Infections with bacteria of the family BACILLACEAE.
A family of bacteria which produce endospores. They are mostly saprophytes from soil, but a few are insect or animal parasites or pathogens.
A genus of BACILLACEAE that are spore-forming, rod-shaped cells. Most species are saprophytic soil forms with only a few species being pathogenic.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.
A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.

Facklamia languida sp. nov., isolated from human clinical specimens. (1/43)

Three strains of a gram-positive catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic coccus-shaped organism originating from human clinical samples were characterized by phenotypic and molecular taxonomic methods. Sequencing of genes encoding 16S rRNA showed that the strains are phylogenetically closely related (99.9 to 100% sequence similarity) and represent a new subline within the genus Facklamia. The unknown bacterium was readily distinguished from all currently described species of the genus Facklamia (viz., Facklamia hominis, Facklamia ignava, and Facklamia sourekii) by biochemical tests and electrophoretic analysis of whole-cell proteins. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that the unknown bacterium be classified as Facklamia languida sp. nov. The type strain of F. languida is CCUG 37842.  (+info)

Experimental infection of pregnant cows with Bacillus licheniformis bacteria. (2/43)

To study the abortifacient potential and fetoplacental tropism of Bacillus licheniformis bacteria, eight cows in the sixth to eighth month of gestation were inoculated intravenously either once (n = 4) or on four successive days (n = 4) with B. licheniformis at doses ranging from 10(9) to 10(12) colony-forming units. Cows were euthanatized and necropsied prior to abortion (n = 2), at the time of abortion (n = 2), or at calving (n = 4). Live-born calves (n = 5) were euthanatized immediately after delivery and necropsied. B. licheniformis was reisolated from placentomes/endometrium in six of eight (75%) cows and from one fetus aborted 43 days after inoculation. Lesions associated with B. licheniformis were restricted to the pregnant uterus, with the exception of one cow, which developed pneumonia. Necrosis in the fetal compartment of the placenta were present in three of four (75%) cows of both inoculation groups. Lesions were mainly restricted to fetal membranes and especially to the fetal side of the placentomes. Necrosis and diffuse neutrophil infiltrations of both villi and intervillous areas occurred in the fetal part of the placenta, and the placentomal interface was distended by bacteria, neutrophils, erythrocytes, and debris. Within trophoblasts, bacteria were located both free in the cytoplasm and in cytoplasmatic vesicles. Inflammation was present in three of eight (38%) calves. Placental and fetal lesions were similar to those found in cases of spontaneous abortions associated with B. licheniformis. The abortifacient potential of B. licheniformis and the tropism for the bovine placenta is demonstrated here for the first time.  (+info)

Nosocomial pseudoepidemic caused by Bacillus cereus traced to contaminated ethyl alcohol from a liquor factory. (3/43)

From September 1990 to October 1990, 15 patients who were admitted to four different departments of the National Taiwan University Hospital, including nine patients in the emergency department, three in the hematology/oncology ward, two in the surgical intensive care unit, and one in a pediatric ward, were found to have positive blood (14 patients) or pleural effusion (1 patient) cultures for Bacillus cereus. After extensive surveillance cultures, 19 additional isolates of B. cereus were recovered from 70% ethyl alcohol that had been used as a skin disinfectant (14 isolates from different locations in the hospital) and from 95% ethyl alcohol (5 isolates from five alcohol tanks in the pharmacy department), and 10 isolates were recovered from 95% ethyl alcohol from the factory which supplied the alcohol to the hospital. In addition to these 44 isolates of B. cereus, 12 epidemiologically unrelated B. cereus isolates, one Bacillus sphaericus isolate from a blood specimen from a patient seen in May 1990, and two B. sphaericus isolates from 95% alcohol in the liquor factory were also studied for their microbiological relatedness. Among these isolates, antibiotypes were determined by using the disk diffusion method and the E test, biotypes were created with the results of the Vitek Bacillus Biochemical Card test, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns were generated by arbitrarily primed PCR. Two clones of the 15 B. cereus isolates recovered from patients were identified (clone A from 2 patients and clone B from 13 patients), and all 29 isolates of B. cereus recovered from 70 or 95% ethyl alcohol in the hospital or in the factory belonged to clone B. The antibiotype and RAPD pattern of the B. sphaericus isolate from the patient were different from those of isolates from the factory. Our data show that the pseudoepidemic was caused by a clone (clone B) of B. cereus from contaminated 70% ethyl alcohol used in the hospital, which we successfully traced to preexisting contaminated 95% ethyl alcohol from the supplier, and by another clone (clone A) without an identifiable source.  (+info)

