A classification of B-lymphocytes based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.
A classification of lymphocytes based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.
IMMUNOGLOBULINS on the surface of B-LYMPHOCYTES. Their MESSENGER RNA contains an EXON with a membrane spanning sequence, producing immunoglobulins in the form of type I transmembrane proteins as opposed to secreted immunoglobulins (ANTIBODIES) which do not contain the membrane spanning segment.
Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.
White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.
Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.
The number of LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
A classification of T-lymphocytes, especially into helper/inducer, suppressor/effector, and cytotoxic subsets, based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.
Ratio of T-LYMPHOCYTES that express the CD4 ANTIGEN to those that express the CD8 ANTIGEN. This value is commonly assessed in the diagnosis and staging of diseases affecting the IMMUNE SYSTEM including HIV INFECTIONS.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.
Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.
An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.
A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.
Bone marrow-derived lymphocytes that possess cytotoxic properties, classically directed against transformed and virus-infected cells. Unlike T CELLS; and B CELLS; NK CELLS are not antigen specific. The cytotoxicity of natural killer cells is determined by the collective signaling of an array of inhibitory and stimulatory CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. A subset of T-LYMPHOCYTES referred to as NATURAL KILLER T CELLS shares some of the properties of this cell type.
A critical subpopulation of regulatory T-lymphocytes involved in MHC Class I-restricted interactions. They include both cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and CD8+ suppressor T-lymphocytes.
Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
A round-to-oval mass of lymphoid tissue embedded in the lateral wall of the PHARYNX. There is one on each side of the oropharynx in the fauces between the anterior and posterior pillars of the SOFT PALATE.
Subpopulation of CD4+ lymphocytes that cooperate with other lymphocytes (either T or B) to initiate a variety of immune functions. For example, helper-inducer T-cells cooperate with B-cells to produce antibodies to thymus-dependent antigens and with other subpopulations of T-cells to initiate a variety of cell-mediated immune functions.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Complex of at least five membrane-bound polypeptides in mature T-lymphocytes that are non-covalently associated with one another and with the T-cell receptor (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL). The CD3 complex includes the gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta, and eta chains (subunits). When antigen binds to the T-cell receptor, the CD3 complex transduces the activating signals to the cytoplasm of the T-cell. The CD3 gamma and delta chains (subunits) are separate from and not related to the gamma/delta chains of the T-cell receptor (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, GAMMA-DELTA).
High-molecular weight glycoproteins uniquely expressed on the surface of LEUKOCYTES and their hemopoietic progenitors. They contain a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase activity which plays a role in intracellular signaling from the CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. The CD45 antigens occur as multiple isoforms that result from alternative mRNA splicing and differential usage of three exons.
Differentiation antigens expressed on B-lymphocytes and B-cell precursors. They are involved in regulation of B-cell proliferation.
A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.
They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
Mucoproteins isolated from the kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris); some of them are mitogenic to lymphocytes, others agglutinate all or certain types of erythrocytes or lymphocytes. They are used mainly in the study of immune mechanisms and in cell culture.
A soluble substance elaborated by antigen- or mitogen-stimulated T-LYMPHOCYTES which induces DNA synthesis in naive lymphocytes.
Manifestations of the immune response which are mediated by antigen-sensitized T-lymphocytes via lymphokines or direct cytotoxicity. This takes place in the absence of circulating antibody or where antibody plays a subordinate role.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
Multi-subunit proteins which function in IMMUNITY. They are produced by B LYMPHOCYTES from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES. They are comprised of two heavy (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) and two light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) with additional ancillary polypeptide chains depending on their isoforms. The variety of isoforms include monomeric or polymeric forms, and transmembrane forms (B-CELL ANTIGEN RECEPTORS) or secreted forms (ANTIBODIES). They are divided by the amino acid sequence of their heavy chains into five classes (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A; IMMUNOGLOBULIN D; IMMUNOGLOBULIN E; IMMUNOGLOBULIN G; IMMUNOGLOBULIN M) and various subclasses.
The in vitro formation of clusters consisting of a cell (usually a lymphocyte) surrounded by antigenic cells or antigen-bearing particles (usually erythrocytes, which may or may not be coated with antibody or antibody and complement). The rosette-forming cell may be an antibody-forming cell, a memory cell, a T-cell, a cell bearing surface cytophilic antibodies, or a monocyte possessing Fc receptors. Rosette formation can be used to identify specific populations of these cells.
Antigens expressed on the cell membrane of T-lymphocytes during differentiation, activation, and normal and neoplastic transformation. Their phenotypic characterization is important in differential diagnosis and studies of thymic ontogeny and T-cell function.
Substances that stimulate mitosis and lymphocyte transformation. They include not only substances associated with LECTINS, but also substances from streptococci (associated with streptolysin S) and from strains of alpha-toxin-producing staphylococci. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Cell separation is the process of isolating and distinguishing specific cell types or individual cells from a heterogeneous mixture, often through the use of physical or biological techniques.
Antigens on surfaces of cells, including infectious or foreign cells or viruses. They are usually protein-containing groups on cell membranes or walls and may be isolated.
CD4-positive T cells that inhibit immunopathology or autoimmune disease in vivo. They inhibit the immune response by influencing the activity of other cell types. Regulatory T-cells include naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ cells, IL-10 secreting Tr1 cells, and Th3 cells.
Reduction in the number of lymphocytes.
Differentiation antigens found on thymocytes and on cytotoxic and suppressor T-lymphocytes. CD8 antigens are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family and are associative recognition elements in MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) Class I-restricted interactions.
Specialized tissues that are components of the lymphatic system. They provide fixed locations within the body where a variety of LYMPHOCYTES can form, mature and multiply. The lymphoid tissues are connected by a network of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.
The phenomenon of target cell destruction by immunologically active effector cells. It may be brought about directly by sensitized T-lymphocytes or by lymphoid or myeloid "killer" cells, or it may be mediated by cytotoxic antibody, cytotoxic factor released by lymphoid cells, or complement.
A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.
Immunized T-lymphocytes which can directly destroy appropriate target cells. These cytotoxic lymphocytes may be generated in vitro in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC), in vivo during a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction, or after immunization with an allograft, tumor cell or virally transformed or chemically modified target cell. The lytic phenomenon is sometimes referred to as cell-mediated lympholysis (CML). These CD8-positive cells are distinct from NATURAL KILLER CELLS and NATURAL KILLER T-CELLS. There are two effector phenotypes: TC1 and TC2.
A MANNOSE/GLUCOSE binding lectin isolated from the jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis). It is a potent mitogen used to stimulate cell proliferation in lymphocytes, primarily T-lymphocyte, cultures.
Lymphocytes that show specificity for autologous tumor cells. Ex vivo isolation and culturing of TIL with interleukin-2, followed by reinfusion into the patient, is one form of adoptive immunotherapy of cancer.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
55-kDa antigens found on HELPER-INDUCER T-LYMPHOCYTES and on a variety of other immune cell types. CD4 antigens are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family and are implicated as associative recognition elements in MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX class II-restricted immune responses. On T-lymphocytes they define the helper/inducer subset. CD4 antigens also serve as INTERLEUKIN-15 receptors and bind to the HIV receptors, binding directly to the HIV ENVELOPE PROTEIN GP120.
Measure of histocompatibility at the HL-A locus. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from two individuals are mixed together in tissue culture for several days. Lymphocytes from incompatible individuals will stimulate each other to proliferate significantly (measured by tritiated thymidine uptake) whereas those from compatible individuals will not. In the one-way MLC test, the lymphocytes from one of the individuals are inactivated (usually by treatment with MITOMYCIN or radiation) thereby allowing only the untreated remaining population of cells to proliferate in response to foreign histocompatibility antigens.
Proteins isolated from the roots of the pokeweed, Phytolacca americana, that agglutinate some erythrocytes, stimulate mitosis and antibody synthesis in lymphocytes, and induce activation of plasma cells.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.
The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.
Immunosuppression by reduction of circulating lymphocytes or by T-cell depletion of bone marrow. The former may be accomplished in vivo by thoracic duct drainage or administration of antilymphocyte serum. The latter is performed ex vivo on bone marrow before its transplantation.
T-cell enhancement of the B-cell response to thymic-dependent antigens.
Glycoproteins expressed on all mature T-cells, thymocytes, and a subset of mature B-cells. Antibodies specific for CD5 can enhance T-cell receptor-mediated T-cell activation. The B-cell-specific molecule CD72 is a natural ligand for CD5. (From Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p156)
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
A class of lymphocytes characterized by the lack of surface markers specific for either T or B lymphocytes.
The type species of LYMPHOCRYPTOVIRUS, subfamily GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting B-cells in humans. It is thought to be the causative agent of INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS and is strongly associated with oral hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY;), BURKITT LYMPHOMA; and other malignancies.
A subclass of HLA-D antigens that consist of alpha and beta chains. The inheritance of HLA-DR antigens differs from that of the HLA-DQ ANTIGENS and HLA-DP ANTIGENS.
T-cell receptors composed of CD3-associated gamma and delta polypeptide chains and expressed primarily in CD4-/CD8- T-cells. The receptors appear to be preferentially located in epithelial sites and probably play a role in the recognition of bacterial antigens. The T-cell receptor gamma/delta chains are separate and not related to the gamma and delta chains which are subunits of CD3 (see ANTIGENS, CD3).
The altered state of immunologic responsiveness resulting from initial contact with antigen, which enables the individual to produce antibodies more rapidly and in greater quantity in response to secondary antigenic stimulus.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
A soluble factor produced by activated T-LYMPHOCYTES that induces the expression of MHC CLASS II GENES and FC RECEPTORS on B-LYMPHOCYTES and causes their proliferation and differentiation. It also acts on T-lymphocytes, MAST CELLS, and several other hematopoietic lineage cells.
An immunoglobulin which accounts for less than 1% of plasma immunoglobulin. It is found on the membrane of many circulating B LYMPHOCYTES.
The number of CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. Determination requires the use of a fluorescence-activated flow cytometer.
Antigens expressed primarily on the membranes of living cells during sequential stages of maturation and differentiation. As immunologic markers they have high organ and tissue specificity and are useful as probes in studies of normal cell development as well as neoplastic transformation.
Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A group of genetically identical cells all descended from a single common ancestral cell by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. Clone cells also include populations of recombinant DNA molecules all carrying the same inserted sequence. (From King & Stansfield, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Mature LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES transported by the blood to the body's extravascular space. They are morphologically distinguishable from mature granulocytic leukocytes by their large, non-lobed nuclei and lack of coarse, heavily stained cytoplasmic granules.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
A method for the detection of very small quantities of antibody in which the antigen-antibody-complement complex adheres to indicator cells, usually primate erythrocytes or nonprimate blood platelets. The reaction is dependent on the number of bound C3 molecules on the C3b receptor sites of the indicator cell.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Oligosaccharide antigenic determinants found principally on NK cells and T-cells. Their role in the immune response is poorly understood.
White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).
Syndromes in which there is a deficiency or defect in the mechanisms of immunity, either cellular or humoral.
The transfer of lymphocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
Receptors present on activated T-LYMPHOCYTES and B-LYMPHOCYTES that are specific for INTERLEUKIN-2 and play an important role in LYMPHOCYTE ACTIVATION. They are heterotrimeric proteins consisting of the INTERLEUKIN-2 RECEPTOR ALPHA SUBUNIT, the INTERLEUKIN-2 RECEPTOR BETA SUBUNIT, and the INTERLEUKIN RECEPTOR COMMON GAMMA-CHAIN.
A group of antigens that includes both the major and minor histocompatibility antigens. The former are genetically determined by the major histocompatibility complex. They determine tissue type for transplantation and cause allograft rejections. The latter are systems of allelic alloantigens that can cause weak transplant rejection.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.
Leukemia associated with HYPERPLASIA of the lymphoid tissues and increased numbers of circulating malignant LYMPHOCYTES and lymphoblasts.
Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.
Unglycosylated phosphoproteins expressed only on B-cells. They are regulators of transmembrane Ca2+ conductance and thought to play a role in B-cell activation and proliferation.
The 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule) containing a transmembrane domain and short cytoplasmic tail. It is expressed by all lymphocytes mediating non-MHC restricted cytotoxicity and is present on some neural tissues and tumors.
The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.
Membrane antigens associated with maturation stages of B-lymphocytes, often expressed in tumors of B-cell origin.
A tumor necrosis factor superfamily member that plays a role in the regulation of B-LYMPHOCYTE survival. It occurs as a membrane-bound protein that is cleaved to release an biologically active soluble form with specificity to TRANSMEMBRANE ACTIVATOR AND CAML INTERACTOR PROTEIN; B-CELL ACTIVATION FACTOR RECEPTOR; and B-CELL MATURATION ANTIGEN.
A worm-like blind tube extension from the CECUM.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Large, transmembrane, non-covalently linked glycoproteins (alpha and beta). Both chains can be polymorphic although there is more structural variation in the beta chains. The class II antigens in humans are called HLA-D ANTIGENS and are coded by a gene on chromosome 6. In mice, two genes named IA and IE on chromosome 17 code for the H-2 antigens. The antigens are found on B-lymphocytes, macrophages, epidermal cells, and sperm and are thought to mediate the competence of and cellular cooperation in the immune response. The term IA antigens used to refer only to the proteins encoded by the IA genes in the mouse, but is now used as a generic term for any class II histocompatibility antigen.
Excess of normal lymphocytes in the blood or in any effusion.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
T-cell receptors composed of CD3-associated alpha and beta polypeptide chains and expressed primarily in CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells. Unlike immunoglobulins, the alpha-beta T-cell receptors recognize antigens only when presented in association with major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules.
The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.
Molecules on the surface of T-lymphocytes that recognize and combine with antigens. The receptors are non-covalently associated with a complex of several polypeptides collectively called CD3 antigens (ANTIGENS, CD3). Recognition of foreign antigen and the major histocompatibility complex is accomplished by a single heterodimeric antigen-receptor structure, composed of either alpha-beta (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, ALPHA-BETA) or gamma-delta (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, GAMMA-DELTA) chains.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.
Cells of the lymphoid series that can react with antigen to produce specific cell products called antibodies. Various cell subpopulations, often B-lymphocytes, can be defined, based on the different classes of immunoglobulins that they synthesize.
Specialized cells of the hematopoietic system that have branch-like extensions. They are found throughout the lymphatic system, and in non-lymphoid tissues such as SKIN and the epithelia of the intestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts. They trap and process ANTIGENS, and present them to T-CELLS, thereby stimulating CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY. They are different from the non-hematopoietic FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS, which have a similar morphology and immune system function, but with respect to humoral immunity (ANTIBODY PRODUCTION).
Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.
Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.
The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)
Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.
Substances that are recognized by the immune system and induce an immune reaction.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
Antibodies which react with the individual structural determinants (idiotopes) on the variable region of other antibodies.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
Glycoprotein members of the immunoglobulin superfamily which participate in T-cell adhesion and activation. They are expressed on most peripheral T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and thymocytes, and function as co-receptors or accessory molecules in the T-cell receptor complex.
The ability of lymphoid cells to mount a humoral or cellular immune response when challenged by antigen.
Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.
The interstitial fluid that is in the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.
The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.
The cells found in the body fluid circulating throughout the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Inbred C3H mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to maintain a high degree of genetic uniformity and share specific genetic characteristics, including susceptibility to certain diseases, which makes them valuable for biomedical research purposes.
Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that serves as a homing receptor for lymphocytes to lymph node high endothelial venules.
Cell surface glycoproteins on lymphocytes and other leukocytes that mediate adhesion to specialized blood vessels called high endothelial venules. Several different classes of lymphocyte homing receptors have been identified, and they appear to target different surface molecules (addressins) on high endothelial venules in different tissues. The adhesion plays a crucial role in the trafficking of lymphocytes.
The demonstration of the cytotoxic effect on a target cell of a lymphocyte, a mediator released by a sensitized lymphocyte, an antibody, or complement.
Acquired defect of cellular immunity that occurs in cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and in some cats infected with feline leukemia virus (FeLV).
A member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily with specificity for CD40 LIGAND. It is found on mature B-LYMPHOCYTES and some EPITHELIAL CELLS, lymphoid DENDRITIC CELLS. Evidence suggests that CD40-dependent activation of B-cells is important for generation of memory B-cells within the germinal centers. Mutations of the gene for CD40 antigen result in HYPER-IGM IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME, TYPE 3. Signaling of the receptor occurs through its association with TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS.
Specialized forms of antibody-producing B-LYMPHOCYTES. They synthesize and secrete immunoglobulin. They are found only in lymphoid organs and at sites of immune responses and normally do not circulate in the blood or lymph. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989, p169 & Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p20)
The class of heavy chains found in IMMUNOGLOBULIN M. They have a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa and they contain about 57 amino acid residues arranged in five domains and have more oligosaccharide branches and a higher carbohydrate content than the heavy chains of IMMUNOGLOBULIN G.
The largest of polypeptide chains comprising immunoglobulins. They contain 450 to 600 amino acid residues per chain, and have molecular weights of 51-72 kDa.
The body's defense mechanism against foreign organisms or substances and deviant native cells. It includes the humoral immune response and the cell-mediated response and consists of a complex of interrelated cellular, molecular, and genetic components.
An integrin heterodimer widely expressed on cells of hematopoietic origin. CD11A ANTIGEN comprises the alpha chain and the CD18 antigen (ANTIGENS, CD18) the beta chain. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 is a major receptor of T-CELLS; B-CELLS; and GRANULOCYTES. It mediates the leukocyte adhesion reactions underlying cytolytic conjugate formation, helper T-cell interactions, and antibody-dependent killing by NATURAL KILLER CELLS and granulocytes. Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 has been defined as a ligand for lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1.
A member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily found on most T-LYMPHOCYTES. Activation of the receptor by CD70 ANTIGEN results in the increased proliferation of CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES and CD8-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES. Signaling by the activated receptor occurs through its association with TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS.
Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.
The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.
Cell surface molecules on cells of the immune system that specifically bind surface molecules or messenger molecules and trigger changes in the behavior of cells. Although these receptors were first identified in the immune system, many have important functions elsewhere.
An energy dependent process following the crosslinking of B CELL ANTIGEN RECEPTORS by multivalent ligands (bivalent anti-antibodies, LECTINS or ANTIGENS), on the B-cell surface. The crosslinked ligand-antigen receptor complexes collect in patches which flow to and aggregate at one pole of the cell to form a large mass - the cap. The caps may then be endocytosed or shed into the environment.
Molecular sites on or in B-lymphocytes, follicular dendritic cells, lymphoid cells, and epithelial cells that recognize and combine with COMPLEMENT C3D. Human complement receptor 2 (CR2) serves as a receptor for both C3dg and the gp350/220 glycoprotein of HERPESVIRUS 4, HUMAN, and binds the monoclonal antibody OKB7, which blocks binding of both ligands to the receptor.
The type species of LENTIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of AIDS. It is characterized by its cytopathic effect and affinity for the T4-lymphocyte.
Inbred CBA mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical and uniform, which makes them useful for scientific research, particularly in the areas of immunology and cancer.
Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.
Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.
'Rats, Inbred Lew' is a strain of laboratory rat that is widely used in biomedical research, known for its consistent genetic background and susceptibility to certain diseases, which makes it an ideal model for studying the genetic basis of complex traits and disease processes.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.
Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The largest lymphatic vessel that passes through the chest and drains into the SUBCLAVIAN VEIN.
Form of passive immunization where previously sensitized immunologic agents (cells or serum) are transferred to non-immune recipients. When transfer of cells is used as a therapy for the treatment of neoplasms, it is called adoptive immunotherapy (IMMUNOTHERAPY, ADOPTIVE).
Cell surface glycoproteins that bind to chemokines and thus mediate the migration of pro-inflammatory molecules. The receptors are members of the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor family. Like the CHEMOKINES themselves, the receptors can be divided into at least three structural branches: CR, CCR, and CXCR, according to variations in a shared cysteine motif.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
A membrane-bound or cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of CYCLIC ADP-RIBOSE (cADPR) from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). This enzyme generally catalyzes the hydrolysis of cADPR to ADP-RIBOSE, as well, and sometimes the synthesis of cyclic ADP-ribose 2' phosphate (2'-P-cADPR) from NADP.
Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.
Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
A bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and HYDROLYSIS of CYCLIC ADP-RIBOSE (cADPR) from NAD+ to ADP-RIBOSE. It is a cell surface molecule which is predominantly expressed on LYMPHOID CELLS and MYELOID CELLS.
A method to identify and enumerate cells that are synthesizing ANTIBODIES against ANTIGENS or HAPTENS conjugated to sheep RED BLOOD CELLS. The sheep red blood cells surrounding cells secreting antibody are lysed by added COMPLEMENT producing a clear zone of HEMOLYSIS. (From Illustrated Dictionary of Immunology, 3rd ed)
Genes encoding the different subunits of the IMMUNOGLOBULINS, for example the IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN GENES and the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAIN GENES. The heavy and light immunoglobulin genes are present as gene segments in the germline cells. The completed genes are created when the segments are shuffled and assembled (B-LYMPHOCYTE GENE REARRANGEMENT) during B-LYMPHOCYTE maturation. The gene segments of the human light and heavy chain germline genes are symbolized V (variable), J (joining) and C (constant). The heavy chain germline genes have an additional segment D (diversity).
Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.
A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. It is of unknown etiology, but is thought to represent a failure of the regulatory mechanisms of the autoimmune system. The disease is marked by a wide range of system dysfunctions, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the formation of LE cells in the blood or bone marrow.
Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.
A cytokine produced by a variety of cell types, including T-LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; DENDRITIC CELLS; and EPITHELIAL CELLS that exerts a variety of effects on immunoregulation and INFLAMMATION. Interleukin-10 combines with itself to form a homodimeric molecule that is the biologically active form of the protein.
Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.
Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.
A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.
Costimulatory T-LYMPHOCYTE receptors that have specificity for CD80 ANTIGEN and CD86 ANTIGEN. Activation of this receptor results in increased T-cell proliferation, cytokine production and promotion of T-cell survival.
Substances that augment, stimulate, activate, potentiate, or modulate the immune response at either the cellular or humoral level. The classical agents (Freund's adjuvant, BCG, Corynebacterium parvum, et al.) contain bacterial antigens. Some are endogenous (e.g., histamine, interferon, transfer factor, tuftsin, interleukin-1). Their mode of action is either non-specific, resulting in increased immune responsiveness to a wide variety of antigens, or antigen-specific, i.e., affecting a restricted type of immune response to a narrow group of antigens. The therapeutic efficacy of many biological response modifiers is related to their antigen-specific immunoadjuvanticity.
Eukaryotic cell line obtained in a quiescent or stationary phase which undergoes conversion to a state of unregulated growth in culture, resembling an in vitro tumor. It occurs spontaneously or through interaction with viruses, oncogenes, radiation, or drugs/chemicals.
Nuclear antigens encoded by VIRAL GENES found in HUMAN HERPESVIRUS 4. At least six nuclear antigens have been identified.
A group of closely related cyclic undecapeptides from the fungi Trichoderma polysporum and Cylindocarpon lucidum. They have some antineoplastic and antifungal action and significant immunosuppressive effects. Cyclosporins have been proposed as adjuvants in tissue and organ transplantation to suppress graft rejection.
Antigens that exist in alternative (allelic) forms in a single species. When an isoantigen is encountered by species members who lack it, an immune response is induced. Typical isoantigens are the BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS.
A chronic leukemia characterized by abnormal B-lymphocytes and often generalized lymphadenopathy. In patients presenting predominately with blood and bone marrow involvement it is called chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL); in those predominately with enlarged lymph nodes it is called small lymphocytic lymphoma. These terms represent spectrums of the same disease.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.
Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.
An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.
Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.
An immunologic deficiency state characterized by an extremely low level of generally all classes of gamma-globulin in the blood.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Molecules found on the surface of some, but not all, B-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes, and macrophages, which recognize and combine with the Fc (crystallizable) portion of immunoglobulin molecules.
Nonsusceptibility to the invasive or pathogenic effects of foreign microorganisms or to the toxic effect of antigenic substances.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
A class of animal lectins that bind to carbohydrate in a calcium-dependent manner. They share a common carbohydrate-binding domain that is structurally distinct from other classes of lectins.
Specific molecular sites on the surface of various cells, including B-lymphocytes and macrophages, that combine with IMMUNOGLOBULIN Gs. Three subclasses exist: Fc gamma RI (the CD64 antigen, a low affinity receptor), Fc gamma RII (the CD32 antigen, a high affinity receptor), and Fc gamma RIII (the CD16 antigen, a low affinity receptor).
Antibody-mediated immune response. Humoral immunity is brought about by ANTIBODY FORMATION, resulting from TH2 CELLS activating B-LYMPHOCYTES, followed by COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
That region of the immunoglobulin molecule that varies in its amino acid sequence and composition, and comprises the binding site for a specific antigen. It is located at the N-terminus of the Fab fragment of the immunoglobulin. It includes hypervariable regions (COMPLEMENTARITY DETERMINING REGIONS) and framework regions.
The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
A species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus feline lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, FELINE) isolated from cats with a chronic wasting syndrome, presumed to be immune deficiency. There are 3 strains: Petaluma (FIP-P), Oma (FIP-O) and Puma lentivirus (PLV). There is no antigenic relationship between FIV and HIV, nor does FIV grow in human T-cells.
Ordered rearrangement of B-lymphocyte variable gene regions coding for the IMMUNOGLOBULIN CHAINS, thereby contributing to antibody diversity. It occurs during the differentiation of the IMMATURE B-LYMPHOCYTES.
An inheritable change in cells manifested by changes in cell division and growth and alterations in cell surface properties. It is induced by infection with a transforming virus.
Thymidine is a pyrimidine nucleoside, consisting of a thymine base linked to a deoxyribose sugar by a β-N1-glycosidic bond, which plays a crucial role in DNA replication and repair processes as one of the four nucleosides in DNA.
The activated center of a lymphoid follicle in secondary lymphoid tissue where B-LYMPHOCYTES are stimulated by antigens and helper T cells (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER) are stimulated to generate memory cells.
Manipulation of the host's immune system in treatment of disease. It includes both active and passive immunization as well as immunosuppressive therapy to prevent graft rejection.

