Hair Preparations: Hair grooming, cleansing and modifying products meant for topical application to hair, usually human. They include sprays, bleaches, dyes, conditioners, rinses, shampoos, nutrient lotions, etc.Eyelid DiseasesEyelid Neoplasms: Tumors of cancer of the EYELIDS.Lice Infestations: Parasitic attack or subsistence on the skin by members of the order Phthiraptera, especially on humans by Pediculus humanus of the family Pediculidae. The hair of the head, eyelashes, and pubis is a frequent site of infestation. (From Dorland, 28th ed; Stedman, 26th ed)Dermatitis, Seborrheic: A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin with unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate ERYTHEMA, dry, moist, or greasy (SEBACEOUS GLAND) scaling and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp, that exfoliate as dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis is common in children and adolescents with HIV INFECTIONS.Pediculus: Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.Scalp DermatosesCannabinol: A physiologically inactive constituent of Cannabis sativa L.Herbal Medicine: The study of medicines derived from botanical sources.Baths: The immersion or washing of the body or any of its parts in water or other medium for cleansing or medical treatment. It includes bathing for personal hygiene as well as for medical purposes with the addition of therapeutic agents, such as alkalines, antiseptics, oil, etc.Lindane: An organochlorine insecticide that has been used as a pediculicide and a scabicide. It has been shown to cause cancer.Hair: A filament-like structure consisting of a shaft which projects to the surface of the SKIN from a root which is softer than the shaft and lodges in the cavity of a HAIR FOLLICLE. It is found on most surfaces of the body.Blepharoplasty: Plastic surgery of the eyelid. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Soaps: Sodium or potassium salts of long chain fatty acids. These detergent substances are obtained by boiling natural oils or fats with caustic alkali. Sodium soaps are harder and are used as topical anti-infectives and vehicles in pills and liniments; potassium soaps are soft, used as vehicles for ointments and also as topical antimicrobials.Clinical Chemistry Tests: Laboratory tests demonstrating the presence of physiologically significant substances in the blood, urine, tissue, and body fluids with application to the diagnosis or therapy of disease.Conditioning, Eyelid: Reflex closure of the eyelid occurring as a result of classical conditioning.Hygiene: The science dealing with the establishment and maintenance of health in the individual and the group. It includes the conditions and practices conducive to health. (Webster, 3d ed)ThionesCannabidiol: Compound isolated from Cannabis sativa extract.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Adenocarcinoma, Sebaceous: A malignant tumor composed of cells showing differentiation toward sebaceous epithelium. The tumor is solitary, firm, somewhat raised, more or less translucent, and covered with normal or slightly verrucose epidermis. It may be yellow or orange. The face and scalp are the commonest sites. The growth can be slow or rapid but metastasis is uncommon. Surgery cures most of the cases. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, pp2403-4)Blepharoptosis: Drooping of the upper lid due to deficient development or paralysis of the levator palpebrae muscle.Entropion: The turning inward (inversion) of the edge of the eyelid, with the tarsal cartilage turned inward toward the eyeball. (Dorland, 27th ed)Ectropion: The turning outward (eversion) of the edge of the eyelid, resulting in the exposure of the palpebral conjunctiva. (Dorland, 27th ed)Blepharitis: Inflammation of the eyelids.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Macular Degeneration: Degenerative changes in the RETINA usually of older adults which results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the MACULA LUTEA) because of damage to the retina. It occurs in dry and wet forms.Cataract: Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Blindness: The inability to see or the loss or absence of perception of visual stimuli. This condition may be the result of EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; OPTIC CHIASM diseases; or BRAIN DISEASES affecting the VISUAL PATHWAYS or OCCIPITAL LOBE.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Chalazion: A non-neoplastic cyst of the MEIBOMIAN GLANDS of the eyelid.Eyelashes: The hairs which project from the edges of the EYELIDS.Asthenopia: Term generally used to describe complaints related to refractive error, ocular muscle imbalance, including pain or aching around the eyes, burning and itchiness of the eyelids, ocular fatigue, and headaches.Lighting: The illumination of an environment and the arrangement of lights to achieve an effect or optimal visibility. Its application is in domestic or in public settings and in medical and non-medical environments.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Hordeolum: Purulent infection of one of the sebaceous glands of Zeis along the eyelid margin (external) or of the meibomian gland on the conjunctival side of the eyelid (internal).Styrene: A colorless, toxic liquid with a strong aromatic odor. It is used to make rubbers, polymers and copolymers, and polystyrene plastics.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Pruritus: An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Mucuna: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is the source of mucuna gum.Meibomian Glands: The sebaceous glands situated on the inner surface of the eyelids between the tarsal plates and CONJUNCTIVA.Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Lubrication: The application of LUBRICANTS to diminish FRICTION between two surfaces.Xerophthalmia: Dryness of the eye surfaces caused by deficiency of tears or conjunctival secretions. It may be associated with vitamin A deficiency, trauma, or any condition in which the eyelids do not close completely.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.
  • If you see a red bubble appearing on your eyelid, or if the area becomes sensitive, or you feel a scratching sensation on you eyeball, it's likely a stye. (doctorshealthpress.com)
  • A definitive diagnosis usually can be made on physical examination of the eyelid and a careful evaluation of symptoms and exposures. (aafp.org)
  • Symptoms are excessive tearing and hardening of the eyelid conjunctiva. (faqs.org)
  • She'll ask about your symptoms and look at your eye and eyelid. (webmd.com)
  • Time course, patient age, symptoms, presence or absence of scale or edema, distribution (isolated lesion vs multiple, discreet vs diffuse, bilateral vs unilateral, lid margin vs crease) help differentiate the different types of eyelid dermatitis. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Some signs and symptoms of dry eyes are a stinging or burning sensation in the eyes, stringy mucus in or around your eyes, sticking together of eyelids when wakin up, increased sensitivity to light, redness in the eyes, a sensation of having something in the eyes (especially when wearing contact lenses), difficulty driving at night, and blurred vision or eye fatigue. (top10homeremedies.com)
  • The home regimen includes scrubbing the eyelids twice daily with baby shampoo diluted with water to yield a 50% dilution and applying an antibiotic ointment at night until resolution of symptoms. (medscape.com)
  • When such contaminated lenses are worn, the bacteria and other germs are introduced in the eyes, leading to infection, which may manifest as various symptoms including small bump on eyelid filled with pus. (med-health.net)
  • The cornea can also be damaged secondarily by other common eye conditions such as tear film abnormalities ( dry eye ), eyelid disorders, glaucoma , and iridocorneal endothelial syndrome (ICE), which may be associated with glaucoma . (medicinenet.com)
  • most frequently it is associated with bacterial overgrowth on the eyelids and Staphylococcus species is the most common. (aapos.org)
  • In certain cases, your doctor might use a swab to collect a sample of the oil or crust that forms on your eyelid. (stelizabeth.com)
  • Possibly it has to do with overactive sebaceous glands in the skin of newborn babies, due to the mother's hormones still in the baby's circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Specifically, the eyelid skin has an abundance of sebaceous glands and other apocrine sweat glands at the base of the lashes that produce increased sebum in the prepubescent stage. (healio.com)
  • Abnormal oily secretions and other debris shed from the eyelids, such as flaking associated with dandruff, can accumulate in your tear film - the water, oil and mucus solution that forms tears. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Abnormal oily secretions and other debris shed from the eyelids, such as flaking associated with dandruff, can build up in your tear film - the water, oil and mucus solution that forms tears. (stelizabeth.com)