Ontogeny and behaviour of early macrophages in the zebrafish embryo. (4/43)

In the zebrafish embryo, the only known site of hemopoieisis is an intra-embryonic blood island at the junction between trunk and tail that gives rise to erythroid cells. Using video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy, as well as in-situ hybridization for the expression of two new hemopoietic marker genes, draculin and leucocyte-specific plastin, we show that macrophages appear in the embryo at least as early as erythroid cells, but originate from ventro-lateral mesoderm situated at the other end of the embryo, just anterior to the cardiac field. These macrophage precursors migrate to the yolksac, and differentiate. From the yolksac, many invade the mesenchyme of the head, while others join the blood circulation. Apart from phagocytosing apoptotic corpses, these macrophages were observed to engulf and destroy large amounts of bacteria injected intravenously; the macrophages also sensed the presence of bacteria injected into body cavities that are isolated from the blood, migrated into these cavities and eradicated the microorganisms. Moreover, we observed that although only a fraction of the macrophage population goes to the site of infection, the entire population acquires an activated behaviour, similar to that of activated macrophages in mammals. Our results support the notion that in vertebrate embryos, macrophages endowed with proliferative capacity arise early from the hemopoietic lineage through a non-classical, rapid differentiation pathway, which bypasses the monocytic series that is well-documented in adult hemopoietic organs.  (+info)

Persistent Bacillus licheniformis bacteremia associated with an international injection of organic drain cleaner. (5/43)

In recent years manufacturers have developed several products containing saprophytic bacteria, previously believed to be of minimal pathogenicity. We describe the first case of persistent Bacillus licheniformis bacteremia occurring after intentional injection of a consumer product that includes B. licheniformis spores. We postulate that these spores remained in the tissue, unaffected by antimicrobials, ultimately necessitating soft-tissue debridement of the area surrounding the injection site. On the basis of this case and a review of the literature, we submit that some consumer products contain bacteria with demonstrated pathogenicity. Manufacturers should study these bacteria in detail in order to rapidly provide information such as bacteriologic data and antimicrobial susceptibility data to clinicians.  (+info)

A novel surfactant nanoemulsion with broad-spectrum sporicidal activity against Bacillus species. (6/43)

Two nontoxic, antimicrobial nanoemulsions, BCTP and BCTP 401, have been developed. These emulsions are composed of detergents and oils in 80% water. BCTP diluted up to 1:1000 inactivated>90% of Bacillus anthracis spores in 4 h and was also sporicidal against three other Bacillus species. This sporicidal activity is due to disruption of the spore coat after initiation of germination without complete outgrowth. BCTP 401 diluted 1:1000 had greater activity than BCTP against Bacillus spores and had an onset of action of <30 min. Mixing BCTP or BCTP 401 with Bacillus cereus prior to subcutaneous injection in mice reduced the resulting skin lesion by 99%. Wound irrigation with BCTP 1 h after spore inoculation yielded a 98% reduction in skin lesion size, and mortality was reduced 3-fold. These nanoemulsion formulas are stable, easily dispersed, nonirritant, and nontoxic compared with other available sporicidal agents.  (+info)

Effects of intramammary infection and parity on calf weaning weight and milk quality in beef cows. (7/43)

The objectives of this study were to determine 1) the effect of intramammary infection on calf weaning weight, milk somatic cell count, and milk composition, and 2) the effect of parity on percentages of infected cows, infected quarters, and blind quarters. The number of infected quarters, milk somatic cell counts, milk components, and intramammary infection were studied at weaning in 164 beef cows. The percentage of infected cows ranged from 61.9% at first parity to 66.7% at fifth to ninth parities. Cows with three or four infected quarters had higher (P < .01) milk somatic cell counts than cows with zero, one, or two infected quarters. Among bacterial isolates, Staphylococcus aureus-infected quarters had the highest (P < .01) milk somatic cell count. Percentages of butterfat and lactose were lower (P < .01) in milk from infected quarters than from uninfected quarters. Infections by S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common and accounted for 67 to 78% of the infections. Percentages of infected quarters and infections caused by S. aureus increased with parity (P < .01). Intramammary infections did not affect (P > .10) calf weaning weight. In conclusion, intramammary infection had no effect on calf weaning weight but increased milk somatic cell count and decreased the percentage of protein, lactose, solids-not-fat, and butterfat. The number of infected and blind mammary quarters increased with parity.  (+info)