IgA production in MHC class II-deficient mice is primarily a function of B-1a cells. (1/1715)

Mice deficient in MHC class II expression (C2d mice) do not make antibody to protein antigens administered systemically, but their ability to produce IgA antibody to antigen administered at mucosal sites has not been described. We investigated IgA production by C2d mice and their IgA antibody response to antigen given orally. Young C2d mice had normal amounts of serum IgA, intestinal-secreted IgA and normal numbers of intestinal IgA plasma cells, compared to control C57BL/6 mice. IgA production by C2d mice increased with age. Following oral immunization with cholera toxin, C57BL/6 mice responded with IgA and IgG antibody, and had increased numbers of IgA plasma cells, but C2d mice gave no response. The Peyer's patch and mesenteric lymph node tissues of C2d mice contained very few CD4-expressing T cells. Thus, C2d mice have no typical mucosal CD4 Th cells and cannot respond to a strong oral immunogen, yet they still produced and secreted IgA. We hypothesized that B-1 lymphocytes could provide a source of IgA independent of antigen-specific T cell help. Young C2d mice had normal numbers of peritoneal B-1a cells and their frequency increased with age. To test the role of these B-1a cells, we bred C2d mice to obtain mice that had no MHC class II expression and expressed the Xid gene that confers deficiency in B-1a cells. These double-deficient mice had 10-fold less serum and secreted IgA than all other F2 littermates. We conclude that B-1a cells are essential for the majority of IgA production in C2d mice. Thus, the C2d mouse may provide a useful tool for analysis of the role of intestinal IgA provided by B-1a cells.  (+info)

An alternatively spliced form of CD79b gene may account for altered B-cell receptor expression in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia. (2/1715)

Several functional anomalies of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells may be explained by abnormalities of the B-cell receptor (BCR), a multimeric complex formed by the sIg homodimer and the noncovalently bound heterodimer Igalpha/Igbeta (CD79a/CD79b). Because the expression of the extracellular Ig-like domain of CD79b has been reported to be absent in the cells of most CLL cases, we have investigated the molecular mechanisms that may account for this defect. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from 50 patients and two cell lines (MEC1, MEC2) obtained from the PBL of one of them were studied. MEC1, MEC2, and 75% of CLL cases did not express detectable levels of the extracellular Ig-like domain of CD79b, which was nevertheless present in greater than 80% CD19(+) cells from normal donors. In healthy subjects the expression of CD79b was equally distributed in CD5(+) and CD5(-) B-cell subsets. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of CD79b RNA from all patients and from MEC1 and MEC2 cell lines consistently yielded two fragments of different size (709 bp and 397 bp). The 709-bp band corresponds to CD79b entire transcript; the 397-bp band corresponds to an alternatively spliced form lacking exon 3 that encodes the extracellular Ig-like domain. Both fragments were also visible in normal PBL. The expression of the 397-bp fragment was increased in normal activated B cells, while no difference was seen between CD5(+) and CD5(-) B cells. To obtain a more accurate estimate of the relative proportions of the two spliced forms, a radioactive PCR was performed in 13 normal and 22 B-CLL samples and the results analyzed using a digital imager. The mean value of the CD79b to the CD79b internally deleted ratio was 0.64 +/- 0.20 SD in normal donors and 0.44 +/- 0.27 SD in B-CLL (P =.01). Direct sequencing of 397-bp RT-PCR products and of genomic DNA corresponding to exon 3 from MEC1, MEC2, their parental cells, and five fresh B-CLL samples did not show any causal mutation. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of exon 3 performed in 18 additional B-CLL cases showed a single abnormal shift corresponding to a TGT --> TGC polymorphic change at amino acid 122. We propose a role for the alternative splicing of CD79b gene in causing the reduced expression of BCR on the surface of B-CLL cells. As normal B cells also present this variant, the mechanism of CD79b posttranscriptional regulation might reflect the activation stage of the normal B cell from which B-CLL derives.  (+info)

Anti-phospholipid antibodies and CD5+ B cells in HIV infection. (3/1715)

This cross-sectional study evaluates the correlation between anti-phospholipid antibodies and CD5+ B cells in 110 patients infected with HIV-1. There were 89.1% of the patients who had IgG antibodies against cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine. The prevalence of IgM and IgA antibodies was < 22%. AIDS was associated with lower frequencies of IgM antibodies against cardiolipin (P = 0.05) and IgG-antibodies against cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine (P = 0.011). Drug users had higher IgM antibodies against phospholipids than patients from other risk groups (P = 0.02). A history of thromboembolic events was not accompanied by higher levels of anti-phospholipid antibodies (P > 0.2). No correlation between anti-phospholipid antibodies and CD5+ B cells was detected. Percentage part of CD5+ B lymphocytes was elevated in all patients and absolute CD4+ T lymphocyte counts and HIV p24 antigen were inversely correlated. In advanced disease a significant reduction of anti-phospholipid antibodies was contrasted with persistent elevation of CD5+ B lymphocytes. These observations may reflect immunological dysfunction involving apoptosis and endothelial damage rather than polyclonal B cell hyperstimulation. A possible explanation would be that in HIV infection an increased rate of spontaneous apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes is accompanied by functional and structural changes of mitochondria. Therefore, structurally altered mitochondrial phospholipids could serve as antigen to induce specific humoral immune responses.  (+info)

Cutting edge: recruitment of the CD19/CD21 coreceptor to B cell antigen receptor is required for antigen-mediated expression of Bcl-2 by resting and cycling hen egg lysozyme transgenic B cells. (4/1715)

Recruitment of the CD19/CD21 coreceptor is thought to lower the threshold for effective signaling through the B cell Ag receptor. We provide evidence supporting a second role for coreceptor recruitment, and that is to enhance the survival/proliferative potential of the responding B cells. We show that B cell Ag receptor signaling in the absence of coreceptor recruitment induces cellular accumulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL, whereas CD19-mediated signals are required for Bcl-2 accumulation. The expression of both anti-apoptotic proteins correlates with the enhanced responsiveness of both resting and cycling B cells to growth-promoting signals delivered through CD40. These results provide further evidence for the necessity of coreceptor recruitment during Ag-dependent B cell activation and indicate that Ags derived from inflammatory sites function as better thymus-dependent Ags than their counterparts not coated with complement fragments.  (+info)

Antigen receptor engagement selectively induces macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) and MIP-1 beta chemokine production in human B cells. (5/1715)

We show herein that B cell Ag receptor (BCR) triggering, but not stimulation by CD40 mAb and/or IL-4, rapidly induced the coordinated expression of two closely related T cell chemoattractants, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1 beta) and MIP-1 alpha, by human B cells. Naive, memory, and germinal center B cells all produced MIP-1 alpha/beta in response to BCR triggering. In contrast to MIP-1 alpha/beta, IL-8, which is spontaneously produced by germinal center B cells but not by naive and memory B cells, was not regulated by BCR triggering. Culturing follicular dendritic cell-like HK cells with activated B cells did not regulate MIP-1 alpha/beta production, but it did induce production of IL-8 by HK cells. Microchemotaxis assays showed that CD4+CD45RO+ T cells of the effector/helper phenotype actively migrated along a chemotactic gradient formed by BCR-stimulated B cells. This effect was partially blocked by anti-MIP-1 beta and anti-CC chemokine receptor 5 Ab, but not by anti-MIP-1 alpha Ab suggesting that MIP-1 beta plays a major role in this chemoattraction. Since maturation of the B cell response to a peptide Ag is mostly dependent on the availability of T cell help, the ability of Ag-stimulated B cells to recruit T cells via MIP-1 alpha/beta, may represent one possible mechanism enabling cognate interactions between rare in vivo Ag-specific T and B cells.  (+info)

Age-dependent altered proportions in subpopulations of tonsillar lymphocytes. (6/1715)

Age-related changes in functional subsets of lymphocytes may influence the potential to build up immune responses. In particular, the capacity of tonsillar lymphocytes to counter infections may be altered during ageing. In order to address this question we investigated the proportional distribution of several subsets of tonsillar T and B cells with regard to ageing. Tonsils were derived from 119 patients between 2 and 65 years of age. Lymphocyte subsets were monitored by three-colour fluorescence of relevant CD markers in flow cytometry. As a general tendency the percentage of CD3+ T cells steadily increased whereas that of CD19+ B cells decreased at the same time. No significant differences were observed between lymphocytes of patients with and without inflammatory history of the tonsils. The percentage of CD8+ T cells declined whereas that of CD4+ T cells increased during the same time span. CD45RA+ T cells increased during the first two decades of life and gradually decreased thereafter. In contrast, CD45RO+ T cells showed an opposite trend. No differences were seen in the population of CD3-/CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells. The mature B cell marker CD40 showed no significant changes during ageing. However, CD38+ B cells, representing B cells of late maturation stages, dramatically declined up to the age of 65. In a similar manner the CD5+ subpopulation of B cells decreased during ageing. Substantial changes in major tonsillar T and B cell populations as shown in this study may have an impact on the ageing process of the immune system.  (+info)

The evolutionarily conserved sequence upstream of the human Ig heavy chain S gamma 3 region is an inducible promoter: synergistic activation by CD40 ligand and IL-4 via cooperative NF-kappa B and STAT-6 binding sites. (7/1715)

Germline C gamma gene transcription is a crucial event in the process that leads to switch DNA recombination to IgG, but its regulation in the human is poorly understood. We took advantage of our monoclonal model of germinal center B cell differentiation, IgM+ IgD+ CL-01 cells, to define the role of the I gamma 3 evolutionarily conserved sequence (ECS) in the germline transcriptional activation of the human C gamma 3 gene. The I gamma 3 ECS lies upstream of the major I gamma 3 transcription initiation site and displays more than 90% identity with the corresponding human I gamma 1, I gamma 2, and I gamma 4 regions. Reporter luciferase gene vectors containing the human gamma 3 ECS were used to transfect CL-01 cells, which have been shown to undergo Smu-->S gamma 3 DNA recombination, upon engagement of CD40 by CD40 ligand (CD40L) and exposure to IL-4. In these transfected CL-01 cells, CD40:CD40L engagement and exposure to IL-4 synergistically induced gamma 3 ECS-dependent luciferase reporter gene activation. Targeted mutational analysis demonstrated that a tandem NF-kappa B/Rel binding motif is critical for the gamma 3 ECS responsiveness to both CD40L and IL-4, while a STAT-6-binding site is additionally required for IL-4 inducibility. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that p50/p65/c-Rel and STAT-6 are effectively induced by CD40L and IL-4, respectively, and bind to specific DNA motifs within the ECS. These partially overlapping CD40L and IL-4 responsive elements are functionally cooperative as the disruption of one of them prevents synergistic promoter activation. Thus, the gamma 3 ECS is an inducible promoter containing cis elements that critically mediate CD40L and IL-4-triggered transcriptional activation of the human C gamma 3 gene.  (+info)

Syndecan-4 is expressed by B lineage lymphocytes and can transmit a signal for formation of dendritic processes. (8/1715)

Our previous studies indicated that stromal cell-derived syndecan-4 might mediate some form of communication with pre-B cells in bone marrow. We now report additional aspects of this recognition and show that syndecan-4 is also present on pre-B cells. Indeed, the molecule is acquired at an early stage of differentiation and retained until mature B cells undergo Ig isotype switching. mAbs developed to two portions of the syndecan-4 protein core were used to probe possible functions on B lineage lymphocytes. Syndecan-4 ligation had no obvious influence on B lymphocyte formation or activation, but this treatment caused a dramatic morphological change in appropriately stimulated leukocytes. Extended filopodia appeared on transfected Ba/F3 or FDCP-1 cells, as well as activated B cell blasts that were placed on syndecan-4 Ab-coated surfaces. The dendritic processes contained polymerized actin as well as pp52(LSP1), a prominent F-actin binding protein in lymphocytes. The cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4 was not required for this response. Shape changes of this type could facilitate interactions between B lymphocytes and other components of the immune system. Not only is syndecan-4 a useful marker for discriminating normal B lineage lymphocyte subsets, but our results suggest new ways for the syndecans to participate in immune responses.  (+info)

B-lymphocytes, also known as B-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in the humoral immune response. They are responsible for producing antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy pathogens such as viruses and bacteria.

B-lymphocyte subsets refer to distinct populations of B-cells that can be identified based on their surface receptors and functional characteristics. Some common B-lymphocyte subsets include:

1. Naive B-cells: These are mature B-cells that have not yet been exposed to an antigen. They express surface receptors called immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin D (IgD).
2. Memory B-cells: These are B-cells that have previously encountered an antigen and mounted an immune response. They express high levels of surface immunoglobulins and can quickly differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells upon re-exposure to the same antigen.
3. Plasma cells: These are fully differentiated B-cells that secrete large amounts of antibodies in response to an antigen. They lack surface immunoglobulins and do not undergo further division.
4. Regulatory B-cells: These are a subset of B-cells that modulate the immune response by producing anti-inflammatory cytokines and suppressing the activation of other immune cells.
5. B-1 cells: These are a population of B-cells that are primarily found in the peripheral blood and mucosal tissues. They produce natural antibodies that provide early protection against pathogens and help to maintain tissue homeostasis.

Understanding the different B-lymphocyte subsets and their functions is important for diagnosing and treating immune-related disorders, including autoimmune diseases, infections, and cancer.

Lymphocyte subsets refer to distinct populations of white blood cells called lymphocytes, which are crucial components of the adaptive immune system. There are two main types of lymphocytes: T cells and B cells, and each type has several subsets based on their surface receptors, functions, and activation status.

1. T cell subsets: These include CD4+ T helper cells (Th cells), CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (Tc cells), regulatory T cells (Tregs), and memory T cells. Th cells are further divided into Th1, Th2, Th17, and Tfh cells based on their cytokine production profiles and functions.
* CD4+ T helper cells (Th cells) play a central role in orchestrating the immune response by producing various cytokines that activate other immune cells.
* CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (Tc cells) directly kill virus-infected or malignant cells upon recognition of specific antigens presented on their surface.
* Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress the activation and proliferation of other immune cells to maintain self-tolerance and prevent autoimmunity.
* Memory T cells are long-lived cells that remain in the body after an initial infection or immunization, providing rapid protection upon subsequent encounters with the same pathogen.
2. B cell subsets: These include naïve B cells, memory B cells, and plasma cells. Upon activation by antigens, B cells differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells that produce specific antibodies to neutralize or eliminate pathogens.
* Naïve B cells are resting cells that have not yet encountered their specific antigen.
* Memory B cells are long-lived cells generated after initial antigen exposure, which can quickly differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells upon re-exposure to the same antigen.
* Plasma cells are terminally differentiated B cells that secrete large amounts of specific antibodies.

Analyzing lymphocyte subsets is essential for understanding immune system function and dysfunction, as well as monitoring the effectiveness of immunotherapies and vaccinations.

1. Receptors: In the context of physiology and medicine, receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of cells or inside cells that detect and respond to specific molecules, known as ligands. These interactions can trigger a variety of responses within the cell, such as starting a signaling cascade or changing the cell's metabolism. Receptors play crucial roles in various biological processes, including communication between cells, regulation of immune responses, and perception of senses.

2. Antigen: An antigen is any substance (usually a protein) that can be recognized by the adaptive immune system, specifically by B-cells and T-cells. Antigens can be derived from various sources, such as microorganisms (like bacteria, viruses, or fungi), pollen, dust mites, or even components of our own cells (for instance, in autoimmune diseases). An antigen's ability to stimulate an immune response is determined by its molecular structure and whether it can be recognized by the receptors on immune cells.

3. B-Cell: B-cells are a type of white blood cell that plays a critical role in the adaptive immune system, particularly in humoral immunity. They originate from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and are responsible for producing antibodies, which are proteins that recognize and bind to specific antigens. Each B-cell has receptors on its surface called B-cell receptors (BCRs) that can recognize a unique antigen. When a B-cell encounters its specific antigen, it becomes activated, undergoes proliferation, and differentiates into plasma cells that secrete large amounts of antibodies to neutralize or eliminate the antigen.

B-lymphocytes, also known as B-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the immune system's response to infection. They are responsible for producing antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy pathogens such as bacteria and viruses.

When a B-lymphocyte encounters a pathogen, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies specific to the antigens on the surface of the pathogen. These antibodies bind to the pathogen, marking it for destruction by other immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages.

B-lymphocytes also have a role in presenting antigens to T-lymphocytes, another type of white blood cell involved in the immune response. This helps to stimulate the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes, which can then go on to destroy infected cells or help to coordinate the overall immune response.

Overall, B-lymphocytes are an essential part of the adaptive immune system, providing long-lasting immunity to previously encountered pathogens and helping to protect against future infections.

Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell that is an essential part of the immune system. They are responsible for recognizing and responding to potentially harmful substances such as viruses, bacteria, and other foreign invaders. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells).

B-lymphocytes produce antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy foreign substances. When a B-cell encounters a foreign substance, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies. These antibodies bind to the foreign substance, marking it for destruction by other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes, on the other hand, are involved in cell-mediated immunity. They directly attack and destroy infected cells or cancerous cells. T-cells can also help to regulate the immune response by producing chemical signals that activate or inhibit other immune cells.

Lymphocytes are produced in the bone marrow and mature in either the bone marrow (B-cells) or the thymus gland (T-cells). They circulate throughout the body in the blood and lymphatic system, where they can be found in high concentrations in lymph nodes, the spleen, and other lymphoid organs.

Abnormalities in the number or function of lymphocytes can lead to a variety of immune-related disorders, including immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

Lymphocyte activation is the process by which B-cells and T-cells (types of lymphocytes) become activated to perform effector functions in an immune response. This process involves the recognition of specific antigens presented on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells or macrophages.

The activation of B-cells leads to their differentiation into plasma cells that produce antibodies, while the activation of T-cells results in the production of cytotoxic T-cells (CD8+ T-cells) that can directly kill infected cells or helper T-cells (CD4+ T-cells) that assist other immune cells.

Lymphocyte activation involves a series of intracellular signaling events, including the binding of co-stimulatory molecules and the release of cytokines, which ultimately result in the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and effector functions. The activation process is tightly regulated to prevent excessive or inappropriate immune responses that can lead to autoimmunity or chronic inflammation.

A lymphocyte count is a laboratory test that measures the number of white blood cells called lymphocytes in a sample of blood. Lymphocytes are a vital part of the immune system and help fight off infections and diseases. A normal lymphocyte count ranges from 1,000 to 4,800 cells per microliter (µL) of blood for adults.

An abnormal lymphocyte count can indicate an infection, immune disorder, or blood cancer. A low lymphocyte count is called lymphopenia, while a high lymphocyte count is called lymphocytosis. The cause of an abnormal lymphocyte count should be investigated through further testing and clinical evaluation.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the adaptive immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several different types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs).

CD4+ helper T-cells assist in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages. They also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response. CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells directly kill infected cells by releasing toxic substances. Regulatory T-cells help maintain immune tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases by suppressing the activity of other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes are important in the immune response to viral infections, cancer, and other diseases. Dysfunction or depletion of T-cells can lead to immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to infections. On the other hand, an overactive T-cell response can contribute to autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation.

T-lymphocyte subsets refer to distinct populations of T-cells, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. The two main types of T-lymphocytes are CD4+ and CD8+ cells, which are defined by the presence or absence of specific proteins called cluster differentiation (CD) molecules on their surface.

CD4+ T-cells, also known as helper T-cells, play a crucial role in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages, to mount an immune response against pathogens. They also produce cytokines that help regulate the immune response.

CD8+ T-cells, also known as cytotoxic T-cells, directly kill infected cells or tumor cells by releasing toxic substances such as perforins and granzymes.

The balance between these two subsets of T-cells is critical for maintaining immune homeostasis and mounting effective immune responses against pathogens while avoiding excessive inflammation and autoimmunity. Therefore, the measurement of T-lymphocyte subsets is essential in diagnosing and monitoring various immunological disorders, including HIV infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

The CD4-CD8 ratio is a measurement of the relative numbers of two types of immune cells, CD4+ T cells (also known as helper T cells) and CD8+ T cells (also known as cytotoxic T cells), in the blood. The CD4-CD8 ratio is commonly used as a marker of immune function and health.

CD4+ T cells play an important role in the immune response by helping to coordinate the activity of other immune cells, producing chemical signals that activate them, and producing antibodies. CD8+ T cells are responsible for directly killing infected cells and tumor cells.

A normal CD4-CD8 ratio is typically between 1.0 and 3.0. A lower ratio may indicate an impaired immune system, such as in cases of HIV infection or other immunodeficiency disorders. A higher ratio may be seen in some viral infections, autoimmune diseases, or cancer. It's important to note that the CD4-CD8 ratio should be interpreted in conjunction with other laboratory and clinical findings for a more accurate assessment of immune function.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

A leukocyte count, also known as a white blood cell (WBC) count, is a laboratory test that measures the number of leukocytes in a sample of blood. Leukocytes are a vital part of the body's immune system and help fight infection and inflammation. A high or low leukocyte count may indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a bone marrow disorder. The normal range for a leukocyte count in adults is typically between 4,500 and 11,000 cells per microliter (mcL) of blood. However, the normal range can vary slightly depending on the laboratory and the individual's age and sex.

Immunophenotyping is a medical laboratory technique used to identify and classify cells, usually in the context of hematologic (blood) disorders and malignancies (cancers), based on their surface or intracellular expression of various proteins and antigens. This technique utilizes specific antibodies tagged with fluorochromes, which bind to the target antigens on the cell surface or within the cells. The labeled cells are then analyzed using flow cytometry, allowing for the detection and quantification of multiple antigenic markers simultaneously.

Immunophenotyping helps in understanding the distribution of different cell types, their subsets, and activation status, which can be crucial in diagnosing various hematological disorders, immunodeficiencies, and distinguishing between different types of leukemias, lymphomas, and other malignancies. Additionally, it can also be used to monitor the progression of diseases, evaluate the effectiveness of treatments, and detect minimal residual disease (MRD) during follow-up care.

The spleen is an organ in the upper left side of the abdomen, next to the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays multiple supporting roles in the body:

1. It fights infection by acting as a filter for the blood. Old red blood cells are recycled in the spleen, and platelets and white blood cells are stored there.
2. The spleen also helps to control the amount of blood in the body by removing excess red blood cells and storing platelets.
3. It has an important role in immune function, producing antibodies and removing microorganisms and damaged red blood cells from the bloodstream.

The spleen can be removed without causing any significant problems, as other organs take over its functions. This is known as a splenectomy and may be necessary if the spleen is damaged or diseased.

CD4-positive T-lymphocytes, also known as CD4+ T cells or helper T cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the immune response. They express the CD4 receptor on their surface and help coordinate the immune system's response to infectious agents such as viruses and bacteria.

CD4+ T cells recognize and bind to specific antigens presented by antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells or macrophages. Once activated, they can differentiate into various subsets of effector cells, including Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg cells, each with distinct functions in the immune response.

CD4+ T cells are particularly important in the immune response to HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), which targets and destroys these cells, leading to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. The number of CD4+ T cells is often used as a marker of disease progression in HIV infection, with lower counts indicating more advanced disease.

Natural Killer (NK) cells are a type of lymphocyte, which are large granular innate immune cells that play a crucial role in the host's defense against viral infections and malignant transformations. They do not require prior sensitization to target and destroy abnormal cells, such as virus-infected cells or tumor cells. NK cells recognize their targets through an array of germline-encoded activating and inhibitory receptors that detect the alterations in the cell surface molecules of potential targets. Upon activation, NK cells release cytotoxic granules containing perforins and granzymes to induce target cell apoptosis, and they also produce a variety of cytokines and chemokines to modulate immune responses. Overall, natural killer cells serve as a critical component of the innate immune system, providing rapid and effective responses against infected or malignant cells.

CD8-positive T-lymphocytes, also known as CD8+ T cells or cytotoxic T cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the adaptive immune system. They are named after the CD8 molecule found on their surface, which is a protein involved in cell signaling and recognition.

CD8+ T cells are primarily responsible for identifying and destroying virus-infected cells or cancerous cells. When activated, they release cytotoxic granules that contain enzymes capable of inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death) in the target cells. They also produce cytokines such as interferon-gamma, which can help coordinate the immune response and activate other immune cells.

CD8+ T cells are generated in the thymus gland and are a type of T cell, which is a lymphocyte that matures in the thymus and plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They recognize and respond to specific antigens presented on the surface of infected or cancerous cells in conjunction with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules.

Overall, CD8+ T cells are an essential component of the immune system's defense against viral infections and cancer.

CD (cluster of differentiation) antigens are cell-surface proteins that are expressed on leukocytes (white blood cells) and can be used to identify and distinguish different subsets of these cells. They are important markers in the field of immunology and hematology, and are commonly used to diagnose and monitor various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases.

CD antigens are designated by numbers, such as CD4, CD8, CD19, etc., which refer to specific proteins found on the surface of different types of leukocytes. For example, CD4 is a protein found on the surface of helper T cells, while CD8 is found on cytotoxic T cells.

CD antigens can be used as targets for immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibody therapy, in which antibodies are designed to bind to specific CD antigens and trigger an immune response against cancer cells or infected cells. They can also be used as markers to monitor the effectiveness of treatments and to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) after treatment.

It's important to note that not all CD antigens are exclusive to leukocytes, some can be found on other cell types as well, and their expression can vary depending on the activation state or differentiation stage of the cells.

Monoclonal antibodies are a type of antibody that are identical because they are produced by a single clone of cells. They are laboratory-produced molecules that act like human antibodies in the immune system. They can be designed to attach to specific proteins found on the surface of cancer cells, making them useful for targeting and treating cancer. Monoclonal antibodies can also be used as a therapy for other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions.

Monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing a single type of immune cell, called a B cell, with a tumor cell to create a hybrid cell, or hybridoma. This hybrid cell is then able to replicate indefinitely, producing a large number of identical copies of the original antibody. These antibodies can be further modified and engineered to enhance their ability to bind to specific targets, increase their stability, and improve their effectiveness as therapeutic agents.

Monoclonal antibodies have several mechanisms of action in cancer therapy. They can directly kill cancer cells by binding to them and triggering an immune response. They can also block the signals that promote cancer growth and survival. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies can be used to deliver drugs or radiation directly to cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of these treatments while minimizing their side effects on healthy tissues.

Monoclonal antibodies have become an important tool in modern medicine, with several approved for use in cancer therapy and other diseases. They are continuing to be studied and developed as a promising approach to treating a wide range of medical conditions.

The palatine tonsils, also known as the "tonsils," are two masses of lymphoid tissue located on either side of the oropharynx, at the back of the throat. They are part of the immune system and play a role in protecting the body from inhaled or ingested pathogens. Each tonsil has a surface covered with crypts and follicles that contain lymphocytes, which help to filter out bacteria and viruses that enter the mouth and nose.

The palatine tonsils are visible through the mouth and can be seen during a routine physical examination. They vary in size, but typically are about the size of a large olive or almond. Swelling or inflammation of the tonsils is called tonsillitis, which can cause symptoms such as sore throat, difficulty swallowing, fever, and swollen lymph nodes in the neck. In some cases, enlarged tonsils may need to be removed through a surgical procedure called a tonsillectomy.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the immune response. They help to protect the body from infection and disease by identifying and attacking foreign substances such as viruses and bacteria.

Helper-inducer T-lymphocytes, also known as CD4+ T-cells or Th0 cells, are a specific subset of T-lymphocytes that help to coordinate the immune response. They do this by activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes (which produce antibodies) and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (which directly attack infected cells). Helper-inducer T-lymphocytes also release cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help to regulate the immune response.

