.org)
  • B. subtilis is heavily flagellated, which gives it the ability to move quickly in liquids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Note: + = Positive, - =Negative This species is commonly found in the upper layers of the soil and B. subtilis is thought to be a normal gut commensal in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • B. subtilis can also be found in marine environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, B. subtilis has been shown to form biofilms on plant roots, which might explain why it is commonly found in gut microbiomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • This species is ordinarily found in the upper layers of the dirt and B. subtilis is believed to be a typical gut commensal in people. (tsijournals.com)
  • YtvA from Bacillus subtilis was found as the first prokaryotic phototropin-like blue-light-responsive photoreceptor. (edu.pe)
  • citation needed] Under stressful conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, B. subtilis undergoes the process of sporulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ion trap mass spectrometry of surfactins produced by Bacillus subtilis SZMC 6179J reveals novel fragmentation features of cyclic lipopeptides by: Bóka Bettina, et al. (u-szeged.hu)
  • Besides glucose, B. subtilis 168 can also grow on xylose as sole carbon source. (frontiersin.org)
  • Compared with the B. subtilis subspecies subtilis standard strain, the isolate had ≈50 fewer bases and the bioW region of the isolate had a single-nucleotide mutation that resulted in a termination codon for amino acid synthesis ( Appendix Figures 1-4). (cdc.gov)
  • The collection efficiency of the filter media was calculated to be 96.5 - 1.5% for B. subtilis, however no collection efficiency was measured for the viruses as no live virus was ever recovered from the downstream samplers. (cdc.gov)
  • B. subtilis cells are typically rod-shaped, and are about 4-10 micrometers (μm) long and 0.25-1.0 μm in diameter, with a cell volume of about 4.6 fL at stationary phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • We engineered a recombinant B. subtilis strain that was able to grow on xylose with a growth rate of 0.43 h −1 using a recombinant Weimberg pathway. (frontiersin.org)
  • The goats that received BS had higher numbers of B. subtilis in fecal samples than CON. (wur.nl)
  • Metal binding to Bacillus subtilis ferrochelatase and interaction between metal sites. (lu.se)
  • The aerosolized 0.6% sodium, hypochlorite solution was the only treatment successful in reducing the total concentration of B. subtilis. (nebraska.edu)