Outbreak of Bacillus cereus infections in a neonatal intensive care unit traced to balloons used in manual ventilation. (8/43)

In 1998, an outbreak of systemic infections caused by Bacillus cereus occurred in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the University Hospital Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Three neonates developed sepsis with positive blood cultures. One neonate died, and the other two neonates recovered. An environmental survey, a prospective surveillance study of neonates, and a case control study were performed, in combination with molecular typing, in order to identify potential sources and transmission routes of infection. Genotypic fingerprinting by amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) showed that the three infections were caused by a single clonal type of B. cereus. The same strain was found in trachea aspirate specimens of 35 other neonates. The case control study showed mechanical ventilation with a Sensormedics ventilation machine to be a risk factor for colonization and/or infection (odds ratio, 9.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 88.2). Prospective surveillance showed that colonization with B. cereus occurred exclusively in the respiratory tract of mechanically ventilated neonates. The epidemic strain of B. cereus was found on the hands of nursing staff and in balloons used for manual ventilation. Sterilization of these balloons ended the outbreak. We conclude that B. cereus can cause outbreaks of severe opportunistic infection in neonates. Typing by AFLP proved very useful in the identification of the outbreak and in the analysis of strains recovered from the environment to trace the cause of the epidemic.  (+info)

Bacillaceae is a family of Gram-positive bacteria that includes the genus Bacillus, which are known for their ability to form endospores. Some species of Bacillus can cause infections in humans, although this is relatively rare.

Infections caused by Bacillus species are typically associated with contaminated food or water, soil, or dust. The most common Bacillus species that causes infections in humans is Bacillus cereus, which can cause foodborne illness characterized by nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Other Bacillus species, such as Bacillus anthracis, can cause more serious infections such as anthrax, which can affect the skin, lungs, or gastrointestinal system.

In general, Bacillaceae infections can be treated with antibiotics, although the specific antibiotic used may depend on the species of bacteria causing the infection. Prevention measures include proper food handling and preparation, as well as avoiding contact with contaminated soil or water.

Bacillaceae is a family of Gram-positive bacteria that are typically rod-shaped (bacilli) and can form endospores under adverse conditions. These bacteria are widely distributed in nature, including in soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals. Some members of this family are capable of causing disease in humans, such as Bacillus anthracis, which causes anthrax, and Bacillus cereus, which can cause foodborne illness. Other genera in this family include Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, and Jeotgalibacillus.

'Bacillus' is a genus of rod-shaped, gram-positive bacteria that are commonly found in soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals. Many species of Bacillus are capable of forming endospores, which are highly resistant to heat, radiation, and chemicals, allowing them to survive for long periods in harsh environments. The most well-known species of Bacillus is B. anthracis, which causes anthrax in animals and humans. Other species of Bacillus have industrial or agricultural importance, such as B. subtilis, which is used in the production of enzymes and antibiotics.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

rRNA (ribosomal RNA) is not a type of gene itself, but rather a crucial component that is transcribed from genes known as ribosomal DNA (rDNA). In cells, rRNA plays an essential role in protein synthesis by assembling with ribosomal proteins to form ribosomes. Ribosomes are complex structures where the translation of mRNA into proteins occurs. There are multiple types of rRNA molecules, including 5S, 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNAs in eukaryotic cells, each with specific functions during protein synthesis.

In summary, 'Genes, rRNA' would refer to the genetic regions (genes) that code for ribosomal RNA molecules, which are vital components of the protein synthesis machinery within cells.