Helper-inducer T-lymphocytes can differentiate into different subsets of T-cells, depending on the type of cytokines they are exposed to. For example, they can differentiate into Th1 cells, which produce cytokines that help to activate cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and macrophages; or Th2 cells, which produce cytokines that help to activate B-lymphocytes and eosinophils.

It is important to note that helper-inducer T-lymphocytes play a crucial role in the immune response, and dysfunction of these cells can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmune disorders.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

CD3 antigens are a group of proteins found on the surface of T-cells, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in the immune response. The CD3 antigens are composed of several different subunits (ε, δ, γ, and α) that associate to form the CD3 complex, which is involved in T-cell activation and signal transduction.

The CD3 complex is associated with the T-cell receptor (TCR), which recognizes and binds to specific antigens presented by antigen-presenting cells. When the TCR binds to an antigen, it triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that lead to T-cell activation and the initiation of an immune response.

CD3 antigens are important targets for immunotherapy in some diseases, such as certain types of cancer. For example, monoclonal antibodies that target CD3 have been developed to activate T-cells and enhance their ability to recognize and destroy tumor cells. However, CD3-targeted therapies can also cause side effects, such as cytokine release syndrome, which can be serious or life-threatening in some cases.

CD45 is a protein that is found on the surface of many types of white blood cells, including T-cells, B-cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. It is also known as leukocyte common antigen because it is present on almost all leukocytes. CD45 is a tyrosine phosphatase that plays a role in regulating the activity of various proteins involved in cell signaling pathways.

As an antigen, CD45 is used as a marker to identify and distinguish different types of white blood cells. It has several isoforms that are generated by alternative splicing of its mRNA, resulting in different molecular weights. The size of the CD45 isoform can be used to distinguish between different subsets of T-cells and B-cells.

CD45 is an important molecule in the immune system, and abnormalities in its expression or function have been implicated in various diseases, including autoimmune disorders and cancer.

CD19 is a type of protein found on the surface of B cells, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the body's immune response. CD19 is a marker that helps identify and distinguish B cells from other types of cells in the body. It is also a target for immunotherapy in certain diseases, such as B-cell malignancies.

An antigen is any substance that can stimulate an immune response, particularly the production of antibodies. In the context of CD19, antigens refer to substances that can bind to CD19 and trigger a response from the immune system. This can include proteins, carbohydrates, or other molecules found on the surface of bacteria, viruses, or cancer cells.

Therefore, 'antigens, CD19' refers to any substances that can bind to the CD19 protein on B cells and trigger an immune response. These antigens may be used in the development of immunotherapies for the treatment of B-cell malignancies or other diseases.

Immunoglobulin M (IgM) is a type of antibody that is primarily found in the blood and lymph fluid. It is the first antibody to be produced in response to an initial exposure to an antigen, making it an important part of the body's primary immune response. IgM antibodies are large molecules that are composed of five basic units, giving them a pentameric structure. They are primarily found on the surface of B cells as membrane-bound immunoglobulins (mlgM), where they function as receptors for antigens. Once an mlgM receptor binds to an antigen, it triggers the activation and differentiation of the B cell into a plasma cell that produces and secretes large amounts of soluble IgM antibodies.

IgM antibodies are particularly effective at agglutination (clumping) and complement activation, which makes them important in the early stages of an immune response to help clear pathogens from the bloodstream. However, they are not as stable or long-lived as other types of antibodies, such as IgG, and their levels tend to decline after the initial immune response has occurred.

In summary, Immunoglobulin M (IgM) is a type of antibody that plays a crucial role in the primary immune response to antigens by agglutination and complement activation. It is primarily found in the blood and lymph fluid, and it is produced by B cells after they are activated by an antigen.

Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped organs that are part of the immune system. They are found throughout the body, especially in the neck, armpits, groin, and abdomen. Lymph nodes filter lymph fluid, which carries waste and unwanted substances such as bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells. They contain white blood cells called lymphocytes that help fight infections and diseases by attacking and destroying the harmful substances found in the lymph fluid. When an infection or disease is present, lymph nodes may swell due to the increased number of immune cells and fluid accumulation as they work to fight off the invaders.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

Phytohemagglutinins (PHA) are a type of lectin, specifically a mitogen, found in certain plants such as red kidney beans, white kidney beans, and butter beans. They have the ability to agglutinate erythrocytes (red blood cells) and stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell). PHA is often used in medical research and diagnostics as a means to study immune system function, particularly the activation and proliferation of T-cells. It's also used in some immunological assays. However, it should be noted that ingesting large amounts of raw or undercooked beans containing high levels of PHA can cause adverse gastrointestinal symptoms due to their ability to interact with the cells lining the digestive tract.

Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a type of cytokine, which are signaling molecules that mediate and regulate immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis. Specifically, IL-2 is a growth factor for T cells, a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in the immune response. It is primarily produced by CD4+ T cells (also known as T helper cells) and stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of activated T cells, including effector T cells and regulatory T cells. IL-2 also has roles in the activation and function of other immune cells, such as B cells, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells. Dysregulation of IL-2 production or signaling can contribute to various pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, chronic infections, and cancer.

Cellular immunity, also known as cell-mediated immunity, is a type of immune response that involves the activation of immune cells, such as T lymphocytes (T cells), to protect the body against infected or damaged cells. This form of immunity is important for fighting off infections caused by viruses and intracellular bacteria, as well as for recognizing and destroying cancer cells.

Cellular immunity involves a complex series of interactions between various immune cells and molecules. When a pathogen infects a cell, the infected cell displays pieces of the pathogen on its surface in a process called antigen presentation. This attracts T cells, which recognize the antigens and become activated. Activated T cells then release cytokines, chemicals that help coordinate the immune response, and can directly attack and kill infected cells or help activate other immune cells to do so.

Cellular immunity is an important component of the adaptive immune system, which is able to learn and remember specific pathogens in order to mount a faster and more effective response upon subsequent exposure. This form of immunity is also critical for the rejection of transplanted organs, as the immune system recognizes the transplanted tissue as foreign and attacks it.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

Immunoglobulins (Igs), also known as antibodies, are glycoprotein molecules produced by the immune system's B cells in response to the presence of foreign substances, such as bacteria, viruses, and toxins. These Y-shaped proteins play a crucial role in identifying and neutralizing pathogens and other antigens, thereby protecting the body against infection and disease.

Immunoglobulins are composed of four polypeptide chains: two identical heavy chains and two identical light chains, held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of these chains form the antigen-binding sites, which recognize and bind to specific epitopes on antigens. Based on their heavy chain type, immunoglobulins are classified into five main isotypes or classes: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has distinct functions in the immune response, such as providing protection in different body fluids and tissues, mediating hypersensitivity reactions, and aiding in the development of immunological memory.

In medical settings, immunoglobulins can be administered therapeutically to provide passive immunity against certain diseases or to treat immune deficiencies, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions that may benefit from immunomodulation.

Rosette formation is a term used in pathology and histology, which refers to the circular arrangement of cells or structures around a central point, creating a pattern that resembles a rose flower. This phenomenon can be observed in various tissues and diseases. For example, in the context of cancer, rosette formation may be seen in certain types of tumors, such as medulloblastomas or retinoblastomas, where cancer cells cluster around blood vessels or form distinctive arrangements that are characteristic of these malignancies. In some cases, rosette formation can provide valuable clues for the diagnosis and classification of neoplasms. However, it is essential to consider other histological features and clinical context when interpreting rosette formation in diagnostic pathology.

Antigens are substances (usually proteins) on the surface of cells, viruses, fungi, or bacteria that the immune system recognizes as foreign and mounts a response against.

Differentiation in the context of T-lymphocytes refers to the process by which immature T-cells mature and develop into different types of T-cells with specific functions, such as CD4+ helper T-cells or CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. Once mature, they circulate throughout the body in search of foreign antigens to attack and destroy.

Therefore, 'Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte' refers to the process by which T-lymphocytes mature and develop the ability to recognize and respond to specific foreign antigens.

Mitogens are substances that stimulate mitosis, or cell division, in particular, the proliferation of cells derived from the immune system. They are often proteins or glycoproteins found on the surface of certain bacteria, viruses, and other cells, which can bind to receptors on the surface of immune cells and trigger a signal transduction pathway that leads to cell division.

Mitogens are commonly used in laboratory research to study the growth and behavior of immune cells, as well as to assess the function of the immune system. For example, mitogens can be added to cultures of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) to stimulate their proliferation and measure their response to various stimuli.

Examples of mitogens include phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). It's important to note that while mitogens can be useful tools in research, they can also have harmful effects if they are introduced into the body in large quantities or inappropriately, as they can stimulate an overactive immune response.

Cell separation is a process used to separate and isolate specific cell types from a heterogeneous mixture of cells. This can be accomplished through various physical or biological methods, depending on the characteristics of the cells of interest. Some common techniques for cell separation include:

1. Density gradient centrifugation: In this method, a sample containing a mixture of cells is layered onto a density gradient medium and then centrifuged. The cells are separated based on their size, density, and sedimentation rate, with denser cells settling closer to the bottom of the tube and less dense cells remaining near the top.

2. Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS): This technique uses magnetic beads coated with antibodies that bind to specific cell surface markers. The labeled cells are then passed through a column placed in a magnetic field, which retains the magnetically labeled cells while allowing unlabeled cells to flow through.

3. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS): In this method, cells are stained with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies that recognize specific cell surface or intracellular markers. The stained cells are then passed through a laser beam, which excites the fluorophores and allows for the detection and sorting of individual cells based on their fluorescence profile.

4. Filtration: This simple method relies on the physical size differences between cells to separate them. Cells can be passed through filters with pore sizes that allow smaller cells to pass through while retaining larger cells.

5. Enzymatic digestion: In some cases, cells can be separated by enzymatically dissociating tissues into single-cell suspensions and then using various separation techniques to isolate specific cell types.

These methods are widely used in research and clinical settings for applications such as isolating immune cells, stem cells, or tumor cells from biological samples.

Surface antigens are molecules found on the surface of cells that can be recognized by the immune system as being foreign or different from the host's own cells. Antigens are typically proteins or polysaccharides that are capable of stimulating an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies and activation of immune cells such as T-cells.

Surface antigens are important in the context of infectious diseases because they allow the immune system to identify and target infected cells for destruction. For example, viruses and bacteria often display surface antigens that are distinct from those found on host cells, allowing the immune system to recognize and attack them. In some cases, these surface antigens can also be used as targets for vaccines or other immunotherapies.

In addition to their role in infectious diseases, surface antigens are also important in the context of cancer. Tumor cells often display abnormal surface antigens that differ from those found on normal cells, allowing the immune system to potentially recognize and attack them. However, tumors can also develop mechanisms to evade the immune system, making it difficult to mount an effective response.

Overall, understanding the properties and behavior of surface antigens is crucial for developing effective immunotherapies and vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer.

Regulatory T-lymphocytes (Tregs), also known as suppressor T cells, are a subpopulation of T-cells that play a critical role in maintaining immune tolerance and preventing autoimmune diseases. They function to suppress the activation and proliferation of other immune cells, thereby regulating the immune response and preventing it from attacking the body's own tissues.

Tregs constitutively express the surface markers CD4 and CD25, as well as the transcription factor Foxp3, which is essential for their development and function. They can be further divided into subsets based on their expression of other markers, such as CD127 and CD45RA.

Tregs are critical for maintaining self-tolerance by suppressing the activation of self-reactive T cells that have escaped negative selection in the thymus. They also play a role in regulating immune responses to foreign antigens, such as those encountered during infection or cancer, and can contribute to the immunosuppressive microenvironment found in tumors.

Dysregulation of Tregs has been implicated in various autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis, as well as in cancer and infectious diseases. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that regulate Treg function is an important area of research with potential therapeutic implications.

Lymphopenia is a term used in medicine to describe an abnormally low count of lymphocytes, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the body's immune system. Lymphocytes help fight off infections and diseases by producing antibodies and attacking infected cells.

A normal lymphocyte count ranges from 1,000 to 4,800 cells per microliter (cells/μL) of blood in adults. A lymphocyte count lower than 1,000 cells/μL is generally considered lymphopenia.

Several factors can cause lymphopenia, including viral infections, certain medications, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. It's important to note that a low lymphocyte count alone may not indicate a specific medical condition, and further testing may be necessary to determine the underlying cause. If left untreated, lymphopenia can increase the risk of infections and other complications.

CD8 antigens are a type of protein found on the surface of certain immune cells called cytotoxic T lymphocytes or cytotoxic T cells. These cells play a critical role in the adaptive immune response, which is the specific and targeted response of the immune system to foreign substances (antigens) that invade the body.

CD8 antigens help cytotoxic T cells recognize and respond to infected or abnormal cells, such as those that have been infected by a virus or have become cancerous. When a cytotoxic T cell encounters a cell displaying a specific antigen bound to a CD8 molecule, it becomes activated and releases toxic substances that can kill the target cell.

CD8 antigens are also known as cluster of differentiation 8 antigens or CD8 receptors. They belong to a larger family of proteins called major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC class I) molecules, which present antigens to T cells and play a crucial role in the immune system's ability to distinguish between self and non-self.

Lymphoid tissue is a specialized type of connective tissue that is involved in the immune function of the body. It is composed of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell), which are responsible for producing antibodies and destroying infected or cancerous cells. Lymphoid tissue can be found throughout the body, but it is particularly concentrated in certain areas such as the lymph nodes, spleen, tonsils, and Peyer's patches in the small intestine.

Lymphoid tissue provides a site for the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of lymphocytes, which are critical components of the adaptive immune response. It also serves as a filter for foreign particles, such as bacteria and viruses, that may enter the body through various routes. The lymphatic system, which includes lymphoid tissue, helps to maintain the health and integrity of the body by protecting it from infection and disease.

Immunologic cytotoxicity refers to the damage or destruction of cells that occurs as a result of an immune response. This process involves the activation of immune cells, such as cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, which release toxic substances, such as perforins and granzymes, that can kill target cells.

In addition, antibodies produced by B cells can also contribute to immunologic cytotoxicity by binding to antigens on the surface of target cells and triggering complement-mediated lysis or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) by activating immune effector cells.

Immunologic cytotoxicity plays an important role in the body's defense against viral infections, cancer cells, and other foreign substances. However, it can also contribute to tissue damage and autoimmune diseases if the immune system mistakenly targets healthy cells or tissues.

The thymus gland is an essential organ of the immune system, located in the upper chest, behind the sternum and surrounding the heart. It's primarily active until puberty and begins to shrink in size and activity thereafter. The main function of the thymus gland is the production and maturation of T-lymphocytes (T-cells), which are crucial for cell-mediated immunity, helping to protect the body from infection and cancer.

The thymus gland provides a protected environment where immune cells called pre-T cells develop into mature T cells. During this process, they learn to recognize and respond appropriately to foreign substances while remaining tolerant to self-tissues, which is crucial for preventing autoimmune diseases.

Additionally, the thymus gland produces hormones like thymosin that regulate immune cell activities and contribute to the overall immune response.

Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, also known as CD8+ T cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in the cell-mediated immune system. They are responsible for identifying and destroying virus-infected cells and cancer cells. When a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognizes a specific antigen presented on the surface of an infected or malignant cell, it becomes activated and releases toxic substances such as perforins and granzymes, which can create pores in the target cell's membrane and induce apoptosis (programmed cell death). This process helps to eliminate the infected or malignant cells and prevent the spread of infection or cancer.

Concanavalin A (Con A) is a type of protein known as a lectin, which is found in the seeds of the plant Canavalia ensiformis, also known as jack bean. It is often used in laboratory settings as a tool to study various biological processes, such as cell division and the immune response, due to its ability to bind specifically to certain sugars on the surface of cells. Con A has been extensively studied for its potential applications in medicine, including as a possible treatment for cancer and viral infections. However, more research is needed before these potential uses can be realized.

Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are a type of immune cell that have migrated from the bloodstream into a tumor. They are primarily composed of T cells, B cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. TILs can be found in various types of solid tumors, and their presence and composition have been shown to correlate with patient prognosis and response to certain therapies.

TILs play a crucial role in the immune response against cancer, as they are able to recognize and kill cancer cells. They can also release cytokines and chemokines that attract other immune cells to the tumor site, enhancing the anti-tumor immune response. However, tumors can develop mechanisms to evade or suppress the immune response, including the suppression of TILs.

TILs have emerged as a promising target for cancer immunotherapy, with adoptive cell transfer (ACT) being one of the most widely studied approaches. In ACT, TILs are isolated from a patient's tumor, expanded in the laboratory, and then reinfused back into the patient to enhance their anti-tumor immune response. This approach has shown promising results in clinical trials for several types of cancer, including melanoma and cervical cancer.

Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a type of antibody, which is a protective protein produced by the immune system in response to foreign substances like bacteria or viruses. IgG is the most abundant type of antibody in human blood, making up about 75-80% of all antibodies. It is found in all body fluids and plays a crucial role in fighting infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and toxins.

IgG has several important functions:

1. Neutralization: IgG can bind to the surface of bacteria or viruses, preventing them from attaching to and infecting human cells.
2. Opsonization: IgG coats the surface of pathogens, making them more recognizable and easier for immune cells like neutrophils and macrophages to phagocytose (engulf and destroy) them.
3. Complement activation: IgG can activate the complement system, a group of proteins that work together to help eliminate pathogens from the body. Activation of the complement system leads to the formation of the membrane attack complex, which creates holes in the cell membranes of bacteria, leading to their lysis (destruction).
4. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC): IgG can bind to immune cells like natural killer (NK) cells and trigger them to release substances that cause target cells (such as virus-infected or cancerous cells) to undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death).
5. Immune complex formation: IgG can form immune complexes with antigens, which can then be removed from the body through various mechanisms, such as phagocytosis by immune cells or excretion in urine.

IgG is a critical component of adaptive immunity and provides long-lasting protection against reinfection with many pathogens. It has four subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) that differ in their structure, function, and distribution in the body.

CD4 antigens, also known as CD4 proteins or CD4 molecules, are a type of cell surface receptor found on certain immune cells, including T-helper cells and monocytes. They play a critical role in the immune response by binding to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on the surface of antigen-presenting cells and helping to activate T-cells. CD4 antigens are also the primary target of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS, leading to the destruction of CD4-positive T-cells and a weakened immune system.

A Lymphocyte Culture Test, Mixed (LCTM) is not a standardized medical test with a universally accepted definition. However, in some contexts, it may refer to a laboratory procedure where both T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes are cultured together from a sample of peripheral blood or other tissues. This test is sometimes used in research or specialized diagnostic settings to evaluate the immune function or to study the interactions between T-cells and B-cells in response to various stimuli, such as antigens or mitogens.

The test typically involves isolating lymphocytes from a sample, adding them to a culture medium along with appropriate stimulants, and then incubating the mixture for a period of time. The resulting responses, such as proliferation, differentiation, or production of cytokines, can be measured and analyzed to gain insights into the immune function or dysfunction.

It's important to note that LCTM is not a routine diagnostic test and its use and interpretation may vary depending on the specific laboratory or research setting.

Pokeweed mitogens are substances derived from the pokeweed plant (Phytolacca americana) that have the ability to stimulate the production and proliferation of various types of cells, particularly white blood cells (lymphocytes). They are often used in laboratory settings as tools for studying the immune system and cell biology.

Pokeweed mitogens are typically extracted from the roots or leaves of the pokeweed plant and purified for use in research and diagnostic applications. When introduced to cells, they bind to specific receptors on the surface of lymphocytes and trigger a series of intracellular signaling events that lead to cell division and growth.

These mitogens are commonly used in immunological assays to measure immune function, such as assessing the proliferative response of lymphocytes to mitogenic stimulation. They can also be used to study the mechanisms of signal transduction and gene regulation in lymphocytes and other cell types.

It is important to note that pokeweed mitogens should only be handled by trained professionals in a controlled laboratory setting, as they can cause adverse reactions if improperly administered or ingested.

Cytokines are a broad and diverse category of small signaling proteins that are secreted by various cells, including immune cells, in response to different stimuli. They play crucial roles in regulating the immune response, inflammation, hematopoiesis, and cellular communication.

Cytokines mediate their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, which triggers intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately result in changes in gene expression, cell behavior, and function. Some key functions of cytokines include:

1. Regulating the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and macrophages.
2. Coordinating the inflammatory response by recruiting immune cells to sites of infection or tissue damage and modulating their effector functions.
3. Regulating hematopoiesis, the process of blood cell formation in the bone marrow, by controlling the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.
4. Modulating the development and function of the nervous system, including neuroinflammation, neuroprotection, and neuroregeneration.

Cytokines can be classified into several categories based on their structure, function, or cellular origin. Some common types of cytokines include interleukins (ILs), interferons (IFNs), tumor necrosis factors (TNFs), chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), and transforming growth factors (TGFs). Dysregulation of cytokine production and signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a soluble cytokine that is primarily produced by the activation of natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes, especially CD4+ Th1 cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. It plays a crucial role in the regulation of the immune response against viral and intracellular bacterial infections, as well as tumor cells. IFN-γ has several functions, including activating macrophages to enhance their microbicidal activity, increasing the presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules on antigen-presenting cells, stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of T cells and NK cells, and inducing the production of other cytokines and chemokines. Additionally, IFN-γ has direct antiproliferative effects on certain types of tumor cells and can enhance the cytotoxic activity of immune cells against infected or malignant cells.

Antibody formation, also known as humoral immune response, is the process by which the immune system produces proteins called antibodies in response to the presence of a foreign substance (antigen) in the body. This process involves several steps:

1. Recognition: The antigen is recognized and bound by a type of white blood cell called a B lymphocyte or B cell, which then becomes activated.
2. Differentiation: The activated B cell undergoes differentiation to become a plasma cell, which is a type of cell that produces and secretes large amounts of antibodies.
3. Antibody production: The plasma cells produce and release antibodies, which are proteins made up of four polypeptide chains (two heavy chains and two light chains) arranged in a Y-shape. Each antibody has two binding sites that can recognize and bind to specific regions on the antigen called epitopes.
4. Neutralization or elimination: The antibodies bind to the antigens, neutralizing them or marking them for destruction by other immune cells. This helps to prevent the spread of infection and protect the body from harmful substances.

Antibody formation is an important part of the adaptive immune response, which allows the body to specifically recognize and respond to a wide variety of pathogens and foreign substances.

Lymphocyte depletion is a medical term that refers to the reduction in the number of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the body. Lymphocytes play a crucial role in the immune system, as they help to fight off infections and diseases.

Lymphocyte depletion can occur due to various reasons, including certain medical treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, immune disorders, viral infections, or bone marrow transplantation. This reduction in lymphocytes can make a person more susceptible to infections and diseases, as their immune system is weakened.

There are different types of lymphocytes, including T cells, B cells, and natural killer (NK) cells, and lymphocyte depletion can affect one or all of these types. In some cases, lymphocyte depletion may be temporary and resolve on its own or with treatment. However, in other cases, it may be more prolonged and require medical intervention to manage the associated risks and complications.

Lymphocyte cooperation is a term used in immunology to describe the interaction and communication between different types of lymphocytes, specifically T cells and B cells, to mount an effective immune response against pathogens.

T cells, also known as T lymphocytes, are a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can directly kill infected cells or produce cytokines that regulate the immune response. B cells, on the other hand, are responsible for humoral immunity, producing antibodies that neutralize pathogens or mark them for destruction by other immune cells.

Lymphocyte cooperation occurs when a T cell recognizes an antigen presented to it by an antigen-presenting cell (APC) in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Once activated, the T cell can then interact with B cells that have also been activated by recognizing the same antigen. The T cell provides help to the B cell by producing cytokines that stimulate its proliferation and differentiation into antibody-secreting plasma cells.

This cooperation between T and B cells is crucial for an effective immune response, as it allows for the generation of a targeted and specific response against pathogens. Defects in lymphocyte cooperation can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmune disorders.

CD5 is a type of protein found on the surface of certain cells in the human body, including some immune cells like T cells and B cells. It is also known as a cell marker or identifier. Antigens are substances (usually proteins) on the surface of cells that can be recognized by the immune system, triggering an immune response.

In the context of CD5, antigens refer to foreign substances that can bind to the CD5 protein and stimulate an immune response. However, it's important to note that CD5 itself is not typically considered an antigen in the medical community. Instead, it is a marker used to identify certain types of cells and monitor their behavior in health and disease states.

In some cases, abnormal expression or regulation of CD5 has been associated with various diseases, including certain types of cancer. For example, some B-cell lymphomas may overexpress CD5, which can help doctors diagnose and monitor the progression of the disease. However, in these contexts, CD5 is not considered an antigen in the traditional sense.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Null lymphocytes are a type of immune cells that do not express typical surface markers found on mature T lymphocytes or B lymphocytes. They lack both CD4 and CD8 proteins, which are commonly used to identify T cells, as well as CD19 and CD20 proteins, which are used to identify B cells.

Null lymphocytes can be further divided into two subsets: double negative (DN) and double positive (DP) null cells. DN null cells lack both CD4 and CD8 proteins, while DP null cells express both of these proteins simultaneously. The function of null lymphocytes is not well understood, but they are thought to play a role in the immune response, particularly in the early stages of an infection or inflammation.

It's worth noting that null lymphocytes can also be found in some pathological conditions, such as certain types of leukemia and lymphoma, where they can accumulate in large numbers and contribute to the disease process.

Medical Definition of "Herpesvirus 4, Human" (Epstein-Barr Virus)

"Herpesvirus 4, Human," also known as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), is a member of the Herpesviridae family and is one of the most common human viruses. It is primarily transmitted through saliva and is often referred to as the "kissing disease."

EBV is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM), also known as glandular fever, which is characterized by symptoms such as fatigue, sore throat, fever, and swollen lymph nodes. The virus can also cause other diseases, including certain types of cancer, such as Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

Once a person becomes infected with EBV, the virus remains in the body for the rest of their life, residing in certain white blood cells called B lymphocytes. In most people, the virus remains dormant and does not cause any further symptoms. However, in some individuals, the virus may reactivate, leading to recurrent or persistent symptoms.

EBV infection is diagnosed through various tests, including blood tests that detect antibodies against the virus or direct detection of the virus itself through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. There is no cure for EBV infection, and treatment is generally supportive, focusing on relieving symptoms and managing complications. Prevention measures include practicing good hygiene, avoiding close contact with infected individuals, and not sharing personal items such as toothbrushes or drinking glasses.

HLA-DR antigens are a type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule that plays a crucial role in the immune system. They are found on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes. HLA-DR molecules present peptide antigens to CD4+ T cells, also known as helper T cells, thereby initiating an immune response.

HLA-DR antigens are highly polymorphic, meaning that there are many different variants of these molecules in the human population. This diversity allows for a wide range of potential peptide antigens to be presented and recognized by the immune system. HLA-DR antigens are encoded by genes located on chromosome 6 in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region.

In transplantation, HLA-DR compatibility between donor and recipient is an important factor in determining the success of the transplant. Incompatibility can lead to a heightened immune response against the transplanted organ or tissue, resulting in rejection. Additionally, certain HLA-DR types have been associated with increased susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

1. Receptors: In the context of physiology and medicine, receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of cells or inside cells that detect and respond to specific molecules, known as ligands. They play a crucial role in various biological processes, including signal transduction, cell communication, and regulation of physiological functions.
2. Antigen: An antigen is a foreign substance (usually a protein) that triggers an immune response when introduced into the body. Antigens can be derived from various sources, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites. They are recognized by the immune system as non-self and stimulate the production of antibodies and activation of immune cells, like T-cells, to eliminate the threat.
3. T-Cell: T-cells, also known as T-lymphocytes, are a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. T-cells have receptors on their surface called T-cell receptors (TCRs) that enable them to recognize and respond to specific antigens presented by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). There are several types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells.
4. gamma-delta (γδ) T-Cell: Gamma-delta (γδ) T-cells are a subset of T-cells that possess a distinct T-cell receptor (TCR) composed of gamma and delta chains. Unlike conventional T-cells, which typically recognize peptide antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, γδ T-cells can directly recognize various non-peptide antigens, such as lipids, glycolipids, and small metabolites. They are involved in the early stages of immune responses, tissue homeostasis, and cancer surveillance.

Immunologic memory, also known as adaptive immunity, refers to the ability of the immune system to recognize and mount a more rapid and effective response upon subsequent exposure to a pathogen or antigen that it has encountered before. This is a key feature of the vertebrate immune system and allows for long-term protection against infectious diseases.

Immunologic memory is mediated by specialized cells called memory T cells and B cells, which are produced during the initial response to an infection or immunization. These cells persist in the body after the pathogen has been cleared and can quickly respond to future encounters with the same or similar antigens. This rapid response leads to a more effective and efficient elimination of the pathogen, resulting in fewer symptoms and reduced severity of disease.

Immunologic memory is the basis for vaccines, which work by exposing the immune system to a harmless form of a pathogen or its components, inducing an initial response and generating memory cells that provide long-term protection against future infections.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is a type of cytokine, which is a cell signaling molecule that mediates communication between cells in the immune system. Specifically, IL-4 is produced by activated T cells and mast cells, among other cells, and plays an important role in the differentiation and activation of immune cells called Th2 cells.

Th2 cells are involved in the immune response to parasites, as well as in allergic reactions. IL-4 also promotes the growth and survival of B cells, which produce antibodies, and helps to regulate the production of certain types of antibodies. In addition, IL-4 has anti-inflammatory effects and can help to downregulate the immune response in some contexts.

Defects in IL-4 signaling have been implicated in a number of diseases, including asthma, allergies, and certain types of cancer.

Immunoglobulin D (IgD) is a type of antibody that is present in the blood and other bodily fluids. It is one of the five classes of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM) found in humans and plays a role in the immune response.

IgD is produced by B cells, a type of white blood cell that is responsible for producing antibodies. It is primarily found on the surface of mature B cells, where it functions as a receptor for antigens (foreign substances that trigger an immune response). When an antigen binds to IgD on the surface of a B cell, it activates the B cell and stimulates it to produce and secrete antibodies specific to that antigen.

IgD is found in relatively low concentrations in the blood compared to other immunoglobulins, and its precise functions are not fully understood. However, it is thought to play a role in the regulation of B cell activation and the immune response. Additionally, some research suggests that IgD may have a direct role in protecting against certain types of infections.

It's worth noting that genetic deficiencies in IgD are not typically associated with any significant immunological abnormalities or increased susceptibility to infection.

A CD4 lymphocyte count is a laboratory test that measures the number of CD4 T-cells (also known as CD4+ T-cells or helper T-cells) in a sample of blood. CD4 cells are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the body's immune response, particularly in fighting off infections caused by viruses and other pathogens.

CD4 cells express a protein on their surface called the CD4 receptor, which is used by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to infect and destroy these cells. As a result, people with HIV infection or AIDS often have low CD4 lymphocyte counts, which can make them more susceptible to opportunistic infections and other complications.

A normal CD4 lymphocyte count ranges from 500 to 1,200 cells per cubic millimeter of blood (cells/mm3) in healthy adults. A lower than normal CD4 count is often used as a marker for the progression of HIV infection and the development of AIDS. CD4 counts are typically monitored over time to assess the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and to guide clinical decision-making regarding the need for additional interventions, such as prophylaxis against opportunistic infections.

Antigens are substances (usually proteins) on the surface of cells, viruses, fungi, or bacteria that can be recognized by the immune system and provoke an immune response. In the context of differentiation, antigens refer to specific markers that identify the developmental stage or lineage of a cell.

Differentiation antigens are proteins or carbohydrates expressed on the surface of cells during various stages of differentiation, which can be used to distinguish between cells at different maturation stages or of different cell types. These antigens play an essential role in the immune system's ability to recognize and respond to abnormal or infected cells while sparing healthy cells.

Examples of differentiation antigens include:

1. CD (cluster of differentiation) molecules: A group of membrane proteins used to identify and define various cell types, such as T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes, and granulocytes.
2. Lineage-specific antigens: Antigens that are specific to certain cell lineages, such as CD3 for T cells or CD19 for B cells.
3. Maturation markers: Antigens that indicate the maturation stage of a cell, like CD34 and CD38 on hematopoietic stem cells.

Understanding differentiation antigens is crucial in immunology, cancer research, transplantation medicine, and vaccine development.

The Fluorescent Antibody Technique (FAT) is a type of immunofluorescence assay used in laboratory medicine and pathology for the detection and localization of specific antigens or antibodies in tissues, cells, or microorganisms. In this technique, a fluorescein-labeled antibody is used to selectively bind to the target antigen or antibody, forming an immune complex. When excited by light of a specific wavelength, the fluorescein label emits light at a longer wavelength, typically visualized as green fluorescence under a fluorescence microscope.

The FAT is widely used in diagnostic microbiology for the identification and characterization of various bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. It has also been applied in the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases and certain cancers by detecting specific antibodies or antigens in patient samples. The main advantage of FAT is its high sensitivity and specificity, allowing for accurate detection and differentiation of various pathogens and disease markers. However, it requires specialized equipment and trained personnel to perform and interpret the results.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

A clone is a group of cells that are genetically identical to each other because they are derived from a common ancestor cell through processes such as mitosis or asexual reproduction. Therefore, the term "clone cells" refers to a population of cells that are genetic copies of a single parent cell.

In the context of laboratory research, cells can be cloned by isolating a single cell and allowing it to divide in culture, creating a population of genetically identical cells. This is useful for studying the behavior and characteristics of individual cell types, as well as for generating large quantities of cells for use in experiments.

It's important to note that while clone cells are genetically identical, they may still exhibit differences in their phenotype (physical traits) due to epigenetic factors or environmental influences.

Mononuclear leukocytes are a type of white blood cells (leukocytes) that have a single, large nucleus. They include lymphocytes (B-cells, T-cells, and natural killer cells), monocytes, and dendritic cells. These cells play important roles in the body's immune system, including defending against infection and disease, and participating in immune responses and surveillance. Mononuclear leukocytes can be found in the bloodstream as well as in tissues throughout the body. They are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity, providing specific and nonspecific defense mechanisms to protect the body from harmful pathogens and other threats.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

The term "Immune Adherence Reaction" is not widely used in modern immunology or medicine. It appears to be an outdated concept that refers to the attachment of immune complexes (consisting of antigens, antibodies, and complement components) to Fc receptors on phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes. This interaction facilitates the clearance of immune complexes from circulation and helps to prevent tissue damage caused by their deposition.

However, it is important to note that this term is not commonly used in current scientific literature or clinical settings. Instead, the processes it describes are typically discussed within the broader context of immune complex-mediated inflammation, complement activation, and phagocytosis.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Monocytes are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system. They are large cells with a round or oval shape and a nucleus that is typically indented or horseshoe-shaped. Monocytes are produced in the bone marrow and then circulate in the bloodstream, where they can differentiate into other types of immune cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells.

Monocytes play an important role in the body's defense against infection and tissue damage. They are able to engulf and digest foreign particles, microorganisms, and dead or damaged cells, which helps to clear them from the body. Monocytes also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help to coordinate the immune response.

Elevated levels of monocytes in the bloodstream can be a sign of an ongoing infection, inflammation, or other medical conditions such as cancer or autoimmune disorders.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

CD57 is a protein found on the surface of some immune cells, specifically natural killer (NK) cells and certain T-cells. It is often used as a marker to identify these populations of cells. Antigens are substances that can stimulate an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies. In the context of CD57, antigens would refer to any substance that can bind to the CD57 protein on the surface of NK or T-cells.

It's worth noting that CD57 has been studied as a potential marker for certain diseases and conditions, such as HIV infection and some types of cancer. However, its use as a diagnostic or prognostic marker is still a subject of ongoing research and debate.

Leukocytes, also known as white blood cells (WBCs), are a crucial component of the human immune system. They are responsible for protecting the body against infections and foreign substances. Leukocytes are produced in the bone marrow and circulate throughout the body in the bloodstream and lymphatic system.

There are several types of leukocytes, including:

1. Neutrophils - These are the most abundant type of leukocyte and are primarily responsible for fighting bacterial infections. They contain enzymes that can destroy bacteria.
2. Lymphocytes - These are responsible for producing antibodies and destroying virus-infected cells, as well as cancer cells. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes.
3. Monocytes - These are the largest type of leukocyte and help to break down and remove dead or damaged tissues, as well as microorganisms.
4. Eosinophils - These play a role in fighting parasitic infections and are also involved in allergic reactions and inflammation.
5. Basophils - These release histamine and other chemicals that cause inflammation in response to allergens or irritants.

An abnormal increase or decrease in the number of leukocytes can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a blood disorder.

Immunologic deficiency syndromes refer to a group of disorders characterized by defective functioning of the immune system, leading to increased susceptibility to infections and malignancies. These deficiencies can be primary (genetic or congenital) or secondary (acquired due to environmental factors, medications, or diseases).

Primary immunodeficiency syndromes (PIDS) are caused by inherited genetic mutations that affect the development and function of immune cells, such as T cells, B cells, and phagocytes. Examples include severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

Secondary immunodeficiency syndromes can result from various factors, including:

1. HIV/AIDS: Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection leads to the depletion of CD4+ T cells, causing profound immune dysfunction and increased vulnerability to opportunistic infections and malignancies.
2. Medications: Certain medications, such as chemotherapy, immunosuppressive drugs, and long-term corticosteroid use, can impair immune function and increase infection risk.
3. Malnutrition: Deficiencies in essential nutrients like protein, vitamins, and minerals can weaken the immune system and make individuals more susceptible to infections.
4. Aging: The immune system naturally declines with age, leading to an increased incidence of infections and poorer vaccine responses in older adults.
5. Other medical conditions: Chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and chronic kidney or liver disease can also compromise the immune system and contribute to immunodeficiency syndromes.

Immunologic deficiency syndromes require appropriate diagnosis and management strategies, which may include antimicrobial therapy, immunoglobulin replacement, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, or targeted treatments for the underlying cause.

A lymphocyte transfusion is not a standard medical practice. However, the term "lymphocyte transfusion" generally refers to the infusion of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, from a donor to a recipient. This procedure is rarely performed and primarily used in research or experimental settings, such as in the context of adoptive immunotherapy for cancer treatment.

In adoptive immunotherapy, T lymphocytes (a subtype of lymphocytes) are collected from the patient or a donor, activated, expanded in the laboratory, and then reinfused into the patient to enhance their immune response against cancer cells. This is not a common procedure and should only be performed under the guidance of experienced medical professionals in specialized centers.

It's important to note that lymphocyte transfusions are different from stem cell or bone marrow transplants, which involve the infusion of hematopoietic stem cells to reconstitute the recipient's entire blood and immune system.

Interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to and interact with the cytokine interleukin-2. IL-2 is a protein that plays an important role in the immune system, particularly in the activation and proliferation of T cells, a type of white blood cell that helps protect the body from infection and disease.

IL-2 receptors are composed of three subunits: alpha (CD25), beta (CD122), and gamma (CD132). These subunits can combine to form different types of IL-2 receptors, each with different functions. The high-affinity IL-2 receptor is made up of all three subunits and is found on the surface of activated T cells. This type of receptor has a strong binding affinity for IL-2 and plays a crucial role in T cell activation and proliferation.

The intermediate-affinity IL-2 receptor, which consists of the beta and gamma subunits, is found on the surface of resting T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. This type of receptor has a lower binding affinity for IL-2 and plays a role in activating and proliferating these cells.

IL-2 receptors are important targets for immunotherapy, as they play a key role in the regulation of the immune response. Drugs that target IL-2 receptors, such as aldesleukin (Proleukin), have been used to treat certain types of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

Histocompatibility antigens, also known as human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), are proteins found on the surface of most cells in the body. They play a critical role in the immune system's ability to differentiate between "self" and "non-self" cells. Histocompatibility antigens are encoded by a group of genes called the major histocompatibility complex (MHC).

There are two main types of histocompatibility antigens: class I and class II. Class I antigens are found on almost all nucleated cells, while class II antigens are primarily expressed on immune cells such as B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. These antigens present pieces of proteins (peptides) from both inside and outside the cell to T-cells, a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in the immune response.

When foreign peptides are presented to T-cells by histocompatibility antigens, it triggers an immune response aimed at eliminating the threat. This is why histocompatibility antigens are so important in organ transplantation - if the donor's and recipient's antigens do not match closely enough, the recipient's immune system may recognize the transplanted organ as foreign and attack it.

Understanding the role of histocompatibility antigens has been crucial in developing techniques for matching donors and recipients in organ transplantation, as well as in diagnosing and treating various autoimmune diseases and cancers.

Inbred strains of mice are defined as lines of mice that have been brother-sister mated for at least 20 consecutive generations. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the mice of an inbred strain are genetically identical to one another, with the exception of spontaneous mutations.

Inbred strains of mice are widely used in biomedical research due to their genetic uniformity and stability, which makes them useful for studying the genetic basis of various traits, diseases, and biological processes. They also provide a consistent and reproducible experimental system, as compared to outbred or genetically heterogeneous populations.

Some commonly used inbred strains of mice include C57BL/6J, BALB/cByJ, DBA/2J, and 129SvEv. Each strain has its own unique genetic background and phenotypic characteristics, which can influence the results of experiments. Therefore, it is important to choose the appropriate inbred strain for a given research question.

Leukemia, lymphoid is a type of cancer that affects the lymphoid cells, which are a vital part of the body's immune system. It is characterized by the uncontrolled production of abnormal white blood cells (leukocytes or WBCs) in the bone marrow, specifically the lymphocytes. These abnormal lymphocytes accumulate and interfere with the production of normal blood cells, leading to a decrease in red blood cells (anemia), platelets (thrombocytopenia), and healthy white blood cells (leukopenia).

There are two main types of lymphoid leukemia: acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Acute lymphoblastic leukemia progresses rapidly, while chronic lymphocytic leukemia has a slower onset and progression.

Symptoms of lymphoid leukemia may include fatigue, frequent infections, easy bruising or bleeding, weight loss, swollen lymph nodes, and bone pain. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and individual patient factors but often involve chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, or stem cell transplantation.

Membrane glycoproteins are proteins that contain oligosaccharide chains (glycans) covalently attached to their polypeptide backbone. They are integral components of biological membranes, spanning the lipid bilayer and playing crucial roles in various cellular processes.

The glycosylation of these proteins occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus during protein folding and trafficking. The attached glycans can vary in structure, length, and composition, which contributes to the diversity of membrane glycoproteins.

Membrane glycoproteins can be classified into two main types based on their orientation within the lipid bilayer:

1. Type I (N-linked): These glycoproteins have a single transmembrane domain and an extracellular N-terminus, where the oligosaccharides are predominantly attached via asparagine residues (Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon).
2. Type II (C-linked): These glycoproteins possess two transmembrane domains and an intracellular C-terminus, with the oligosaccharides linked to tryptophan residues via a mannose moiety.

Membrane glycoproteins are involved in various cellular functions, such as:

* Cell adhesion and recognition
* Receptor-mediated signal transduction
* Enzymatic catalysis
* Transport of molecules across membranes
* Cell-cell communication
* Immunological responses

Some examples of membrane glycoproteins include cell surface receptors (e.g., growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors), adhesion molecules (e.g., integrins, cadherins), and transporters (e.g., ion channels, ABC transporters).

CD20 is not a medical definition of an antigen, but rather it is a cell surface marker that helps identify a specific type of white blood cell called B-lymphocytes or B-cells. These cells are part of the adaptive immune system and play a crucial role in producing antibodies to fight off infections.

CD20 is a protein found on the surface of mature B-cells, and it is used as a target for monoclonal antibody therapies in the treatment of certain types of cancer and autoimmune diseases. Rituximab is an example of a monoclonal antibody that targets CD20 and is used to treat conditions such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and rheumatoid arthritis.

While CD20 itself is not an antigen, it can be recognized by the immune system as a foreign substance when a monoclonal antibody such as rituximab binds to it. This binding can trigger an immune response, leading to the destruction of the B-cells that express CD20 on their surface.

CD56 is a type of antigen that is found on the surface of certain cells in the human body. It is also known as neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM-1) and is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. CD56 antigens are primarily expressed on natural killer (NK) cells, a type of immune cell that plays a role in the body's defense against viruses and cancer.

CD56 antigens help NK cells recognize and bind to other cells in the body, such as infected or abnormal cells. This binding can trigger the NK cells to release chemicals that can kill the target cells. CD56 antigens also play a role in the development and function of NK cells, including their ability to communicate with other immune cells and coordinate an effective response to threats.

In addition to NK cells, CD56 antigens are also found on some subsets of T cells, another type of immune cell. In these cells, CD56 antigens help regulate the activation and function of the T cells.

Abnormalities in the expression of CD56 antigens have been associated with various diseases, including certain types of cancer and autoimmune disorders.

Immune tolerance, also known as immunological tolerance or specific immune tolerance, is a state of unresponsiveness or non-reactivity of the immune system towards a particular substance (antigen) that has the potential to elicit an immune response. This occurs when the immune system learns to distinguish "self" from "non-self" and does not attack the body's own cells, tissues, and organs.

In the context of transplantation, immune tolerance refers to the absence of a destructive immune response towards the transplanted organ or tissue, allowing for long-term graft survival without the need for immunosuppressive therapy. Immune tolerance can be achieved through various strategies, including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, costimulation blockade, and regulatory T cell induction.

In summary, immune tolerance is a critical mechanism that prevents the immune system from attacking the body's own structures while maintaining the ability to respond appropriately to foreign pathogens and antigens.

Antigens are substances that can stimulate an immune response, particularly the production of antibodies by B-lymphocytes. Differentiation refers to the process by which cells mature and become more specialized in their functions. In the context of B-lymphocytes, differentiation involves the maturation of naive B-cells into plasma cells that are capable of producing large amounts of antibodies in response to an antigenic stimulus.

B-lymphocytes, also known as B-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a critical role in the adaptive immune system. They are responsible for producing antibodies, which are proteins that recognize and bind to specific antigens, marking them for destruction by other immune cells.

When a B-lymphocyte encounters an antigen, it becomes activated and begins to differentiate into a plasma cell. During this process, the B-cell undergoes several changes, including an increase in size, the expression of new surface receptors, and the production of large amounts of antibodies specific to the antigen. These antibodies are then released into the bloodstream, where they can bind to the antigen and help to neutralize or eliminate it.

Overall, the differentiation of B-lymphocytes in response to antigens is a critical component of the adaptive immune system, allowing the body to mount targeted responses to specific pathogens and other foreign substances.

B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a type of protein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family. Its primary function is to stimulate and activate B cells, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the immune system by producing antibodies. BAFF helps to promote the survival, differentiation, and activation of B cells, thereby contributing to the adaptive immune response.

BAFF binds to its receptor, known as BAFF receptor (BAFF-R), which is expressed on the surface of B cells. This interaction leads to the activation of various signaling pathways that promote B cell survival and proliferation. Overexpression or excessive production of BAFF has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjogren's syndrome, due to the abnormal activation and expansion of B cells.

In summary, B-cell activating factor is a protein that plays an essential role in the activation and survival of B cells, which are crucial for the immune response. However, its overexpression or dysregulation can contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases.

The appendix is a small, tube-like structure that projects from the large intestine, located in the lower right quadrant of the abdomen. Its function in humans is not well understood and is often considered vestigial, meaning it no longer serves a necessary purpose. However, in some animals, the appendix plays a role in the immune system. Inflammation of the appendix, known as appendicitis, can cause severe abdominal pain and requires medical attention, often leading to surgical removal of the appendix (appendectomy).

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

Histocompatibility antigens Class II are a group of cell surface proteins that play a crucial role in the immune system's response to foreign substances. They are expressed on the surface of various cells, including immune cells such as B lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and activated T lymphocytes.

Class II histocompatibility antigens are encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes, which are located on chromosome 6 in humans. These antigens are composed of two non-covalently associated polypeptide chains, an alpha (α) and a beta (β) chain, which form a heterodimer. There are three main types of Class II histocompatibility antigens, known as HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR.

Class II histocompatibility antigens present peptide antigens to CD4+ T helper cells, which then activate other immune cells, such as B cells and macrophages, to mount an immune response against the presented antigen. Because of their role in initiating an immune response, Class II histocompatibility antigens are important in transplantation medicine, where mismatches between donor and recipient can lead to rejection of the transplanted organ or tissue.

Lymphocytosis is a medical term that refers to an abnormal increase in the number of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the peripheral blood. A normal lymphocyte count ranges from 1,000 to 4,800 cells per microliter (μL) of blood in adults. Lymphocytosis is typically defined as a lymphocyte count greater than 4,800 cells/μL in adults or higher than age-specific normal values in children.

There are various causes of lymphocytosis, including viral infections (such as mononucleosis), bacterial infections, tuberculosis, fungal infections, parasitic infections, autoimmune disorders, allergies, and certain cancers like chronic lymphocytic leukemia or lymphoma. It is essential to investigate the underlying cause of lymphocytosis through a thorough clinical evaluation, medical history, physical examination, and appropriate diagnostic tests, such as blood tests, imaging studies, or biopsies.

It's important to note that an isolated episode of mild lymphocytosis is often not clinically significant and may resolve on its own without any specific treatment. However, persistent or severe lymphocytosis requires further evaluation and management based on the underlying cause.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

1. Receptors: In the context of physiology and medicine, receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of cells or inside cells that detect and respond to specific molecules, known as ligands. Receptors play a crucial role in signal transduction, enabling cells to communicate with each other and respond to changes in their environment.
2. Antigen: An antigen is any substance (usually a protein) that can be recognized by the immune system and stimulate an immune response. Antigens can be foreign substances such as bacteria, viruses, or pollen, or they can be components of our own cells, such as tumor antigens in cancer cells. Antigens are typically bound and presented to the immune system by specialized cells called antigen-presenting cells (APCs).
3. T-Cell: T-cells, also known as T lymphocytes, are a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. T-cells are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are two main types of T-cells: CD4+ helper T-cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. Helper T-cells assist other immune cells, such as B-cells and macrophages, in mounting an immune response, while cytotoxic T-cells directly kill infected or cancerous cells.
4. Alpha-Beta: Alpha-beta is a type of T-cell receptor (TCR) that is found on the surface of most mature T-cells. The alpha-beta TCR is composed of two polypeptide chains, an alpha chain and a beta chain, that are held together by disulfide bonds. The alpha-beta TCR recognizes and binds to specific antigens presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on the surface of APCs. This interaction is critical for initiating an immune response against infected or cancerous cells.

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue found inside certain bones in the body, such as the hips, thighs, and vertebrae. It is responsible for producing blood-forming cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. There are two types of bone marrow: red marrow, which is involved in blood cell production, and yellow marrow, which contains fatty tissue.

Red bone marrow contains hematopoietic stem cells, which can differentiate into various types of blood cells. These stem cells continuously divide and mature to produce new blood cells that are released into the circulation. Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body, white blood cells help fight infections, and platelets play a crucial role in blood clotting.

Bone marrow also serves as a site for immune cell development and maturation. It contains various types of immune cells, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, which help protect the body against infections and diseases.

Abnormalities in bone marrow function can lead to several medical conditions, including anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and various types of cancer, such as leukemia and multiple myeloma. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy are common diagnostic procedures used to evaluate bone marrow health and function.

1. Receptors: In the context of physiology and medicine, receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of cells or inside cells that detect and respond to specific molecules, known as ligands. These interactions can trigger a range of responses within the cell, such as starting a signaling pathway or changing the cell's behavior. There are various types of receptors, including ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and enzyme-linked receptors.

2. Antigen: An antigen is any substance (usually a protein) that can be recognized by the immune system, specifically by antibodies or T-cells, as foreign and potentially harmful. Antigens can be derived from various sources, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or even non-living substances like pollen, chemicals, or toxins. An antigen typically contains epitopes, which are the specific regions that antibodies or T-cell receptors recognize and bind to.

3. T-Cell: Also known as T lymphocytes, T-cells are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in cell-mediated immunity, a part of the adaptive immune system. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs). T-cells recognize antigens presented to them by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) via their surface receptors called the T-cell receptor (TCR). Once activated, T-cells can proliferate and differentiate into various effector cells that help eliminate infected or damaged cells.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Antilymphocyte serum (ALS) is a type of immune serum that contains antibodies against human lymphocytes. It is produced by immunizing animals, such as horses or rabbits, with human lymphocytes to stimulate an immune response and the production of anti-lymphocyte antibodies. The resulting serum is then collected and can be used as a therapeutic agent to suppress the activity of the immune system in certain medical conditions.

ALS is primarily used in the treatment of transplant rejection, particularly in organ transplantation, where it helps to prevent the recipient's immune system from attacking and rejecting the transplanted organ. It can also be used in the management of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, to suppress the overactive immune response that contributes to these conditions.

It is important to note that the use of ALS carries a risk of side effects, including allergic reactions, fever, and decreased white blood cell counts. Close monitoring and appropriate management of these potential adverse events are essential during treatment with ALS.

Antibody-producing cells, also known as plasma cells, are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for producing and secreting antibodies in response to a foreign substance or antigen. These cells are derived from B lymphocytes, which become activated upon encountering an antigen and differentiate into plasma cells.

Once activated, plasma cells can produce large amounts of specific antibodies that bind to the antigen, marking it for destruction by other immune cells. Antibody-producing cells play a crucial role in the body's humoral immune response, which helps protect against infection and disease.

Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of immune cell that play a critical role in the body's defense against infection and cancer. They are named for their dendrite-like projections, which they use to interact with and sample their environment. DCs are responsible for processing antigens (foreign substances that trigger an immune response) and presenting them to T cells, a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in the immune system's response to infection and cancer.