Sodium Chloride is defined as the inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions. It is commonly known as table salt or halite, and it is used extensively in food seasoning and preservation due to its ability to enhance flavor and inhibit bacterial growth. In medicine, sodium chloride is used as a balanced electrolyte solution for rehydration and as a topical wound irrigant and antiseptic. It is also an essential component of the human body's fluid balance and nerve impulse transmission.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

nov., a new member of the Bacillaceae family isolated from the human gut". New Microbes and New Infections. 12: 76-85. doi: ... Numidum is a Gram-positive and facultative anaerobic genus of bacteria from the family of Bacillaceae with one known species ( ... Bacillaceae, Bacteria genera, Monotypic bacteria genera, Bacteria described in 2016, All stub articles, Bacillota stubs). ...
Clinical Microbiology and Infection. 13 (9): 946-948. doi:10.1111/j.1469-0691.2007.01779.x. PMID 17645563. v t e (Articles with ... short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Bacillaceae, Bacteria ...
nov., three new species isolated from the human skin". New Microbes and New Infections. 31: 100579. doi:10.1016/j.nmni. ... v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Bacillaceae, ...
nov., three halophilic species isolated from salty human stools by culturomics". New Microbes and New Infections. 20: 51-54. ... Bacillaceae, Bacteria described in 2017, All stub articles, Bacillota stubs). ...
nov., a new halophilic bacterium isolated from the stool of a healthy 11-year-old boy". New Microbes and New Infections. 30: ... Bacillaceae, Bacteria described in 2017, All stub articles, Bacilli stubs). ...
... nocardia infections MeSH C01.252.410.040.692.606 - maduromycosis MeSH C01.252.410.090 - bacillaceae infections MeSH C01.252. ... bacteroides infections MeSH C01.252.400.126 - bartonellaceae infections MeSH C01.252.400.126.100 - bartonella infections MeSH ... moraxellaceae infections MeSH C01.252.400.560.022 - acinetobacter infections MeSH C01.252.400.610 - mycoplasmatales infections ... salmonella infections, animal MeSH C01.252.400.310.821.873 - typhoid fever MeSH C01.252.400.310.850 - serratia infections MeSH ...
nov., three halophilic species isolated from salty human stools by culturomics". New Microbes and New Infections. 20: 51-54. ... Sediminibacillus is a genus of bacteria from the family of Bacillaceae. Sediminibacillus species are halophilic bacteria and ... nov., three halophilic species isolated from salty human stools by culturomics". New Microbes and New Infections. 20: 51-54. ... Bacillaceae, Bacteria genera, All stub articles, Bacillota stubs). ...
"First description of an Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens prosthetic joint infection". New Microbes and New Infections. 18 ... 2015 - family Bacillaceae. A Gram-positive, rod-shaped and non-motile bacterium which has been isolated from Lonar crater lake ... 2020 - family Bacillaceae. A spore-forming, rod-shaped, alkaliphile bacterium collected from Mono Lake, California, notable for ... 1995) Patel and Gupta 2020 - family Bacillaceae. Another species in this aforementioned genus of bacteria, isolated from soil ...
Brossier F, Levy M, Mock M (February 2002). "Anthrax spores make an essential contribution to vaccine efficacy". Infection and ... Bacillaceae). ... meaning they will not cause significant infection. One possible ...
... is a soil-dwelling human pathogen which has been associated with "septicemia, mixed abscess infections, and ... proposed as novel Bacillaceae genera, by phylogenomics and comparative genomic analyses: description of Robertmurraya ... wound infections", as well as with meningitis. This species has been recently transferred into the genus Niallia. The correct ...
Peters, William H. "Hand Infection Apparently Due to Bacillus Fusiformis."JSTOR. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 15 June ... Bacillaceae, Bacteria described in 1901). ... Some researchers believed that L. fusiformis infections could ... to cause a form of pathogenicity in humans relating to tropical ulcer formations and dermal and/or respiratory infections. ...
Lan, R; Reeves, PR (2002). "Escherichia coli in disguise: molecular origins of Shigella". Microbes and Infection / Institut ... Bacillaceae, and Spirillaceae, but also Trichobacterinae for filamentous bacteria. Orla-Jensen established two orders: ...
Categories: Bacillaceae Infections Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