DCs can be found throughout the body, including in the skin, mucous membranes, and lymphoid organs. They are able to recognize and respond to a wide variety of antigens, including those from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Once they have processed an antigen, DCs migrate to the lymph nodes, where they present the antigen to T cells. This interaction activates the T cells, which then go on to mount a targeted immune response against the invading pathogen or cancerous cells.

DCs are a diverse group of cells that can be divided into several subsets based on their surface markers and function. Some DCs, such as Langerhans cells and dermal DCs, are found in the skin and mucous membranes, where they serve as sentinels for invading pathogens. Other DCs, such as plasmacytoid DCs and conventional DCs, are found in the lymphoid organs, where they play a role in activating T cells and initiating an immune response.

Overall, dendritic cells are essential for the proper functioning of the immune system, and dysregulation of these cells has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including autoimmune disorders and cancer.

An epitope is a specific region on the surface of an antigen (a molecule that can trigger an immune response) that is recognized by an antibody, B-cell receptor, or T-cell receptor. It is also commonly referred to as an antigenic determinant. Epitopes are typically composed of linear amino acid sequences or conformational structures made up of discontinuous amino acids in the antigen. They play a crucial role in the immune system's ability to differentiate between self and non-self molecules, leading to the targeted destruction of foreign substances like viruses and bacteria. Understanding epitopes is essential for developing vaccines, diagnostic tests, and immunotherapies.

Lectins are a type of proteins that bind specifically to carbohydrates and have been found in various plant and animal sources. They play important roles in biological recognition events, such as cell-cell adhesion, and can also be involved in the immune response. Some lectins can agglutinate certain types of cells or precipitate glycoproteins, while others may have a more direct effect on cellular processes. In some cases, lectins from plants can cause adverse effects in humans if ingested, such as digestive discomfort or allergic reactions.

Macrophages are a type of white blood cell that are an essential part of the immune system. They are large, specialized cells that engulf and destroy foreign substances, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi, as well as damaged or dead cells. Macrophages are found throughout the body, including in the bloodstream, lymph nodes, spleen, liver, lungs, and connective tissues. They play a critical role in inflammation, immune response, and tissue repair and remodeling.

Macrophages originate from monocytes, which are a type of white blood cell produced in the bone marrow. When monocytes enter the tissues, they differentiate into macrophages, which have a larger size and more specialized functions than monocytes. Macrophages can change their shape and move through tissues to reach sites of infection or injury. They also produce cytokines, chemokines, and other signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response and recruit other immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

Macrophages have a variety of surface receptors that allow them to recognize and respond to different types of foreign substances and signals from other cells. They can engulf and digest foreign particles, bacteria, and viruses through a process called phagocytosis. Macrophages also play a role in presenting antigens to T cells, which are another type of immune cell that helps coordinate the immune response.

Overall, macrophages are crucial for maintaining tissue homeostasis, defending against infection, and promoting wound healing and tissue repair. Dysregulation of macrophage function has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory conditions.

Immunoenzyme techniques are a group of laboratory methods used in immunology and clinical chemistry that combine the specificity of antibody-antigen reactions with the sensitivity and amplification capabilities of enzyme reactions. These techniques are primarily used for the detection, quantitation, or identification of various analytes (such as proteins, hormones, drugs, viruses, or bacteria) in biological samples.

In immunoenzyme techniques, an enzyme is linked to an antibody or antigen, creating a conjugate. This conjugate then interacts with the target analyte in the sample, forming an immune complex. The presence and amount of this immune complex can be visualized or measured by detecting the enzymatic activity associated with it.

There are several types of immunoenzyme techniques, including:

1. Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA): A widely used method for detecting and quantifying various analytes in a sample. In ELISA, an enzyme is attached to either the capture antibody or the detection antibody. After the immune complex formation, a substrate is added that reacts with the enzyme, producing a colored product that can be measured spectrophotometrically.
2. Immunoblotting (Western blot): A method used for detecting specific proteins in a complex mixture, such as a protein extract from cells or tissues. In this technique, proteins are separated by gel electrophoresis and transferred to a membrane, where they are probed with an enzyme-conjugated antibody directed against the target protein.
3. Immunohistochemistry (IHC): A method used for detecting specific antigens in tissue sections or cells. In IHC, an enzyme-conjugated primary or secondary antibody is applied to the sample, and the presence of the antigen is visualized using a chromogenic substrate that produces a colored product at the site of the antigen-antibody interaction.
4. Immunofluorescence (IF): A method used for detecting specific antigens in cells or tissues by employing fluorophore-conjugated antibodies. The presence of the antigen is visualized using a fluorescence microscope.
5. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA): A method used for detecting and quantifying specific antigens or antibodies in liquid samples, such as serum or culture supernatants. In ELISA, an enzyme-conjugated detection antibody is added after the immune complex formation, and a substrate is added that reacts with the enzyme to produce a colored product that can be measured spectrophotometrically.

These techniques are widely used in research and diagnostic laboratories for various applications, including protein characterization, disease diagnosis, and monitoring treatment responses.

Transgenic mice are genetically modified rodents that have incorporated foreign DNA (exogenous DNA) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA technology, where a specific gene or genetic sequence of interest is isolated and then introduced into the mouse embryo. The resulting transgenic mice can then express the protein encoded by the foreign gene, allowing researchers to study its function in a living organism.

The process of creating transgenic mice usually involves microinjecting the exogenous DNA into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg, which is then implanted into a surrogate mother. The offspring that result from this procedure are screened for the presence of the foreign DNA, and those that carry the desired genetic modification are used to establish a transgenic mouse line.

Transgenic mice have been widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function, and test new therapies. They provide a valuable tool for understanding complex biological processes and developing new treatments for a variety of medical conditions.

"Cell count" is a medical term that refers to the process of determining the number of cells present in a given volume or sample of fluid or tissue. This can be done through various laboratory methods, such as counting individual cells under a microscope using a specialized grid called a hemocytometer, or using automated cell counters that use light scattering and electrical impedance techniques to count and classify different types of cells.

Cell counts are used in a variety of medical contexts, including hematology (the study of blood and blood-forming tissues), microbiology (the study of microscopic organisms), and pathology (the study of diseases and their causes). For example, a complete blood count (CBC) is a routine laboratory test that includes a white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin level, hematocrit value, and platelet count. Abnormal cell counts can indicate the presence of various medical conditions, such as infections, anemia, or leukemia.

An antigen is a substance (usually a protein) that is recognized as foreign by the immune system and stimulates an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies or activation of T-cells. Antigens can be derived from various sources, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, and tumor cells. They can also come from non-living substances such as pollen, dust mites, or chemicals.

Antigens contain epitopes, which are specific regions on the antigen molecule that are recognized by the immune system. The immune system's response to an antigen depends on several factors, including the type of antigen, its size, and its location in the body.

In general, antigens can be classified into two main categories:

1. T-dependent antigens: These require the help of T-cells to stimulate an immune response. They are typically larger, more complex molecules that contain multiple epitopes capable of binding to both MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells and T-cell receptors on CD4+ T-cells.
2. T-independent antigens: These do not require the help of T-cells to stimulate an immune response. They are usually smaller, simpler molecules that contain repetitive epitopes capable of cross-linking B-cell receptors and activating them directly.

Understanding antigens and their properties is crucial for developing vaccines, diagnostic tests, and immunotherapies.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

Anti-idiotypic antibodies are a type of immune protein that recognizes and binds to the unique identifying region (idiotype) of another antibody. These antibodies are produced by the immune system as part of a regulatory feedback mechanism, where they can modulate or inhibit the activity of the original antibody. They have been studied for their potential use in immunotherapy and vaccine development.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

CD2 is a type of cell surface protein known as a glycoprotein that is found on the surface of T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and thymocytes in humans. It plays a role in the activation and regulation of the immune response. CD2 can also function as an adhesion molecule, helping to bind T cells to other cells during an immune response.

An antigen is any substance that can stimulate an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies or the activation of immune cells such as T cells. In the context of CD2, an "antigen" may refer to a specific molecule or structure that interacts with CD2 and triggers a response from T cells or other immune cells.

It's worth noting that while CD2 can interact with certain antigens, it is not itself an antigen in the traditional sense. However, the term "antigen" is sometimes used more broadly to refer to any molecule that interacts with the immune system and triggers a response, so it is possible for CD2 to be referred to as an "antigen" in this context.

Immunocompetence is the condition of having a properly functioning immune system that can effectively respond to the presence of foreign substances, such as pathogens (like bacteria, viruses, and parasites) and other potentially harmful agents. It involves the ability of the immune system to recognize, attack, and eliminate these foreign substances while also maintaining tolerance to self-tissues and promoting tissue repair.

Immunocompetence is essential for overall health and wellbeing, as it helps protect the body from infections and diseases. Factors that can affect immunocompetence include age, genetics, stress, nutrition, sleep, and certain medical conditions or treatments (like chemotherapy or immunosuppressive drugs) that can weaken the immune system.

Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a type of antibody that plays a crucial role in the immune function of the human body. It is primarily found in external secretions, such as saliva, tears, breast milk, and sweat, as well as in mucous membranes lining the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. IgA exists in two forms: a monomeric form found in serum and a polymeric form found in secretions.

The primary function of IgA is to provide immune protection at mucosal surfaces, which are exposed to various environmental antigens, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and allergens. By doing so, it helps prevent the entry and colonization of pathogens into the body, reducing the risk of infections and inflammation.

IgA functions by binding to antigens present on the surface of pathogens or allergens, forming immune complexes that can neutralize their activity. These complexes are then transported across the epithelial cells lining mucosal surfaces and released into the lumen, where they prevent the adherence and invasion of pathogens.

In summary, Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a vital antibody that provides immune defense at mucosal surfaces by neutralizing and preventing the entry of harmful antigens into the body.

Lymph is a colorless, transparent fluid that circulates throughout the lymphatic system, which is a part of the immune and circulatory systems. It consists of white blood cells called lymphocytes, proteins, lipids, glucose, electrolytes, hormones, and waste products. Lymph plays an essential role in maintaining fluid balance, absorbing fats from the digestive tract, and defending the body against infection by transporting immune cells to various tissues and organs. It is collected from tissues through lymph capillaries and flows through increasingly larger lymphatic vessels, ultimately returning to the bloodstream via the subclavian veins in the chest region.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders in which the immune system, which normally protects the body from foreign invaders like bacteria and viruses, mistakenly attacks the body's own cells and tissues. This results in inflammation and damage to various organs and tissues in the body.

In autoimmune diseases, the body produces autoantibodies that target its own proteins or cell receptors, leading to their destruction or malfunction. The exact cause of autoimmune diseases is not fully understood, but it is believed that a combination of genetic and environmental factors contribute to their development.

There are over 80 different types of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Graves' disease, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Symptoms can vary widely depending on the specific autoimmune disease and the organs or tissues affected. Treatment typically involves managing symptoms and suppressing the immune system to prevent further damage.

Cell movement, also known as cell motility, refers to the ability of cells to move independently and change their location within tissue or inside the body. This process is essential for various biological functions, including embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and cancer metastasis.

There are several types of cell movement, including:

1. **Crawling or mesenchymal migration:** Cells move by extending and retracting protrusions called pseudopodia or filopodia, which contain actin filaments. This type of movement is common in fibroblasts, immune cells, and cancer cells during tissue invasion and metastasis.
2. **Amoeboid migration:** Cells move by changing their shape and squeezing through tight spaces without forming protrusions. This type of movement is often observed in white blood cells (leukocytes) as they migrate through the body to fight infections.
3. **Pseudopodial extension:** Cells extend pseudopodia, which are temporary cytoplasmic projections containing actin filaments. These protrusions help the cell explore its environment and move forward.
4. **Bacterial flagellar motion:** Bacteria use a whip-like structure called a flagellum to propel themselves through their environment. The rotation of the flagellum is driven by a molecular motor in the bacterial cell membrane.
5. **Ciliary and ependymal movement:** Ciliated cells, such as those lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tubes, have hair-like structures called cilia that beat in coordinated waves to move fluids or mucus across the cell surface.

Cell movement is regulated by a complex interplay of signaling pathways, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and adhesion molecules, which enable cells to respond to environmental cues and navigate through tissues.

Blood cells are the formed elements in the blood, including red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes), and platelets (thrombocytes). These cells are produced in the bone marrow and play crucial roles in the body's functions. Red blood cells are responsible for carrying oxygen to tissues and carbon dioxide away from them, while white blood cells are part of the immune system and help defend against infection and disease. Platelets are cell fragments that are essential for normal blood clotting.

'C3H' is the name of an inbred strain of laboratory mice that was developed at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. The mice are characterized by their uniform genetic background and have been widely used in biomedical research for many decades.

The C3H strain is particularly notable for its susceptibility to certain types of cancer, including mammary tumors and lymphomas. It also has a high incidence of age-related macular degeneration and other eye diseases. The strain is often used in studies of immunology, genetics, and carcinogenesis.

Like all inbred strains, the C3H mice are the result of many generations of brother-sister matings, which leads to a high degree of genetic uniformity within the strain. This makes them useful for studying the effects of specific genes or environmental factors on disease susceptibility and other traits. However, it also means that they may not always be representative of the genetic diversity found in outbred populations, including humans.

L-Selectin, also known as LECAM-1 (Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule 1), is a type of cell adhesion molecule that is found on the surface of leukocytes (white blood cells). It plays an important role in the immune system by mediating the initial attachment and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelial lining of blood vessels, which is a critical step in the process of inflammation and immune response.

L-Selectin recognizes specific sugar structures called sialyl Lewis x (sLeX) and related structures on the surface of endothelial cells, allowing leukocytes to bind to them. This interaction helps to slow down the leukocytes and facilitate their extravasation from the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues, where they can carry out their immune functions.

L-Selectin is involved in a variety of immunological processes, including the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of infection or injury, the homing of lymphocytes to lymphoid organs, and the regulation of immune cell trafficking under homeostatic conditions.

Lymphocyte homing receptors are specialized molecules found on the surface of lymphocytes (white blood cells that include T-cells and B-cells), which play a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection and disease. These receptors facilitate the targeted migration and trafficking of lymphocytes from the bloodstream to specific secondary lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes, spleen, and Peyer's patches in the intestines, where they can encounter antigens and mount an immune response.

The homing receptors consist of two main components: adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors. Adhesion molecules, such as selectins and integrins, mediate the initial attachment and rolling of lymphocytes along the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels in lymphoid organs. Chemokine receptors, on the other hand, interact with chemokines (a type of cytokine) that are secreted by the endothelial cells and stromal cells within the lymphoid organs. This interaction triggers a signaling cascade that activates integrins, leading to their firm adhesion to the endothelium and subsequent transmigration into the lymphoid tissue.

The specificity of this homing process is determined by the unique combination of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors expressed on different subsets of lymphocytes, which allows them to home to distinct anatomical locations in response to various chemokine gradients. This targeted migration ensures that the immune system can effectively mount a rapid and localized response against pathogens while minimizing unnecessary inflammation in other parts of the body.

Cytotoxicity tests, immunologic are a group of laboratory assays used to measure the immune-mediated damage or destruction (cytotoxicity) of cells. These tests are often used in medical research and clinical settings to evaluate the potential toxicity of drugs, biological agents, or environmental factors on specific types of cells.

Immunologic cytotoxicity tests typically involve the use of immune effector cells, such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) or natural killer (NK) cells, which can recognize and kill target cells that express specific antigens on their surface. The tests may also involve the use of antibodies or other immune molecules that can bind to target cells and trigger complement-mediated cytotoxicity.

There are several types of immunologic cytotoxicity tests, including:

1. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assays: These tests measure the ability of CTLs to recognize and kill target cells that express specific antigens. The test involves incubating target cells with CTLs and then measuring the amount of cell death or damage.
2. Natural killer (NK) cell assays: These tests measure the ability of NK cells to recognize and kill target cells that lack self-antigens or express stress-induced antigens. The test involves incubating target cells with NK cells and then measuring the amount of cell death or damage.
3. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays: These tests measure the ability of antibodies to bind to target cells and recruit immune effector cells, such as NK cells or macrophages, to mediate cell lysis. The test involves incubating target cells with antibodies and then measuring the amount of cell death or damage.
4. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assays: These tests measure the ability of complement proteins to bind to target cells and form a membrane attack complex that leads to cell lysis. The test involves incubating target cells with complement proteins and then measuring the amount of cell death or damage.

Immunologic cytotoxicity tests are important tools in immunology, cancer research, and drug development. They can help researchers understand how immune cells recognize and kill infected or damaged cells, as well as how to develop new therapies that enhance or inhibit these processes.

Feline Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (FAIDS) is a progressive immune disorder in cats caused by infection with the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). The virus attacks and weakens the cat's immune system, making it difficult for the animal to fight off other infections and diseases.

The initial infection with FIV may cause symptoms such as fever, swollen lymph nodes, and loss of appetite. However, many cats do not show any signs of illness for years after the initial infection. As the immune system becomes weaker over time, the cat becomes more susceptible to various secondary infections, cancers, and other diseases. Common symptoms in advanced stages of FAIDS include weight loss, chronic or recurring infections (such as respiratory, skin, or gastrointestinal infections), dental disease, anemia, and neurological disorders.

FAIDS is most commonly spread through bite wounds from infected cats, as the virus is present in their saliva. It can also be transmitted through sexual contact or from mother to kitten during pregnancy or nursing. There is no cure for FAIDS, but antiretroviral therapy (ART) can help manage the infection and slow down its progression. Supportive care, such as proper nutrition, regular veterinary check-ups, and monitoring for secondary infections, is essential for maintaining the cat's quality of life.

It is important to note that FIV is species-specific and cannot be transmitted from cats to humans or other animals, except non-human primates.

CD40 is a type of protein known as a tumor necrosis factor receptor that is found on the surface of various cells in the body, including B cells, dendritic cells, and activated T cells. It plays an important role in the immune system by interacting with another protein called CD154 (also known as CD40 ligand) to activate immune responses.

CD40 antigens are molecules that can stimulate an immune response when introduced into the body because they are recognized as foreign substances by the immune system. They may be used in vaccines or other immunotherapies to induce an immune response against specific targets, such as cancer cells or infectious agents.

CD40 antigens can also be found on some types of tumor cells, and activating CD40 with CD154 has been shown to enhance the anti-tumor immune response in preclinical models. Therefore, CD40 agonists are being investigated as potential cancer therapies.

In summary, CD40 antigens are proteins that can stimulate an immune response and are involved in activating immune cells. They have potential applications in vaccines, immunotherapies, and cancer treatments.

Plasma cells are a type of white blood cell that are derived from B cells (another type of white blood cell) and are responsible for producing antibodies. Antibodies are proteins that help the body to fight against infections by recognizing and binding to specific antigens, such as bacteria or viruses. Plasma cells are found in the bone marrow, spleen, and lymph nodes, and they play a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection.

Plasma cells are characterized by their large size, eccentric nucleus, and abundant cytoplasm filled with rough endoplasmic reticulum, which is where antibody proteins are synthesized and stored. When activated, plasma cells can produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies into the bloodstream and lymphatic system, where they can help to neutralize or eliminate pathogens.

It's worth noting that while plasma cells play an important role in the immune response, abnormal accumulations of these cells can also be a sign of certain diseases, such as multiple myeloma, a type of cancer that affects plasma cells.

Immunoglobulin mu-chains (IgM) are a type of heavy chain found in immunoglobulins, also known as antibodies. IgM is the first antibody to be produced in response to an initial exposure to an antigen and plays a crucial role in the early stages of the immune response.

IgM antibodies are composed of four monomeric units, each consisting of two heavy chains and two light chains. The heavy chains in IgM are called mu-chains, which have a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa. Each mu-chain contains five domains: one variable (V) domain at the N-terminus, four constant (C) domains (Cμ1-4), and a membrane-spanning region followed by a short cytoplasmic tail.

IgM antibodies are primarily found on the surface of B cells as part of the B cell receptor (BCR). When a B cell encounters an antigen, the BCR binds to it, triggering a series of intracellular signaling events that lead to B cell activation and differentiation into plasma cells. In response to activation, the B cell begins to secrete IgM antibodies into the bloodstream.

IgM antibodies have several unique features that make them effective in the early stages of an immune response. They are highly efficient at agglutination, or clumping together, of pathogens and antigens, which helps to neutralize them. IgM antibodies also activate the complement system, a group of proteins that work together to destroy pathogens.

Overall, Immunoglobulin mu-chains are an essential component of the immune system, providing early protection against pathogens and initiating the adaptive immune response.

Immunoglobulin heavy chains are proteins that make up the framework of antibodies, which are Y-shaped immune proteins. These heavy chains, along with light chains, form the antigen-binding sites of an antibody, which recognize and bind to specific foreign substances (antigens) in order to neutralize or remove them from the body.

The heavy chain is composed of a variable region, which contains the antigen-binding site, and constant regions that determine the class and function of the antibody. There are five classes of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM) that differ in their heavy chain constant regions and therefore have different functions in the immune response.

Immunoglobulin heavy chains are synthesized by B cells, a type of white blood cell involved in the adaptive immune response. The genetic rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes during B cell development results in the production of a vast array of different antibodies with unique antigen-binding sites, allowing for the recognition and elimination of a wide variety of pathogens.

The immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend the body against harmful invaders. It recognizes and responds to threats such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, fungi, and damaged or abnormal cells, including cancer cells. The immune system has two main components: the innate immune system, which provides a general defense against all types of threats, and the adaptive immune system, which mounts specific responses to particular threats.

The innate immune system includes physical barriers like the skin and mucous membranes, chemical barriers such as stomach acid and enzymes in tears and saliva, and cellular defenses like phagocytes (white blood cells that engulf and destroy invaders) and natural killer cells (which recognize and destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells).

The adaptive immune system is more specific and takes longer to develop a response but has the advantage of "remembering" previous encounters with specific threats. This allows it to mount a faster and stronger response upon subsequent exposures, providing immunity to certain diseases. The adaptive immune system includes T cells (which help coordinate the immune response) and B cells (which produce antibodies that neutralize or destroy invaders).

Overall, the immune system is essential for maintaining health and preventing disease. Dysfunction of the immune system can lead to a variety of disorders, including autoimmune diseases, immunodeficiencies, and allergies.

Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1) is a type of integrin, which is a family of cell surface proteins that are important for cell-cell adhesion and signal transduction. LFA-1 is composed of two subunits, called alpha-L (CD11a) and beta-2 (CD18), and it is widely expressed on various leukocytes, including T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells.

LFA-1 plays a crucial role in the immune system by mediating the adhesion of leukocytes to other cells, such as endothelial cells that line blood vessels, and extracellular matrix components. This adhesion is necessary for leukocyte migration from the bloodstream into tissues during inflammation or immune responses. LFA-1 also contributes to the activation of T cells and their interaction with antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages.

The binding of LFA-1 to its ligands, including intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and ICAM-2, triggers intracellular signaling pathways that regulate various cellular functions, such as cytoskeletal reorganization, gene expression, and cell survival. Dysregulation of LFA-1 function has been implicated in several immune-related diseases, including autoimmune disorders, inflammatory diseases, and cancer.

CD27 is a protein that is found on the surface of certain immune cells, including T cells and B cells. It is a type of molecule known as a cell-surface antigen, which can be recognized by other immune cells and used to target those cells for activation or destruction. CD27 plays a role in the regulation of the immune response, particularly in the activation and differentiation of T cells.

CD27 is also a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, which means that it has a specific structure and function that allows it to interact with other molecules called ligands. The interaction between CD27 and its ligand, CD70, helps to activate T cells and promote their survival and proliferation.

In addition to its role in the immune response, CD27 has also been studied as a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. Because CD27 is expressed on certain types of tumor cells, it may be possible to use therapies that target CD27 to stimulate an immune response against the tumor and help to destroy it. However, more research is needed to determine the safety and effectiveness of these approaches.

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is a viral illness that progressively attacks and weakens the immune system, making individuals more susceptible to other infections and diseases. The virus primarily infects CD4+ T cells, a type of white blood cell essential for fighting off infections. Over time, as the number of these immune cells declines, the body becomes increasingly vulnerable to opportunistic infections and cancers.

HIV infection has three stages:

1. Acute HIV infection: This is the initial stage that occurs within 2-4 weeks after exposure to the virus. During this period, individuals may experience flu-like symptoms such as fever, fatigue, rash, swollen glands, and muscle aches. The virus replicates rapidly, and the viral load in the body is very high.
2. Chronic HIV infection (Clinical latency): This stage follows the acute infection and can last several years if left untreated. Although individuals may not show any symptoms during this phase, the virus continues to replicate at low levels, and the immune system gradually weakens. The viral load remains relatively stable, but the number of CD4+ T cells declines over time.
3. AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome): This is the most advanced stage of HIV infection, characterized by a severely damaged immune system and numerous opportunistic infections or cancers. At this stage, the CD4+ T cell count drops below 200 cells/mm3 of blood.

It's important to note that with proper antiretroviral therapy (ART), individuals with HIV infection can effectively manage the virus, maintain a healthy immune system, and significantly reduce the risk of transmission to others. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for improving long-term health outcomes and reducing the spread of HIV.

Autoantibodies are defined as antibodies that are produced by the immune system and target the body's own cells, tissues, or organs. These antibodies mistakenly identify certain proteins or molecules in the body as foreign invaders and attack them, leading to an autoimmune response. Autoantibodies can be found in various autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and thyroiditis. The presence of autoantibodies can also be used as a diagnostic marker for certain conditions.

Antibody specificity refers to the ability of an antibody to bind to a specific epitope or antigenic determinant on an antigen. Each antibody has a unique structure that allows it to recognize and bind to a specific region of an antigen, typically a small portion of the antigen's surface made up of amino acids or sugar residues. This highly specific binding is mediated by the variable regions of the antibody's heavy and light chains, which form a pocket that recognizes and binds to the epitope.

The specificity of an antibody is determined by its unique complementarity-determining regions (CDRs), which are loops of amino acids located in the variable domains of both the heavy and light chains. The CDRs form a binding site that recognizes and interacts with the epitope on the antigen. The precise fit between the antibody's binding site and the epitope is critical for specificity, as even small changes in the structure of either can prevent binding.

Antibody specificity is important in immune responses because it allows the immune system to distinguish between self and non-self antigens. This helps to prevent autoimmune reactions where the immune system attacks the body's own cells and tissues. Antibody specificity also plays a crucial role in diagnostic tests, such as ELISA assays, where antibodies are used to detect the presence of specific antigens in biological samples.

Immunologic receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of immune cells that recognize and bind to specific molecules, known as antigens, on the surface of pathogens or infected cells. This binding triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that activate the immune cell and initiate an immune response.

There are several types of immunologic receptors, including:

1. T-cell receptors (TCRs): These receptors are found on the surface of T cells and recognize antigens presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules.
2. B-cell receptors (BCRs): These receptors are found on the surface of B cells and recognize free antigens in solution.
3. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs): These receptors are found inside immune cells and recognize conserved molecular patterns associated with pathogens, such as lipopolysaccharides and flagellin.
4. Fc receptors: These receptors are found on the surface of various immune cells and bind to the constant region of antibodies, mediating effector functions such as phagocytosis and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC).