nov., a new member of the Bacillaceae family isolated from the human gut". New Microbes and New Infections. 12: 76-85. doi: ... Numidum is a Gram-positive and facultative anaerobic genus of bacteria from the family of Bacillaceae with one known species ( ... Bacillaceae, Bacteria genera, Monotypic bacteria genera, Bacteria described in 2016, All stub articles, Bacillota stubs). ...
CDC/ Todd Parker, Ph.D., Assoc Director for Laboratory Science, Div of Preparedness and Emerging Infections at CDC. ... Todd Parker, Ph.D., Assoc Director for Laboratory Science, Div of Preparedness and Emerging Infections at CDC. ...
Infezioni Da Bacillaceae 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the family BACILLACEAE. ... DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal ... Listeriosis 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the genus LISTERIA. * Infezioni Da Staphylococcus 1 quesito Infections with ... Actinomicosi 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOMYCES. * Infezioni Da Corynebacterium 0 domande Infections ...
Bacillaceae Infection use Bacillaceae Infections Bacillaceae Infections Bacillales Bacillariophyta use Diatoms Bacillariophytas ... Bacterial Infection, Gram-Negative use Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections Bacterial Infection, Gram-Positive use Gram-Positive ... Bacterial Infections, Gram Negative use Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections Bacterial Infections, Gram Positive use Gram- ... Bacterial Infections, Gram-Negative use Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections Bacterial Infections, Gram-Positive use Gram- ...
Bacillaceae Infection use Bacillaceae Infections Bacillaceae Infections Bacillales Bacillariophyta use Diatoms Bacillariophytas ... Bacterial Infection, Gram-Negative use Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections Bacterial Infection, Gram-Positive use Gram-Positive ... Bacterial Infections, Gram Negative use Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections Bacterial Infections, Gram Positive use Gram- ... Bacterial Infections, Gram-Negative use Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections Bacterial Infections, Gram-Positive use Gram- ...
Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is an infectious nosocomial disease caused by Clostridioides difficile, an ... Emerging infections program CdST: burden of Clostridium difficile infection in the United States. N Engl J Med. 2015;372(24): ... Nov., a moderately halophilic and alkalitolerant bacterium in the family Bacillaceae, isolated from kimchi. J Microbiol. 2018; ... An estimated 453,000 infections occur annually due to this organism; 15,000 deaths are directly attributable to infections ...
To investigate the role of midgut bacteria in the infection of NPV and Bt in H. cunea, we performed a series of tests, ... Bacillaceae , Bacillales , Bacillus thuringiensis , Lepidópteros , Mariposas Nocturnas , Nucleopoliedrovirus , Animales , Larva ... The Expression of P35 Plays a Key Role in the Difference in Apoptosis Induced by AcMNPV Infection in Different Spodoptera ... Infection bioassays demonstrated that re-introduction of the HcM7 strain to germfree larvae preactivated the expression of ...
and related spore-former bacteria in human feces and documented that the majority of recovered isolates belonged to Bacillaceae ... Moreover, several studies in human revealed that leptin levels associated with autoimmune disorders, infections, and endocrine/ ... pylori infection and maintaining homeostasis of the intestine (Khodadad et al., 2013; Lefevre et al., 2015; Alkaya et al., 2016 ... of illness associated with Bacillus probiotic strains supplement of humans are result of either opportunistic infections or ...
At high levels LF induces cell death and release of the bacterium while EF increases host susceptibility to infection and ... Host Lineage: Bacillus anthracis; Bacillus; Bacillaceae; Bacillales; Firmicutes; Bacteria. General Information: This strain ...
Bacillus anthracis is a Gram-positive, endospore-forming belonging to Bacillaceae family. B. anthracis is the etiologic agent ... Bacillus anthracis is a Gram-positive, endospore-forming belonging to Bacillaceae family. B. anthracis is the etiologic agent ... Listeria ivanovii it behaves like L. monocytogenes but is found almost exclusively in ruminants (mainly sheep). Infection with ... Bacillus anthracis is a Gram-positive, endospore-forming belonging to Bacillaceae family. B. anthracis is the etiologic agent ...
Lactobacillus rhamnosus infection in a child following bone marrow transplant. J Infect 1996;32:165-7. View abstract. ... Gupta RS, Patel S, Saini N, Chen S. Robust demarcation of 17 distinct Bacillus species clades, proposed as novel Bacillaceae ... Effect on urogenital flora of antibiotic therapy for urinary tract infection. Scand J Infect Dis 1990;22:43-7. View abstract. ... Rossi F, Amadoro C, Gasperi M, Colavita G. Lactobacilli infection case reports in the last three years and safety implications ...