Immunologic receptors play a critical role in the recognition and elimination of pathogens and infected cells, and dysregulation of these receptors can lead to immune disorders and diseases.

Immunologic capping is a biological process that occurs in immune cells, particularly B lymphocytes and neutrophils. It refers to the redistribution and clustering of immunoglobulin receptors or antibodies on the cell surface upon engagement with their specific antigens. This phenomenon leads to the formation of a cap-like structure at one pole of the cell, which is then internalized by endocytosis, followed by the degradation of the antigen-antibody complex in lysosomes. Immunologic capping helps regulate immune responses and contributes to the elimination of antigens from the cell surface.

Complement receptor 3d (CR3d or CD11b/CD18) is not a medical definition in itself, but rather a specific type of integrin receptor that plays a crucial role in the immune system. Here's a breakdown of the components:

1. Complement Receptors: These are proteins found on the surface of various cells, including white blood cells (leukocytes), that recognize and bind to complement components, which are proteins involved in the immune response. The binding of complement components to their receptors helps facilitate communication between cells, enhances phagocytosis (the process by which certain cells engulf and destroy foreign particles or microorganisms), and contributes to the inflammatory response.
2. CR3 (Complement Receptor 3): Complement Receptor 3 is a heterodimeric receptor composed of two subunits, CD11b (also known as integrin alpha M) and CD18 (also known as integrin beta 2). Together, they form the integrin Mac-1 or αMβ2.
3. CR3d (CD11b/CD18): CR3d specifically refers to the CD11b subunit of the Complement Receptor 3 heterodimer. The CD11b subunit is responsible for recognizing and binding to complement component C3b, iC3b, and C4b fragments, as well as other ligands such as fibrinogen, ICAM-1 (Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1), and factor X.

In summary, Complement Receptor 3d (CR3d or CD11b/CD18) is a type of integrin receptor found on the surface of various immune cells that recognizes and binds to complement components C3b, iC3b, and C4b fragments, as well as other ligands. This binding facilitates communication between cells, enhances phagocytosis, and contributes to the inflammatory response.

HIV-1 (Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1) is a species of the retrovirus genus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is primarily transmitted through sexual contact, exposure to infected blood or blood products, and from mother to child during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding. HIV-1 infects vital cells in the human immune system, such as CD4+ T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, leading to a decline in their numbers and weakening of the immune response over time. This results in the individual becoming susceptible to various opportunistic infections and cancers that ultimately cause death if left untreated. HIV-1 is the most prevalent form of HIV worldwide and has been identified as the causative agent of the global AIDS pandemic.

"CBA" is an abbreviation for a specific strain of inbred mice that were developed at the Cancer Research Institute in London. The "Inbred CBA" mice are genetically identical individuals within the same strain, due to many generations of brother-sister matings. This results in a homozygous population, making them valuable tools for research because they reduce variability and increase reproducibility in experimental outcomes.

The CBA strain is known for its susceptibility to certain diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and cancer, which makes it a popular choice for researchers studying those conditions. Additionally, the CBA strain has been widely used in studies related to transplantation immunology, infectious diseases, and genetic research.

It's important to note that while "Inbred CBA" mice are a well-established and useful tool in biomedical research, they represent only one of many inbred strains available for scientific investigation. Each strain has its own unique characteristics and advantages, depending on the specific research question being asked.

Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is a type of clinical specimen obtained through a procedure called bronchoalveolar lavage. This procedure involves inserting a bronchoscope into the lungs and instilling a small amount of saline solution into a specific area of the lung, then gently aspirating the fluid back out. The fluid that is recovered is called bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

BAL fluid contains cells and other substances that are present in the lower respiratory tract, including the alveoli (the tiny air sacs where gas exchange occurs). By analyzing BAL fluid, doctors can diagnose various lung conditions, such as pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, and lung cancer. They can also monitor the effectiveness of treatments for these conditions by comparing the composition of BAL fluid before and after treatment.

BAL fluid is typically analyzed for its cellular content, including the number and type of white blood cells present, as well as for the presence of bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms. The fluid may also be tested for various proteins, enzymes, and other biomarkers that can provide additional information about lung health and disease.

Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are a type of protein found on the surface of cells that mediate the attachment or adhesion of cells to either other cells or to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the network of proteins and carbohydrates that provides structural and biochemical support to surrounding cells.

CAMs play crucial roles in various biological processes, including tissue development, differentiation, repair, and maintenance of tissue architecture and function. They are also involved in cell signaling, migration, and regulation of the immune response.

There are several types of CAMs, classified based on their structure and function, such as immunoglobulin-like CAMs (IgCAMs), cadherins, integrins, and selectins. Dysregulation of CAMs has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

I'm happy to help! "Rats, Inbred Lew" is a specific strain of laboratory rats that have been inbred for research purposes. The "Lew" part of the name refers to the location where they were first developed, the Lewis Institute in Lake Bluff, Illinois, USA.

Inbreeding is a process of mating closely related individuals over many generations to create a genetically homogeneous population. This results in a high degree of genetic similarity among members of the strain, making them ideal for use as experimental models because any differences observed between individuals are more likely to be due to the experimental manipulation rather than genetic variation.

Inbred Lew rats have been widely used in biomedical research, particularly in studies related to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. They exhibit a number of unique characteristics that make them useful for these types of studies, including their susceptibility to developing high blood pressure when fed a high-salt diet or given certain drugs.

It's important to note that while inbred strains like Lew rats can be very useful tools for researchers, they are not perfect models for human disease. Because they have been bred in a controlled environment and selected for specific traits, they may not respond to experimental manipulations in the same way that humans or other animals would. Therefore, it's important to interpret findings from these studies with caution and consider multiple lines of evidence before drawing any firm conclusions.

I apologize, but "sheep" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a common animal with the scientific name Ovis aries. If you have any medical or health-related questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are immature, self-renewing cells that give rise to all the mature blood and immune cells in the body. They are capable of both producing more hematopoietic stem cells (self-renewal) and differentiating into early progenitor cells that eventually develop into red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. HSCs are found in the bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and peripheral blood. They have the ability to repair damaged tissues and offer significant therapeutic potential for treating various diseases, including hematological disorders, genetic diseases, and cancer.

Cell adhesion refers to the binding of cells to extracellular matrices or to other cells, a process that is fundamental to the development, function, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Cell adhesion is mediated by various cell surface receptors, such as integrins, cadherins, and immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecules (Ig-CAMs), which interact with specific ligands in the extracellular environment. These interactions lead to the formation of specialized junctions, such as tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, that help to maintain tissue architecture and regulate various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Disruptions in cell adhesion can contribute to a variety of diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and degenerative disorders.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

The thoracic duct is the largest lymphatic vessel in the human body. It is a part of the lymphatic system, which helps to regulate fluid balance and immune function. The thoracic duct originates from the cisterna chyli, a dilated sac located in the abdomen near the aorta.

The thoracic duct collects lymph from the lower extremities, abdomen, pelvis, and left side of the thorax (chest). It ascends through the diaphragm and enters the chest, where it passes through the mediastinum (the central part of the chest between the lungs) and eventually drains into the left subclavian vein.

The thoracic duct plays a crucial role in transporting lymphatic fluid, which contains white blood cells, fats, proteins, and other substances, back into the circulatory system. Any obstruction or damage to the thoracic duct can lead to lymph accumulation in the surrounding tissues, causing swelling and other symptoms.

Adoptive transfer is a medical procedure in which immune cells are transferred from a donor to a recipient with the aim of providing immunity or treating a disease, such as cancer. This technique is often used in the field of immunotherapy and involves isolating specific immune cells (like T-cells) from the donor, expanding their numbers in the laboratory, and then infusing them into the patient. The transferred cells are expected to recognize and attack the target cells, such as malignant or infected cells, leading to a therapeutic effect. This process requires careful matching of donor and recipient to minimize the risk of rejection and graft-versus-host disease.

Chemokine receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that bind to chemokines, which are small signaling proteins involved in immune cell trafficking and inflammation. These receptors play a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses, hematopoiesis, and development. Chemokine receptors are expressed on the surface of various cells, including leukocytes, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Upon binding to their respective chemokines, these receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways that lead to cell migration, activation, or proliferation. There are several subfamilies of chemokine receptors, including CXCR, CCR, CX3CR, and XCR, each with distinct specificities for different chemokines. Dysregulation of chemokine receptor signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, and viral infections.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

ADP-ribosyl cyclase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR). This enzyme plays a role in intracellular signaling, particularly in calcium mobilization in various cell types including immune cells and neurons. The regulation of this enzyme has been implicated in several physiological processes as well as in the pathophysiology of some diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Homologous transplantation is a type of transplant surgery where organs or tissues are transferred between two genetically non-identical individuals of the same species. The term "homologous" refers to the similarity in structure and function of the donated organ or tissue to the recipient's own organ or tissue.

For example, a heart transplant from one human to another is an example of homologous transplantation because both organs are hearts and perform the same function. Similarly, a liver transplant, kidney transplant, lung transplant, and other types of organ transplants between individuals of the same species are also considered homologous transplantations.

Homologous transplantation is in contrast to heterologous or xenogeneic transplantation, where organs or tissues are transferred from one species to another, such as a pig heart transplanted into a human. Homologous transplantation is more commonly performed than heterologous transplantation due to the increased risk of rejection and other complications associated with xenogeneic transplants.

Immunosuppressive agents are medications that decrease the activity of the immune system. They are often used to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs and to treat autoimmune diseases, where the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own tissues. These drugs work by interfering with the immune system's normal responses, which helps to reduce inflammation and damage to tissues. However, because they suppress the immune system, people who take immunosuppressive agents are at increased risk for infections and other complications. Examples of immunosuppressive agents include corticosteroids, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and sirolimus.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

CD38 is a type of antigen that is found on the surface of many different types of cells in the human body, including immune cells such as T-cells and B-cells. Antigens are substances (usually proteins) on the surface of cells that can be recognized by the immune system, triggering an immune response.

CD38 plays a role in several different cellular processes, including the regulation of calcium levels within cells, the production of energy in the form of ATP, and the modulation of immune responses. It is also involved in the activation and proliferation of T-cells and B-cells, which are critical components of the adaptive immune system.

CD38 can be targeted by certain types of immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibodies, to help stimulate an immune response against cancer cells that express this antigen on their surface.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hemolytic Plaque Technique" is not a widely recognized or established medical term. It seems like it might be a combination of two different concepts in medical and scientific research: the Hemolytic Assay and the Plaque Assay technique.

A Hemolytic Assay is a method used to measure the amount of hemolysis, or the rupturing of red blood cells, caused by a substance such as a toxin or an antibody. This assay can help determine the concentration of the hemolysin in a sample.

On the other hand, the Plaque Assay Technique is a method used to measure the number of infectious virus particles in a sample. It involves adding a layer of cells (like bacteria) that the virus can infect and then covering it with a nutrient agar overlay. After a period of incubation, clear areas or "plaques" appear in the agar where the viruses have infected and lysed the cells. By counting these plaques, researchers can estimate the number of infectious virus particles present in the original sample.

Therefore, if you're looking for a definition of a Hemolytic Plaque Technique, it might refer to a research method that combines both concepts, possibly measuring the amount of a substance (like an antibody) that causes hemolysis in red blood cells and correlating it with the number of infectious virus particles present. However, I would recommend consulting the original source or author for clarification on their intended meaning.

Immunoglobulins (Igs), also known as antibodies, are proteins produced by the immune system to recognize and neutralize foreign substances such as pathogens or toxins. They are composed of four polypeptide chains: two heavy chains and two light chains, which are held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains contain loops that form the antigen-binding site, allowing each Ig molecule to recognize a specific epitope (antigenic determinant) on an antigen.

Genes encoding immunoglobulins are located on chromosome 14 (light chain genes) and chromosomes 22 and 2 (heavy chain genes). The diversity of the immune system is generated through a process called V(D)J recombination, where variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments are randomly selected and assembled to form the variable regions of the heavy and light chains. This results in an enormous number of possible combinations, allowing the immune system to recognize and respond to a vast array of potential threats.

There are five classes of immunoglobulins: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM, each with distinct functions and structures. For example, IgG is the most abundant class in serum and provides long-term protection against pathogens, while IgA is found on mucosal surfaces and helps prevent the entry of pathogens into the body.

Immunosuppression is a state in which the immune system's ability to mount an immune response is reduced, compromised or inhibited. This can be caused by certain medications (such as those used to prevent rejection of transplanted organs), diseases (like HIV/AIDS), or genetic disorders. As a result, the body becomes more susceptible to infections and cancer development. It's important to note that immunosuppression should not be confused with immunity, which refers to the body's ability to resist and fight off infections and diseases.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease that can affect almost any organ or system in the body. In SLE, the immune system produces an exaggerated response, leading to the production of autoantibodies that attack the body's own cells and tissues, causing inflammation and damage. The symptoms and severity of SLE can vary widely from person to person, but common features include fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes (particularly a "butterfly" rash across the nose and cheeks), fever, hair loss, and sensitivity to sunlight.

Systemic lupus erythematosus can also affect the kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, blood vessels, and other organs, leading to a wide range of symptoms such as kidney dysfunction, chest pain, shortness of breath, seizures, and anemia. The exact cause of SLE is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors. Treatment typically involves medications to suppress the immune system and manage symptoms, and may require long-term management by a team of healthcare professionals.

Bone marrow cells are the types of cells found within the bone marrow, which is the spongy tissue inside certain bones in the body. The main function of bone marrow is to produce blood cells. There are two types of bone marrow: red and yellow. Red bone marrow is where most blood cell production takes place, while yellow bone marrow serves as a fat storage site.

The three main types of bone marrow cells are:

1. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs): These are immature cells that can differentiate into any type of blood cell, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. They have the ability to self-renew, meaning they can divide and create more hematopoietic stem cells.
2. Red blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into mature red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes. Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide back to the lungs.
3. Myeloid and lymphoid white blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into various types of white blood cells, which play a crucial role in the body's immune system by fighting infections and diseases. Myeloid progenitors give rise to granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils), monocytes, and megakaryocytes (which eventually become platelets). Lymphoid progenitors differentiate into B cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells.

Bone marrow cells are essential for maintaining a healthy blood cell count and immune system function. Abnormalities in bone marrow cells can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, or thrombocytosis, depending on the specific type of blood cell affected. Additionally, bone marrow cells are often used in transplantation procedures to treat patients with certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and lymphoma, or other hematologic disorders.

Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that plays a crucial role in the modulation of immune responses. It is produced by various cell types, including T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. IL-10 inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-12, and downregulates the expression of costimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells. This results in the suppression of T cell activation and effector functions, which ultimately helps to limit tissue damage during inflammation and promote tissue repair. Dysregulation of IL-10 has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer.

Fetal blood refers to the blood circulating in a fetus during pregnancy. It is essential for the growth and development of the fetus, as it carries oxygen and nutrients from the placenta to the developing tissues and organs. Fetal blood also removes waste products, such as carbon dioxide, from the fetal tissues and transports them to the placenta for elimination.

Fetal blood has several unique characteristics that distinguish it from adult blood. For example, fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the primary type of hemoglobin found in fetal blood, whereas adults primarily have adult hemoglobin (HbA). Fetal hemoglobin has a higher affinity for oxygen than adult hemoglobin, which allows it to more efficiently extract oxygen from the maternal blood in the placenta.

Additionally, fetal blood contains a higher proportion of reticulocytes (immature red blood cells) and nucleated red blood cells compared to adult blood. These differences reflect the high turnover rate of red blood cells in the developing fetus and the need for rapid growth and development.

Examination of fetal blood can provide important information about the health and well-being of the fetus during pregnancy. For example, fetal blood sampling (also known as cordocentesis or percutaneous umbilical blood sampling) can be used to diagnose genetic disorders, infections, and other conditions that may affect fetal development. However, this procedure carries risks, including preterm labor, infection, and fetal loss, and is typically only performed when there is a significant risk of fetal compromise or when other diagnostic tests have been inconclusive.

The intestinal mucosa is the innermost layer of the intestines, which comes into direct contact with digested food and microbes. It is a specialized epithelial tissue that plays crucial roles in nutrient absorption, barrier function, and immune defense. The intestinal mucosa is composed of several cell types, including absorptive enterocytes, mucus-secreting goblet cells, hormone-producing enteroendocrine cells, and immune cells such as lymphocytes and macrophages.

The surface of the intestinal mucosa is covered by a single layer of epithelial cells, which are joined together by tight junctions to form a protective barrier against harmful substances and microorganisms. This barrier also allows for the selective absorption of nutrients into the bloodstream. The intestinal mucosa also contains numerous lymphoid follicles, known as Peyer's patches, which are involved in immune surveillance and defense against pathogens.

In addition to its role in absorption and immunity, the intestinal mucosa is also capable of producing hormones that regulate digestion and metabolism. Dysfunction of the intestinal mucosa can lead to various gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and food allergies.

Lymphoma is a type of cancer that originates from the white blood cells called lymphocytes, which are part of the immune system. These cells are found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and other organs. Lymphoma can be classified into two main types: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).

HL is characterized by the presence of a specific type of abnormal lymphocyte called Reed-Sternberg cells, while NHL includes a diverse group of lymphomas that lack these cells. The symptoms of lymphoma may include swollen lymph nodes, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and fatigue.

The exact cause of lymphoma is not known, but it is believed to result from genetic mutations in the lymphocytes that lead to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Exposure to certain viruses, chemicals, and radiation may increase the risk of developing lymphoma. Treatment options for lymphoma depend on various factors such as the type and stage of the disease, age, and overall health of the patient. Common treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Delayed hypersensitivity, also known as type IV hypersensitivity, is a type of immune response that takes place several hours to days after exposure to an antigen. It is characterized by the activation of T cells (a type of white blood cell) and the release of various chemical mediators, leading to inflammation and tissue damage. This reaction is typically associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, such as contact dermatitis, granulomatous disorders (e.g. tuberculosis), and certain autoimmune diseases.

The reaction process involves the following steps:

1. Sensitization: The first time an individual is exposed to an antigen, T cells are activated and become sensitized to it. This process can take several days.
2. Memory: Some of the activated T cells differentiate into memory T cells, which remain in the body and are ready to respond quickly if the same antigen is encountered again.
3. Effector phase: Upon subsequent exposure to the antigen, the memory T cells become activated and release cytokines, which recruit other immune cells (e.g. macrophages) to the site of inflammation. These cells cause tissue damage through various mechanisms, such as phagocytosis, degranulation, and the release of reactive oxygen species.
4. Chronic inflammation: The ongoing immune response can lead to chronic inflammation, which may result in tissue destruction and fibrosis (scarring).

Examples of conditions associated with delayed hypersensitivity include:

* Contact dermatitis (e.g. poison ivy, nickel allergy)
* Tuberculosis
* Leprosy
* Sarcoidosis
* Rheumatoid arthritis
* Type 1 diabetes mellitus
* Multiple sclerosis
* Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis)

CD28 is a co-stimulatory molecule that plays an important role in the activation and regulation of T cells, which are key players in the immune response. It is a type of protein found on the surface of T cells and interacts with other proteins called B7-1 (also known as CD80) and B7-2 (also known as CD86) that are expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs).

When a T cell encounters an APC that is presenting an antigen, the T cell receptor (TCR) on the surface of the T cell recognizes and binds to the antigen. However, this interaction alone is not enough to fully activate the T cell. The engagement of CD28 with B7-1 or B7-2 provides a critical co-stimulatory signal that promotes T cell activation, proliferation, and survival.

CD28 is also an important target for immune checkpoint inhibitors, which are drugs used to treat cancer by blocking the inhibitory signals that prevent T cells from attacking tumor cells. By blocking CD28, these drugs can enhance the anti-tumor response of T cells and improve cancer outcomes.

Immunologic adjuvants are substances that are added to a vaccine to enhance the body's immune response to the antigens contained in the vaccine. They work by stimulating the immune system and promoting the production of antibodies and activating immune cells, such as T-cells and macrophages, which help to provide a stronger and more sustained immune response to the vaccine.

Immunologic adjuvants can be derived from various sources, including bacteria, viruses, and chemicals. Some common examples include aluminum salts (alum), oil-in-water emulsions (such as MF59), and bacterial components (such as lipopolysaccharide or LPS).

The use of immunologic adjuvants in vaccines can help to improve the efficacy of the vaccine, particularly for vaccines that contain weak or poorly immunogenic antigens. They can also help to reduce the amount of antigen needed in a vaccine, which can be beneficial for vaccines that are difficult or expensive to produce.

It's important to note that while adjuvants can enhance the immune response to a vaccine, they can also increase the risk of adverse reactions, such as inflammation and pain at the injection site. Therefore, the use of immunologic adjuvants must be carefully balanced against their potential benefits and risks.

A "cell line, transformed" is a type of cell culture that has undergone a stable genetic alteration, which confers the ability to grow indefinitely in vitro, outside of the organism from which it was derived. These cells have typically been immortalized through exposure to chemical or viral carcinogens, or by introducing specific oncogenes that disrupt normal cell growth regulation pathways.

Transformed cell lines are widely used in scientific research because they offer a consistent and renewable source of biological material for experimentation. They can be used to study various aspects of cell biology, including signal transduction, gene expression, drug discovery, and toxicity testing. However, it is important to note that transformed cells may not always behave identically to their normal counterparts, and results obtained using these cells should be validated in more physiologically relevant systems when possible.

Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigens (EBV NA) are proteins found inside the nucleus of cells that have been infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV is a type of herpesvirus that is best known as the cause of infectious mononucleosis (also known as "mono" or "the kissing disease").

There are two main types of EBV NA: EBNA-1 and EBNA-2. These proteins play a role in the replication and survival of the virus within infected cells. They can be detected using laboratory tests, such as immunofluorescence assays or Western blotting, to help diagnose EBV infection or detect the presence of EBV-associated diseases, such as certain types of lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

EBNA-1 is essential for the maintenance and replication of the EBV genome within infected cells, while EBNA-2 activates viral gene expression and modulates the host cell's immune response to promote virus survival. Both proteins are considered potential targets for the development of antiviral therapies and vaccines against EBV infection.

Cyclosporins are a group of cyclic undecapeptides that have immunosuppressive properties. The most well-known and widely used cyclosporin is cyclosporine A, which is commonly used in organ transplantation to prevent rejection. It works by inhibiting the activation of T-cells, a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in the immune response. By suppressing the activity of T-cells, cyclosporine A reduces the risk of an immune response against the transplanted organ.

Cyclosporins are also used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis, where they help to reduce inflammation and prevent damage to tissues. Like all immunosuppressive drugs, cyclosporins can increase the risk of infection and cancer, so they must be used with caution and under close medical supervision.

Isoantigens are antigens that are present on the cells or tissues of one individual of a species, but are absent or different in another individual of the same species. They are also known as "alloantigens." Isoantigens are most commonly found on the surface of red blood cells and other tissues, and they can stimulate an immune response when transplanted into a different individual. This is because the recipient's immune system recognizes the isoantigens as foreign and mounts a defense against them. Isoantigens are important in the field of transplantation medicine, as they must be carefully matched between donor and recipient to reduce the risk of rejection.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a type of cancer that starts from cells that become certain white blood cells (called lymphocytes) in the bone marrow. The cancer (leukemia) cells start in the bone marrow but then go into the blood.

In CLL, the leukemia cells often build up slowly. Many people don't have any symptoms for at least a few years. But over time, the cells can spread to other parts of the body, including the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen.

The "B-cell" part of the name refers to the fact that the cancer starts in a type of white blood cell called a B lymphocyte or B cell. The "chronic" part means that this leukemia usually progresses more slowly than other types of leukemia.

It's important to note that chronic lymphocytic leukemia is different from chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Although both are cancers of the white blood cells, they start in different types of white blood cells and progress differently.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Th2 cells, or T helper 2 cells, are a type of CD4+ T cell that plays a key role in the immune response to parasites and allergens. They produce cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 which promote the activation and proliferation of eosinophils, mast cells, and B cells, leading to the production of antibodies such as IgE. Th2 cells also play a role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis.

It's important to note that an imbalance in Th1/Th2 response can lead to immune dysregulation and disease states. For example, an overactive Th2 response can lead to allergic reactions while an underactive Th2 response can lead to decreased ability to fight off parasitic infections.

It's also worth noting that there are other subsets of CD4+ T cells such as Th1, Th17, Treg and others, each with their own specific functions and cytokine production profiles.

Th1 cells, or Type 1 T helper cells, are a subset of CD4+ T cells that play a crucial role in the cell-mediated immune response. They are characterized by the production of specific cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 (IL-2). Th1 cells are essential for protecting against intracellular pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. They activate macrophages to destroy ingested microorganisms, stimulate the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells that produce antibodies, and recruit other immune cells to the site of infection. Dysregulation of Th1 cell responses has been implicated in various autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 1 diabetes.

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a chronic, life-threatening condition caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). AIDS is the most advanced stage of HIV infection, characterized by the significant weakening of the immune system, making the person more susceptible to various opportunistic infections and cancers.

The medical definition of AIDS includes specific criteria based on CD4+ T-cell count or the presence of certain opportunistic infections and diseases. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a person with HIV is diagnosed with AIDS when:

1. The CD4+ T-cell count falls below 200 cells per cubic millimeter of blood (mm3) - a normal range is typically between 500 and 1,600 cells/mm3.
2. They develop one or more opportunistic infections or cancers that are indicative of advanced HIV disease, regardless of their CD4+ T-cell count.

Some examples of these opportunistic infections and cancers include:

* Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP)
* Candidiasis (thrush) affecting the esophagus, trachea, or lungs
* Cryptococcal meningitis
* Toxoplasmosis of the brain
* Cytomegalovirus disease
* Kaposi's sarcoma
* Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
* Invasive cervical cancer

It is important to note that with appropriate antiretroviral therapy (ART), people living with HIV can maintain their CD4+ T-cell counts, suppress viral replication, and prevent the progression to AIDS. Early diagnosis and consistent treatment are crucial for managing HIV and improving life expectancy and quality of life.

Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a cytokine, a type of small signaling protein involved in immune response and inflammation. It is primarily produced by activated macrophages, although other cell types such as T-cells, natural killer cells, and mast cells can also produce it.

TNF-α plays a crucial role in the body's defense against infection and tissue injury by mediating inflammatory responses, activating immune cells, and inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death) in certain types of cells. It does this by binding to its receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2, which are found on the surface of many cell types.

In addition to its role in the immune response, TNF-α has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis, as well as cancer, where it can promote tumor growth and metastasis.

Therapeutic agents that target TNF-α, such as infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept, have been developed to treat these conditions. However, these drugs can also increase the risk of infections and other side effects, so their use must be carefully monitored.

Agammaglobulinemia is a medical condition characterized by a severe deficiency or complete absence of gamma globulins (a type of antibodies) in the blood. This deficiency results from a lack of functional B cells, which are a type of white blood cell that produces antibodies to help fight off infections.