the nucleotide sequences of the 3 end of the 16s rdna and the 16s-23s internal transcribed spacer (its) of 40 bacillaceae ... however, what kinds of extracellular proteases from these pathogens and how they contribute to the pathogenesis of infections ... comparative phylogeny of rrs and nifh genes in the bacillaceae.. the rrs (16s rdna) gene sequences of nitrogen-fixing endospore ... the reclassification was based on phylogenetic analysis of 16s rrna gene sequences from selected bacillaceae. the analysis ...
RESULTS: The estimated number of new HIV infections among MSM was 25,100 in 2010 and 23,100 in 2019. New infections decreased ... while Firmicutes were represented by Family Bacillaceae and the genus Staphylococcus. Selected gene targets were nitrate ... Sterilising immunity that blocks infection for life, and thus prevents illness after infection, is the ultimate goal for ... Cluster of SARS-CoV-2 Gamma Variant Infections, Parintins, Brazil, March 2021. daSilva JF , Esteves RJ , Siza C , Soares EP , ...
An outbreak of Bacillus cereus respiratory tract infections affecting six ventilated preterm neonates over a two-week period is ... Bacillaceae Infections / epidemiology Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH * Add to Search ... Bacillus cereus Invasive Infections in Preterm Neonates: an Up-to-Date Review of the Literature. Lotte R, Chevalier A, Boyer L ... An outbreak of Bacillus cereus respiratory tract infections on a neonatal unit due to contaminated ventilator circuits J Gray 1 ...
Infections à Bacillaceae Entry term(s):. Bacillaceae Infection. Infection, Bacillaceae. Infections, Bacillaceae. ... Infections with bacteria of the family BACILLACEAE. Preferred term. Bacillaceae Infections Entry term(s). Bacillaceae Infection ... Bacillaceae Infections - Preferred Concept UI. M0025666. Scope note. ...
Infections with bacteria of the family BACILLACEAE.. Entry Version. BACILLACEAE INFECT. Entry Term(s). Infections, Bacillaceae ... Infections with bacteria of the family BACILLACEAE.. Terms. Bacillaceae Infections Preferred Term Term UI T050494. Date01/01/ ... Actinomycetales Infections [C01.150.252.410.040] * Bacillaceae Infections [C01.150.252.410.090] * Anthrax [C01.150.252.410. ... Infections [C01] * Bacterial Infections and Mycoses [C01.150] * Bacterial Infections [C01.150.252] * Gram-Positive Bacterial ...
Infections with bacteria of the family BACILLACEAE.. Entry Version. BACILLACEAE INFECT. Entry Term(s). Infections, Bacillaceae ... Infections with bacteria of the family BACILLACEAE.. Terms. Bacillaceae Infections Preferred Term Term UI T050494. Date01/01/ ... Actinomycetales Infections [C01.150.252.410.040] * Bacillaceae Infections [C01.150.252.410.090] * Anthrax [C01.150.252.410. ... Infections [C01] * Bacterial Infections and Mycoses [C01.150] * Bacterial Infections [C01.150.252] * Gram-Positive Bacterial ...
Bacteria from this genus are found in most dogs and cats; they can cause severe infections after a dog bite. Of the bacterial ... For example, the family Bacillaceae includes the species Bacillus anthracis that causes anthrax, a disease associated with ... and Bacillaceae (Table S8). Of interest, there were two phyla, Chloroflexi and Verrucomicrobia, in which OTUs were not related ... Bacillaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, and Lactobacillaceae) were more abundant in house dust from individuals working with farm ...
... a blood infection) and necrotizing enterocolitis, a life-threatening condition affecting the intestines. These infants were ... and Bacillaceae over various intervals. ...
Secondary Infection: The development of the secondary infection has occurred after use of combination containing steroids and ... Bacillaceae). It has a potency of not less than 6,000 polymyxin B units per milligram, calculated on an anhydrous basis. The ... In acute purulent conditions of the eye, steroids may mask infection or enhance existing infection. If these products are used ... The use of a combination drug with an anti-infective component is indicated where the risk of infection is high or where there ...
Bacillaceae Bacillaceae Infections Bacillales Bacillus Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Bacillus anthracis Bacillus cereus Bacillus ... Astroviridae Infections Asymmetric Cell Division Asymptomatic Diseases Asymptomatic Infections AT Rich Sequence AT-Hook Motifs ... Central Nervous System Infections Central Nervous System Neoplasms Central Nervous System Parasitic Infections Central Nervous ... Bacterial Infections Bacterial Infections and Mycoses Bacterial Load Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins Bacterial Physiological ...
Regulatory B7 Antigens Babesia Babesia bovis Babesia microti Babesiosis Babuvirus Baccharis Bacillaceae Bacillaceae Infections ... Posterior Cerebral Artery Infection Infection Control Infection Control Practitioners Infection Control, Dental Infectious ... Bacterial Eye Infections, Fungal Eye Infections, Parasitic Eye Infections, Viral Eye Injuries Eye Injuries, Penetrating Eye ... Flavins Flaviviridae Flaviviridae Infections Flavivirus Flavivirus Infections Flavobacteriaceae Flavobacteriaceae Infections ...
Chronic infection dynamics exhibit a peak in adolescence. [101]. Burkholderia cepacia complex. Group of at least 17 ... Bacillaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae. Many of these represent normal commensal microbiota in the upper respiratory tract that ... Chronic infection is unusual (10%) of cases. [104]. Achromobacter xylosoxidans Emerging CF pathogen. Detected with increasing ... Airway Microbiome in COPD In COPD, bacterial colonization or infection of the lower airways has long been noted by culture ...
BACKGROUND: Reducing Salmonella infection in broiler chickens by using effective and safe alternatives to antibiotics is vital ... Bacillaceae significantly was enriched in infected birds given EOA. Also, phylogenetic investigation of communities by ... Results showed that E. coli O78 infection reduced body weight gain, increased mortality and the ratio of feed to gain along ... RESULTS: Feeding EOA showed a reversed ability on negative effects caused by SE infection, as evidenced by decreasing the feed ...
RESULTS: The estimated number of new HIV infections among MSM was 25,100 in 2010 and 23,100 in 2019. New infections decreased ... represented by Family Bacillaceae and the genus Staphylococcus. Selected gene targets were nitrate reduction and transport, ... this interaction may offer protection against infection. To investigate how prior WNV exposure would influ-ence USUV infection ... These infections can be challenging to diagnose and are associated with poor outcomes. The reported incidence of IFI has varied ...
Bacillaceae). It has a potency of not less than 6,000 polymyxin B units per mg, calculated on an anhydrous basis. The ... In mild to moderate infections, instill one drop in the affected eye(s) every three hours (maximum of 6 doses per day) for a ... Patients should be advised not to wear contact lenses if they have signs and symptoms of ocular bacterial infections. ... Polymyxin B sulfate and trimethoprim ophthalmic solution is indicated in the treatment of surface ocular bacterial infections, ...
Diversity in mucosa-associated community, Bacillaceae family, Bacillus, Actinomyces. ↓ Digesta-associated community. ↔ SGR. [ ... allowed for enhanced survival against Vibrio harveyi infection, in line with an increase in serum lysozyme activity and ... Diversity (Shannon index), richness (Chao index), LAB, Corynebacterium, Bacillaceae. ↓ Proteobacteria:Firmicutes ratio. ↔ WG, ... a higher abundance of Corynebacterium genus and Bacillaceae was found in the groups that were fed diets with insect larvae, but ...
Urinary Tract Infection Microbial DNA qPCR Array Microbial Identification Data Analysis. EN. ... Respiratory Viral Infections Microbial DNA qPCR Array Microbial Identification Data Analysis. EN. ... Respiratory Viral Infections Microbial DNA qPCR Array Microbial Identification Data Analysis. EN. ... Urinary Tract Infection Microbial DNA qPCR Array Microbial Identification Data Analysis. EN. ...
Clostridium septicum, from culture growth of soft tissue infection. Images >. Figure 2. Gram stain of Clostridium septicum ... Bacillaceae. Clostridium Clostridium acetobutylicum. Clostridium beijerinckii. Clostridium bifermentans. Clostridium botulinum ... Figure 1. Gram stain of Clostridium septicum, from culture growth of soft tissue infection.. ...
Bacillaceae. Bacillus. B. coagulans, B. subtilis, B. subtilis var natto, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. licheniformism, B. circulans ... Falagas, E.M.; Betsi, I.G.; Tokas, T.; Athanasiou, S. Probiotics for prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women ... Regal, R.; Pham, C.; Bostwick, T. Urinary tract infections in extended care facilities: Preventive management strategies. ... to the prevention and treatment of infections of the urinary tract [29,30] and to the control and reduction of high blood ...
B Virus Infection See Herpesviridae Infections B Vitamin See Vitamin B Complex ...