There are two main types of agammaglobulinemia: X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) and autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia (ARA). XLA is caused by mutations in the BTK gene and primarily affects males, while ARA is caused by mutations in other genes and can affect both males and females.

People with agammaglobulinemia are at increased risk for recurrent bacterial infections, particularly respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia and sinusitis. They may also be more susceptible to certain viral and parasitic infections. Treatment typically involves replacement therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) to provide the patient with functional antibodies.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Fc receptors (FcRs) are specialized proteins found on the surface of various immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, eosinophils, basophils, mast cells, and B lymphocytes. They play a crucial role in the immune response by recognizing and binding to the Fc region of antibodies (IgG, IgA, and IgE) after they have interacted with their specific antigens.

FcRs can be classified into several types based on the class of antibody they bind:

1. FcγRs - bind to the Fc region of IgG antibodies
2. FcαRs - bind to the Fc region of IgA antibodies
3. FcεRs - bind to the Fc region of IgE antibodies

The binding of antibodies to Fc receptors triggers various cellular responses, such as phagocytosis, degranulation, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which contribute to the elimination of pathogens, immune complexes, and other foreign substances. Dysregulation of Fc receptor function has been implicated in several diseases, including autoimmune disorders and allergies.

Immunity, in medical terms, refers to the body's ability to resist or fight against harmful foreign substances or organisms such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi. This resistance is achieved through various mechanisms, including the production of antibodies, the activation of immune cells like T-cells and B-cells, and the release of cytokines and other chemical messengers that help coordinate the immune response.

There are two main types of immunity: innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Innate immunity is the body's first line of defense against infection and involves nonspecific mechanisms such as physical barriers (e.g., skin and mucous membranes), chemical barriers (e.g., stomach acid and enzymes), and inflammatory responses. Adaptive immunity, on the other hand, is specific to particular pathogens and involves the activation of T-cells and B-cells, which recognize and remember specific antigens (foreign substances that trigger an immune response). This allows the body to mount a more rapid and effective response to subsequent exposures to the same pathogen.

Immunity can be acquired through natural means, such as when a person recovers from an infection and develops immunity to that particular pathogen, or artificially, through vaccination. Vaccines contain weakened or inactivated forms of a pathogen or its components, which stimulate the immune system to produce a response without causing the disease. This response provides protection against future infections with that same pathogen.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

C-type lectins are a family of proteins that contain one or more carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) with a characteristic pattern of conserved sequence motifs. These proteins are capable of binding to specific carbohydrate structures in a calcium-dependent manner, making them important in various biological processes such as cell adhesion, immune recognition, and initiation of inflammatory responses.

C-type lectins can be further classified into several subfamilies based on their structure and function, including selectins, collectins, and immunoglobulin-like receptors. They play a crucial role in the immune system by recognizing and binding to carbohydrate structures on the surface of pathogens, facilitating their clearance by phagocytic cells. Additionally, C-type lectins are involved in various physiological processes such as cell development, tissue repair, and cancer progression.

It is important to note that some C-type lectins can also bind to self-antigens and contribute to autoimmune diseases. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of these proteins has important implications for developing new therapeutic strategies for various diseases.

IgG receptors, also known as Fcγ receptors (Fc gamma receptors), are specialized protein molecules found on the surface of various immune cells, such as neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and some lymphocytes. These receptors recognize and bind to the Fc region of IgG antibodies, one of the five classes of immunoglobulins in the human body.

IgG receptors play a crucial role in immune responses by mediating different effector functions, including:

1. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC): IgG receptors on natural killer (NK) cells and other immune cells bind to IgG antibodies coated on the surface of virus-infected or cancer cells, leading to their destruction.
2. Phagocytosis: When IgG antibodies tag pathogens or foreign particles, phagocytes like neutrophils and macrophages recognize and bind to these immune complexes via IgG receptors, facilitating the engulfment and removal of the targeted particles.
3. Antigen presentation: IgG receptors on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) can internalize immune complexes, process the antigens, and present them to T cells, thereby initiating adaptive immune responses.
4. Inflammatory response regulation: IgG receptors can modulate inflammation by activating or inhibiting downstream signaling pathways in immune cells, depending on the specific type of Fcγ receptor and its activation state.

There are several types of IgG receptors (FcγRI, FcγRII, FcγRIII, and FcγRIV) with varying affinities for different subclasses of IgG antibodies (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4). The distinct functions and expression patterns of these receptors contribute to the complexity and fine-tuning of immune responses in the human body.

Humoral immunity is a type of immune response in which the body produces proteins called antibodies that circulate in bodily fluids such as blood and help to protect against infection. This form of immunity involves the interaction between antigens (foreign substances that trigger an immune response) and soluble factors, including antibodies, complement proteins, and cytokines.

When a pathogen enters the body, it is recognized as foreign by the immune system, which triggers the production of specific antibodies to bind to and neutralize or destroy the pathogen. These antibodies are produced by B cells, a type of white blood cell that is part of the adaptive immune system.

Humoral immunity provides protection against extracellular pathogens, such as bacteria and viruses, that exist outside of host cells. It is an important component of the body's defense mechanisms and plays a critical role in preventing and fighting off infections.

An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is a type of analytical biochemistry assay used to detect and quantify the presence of a substance, typically a protein or peptide, in a liquid sample. It takes its name from the enzyme-linked antibodies used in the assay.

In an ELISA, the sample is added to a well containing a surface that has been treated to capture the target substance. If the target substance is present in the sample, it will bind to the surface. Next, an enzyme-linked antibody specific to the target substance is added. This antibody will bind to the captured target substance if it is present. After washing away any unbound material, a substrate for the enzyme is added. If the enzyme is present due to its linkage to the antibody, it will catalyze a reaction that produces a detectable signal, such as a color change or fluorescence. The intensity of this signal is proportional to the amount of target substance present in the sample, allowing for quantification.

ELISAs are widely used in research and clinical settings to detect and measure various substances, including hormones, viruses, and bacteria. They offer high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility, making them a reliable choice for many applications.

The Immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region is the antigen-binding part of an antibody, which is highly variable in its amino acid sequence and therefore specific to a particular epitope (the site on an antigen that is recognized by the antigen-binding site of an antibody). This variability is generated during the process of V(D)J recombination in the maturation of B cells, allowing for a diverse repertoire of antibodies to be produced and recognizing a wide range of potential pathogens.

The variable region is composed of several sub-regions including:

1. The heavy chain variable region (VH)
2. The light chain variable region (VL)
3. The heavy chain joining region (JH)
4. The light chain joining region (JL)

These regions are further divided into framework regions and complementarity-determining regions (CDRs). The CDRs, particularly CDR3, contain the most variability and are primarily responsible for antigen recognition.

Innate immunity, also known as non-specific immunity or natural immunity, is the inherent defense mechanism that provides immediate protection against potentially harmful pathogens (like bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites) without the need for prior exposure. This type of immunity is present from birth and does not adapt to specific threats over time.

Innate immune responses involve various mechanisms such as:

1. Physical barriers: Skin and mucous membranes prevent pathogens from entering the body.
2. Chemical barriers: Enzymes, stomach acid, and lysozyme in tears, saliva, and sweat help to destroy or inhibit the growth of microorganisms.
3. Cellular responses: Phagocytic cells (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages) recognize and engulf foreign particles and pathogens, while natural killer (NK) cells target and eliminate virus-infected or cancerous cells.
4. Inflammatory response: When an infection occurs, the innate immune system triggers inflammation to increase blood flow, recruit immune cells, and remove damaged tissue.
5. Complement system: A group of proteins that work together to recognize and destroy pathogens directly or enhance phagocytosis by coating them with complement components (opsonization).

Innate immunity plays a crucial role in initiating the adaptive immune response, which is specific to particular pathogens and provides long-term protection through memory cells. Both innate and adaptive immunity work together to maintain overall immune homeostasis and protect the body from infections and diseases.

An acute disease is a medical condition that has a rapid onset, develops quickly, and tends to be short in duration. Acute diseases can range from minor illnesses such as a common cold or flu, to more severe conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, or a heart attack. These types of diseases often have clear symptoms that are easy to identify, and they may require immediate medical attention or treatment.

Acute diseases are typically caused by an external agent or factor, such as a bacterial or viral infection, a toxin, or an injury. They can also be the result of a sudden worsening of an existing chronic condition. In general, acute diseases are distinct from chronic diseases, which are long-term medical conditions that develop slowly over time and may require ongoing management and treatment.

Examples of acute diseases include:

* Acute bronchitis: a sudden inflammation of the airways in the lungs, often caused by a viral infection.
* Appendicitis: an inflammation of the appendix that can cause severe pain and requires surgical removal.
* Gastroenteritis: an inflammation of the stomach and intestines, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
* Migraine headaches: intense headaches that can last for hours or days, and are often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.
* Myocardial infarction (heart attack): a sudden blockage of blood flow to the heart muscle, often caused by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries.
* Pneumonia: an infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Sinusitis: an inflammation of the sinuses, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

It's important to note that while some acute diseases may resolve on their own with rest and supportive care, others may require medical intervention or treatment to prevent complications and promote recovery. If you are experiencing symptoms of an acute disease, it is always best to seek medical attention to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that primarily affects felines, including domestic cats and wild cats. It is the feline equivalent of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The virus attacks the immune system, specifically the CD4+ T-cells, leading to a decline in the immune function over time.

This makes the infected cat more susceptible to various secondary infections and diseases. It is usually transmitted through bite wounds from infected cats during fighting or mating. Mother to offspring transmission can also occur, either in utero, during birth, or through nursing.

There is no cure for FIV, but antiretroviral therapy can help manage the disease and improve the quality of life for infected cats. It's important to note that while FIV-positive cats can live normal lives for many years, they should be kept indoors to prevent transmission to other cats and to protect them from opportunistic infections.

B-lymphocyte gene rearrangement is a fundamental biological process that occurs during the development of B-lymphocytes (also known as B cells), which are a type of white blood cell responsible for producing antibodies to help fight infections. This process involves the rearrangement of genetic material within the B-lymphocyte's immunoglobulin genes, specifically the heavy chain (IgH) and light chain (IgL) genes, to create a diverse repertoire of antibodies with unique specificities.

During B-lymphocyte gene rearrangement, large segments of DNA are cut, deleted, or inverted, and then rejoined to form a functional IgH or IgL gene that encodes an antigen-binding site on the antibody molecule. The process occurs in two main steps:

1. Variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments are rearranged to form the heavy chain gene, which is located on chromosome 14. This results in a vast array of possible combinations, allowing for the generation of a diverse set of antibody molecules.
2. A separate variable (V) and joining (J) gene segment rearrangement occurs to form the light chain gene, which can be either kappa or lambda type, located on chromosomes 2 and 22, respectively.

Once the heavy and light chain genes are successfully rearranged, they are transcribed into mRNA and translated into immunoglobulin proteins, forming a functional antibody molecule. If the initial gene rearrangement fails to produce a functional antibody, additional attempts at rearrangement can occur, involving different combinations of V, D, and J segments or the use of alternative reading frames.

Errors in B-lymphocyte gene rearrangement can lead to various genetic disorders, such as lymphomas and leukemias, due to the production of aberrant antibodies or uncontrolled cell growth.

Cell transformation, viral refers to the process by which a virus causes normal cells to become cancerous or tumorigenic. This occurs when the genetic material of the virus integrates into the DNA of the host cell and alters its regulation, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Some viruses known to cause cell transformation include human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and certain types of herpesviruses.

Thymidine is a pyrimidine nucleoside that consists of a thymine base linked to a deoxyribose sugar by a β-N1-glycosidic bond. It plays a crucial role in DNA replication and repair processes as one of the four nucleosides in DNA, along with adenosine, guanosine, and cytidine. Thymidine is also used in research and clinical settings for various purposes, such as studying DNA synthesis or as a component of antiviral and anticancer therapies.

A germinal center is a microanatomical structure found within the secondary lymphoid organs, such as the spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches. It is a transient structure that forms during the humoral immune response, specifically during the activation of B cells by antigens.

Germinal centers are the sites where activated B cells undergo rapid proliferation, somatic hypermutation, and class switch recombination to generate high-affinity antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. These processes help to refine the immune response and provide long-lasting immunity against pathogens.

The germinal center is composed of two main regions: the dark zone (or proliferation center) and the light zone (or selection area). The dark zone contains rapidly dividing B cells, while the light zone contains follicular dendritic cells that present antigens to the B cells. Through a process called affinity maturation, B cells with higher-affinity antibodies are selected for survival and further differentiation into plasma cells or memory B cells.

Overall, germinal centers play a critical role in the adaptive immune response by generating high-affinity antibodies and providing long-term immunity against pathogens.

Immunotherapy is a type of medical treatment that uses the body's own immune system to fight against diseases, such as cancer. It involves the use of substances (like vaccines, medications, or immune cells) that stimulate or suppress the immune system to help it recognize and destroy harmful disease-causing cells or agents, like tumor cells.

Immunotherapy can work in several ways:

1. Activating the immune system: Certain immunotherapies boost the body's natural immune responses, helping them recognize and attack cancer cells more effectively.
2. Suppressing immune system inhibitors: Some immunotherapies target and block proteins or molecules that can suppress the immune response, allowing the immune system to work more efficiently against diseases.
3. Replacing or enhancing specific immune cells: Immunotherapy can also involve administering immune cells (like T-cells) that have been genetically engineered or modified to recognize and destroy cancer cells.

Immunotherapies have shown promising results in treating various types of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and allergies. However, they can also cause side effects, as an overactive immune system may attack healthy tissues and organs. Therefore, careful monitoring is necessary during immunotherapy treatment.

Aging is a complex, progressive and inevitable process of bodily changes over time, characterized by the accumulation of cellular damage and degenerative changes that eventually lead to increased vulnerability to disease and death. It involves various biological, genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors that contribute to the decline in physical and mental functions. The medical field studies aging through the discipline of gerontology, which aims to understand the underlying mechanisms of aging and develop interventions to promote healthy aging and extend the human healthspan.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects the joints. It is characterized by persistent inflammation, synovial hyperplasia, and subsequent damage to the articular cartilage and bone. The immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own tissues, specifically targeting the synovial membrane lining the joint capsule. This results in swelling, pain, warmth, and stiffness in affected joints, often most severely in the hands and feet.

RA can also have extra-articular manifestations, affecting other organs such as the lungs, heart, skin, eyes, and blood vessels. The exact cause of RA remains unknown, but it is believed to involve a complex interplay between genetic susceptibility and environmental triggers. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial in managing rheumatoid arthritis to prevent joint damage, disability, and systemic complications.

Immunologic factors refer to the elements of the immune system that contribute to the body's defense against foreign substances, infectious agents, and cancerous cells. These factors include various types of white blood cells (such as lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, and eosinophils), antibodies, complement proteins, cytokines, and other molecules involved in the immune response.

Immunologic factors can be categorized into two main types: innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Innate immunity is the non-specific defense mechanism that provides immediate protection against pathogens through physical barriers (e.g., skin, mucous membranes), chemical barriers (e.g., stomach acid, enzymes), and inflammatory responses. Adaptive immunity, on the other hand, is a specific defense mechanism that develops over time as the immune system learns to recognize and respond to particular pathogens or antigens.

Abnormalities in immunologic factors can lead to various medical conditions, such as autoimmune disorders, immunodeficiency diseases, and allergies. Therefore, understanding immunologic factors is crucial for diagnosing and treating these conditions.

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 13 (CXCL13), also known as B cell-attracting chemokine 1 (BCA-1) or B lymphocyte chemoattractant (BLC), is a small signaling protein belonging to the CXC chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of chemotactic cytokines that play crucial roles in immunological and inflammatory processes, mainly by recruiting and activating various leukocytes.

CXCL13 is primarily produced by stromal cells, including follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) within secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph nodes, spleen, and Peyer's patches. This chemokine specifically binds to the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CXCR5), which is expressed on various immune cells, most notably B cells, follicular helper T cells (Tfh), and some dendritic cell subsets.

The primary function of CXCL13 is to orchestrate the migration and positioning of immune cells, particularly B cells, within secondary lymphoid organs during an immune response. By attracting CXCR5-expressing B cells and Tfh cells, CXCL13 plays a critical role in the formation and maintenance of germinal centers (GCs), which are specialized microanatomical structures where affinity maturation and class switch recombination of B cells occur.

Abnormal levels or functions of CXCL13 have been implicated in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), certain types of cancer, and neurological disorders like multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease.

Granulocytes are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the body's immune system. They are called granulocytes because they contain small granules in their cytoplasm, which are filled with various enzymes and proteins that help them fight off infections and destroy foreign substances.

There are three types of granulocytes: neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. Neutrophils are the most abundant type and are primarily responsible for fighting bacterial infections. Eosinophils play a role in defending against parasitic infections and regulating immune responses. Basophils are involved in inflammatory reactions and allergic responses.

Granulocytes are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream, where they circulate and patrol for any signs of infection or foreign substances. When they encounter a threat, they quickly move to the site of infection or injury and release their granules to destroy the invading organisms or substances.

Abnormal levels of granulocytes in the blood can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a bone marrow disorder.

A binding site on an antibody refers to the specific region on the surface of the antibody molecule that can recognize and bind to a specific antigen. Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of foreign substances called antigens. They have two main functions: to neutralize the harmful effects of antigens and to help eliminate them from the body.

The binding site of an antibody is located at the tips of its Y-shaped structure, formed by the variable regions of the heavy and light chains of the antibody molecule. These regions contain unique amino acid sequences that determine the specificity of the antibody for a particular antigen. The binding site can recognize and bind to a specific epitope or region on the antigen, forming an antigen-antibody complex.

The binding between the antibody and antigen is highly specific and depends on non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces, and electrostatic attractions. This interaction plays a crucial role in the immune response, as it allows the immune system to recognize and eliminate pathogens and other foreign substances from the body.

Immunoglobulin kappa-chains are one of the two types of light chains (the other being lambda-chains) that make up an immunoglobulin molecule, also known as an antibody. These light chains combine with heavy chains to form the antigen-binding site of an antibody, which is responsible for recognizing and binding to specific antigens or foreign substances in the body.

Kappa-chains contain a variable region that differs between different antibodies and contributes to the diversity of the immune system's response to various antigens. They also have a constant region, which is consistent across all kappa-chains. Approximately 60% of all human antibodies contain kappa-chains, while the remaining 40% contain lambda-chains. The relative proportions of kappa and lambda chains can be used in diagnostic tests to identify clonal expansions of B cells, which may indicate a malignancy such as multiple myeloma or lymphoma.

Immunoglobulin class switching, also known as isotype switching or class switch recombination (CSR), is a biological process that occurs in B lymphocytes as part of the adaptive immune response. This mechanism allows a mature B cell to change the type of antibody it produces from one class to another (e.g., from IgM to IgG, IgA, or IgE) while keeping the same antigen-binding specificity.

During immunoglobulin class switching, the constant region genes of the heavy chain undergo a DNA recombination event, which results in the deletion of the original constant region exons and the addition of new constant region exons downstream. This switch allows the B cell to express different effector functions through the production of antibodies with distinct constant regions, tailoring the immune response to eliminate pathogens more effectively. The process is regulated by various cytokines and signals from T cells and is critical for mounting an effective humoral immune response.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are a group of specialized cells in the immune system that play a critical role in initiating and regulating immune responses. They have the ability to engulf, process, and present antigens (molecules derived from pathogens or other foreign substances) on their surface in conjunction with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. This presentation of antigens allows APCs to activate T cells, which are crucial for adaptive immunity.

There are several types of APCs, including:

1. Dendritic cells (DCs): These are the most potent and professional APCs, found in various tissues throughout the body. DCs can capture antigens from their environment, process them, and migrate to lymphoid organs where they present antigens to T cells.
2. Macrophages: These large phagocytic cells are found in many tissues and play a role in both innate and adaptive immunity. They can engulf and digest pathogens, then present processed antigens on their MHC class II molecules to activate CD4+ T helper cells.
3. B cells: These are primarily responsible for humoral immune responses by producing antibodies against antigens. When activated, B cells can also function as APCs and present antigens on their MHC class II molecules to CD4+ T cells.

The interaction between APCs and T cells is critical for the development of an effective immune response against pathogens or other foreign substances. This process helps ensure that the immune system can recognize and eliminate threats while minimizing damage to healthy tissues.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

Jurkat cells are a type of human immortalized T lymphocyte (a type of white blood cell) cell line that is commonly used in scientific research. They were originally isolated from the peripheral blood of a patient with acute T-cell leukemia. Jurkat cells are widely used as a model system to study T-cell activation, signal transduction, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are also used in the study of HIV infection and replication, as they can be infected with the virus and used to investigate viral replication and host cell responses.

Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are large molecules found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. They consist of a hydrophilic polysaccharide called the O-antigen, a core oligosaccharide, and a lipid portion known as Lipid A. The Lipid A component is responsible for the endotoxic activity of LPS, which can trigger a powerful immune response in animals, including humans. This response can lead to symptoms such as fever, inflammation, and septic shock, especially when large amounts of LPS are introduced into the bloodstream.

Siglec-2, also known as CD22, is a type of cell surface protein that belongs to the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) family. It is primarily expressed on mature B cells and plays a crucial role in regulating B cell activation and function. Siglec-2 recognizes and binds to sialic acid residues on glycoproteins and gangliosides, which are sugars that are attached to proteins and lipids on the surface of cells. This binding can lead to inhibitory signals that dampen B cell activation and help prevent autoimmunity. Siglec-2 has also been implicated in the regulation of B cell migration and adhesion.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

The B-cell activation factor receptor, also known as BAFF-R or CD268, is a protein found on the surface of B cells, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the immune system. The BAFF-R receptor binds to a protein called BAFF (B-cell activating factor), which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family.

When BAFF binds to BAFF-R, it triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that promote the survival, activation, and differentiation of B cells. This interaction is critical for the normal development and function of the immune system, as it helps to maintain the balance between the proliferation and deletion of B cells.

However, abnormal activation of the BAFF-R pathway has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and Sjogren's syndrome. In these conditions, excessive levels of BAFF can lead to the overactivation of B cells, resulting in the production of autoantibodies that attack the body's own tissues.

Therefore, therapies that target the BAFF-R pathway are being investigated as potential treatments for autoimmune diseases. These include monoclonal antibodies that bind to BAFF or BAFF-R and block their interaction, as well as small molecule inhibitors that interfere with downstream signaling events.

Immunoglobulins, also known as antibodies, are proteins produced by the immune system to recognize and neutralize foreign substances like pathogens or antigens. The term "immunoglobulin isotypes" refers to the different classes of immunoglobulins that share a similar structure but have distinct functions and properties.

There are five main isotypes of immunoglobulins in humans, namely IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each isotype has a unique heavy chain constant region (CH) that determines its effector functions, such as binding to Fc receptors, complement activation, or protection against pathogens.

IgA is primarily found in external secretions like tears, saliva, and breast milk, providing localized immunity at mucosal surfaces. IgD is expressed on the surface of B cells and plays a role in their activation and differentiation. IgE is associated with allergic responses and binds to mast cells and basophils, triggering the release of histamine and other mediators of inflammation.

IgG is the most abundant isotype in serum and has several subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) that differ in their effector functions. IgG can cross the placenta, providing passive immunity to the fetus. IgM is the first antibody produced during an immune response and is primarily found in the bloodstream, where it forms large pentameric complexes that are effective at agglutination and complement activation.

Overall, immunoglobulin isotypes play a crucial role in the adaptive immune response, providing specific and diverse mechanisms for recognizing and neutralizing foreign substances.

A dose-response relationship in immunology refers to the quantitative relationship between the dose or amount of an antigen (a substance that triggers an immune response) and the magnitude or strength of the resulting immune response. Generally, as the dose of an antigen increases, the intensity and/or duration of the immune response also increase, up to a certain point. This relationship helps in determining the optimal dosage for vaccines and immunotherapies, ensuring sufficient immune activation while minimizing potential adverse effects.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Autoimmune thyroiditis, also known as Hashimoto's disease, is a chronic inflammation of the thyroid gland caused by an autoimmune response. In this condition, the immune system produces antibodies that attack and damage the thyroid gland, leading to hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid). The thyroid gland may become enlarged (goiter), and symptoms can include fatigue, weight gain, cold intolerance, constipation, dry skin, and depression. Autoimmune thyroiditis is more common in women than men and tends to run in families. It is often associated with other autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, Addison's disease, and type 1 diabetes. The diagnosis is typically made through blood tests that measure levels of thyroid hormones and antibodies. Treatment usually involves thyroid hormone replacement therapy to manage the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a medical procedure in which damaged or destroyed bone marrow is replaced with healthy bone marrow from a donor. Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside bones that produces blood cells. The main types of BMT are autologous, allogeneic, and umbilical cord blood transplantation.

In autologous BMT, the patient's own bone marrow is used for the transplant. This type of BMT is often used in patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma who have undergone high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy to destroy their cancerous bone marrow.

In allogeneic BMT, bone marrow from a genetically matched donor is used for the transplant. This type of BMT is often used in patients with leukemia, lymphoma, or other blood disorders who have failed other treatments.

Umbilical cord blood transplantation involves using stem cells from umbilical cord blood as a source of healthy bone marrow. This type of BMT is often used in children and adults who do not have a matched donor for allogeneic BMT.

The process of BMT typically involves several steps, including harvesting the bone marrow or stem cells from the donor, conditioning the patient's body to receive the new bone marrow or stem cells, transplanting the new bone marrow or stem cells into the patient's body, and monitoring the patient for signs of engraftment and complications.

BMT is a complex and potentially risky procedure that requires careful planning, preparation, and follow-up care. However, it can be a life-saving treatment for many patients with blood disorders or cancer.

A hapten is a small molecule that can elicit an immune response only when it is attached to a larger carrier protein. On its own, a hapten is too small to be recognized by the immune system as a foreign substance. However, when it binds to a carrier protein, it creates a new antigenic site that can be detected by the immune system. This process is known as haptenization.

Haptens are important in the study of immunology and allergies because they can cause an allergic response when they bind to proteins in the body. For example, certain chemicals found in cosmetics, drugs, or industrial products can act as haptens and trigger an allergic reaction when they come into contact with the skin or mucous membranes. The resulting immune response can cause symptoms such as rash, itching, or inflammation.

Haptens can also be used in the development of vaccines and diagnostic tests, where they are attached to carrier proteins to stimulate an immune response and produce specific antibodies that can be measured or used for therapy.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, such as a bacterium or virus. They are capable of identifying and binding to specific antigens (foreign substances) on the surface of these invaders, marking them for destruction by other immune cells. Antibodies are also known as immunoglobulins and come in several different types, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM, each with a unique function in the immune response. They are composed of four polypeptide chains, two heavy chains and two light chains, that are held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains form the antigen-binding site, which is specific to a particular antigen.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

An antigen is any substance that can stimulate an immune response, particularly the production of antibodies. Viral antigens are antigens that are found on or produced by viruses. They can be proteins, glycoproteins, or carbohydrates present on the surface or inside the viral particle.