Cross Infection C23.550.291.875.500 Cross-Priming G12.425.260 Crowns E6.323.428.100 E6.780.346.250 E6.323.528.250 E7.695.190.88 ... Bacillaceae B3.353.500.100 Bacillales B3.353.500 Bacillus B3.353.500.100.218 Bacillus anthracis B3.353.500.100.218.151 Bacillus ... Tumor Virus Infections C4.619.935 C4.925 Tungrovirus B4.715.835 Tunica Intima A7.231.330.800 A10.272.491.355.800 Tunica Media ... Epstein-Barr Virus Infections C4.619.935.313 C4.925.313 Erbium D1.268.477.437 Erbovirus B4.909.777.618.290 Erectile Dysfunction ...
  • Numidum is a Gram-positive and facultative anaerobic genus of bacteria from the family of Bacillaceae with one known species (Numidum massiliense) which has been isolated from the human gut. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infezioni Batteriche 18 domande Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Batteriche Dell'Occhio 5 domande Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Batteri Gram-Negativi 1 quesito Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Batteri Gram-Positivi 2 domande Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Actinomycetales 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES. (lookformedical.com)
  • Actinomicosi 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOMYCES. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Nocardia 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the genus NOCARDIA. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Staphylococcus 1 quesito Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Streptococcus 1 quesito Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS. (lookformedical.com)
  • This includes infections in the genera BIFIDOBACTERIUM and GARDNERELLA, in the family Bifidobacteriaceae. (lookformedical.com)
  • Bacillus anthracis is a Gram-positive, endospore-forming belonging to Bacillaceae family. (biopremier.com)
  • Baculovirus infection induces apoptosis in host cells, and apoptosis significantly affects virus production. (bvsalud.org)
  • In the early stages of viral infection (1-6 h), Se-1 cells underwent severe apoptosis, while Se-3 cells underwent very slight apoptosis. (bvsalud.org)
  • In the late stages of viral infection (12-72 h), Se-1 cells continued to undergo apoptosis and formed a large number of apoptotic bodies, while the apoptosis of Se-3 cells was inhibited and no apoptotic bodies were formed. (bvsalud.org)
  • Combined with the fact that the expression of P35 protein is inhibited in Se-1 cells but normally expressed in Se-3 cells during the infection of recombinant p35 repair AcMNPV, we proposed that the different expression of P35 is an important reason for the apoptosis differences between the two cell lines. (bvsalud.org)
  • At high levels LF induces cell death and release of the bacterium while EF increases host susceptibility to infection and promotes fluid accumulation in the cells. (up.ac.za)
  • Fournier gangrene is usually secondary to perirectal or periurethral infections associated with local trauma, operative procedures, or urinary tract disease. (lookformedical.com)
  • B. cereus is commonly known to cause food-borne intoxications, it has been additionally reported to cause local and systemic infections, as an opportunistic pathogen, especially among immunocompromised patients, newborns, and patients with surgical wounds. (biopremier.com)
  • Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is an infectious nosocomial disease caused by Clostridioides difficile , an opportunistic pathogen that occurs in the intestine after extensive antibiotic regimens. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Infection with L. ivanovii can lead to septicemic disease with enteritis, neonatal sepsis and even abortion. (biopremier.com)
  • Diabetes has also been associated with an increased risk of a broader set of conditions including cancers, liver disease, and common infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Here, we found that AcMNPV infection induced different apoptosis responses in different Spodoptera exigua cell lines. (bvsalud.org)
  • In humans can cause infections mainly in immunocompromised patients. (biopremier.com)
  • An outbreak of Bacillus cereus respiratory tract infections affecting six ventilated preterm neonates over a two-week period is described. (nih.gov)
  • For steroid-responsive inflammatory ocular conditions for which a corticosteroid is indicated and where bacterial infection or risk of bacterial ocular infection exists. (nih.gov)
  • Prolonged use may suppress the host response and thus increase the hazard of secondary ocular infections. (nih.gov)
  • In acute purulent conditions of the eye, steroids may mask infection or enhance existing infection. (nih.gov)
  • Diabetes has also been associated with an increased risk of a broader set of conditions including cancers, liver disease, and common infections. (cdc.gov)