Viral antigens play a crucial role in the immune system's recognition and response to viral infections. When a virus infects a host cell, it may display its antigens on the surface of the infected cell. This allows the immune system to recognize and target the infected cells for destruction, thereby limiting the spread of the virus.

Viral antigens are also important targets for vaccines. Vaccines typically work by introducing a harmless form of a viral antigen to the body, which then stimulates the production of antibodies and memory T-cells that can recognize and respond quickly and effectively to future infections with the actual virus.

It's worth noting that different types of viruses have different antigens, and these antigens can vary between strains of the same virus. This is why there are often different vaccines available for different viral diseases, and why flu vaccines need to be updated every year to account for changes in the circulating influenza virus strains.

Tuberculin is not a medical condition but a diagnostic tool used in the form of a purified protein derivative (PPD) to detect tuberculosis infection. It is prepared from the culture filtrate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB. The PPD tuberculin is injected intradermally, and the resulting skin reaction is measured after 48-72 hours to determine if a person has developed an immune response to the bacteria, indicating a past or present infection with TB. It's important to note that a positive tuberculin test does not necessarily mean that active disease is present, but it does indicate that further evaluation is needed.

B-cell lymphoma is a type of cancer that originates from the B-lymphocytes, which are a part of the immune system and play a crucial role in fighting infections. These cells can develop mutations in their DNA, leading to uncontrolled growth and division, resulting in the formation of a tumor.

B-cell lymphomas can be classified into two main categories: Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. B-cell lymphomas are further divided into subtypes based on their specific characteristics, such as the appearance of the cells under a microscope, the genetic changes present in the cancer cells, and the aggressiveness of the disease.

Some common types of B-cell lymphomas include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, and Burkitt lymphoma. Treatment options for B-cell lymphomas depend on the specific subtype, stage of the disease, and other individual factors. Treatment may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy, or stem cell transplantation.

In medical terms, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. It consists of two main layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and dermis (inner layer), as well as accessory structures like hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. The skin plays a crucial role in protecting us from external factors such as bacteria, viruses, and environmental hazards, while also regulating body temperature and enabling the sense of touch.

Cell survival refers to the ability of a cell to continue living and functioning normally, despite being exposed to potentially harmful conditions or treatments. This can include exposure to toxins, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, or other stressors that can damage cells or interfere with their normal processes.

In scientific research, measures of cell survival are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of various therapies or treatments. For example, researchers may expose cells to a particular drug or treatment and then measure the percentage of cells that survive to assess its potential therapeutic value. Similarly, in toxicology studies, measures of cell survival can help to determine the safety of various chemicals or substances.

It's important to note that cell survival is not the same as cell proliferation, which refers to the ability of cells to divide and multiply. While some treatments may promote cell survival, they may also inhibit cell proliferation, making them useful for treating diseases such as cancer. Conversely, other treatments may be designed to specifically target and kill cancer cells, even if it means sacrificing some healthy cells in the process.

Antigen presentation is the process by which certain cells in the immune system, known as antigen presenting cells (APCs), display foreign or abnormal proteins (antigens) on their surface to other immune cells, such as T-cells. This process allows the immune system to recognize and mount a response against harmful pathogens, infected or damaged cells.

There are two main types of antigen presentation: major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and MHC class II presentation.

1. MHC class I presentation: APCs, such as dendritic cells, macrophages, and B-cells, process and load antigens onto MHC class I molecules, which are expressed on the surface of almost all nucleated cells in the body. The MHC class I-antigen complex is then recognized by CD8+ T-cells (cytotoxic T-cells), leading to the destruction of infected or damaged cells.
2. MHC class II presentation: APCs, particularly dendritic cells and B-cells, process and load antigens onto MHC class II molecules, which are mainly expressed on the surface of professional APCs. The MHC class II-antigen complex is then recognized by CD4+ T-cells (helper T-cells), leading to the activation of other immune cells, such as B-cells and macrophages, to eliminate the pathogen or damaged cells.

In summary, antigen presentation is a crucial step in the adaptive immune response, allowing for the recognition and elimination of foreign or abnormal substances that could potentially harm the body.

Peyer's patches are specialized lymphoid nodules found in the mucosa of the ileum, a part of the small intestine. They are a component of the immune system and play a crucial role in monitoring and defending against harmful pathogens that are ingested with food and drink. Peyer's patches contain large numbers of B-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes, and macrophages, which work together to identify and eliminate potential threats. They also have a unique structure that allows them to sample and analyze the contents of the intestinal lumen, providing an early warning system for the immune system.

Immunoglobulin Fc fragments are the crystallizable fragment of an antibody that is responsible for effector functions such as engagement with Fc receptors on immune cells, activation of the complement system, and neutralization of toxins. The Fc region is located at the tail end of the Y-shaped immunoglobulin molecule, and it is made up of constant regions of the heavy chains of the antibody.

When an antibody binds to its target antigen, the Fc region can interact with other proteins in the immune system, leading to a variety of responses such as phagocytosis, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and complement activation. These effector functions help to eliminate pathogens and infected cells from the body.

Immunoglobulin Fc fragments can be produced artificially through enzymatic digestion of intact antibodies, resulting in a fragment that retains the ability to interact with Fc receptors and other proteins involved in immune responses. These fragments have potential therapeutic applications in a variety of diseases, including autoimmune disorders, inflammatory conditions, and cancer.

Coxsackievirus infections are a type of viral illness caused by Coxsackie A and B viruses, which belong to the family Picornaviridae. These viruses can cause a wide range of symptoms, depending on the specific strain and the age and overall health of the infected individual.

The most common types of Coxsackievirus infections are hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) and herpangina. HFMD is characterized by fever, sore throat, and a rash that typically appears on the hands, feet, and mouth. Herpangina is similar but is usually marked by painful sores in the back of the mouth or throat.

Other possible symptoms of Coxsackievirus infections include:

* Fever
* Headache
* Muscle aches
* Fatigue
* Nausea and vomiting
* Abdominal pain

In some cases, Coxsackievirus infections can lead to more serious complications, such as meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord), myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle), or pleurodynia (also known as "devil's grip," a painful inflammation of the chest and abdominal muscles).

Coxsackievirus infections are typically spread through close contact with an infected person, such as through respiratory droplets or by touching contaminated surfaces. The viruses can also be spread through fecal-oral transmission.

There is no specific treatment for Coxsackievirus infections, and most people recover on their own within a week or two. However, severe cases may require hospitalization and supportive care, such as fluids and pain relief. Prevention measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing hands frequently and avoiding close contact with sick individuals.

Prednisolone is a synthetic glucocorticoid drug, which is a class of steroid hormones. It is commonly used in the treatment of various inflammatory and autoimmune conditions due to its potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Prednisolone works by binding to specific receptors in cells, leading to changes in gene expression that reduce the production of substances involved in inflammation, such as cytokines and prostaglandins.

Prednisolone is available in various forms, including tablets, syrups, and injectable solutions. It can be used to treat a wide range of medical conditions, including asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, allergies, skin conditions, and certain types of cancer.

Like other steroid medications, prednisolone can have significant side effects if used in high doses or for long periods of time. These may include weight gain, mood changes, increased risk of infections, osteoporosis, diabetes, and adrenal suppression. As a result, the use of prednisolone should be closely monitored by a healthcare professional to ensure that its benefits outweigh its risks.

The Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit (IL-2Rα), also known as CD25, is a protein that is expressed on the surface of certain immune cells, such as activated T-cells and B-cells. It is a subunit of the interleukin-2 receptor, which plays a crucial role in the activation and regulation of the immune response. The IL-2Rα binds to interleukin-2 (IL-2) with high affinity, forming a complex that initiates intracellular signaling pathways involved in T-cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. IL-2Rα is also a target for immunosuppressive therapies used to prevent rejection of transplanted organs and to treat autoimmune diseases.

Chemotaxis, Leukocyte is the movement of leukocytes (white blood cells) towards a higher concentration of a particular chemical substance, known as a chemotactic factor. This process plays a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection and injury.

When there is an infection or tissue damage, certain cells release chemotactic factors, which are small molecules or proteins that can attract leukocytes to the site of inflammation. Leukocytes have receptors on their surface that can detect these chemotactic factors and move towards them through a process called chemotaxis.

Once they reach the site of inflammation, leukocytes can help eliminate pathogens or damaged cells by phagocytosis (engulfing and destroying) or releasing toxic substances that kill the invading microorganisms. Chemotaxis is an essential part of the immune system's defense mechanisms and helps to maintain tissue homeostasis and prevent the spread of infection.

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream where they circulate and are able to move quickly to sites of infection or inflammation in the body. Neutrophils are capable of engulfing and destroying bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances through a process called phagocytosis. They are also involved in the release of inflammatory mediators, which can contribute to tissue damage in some cases. Neutrophils are characterized by the presence of granules in their cytoplasm, which contain enzymes and other proteins that help them carry out their immune functions.

Burkitt lymphoma is a type of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), which is a cancer that originates in the lymphatic system. It is named after Denis Parsons Burkitt, an Irish surgeon who first described this form of cancer in African children in the 1950s.

Burkitt lymphoma is characterized by the rapid growth and spread of abnormal B-lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell), which can affect various organs and tissues, including the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and central nervous system.

There are three main types of Burkitt lymphoma: endemic, sporadic, and immunodeficiency-associated. The endemic form is most common in equatorial Africa and is strongly associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The sporadic form occurs worldwide but is rare, accounting for less than 1% of all NHL cases in the United States. Immunodeficiency-associated Burkitt lymphoma is seen in individuals with weakened immune systems due to HIV/AIDS or immunosuppressive therapy after organ transplantation.

Burkitt lymphoma typically presents as a rapidly growing mass, often involving the jaw, facial bones, or abdominal organs. Symptoms may include swollen lymph nodes, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and fatigue. Diagnosis is made through a biopsy of the affected tissue, followed by immunohistochemical staining and genetic analysis to confirm the presence of characteristic chromosomal translocations involving the MYC oncogene.

Treatment for Burkitt lymphoma typically involves intensive chemotherapy regimens, often combined with targeted therapy or immunotherapy. The prognosis is generally good when treated aggressively and promptly, with a high cure rate in children and young adults. However, the prognosis may be poorer in older patients or those with advanced-stage disease at diagnosis.

Sarcoidosis is a multi-system disorder characterized by the formation of granulomas (small clumps of inflammatory cells) in various organs, most commonly the lungs and lymphatic system. These granulomas can impair the function of the affected organ(s), leading to a variety of symptoms. The exact cause of sarcoidosis is unknown, but it's thought to be an overactive immune response to an unknown antigen, possibly triggered by an infection, chemical exposure, or another environmental factor.

The diagnosis of sarcoidosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies (such as chest X-rays and CT scans), and laboratory tests (including blood tests and biopsies). While there is no cure for sarcoidosis, treatment may be necessary to manage symptoms and prevent complications. Corticosteroids are often used to suppress the immune system and reduce inflammation, while other medications may be prescribed to treat specific organ involvement or symptoms. In some cases, sarcoidosis may resolve on its own without any treatment.

Neoplasm antigens, also known as tumor antigens, are substances that are produced by cancer cells (neoplasms) and can stimulate an immune response. These antigens can be proteins, carbohydrates, or other molecules that are either unique to the cancer cells or are overexpressed or mutated versions of normal cellular proteins.

Neoplasm antigens can be classified into two main categories: tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). TSAs are unique to cancer cells and are not expressed by normal cells, while TAAs are present at low levels in normal cells but are overexpressed or altered in cancer cells.

TSAs can be further divided into viral antigens and mutated antigens. Viral antigens are produced when cancer is caused by a virus, such as human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical cancer. Mutated antigens are the result of genetic mutations that occur during cancer development and are unique to each patient's tumor.

Neoplasm antigens play an important role in the immune response against cancer. They can be recognized by the immune system, leading to the activation of immune cells such as T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, which can then attack and destroy cancer cells. However, cancer cells often develop mechanisms to evade the immune response, allowing them to continue growing and spreading.

Understanding neoplasm antigens is important for the development of cancer immunotherapies, which aim to enhance the body's natural immune response against cancer. These therapies include checkpoint inhibitors, which block proteins that inhibit T cell activation, and therapeutic vaccines, which stimulate an immune response against specific tumor antigens.

Immunization is defined medically as the process where an individual is made immune or resistant to an infectious disease, typically through the administration of a vaccine. The vaccine stimulates the body's own immune system to recognize and fight off the specific disease-causing organism, thereby preventing or reducing the severity of future infections with that organism.

Immunization can be achieved actively, where the person is given a vaccine to trigger an immune response, or passively, where antibodies are transferred to the person through immunoglobulin therapy. Immunizations are an important part of preventive healthcare and have been successful in controlling and eliminating many infectious diseases worldwide.

Viral matrix proteins are structural proteins that play a crucial role in the morphogenesis and life cycle of many viruses. They are often located between the viral envelope and the viral genome, serving as a scaffold for virus assembly and budding. These proteins also interact with other viral components, such as the viral genome, capsid proteins, and envelope proteins, to form an infectious virion. Additionally, matrix proteins can have regulatory functions, influencing viral transcription, replication, and host cell responses. The specific functions of viral matrix proteins vary among different virus families.

CD95 (also known as Fas or APO-1) is a type of cell surface receptor that can bind to specific proteins and trigger programmed cell death, also known as apoptosis. It is an important regulator of the immune system and helps to control the activation and deletion of immune cells. CD95 ligand (CD95L), the protein that binds to CD95, is expressed on activated T-cells and can induce apoptosis in other cells that express CD95, including other T-cells and tumor cells.

An antigen is any substance that can stimulate an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies or activation of immune cells. In the context of CD95, antigens may refer to substances that can induce the expression of CD95 on the surface of cells, making them susceptible to CD95L-mediated apoptosis. These antigens could include viral proteins, tumor antigens, or other substances that trigger an immune response.

Therefore, the medical definition of 'antigens, CD95' may refer to substances that can induce the expression of CD95 on the surface of cells and make them targets for CD95L-mediated apoptosis.

Autoimmunity is a medical condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy tissues within the body. In normal function, the immune system recognizes and fights off foreign substances such as bacteria, viruses, and toxins. However, when autoimmunity occurs, the immune system identifies self-molecules or tissues as foreign and produces an immune response against them.

This misguided response can lead to chronic inflammation, tissue damage, and impaired organ function. Autoimmune diseases can affect various parts of the body, including the joints, skin, glands, muscles, and blood vessels. Some common examples of autoimmune diseases are rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and Graves' disease.

The exact cause of autoimmunity is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors that trigger an abnormal immune response in susceptible individuals. Treatment for autoimmune diseases typically involves managing symptoms, reducing inflammation, and suppressing the immune system's overactive response using medications such as corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, and biologics.

SCID mice is an acronym for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency mice. These are genetically modified mice that lack a functional immune system due to the mutation or knockout of several key genes required for immunity. This makes them ideal for studying the human immune system, infectious diseases, and cancer, as well as testing new therapies and treatments in a controlled environment without the risk of interference from the mouse's own immune system. SCID mice are often used in xenotransplantation studies, where human cells or tissues are transplanted into the mouse to study their behavior and interactions with the human immune system.

Ficoll is not a medical term itself, but it is a type of synthetic polymer that is often used in laboratory settings for various medical and scientific purposes. Ficoll is a high-molecular-weight coopolymer of sucrose and epichlorohydrin, which forms a highly flexible and soluble structure with unique physical properties.

In medicine and research, Ficoll is commonly used as a component in density gradient media for the separation and purification of biological cells, viruses, and other particles based on their size, density, or sedimentation rate. The most common application of Ficoll is in the preparation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from whole blood samples.

Ficoll-Paque is a commercially available density gradient medium that contains Ficoll and a high-density solution of sodium diatrizoate. When a blood sample is layered onto the Ficoll-Paque solution and centrifuged, the various cell types in the blood separate into distinct bands based on their densities. The PBMCs, which include lymphocytes, monocytes, and other immune cells, collect at the interface between the Ficoll layer and the plasma layer, allowing for easy isolation and further analysis.

Therefore, while not a medical term itself, Ficoll plays an essential role in many laboratory procedures used in medical research and diagnostics.

CD40 ligand (CD40L or CD154) is a type II transmembrane protein and a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily. It is primarily expressed on activated CD4+ T cells, but can also be found on other immune cells such as activated B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells.

CD40 ligand binds to its receptor, CD40, which is mainly expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as B cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages. The interaction between CD40L and CD40 plays a crucial role in the activation and regulation of the immune response.

CD40L-CD40 signaling is essential for T cell-dependent B cell activation, antibody production, and class switching. It also contributes to the activation and maturation of dendritic cells, promoting their ability to stimulate T cell responses. Dysregulation of CD40L-CD40 signaling has been implicated in various autoimmune diseases, transplant rejection, and cancer.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Antibodies, viral are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection with a virus. These antibodies are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens on the surface of the virus, which helps to neutralize or destroy the virus and prevent its replication. Once produced, these antibodies can provide immunity against future infections with the same virus.

Viral antibodies are typically composed of four polypeptide chains - two heavy chains and two light chains - that are held together by disulfide bonds. The binding site for the antigen is located at the tip of the Y-shaped structure, formed by the variable regions of the heavy and light chains.

There are five classes of antibodies in humans: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has a different function and is distributed differently throughout the body. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody found in the bloodstream and provides long-term immunity against viruses, while IgA is found primarily in mucous membranes and helps to protect against respiratory and gastrointestinal infections.

In addition to their role in the immune response, viral antibodies can also be used as diagnostic tools to detect the presence of a specific virus in a patient's blood or other bodily fluids.

The Yellow Fever Vaccine is a vaccine that protects against the yellow fever virus, which is transmitted to humans through the bites of infected mosquitoes. The vaccine contains live, weakened yellow fever virus, and it works by stimulating the immune system to produce an immune response that provides protection against the disease.

The yellow fever vaccine is recommended for people who are traveling to areas where yellow fever is common, including parts of Africa and South America. It is also required for entry into some countries in these regions. The vaccine is generally safe and effective, but it can cause mild side effects such as headache, muscle pain, and fever in some people. Serious side effects are rare, but may include allergic reactions or infection with the weakened virus used in the vaccine.

It's important to note that yellow fever vaccine may not be recommended for certain individuals, including infants younger than 6 months, pregnant women, people with weakened immune systems, and those with a history of severe allergic reaction to a previous dose of the vaccine or any component of the vaccine. It is always best to consult with a healthcare provider before receiving any vaccination.

Hydrocortisone is a synthetic glucocorticoid, which is a class of steroid hormones. It is identical to the naturally occurring cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal gland that helps regulate metabolism and helps your body respond to stress. Hydrocortisone has anti-inflammatory effects and is used to treat various inflammatory conditions such as allergies, skin disorders, and autoimmune diseases. It works by suppressing the immune system's response to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and other symptoms caused by inflammation.

Hydrocortisone is available in different forms, including oral tablets, topical creams, lotions, gels, and ointments, as well as injectable solutions. The specific use and dosage depend on the condition being treated and the individual patient's medical history and current health status.

As with any medication, hydrocortisone can have side effects, especially when used in high doses or for extended periods. Common side effects include increased appetite, weight gain, mood changes, insomnia, and skin thinning. Long-term use of hydrocortisone may also increase the risk of developing osteoporosis, diabetes, cataracts, and other health problems. Therefore, it is essential to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when using this medication.

Distinguishing between human lymphocyte subsets. Identification of cone cell inner and outer segments and to a lesser extent ...
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September 2020). "Dynamic changes in peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in adult patients with COVID-19". International ... It is well known that a SARS-CoV-2 infection induces a decreased lymphocyte count, and those with a lower lymphocyte count ... The authors pointed out that the lymphocyte count recovered to normal after 4 days. Low lymphocyte count could be a significant ... Zhang HJ, Qi GQ, Gu X, Zhang XY, Fang YF, Jiang H, Zhao YJ (July 2021). "Lymphocyte blood levels that remain low can predict ...
el-Demiry M, James K (1988). "Lymphocyte subsets and macrophages in the male genital tract in health and disease. A monoclonal ... effects of activin and transforming growth factor beta on lymphocyte subsets in vitro". Biology of Reproduction. 58 (4): 943- ... T-lymphocytes (T-cells) are white blood cells which take part in cell-mediated immunity. They are often found within tissues ... B-lymphocytes take part in the adaptive immune response and produce antibodies. These cells are not normally found in the ...
August 2020). "Lymphocyte Subset Counts in COVID-19 Patients: A Meta-Analysis". Cytometry. Part A. 97 (8): 772-776. doi:10.1002 ... Sallusto F, Lenig D, Förster R, Lipp M, Lanzavecchia A (October 1999). "Two subsets of memory T lymphocytes with distinct ... revealed that another T helper subset may exist. Th9 cells are claimed to be an IL9 (interleukin 9)-producing T cell subset ... These effects are primarily due to the loss of any helper T cell that can interact with the B lymphocyte correctly. Another ...
Poussier, P., et al., Lymphopenia and abnormal lymphocyte subsets in the "BB" rat: relationship to the diabetic syndrome. ...
"Transitional Type 1 and 2 B Lymphocyte Subsets Are Differentially Responsive to Antigen Receptor Signaling". J. Biol. Chem. 277 ... Chung JB, Sater RA, Fields ML, Erikson J, Monroe JG (2002). "CD23 defines two distinct subsets of immature B cells which differ ... T1 B cells are distinguished from the other subsets by the following surface marker characteristics: they are IgMhiIgD−CD21− ... B cells, Lymphocytes, Bone marrow, Human cells, Immunology, Immune system). ...
He was among those who defined the subsets of human B lymphocytes. These studies led to a redefinition of many human B cell ... "Analysis of somatic mutation in five B cell subsets of human tonsil". The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 180 (1): 329-339. ... "Receptor revision of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region genes in normal human B lymphocytes". The Journal of ...
1996;17(2):197-9. PMID 8936281 Differences in intraepithelial lymphocyte t cell subsets isolated from murine small versus large ... his research was on experimental models of hapten-induced Inflammatory bowel disease and studying intraepithelial lymphocytes. ...
Sallusto, F.; Lenig, D.; Förster, R.; Lipp, M.; Lanzavecchia, A. (1999). "Two subsets of memory T lymphocytes with distinct ... Viola, A.; Schroeder, S.; Sakakibara, S.; Lanzavecchia, A. (1999). "T lymphocyte costimulation mediated by reorganization of ... lymphocyte activation and immunological memory and iii) human monoclonal antibodies. In 1985, using antigen-specific T and B ... and discovered a fundamental division of memory T cells into two major subsets of central memory and effector memory and ...
"Two subsets of memory T lymphocytes with distinct homing potentials and effector functions." Nature 401.6754 (1999): 708. ...
Sallusto F, Lenig D, Förster R, Lipp M, Lanzavecchia A (1999). "Two subsets of memory T lymphocytes with distinct homing ... These two subsets were previously called "naturally occurring" and "adaptive" (or "induced"), respectively. Both subsets ... Gamma delta T cells (γδ T cells) represent a small subset of T cells which possess a γδ TCR rather than the αβ TCR on the cell ... T cell subsets were initially defined by function, but also have associated gene or protein expression patterns. T helper cells ...
... s are a subset of T lymphocytes that might have some of the same functions as memory B cells. Their lineage is ... Sallusto F, Lenig D, Förster R, Lipp M, Lanzavecchia A (October 1999). "Two subsets of memory T lymphocytes with distinct ... Those lymphocytes are capable of self-renewal as are the TCM lymphocytes and are also capable of generating both the TCM and ... subsets. Although most information is currently based on observations in the cytotoxic T cells (CD8-positive) subset, similar ...
885-895 Han S, Dillon SR... Kelsoe G (1997). V(D)J recombinase activity in a subset of germinal center B lymphocytes. Science. ... Kelsoe's research focuses on humoral immunity, B lymphocyte development and activation, and the mechanism by which lymphocytes ...
This selective inhibition is not observed in conventional chemotherapy which reduces the number of all lymphocyte subsets. In ...
"Distribution of cyclophilin B-binding sites in the subsets of human peripheral blood lymphocytes". Immunology. 91 (4): 609-17. ... This protein can bind to cells derived from T- and B-lymphocytes, and may regulate cyclosporine A-mediated immunosuppression. ... recognized by HLA-A24-restricted and tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes which could be used as cancer vaccines, and in fact ...
Effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide on tumor microenvironment T-lymphocyte subsets and dendritic cells in H22-bearing ...
Harris MT, Schwarting GA, Stout RD (September 1981). "Selective expression of asialo GM1 on maturational subsets of lymphocytes ... 15 July 1997). "Functional and phenotypic characterization of cord blood and bone marrow subsets expressing FLT3 (CD135) ... in vivo differentiation into lymphocytes and potential for germ line transmission". FEBS Letters. 455 (1-2): 101-4. doi:10.1016 ...
In jawless fishes, two subsets of lymphocytes use variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) for antigen binding. Diversity is ... T and B lymphocytes are the cells of the adaptive immune system. The human body has about 2 trillion lymphocytes, which are 20- ... Lymphocyte receptors, Ig and TCR, are found in all jawed vertebrates. The most ancient Ig class, IgM, is membrane-bound and ... Cytotoxic T cells (also known as TC, killer T cell, or cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL)) are a sub-group of T cells that induce the ...
There are no major changes in the T-lymphocytes subsets of the mesenterial lymph node. Instead γδ-T cells guide the immune ... Antigens of C. oncophora larvae and adult worms are capable of triggering lymphocyte proliferation. Moreover, excretory/ ... Primary infection does not involve recruitment of specific lymphocytes to the intestinal mucosa. ...
PTSAgs induce the VB-specific expansion of both CD4 and CD8- subsets of T-lymphocytes. TSST-1 forms homodimers in most of its ...
"Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes ... Tumor infiltrating lymphocyte entry in the public domain NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms Lion Biotechnologies, Inc. (Lymphocytes ... CD8+-Enriched Autologous Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes Following a Lymphocyte Depleting Regimen in Metastatic Digestive Tract ... Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are white blood cells that have left the bloodstream and migrated towards a tumor. They ...
2001a;97:319-327 Lymphocyte phenotype subsets in the cerebrospinal fluid of normal horses and horses with equine protozoal ...
"The Monoclonal Antimonocyte Antibody My4 Stains B Lymphocytes and Two Distinct Monocyte Subsets in Human Peripheral Blood". ... The first clear description of monocyte subsets by flow cytometry dates back to the late 1980s, when a population of CD16- ... Analysis of monocyte subsets has demonstrated predominance of classical monocytes and absence of CD14lowCD16+ monocytes. The ... Both may be useful, but these cells became valid diagnostic tools only when monocyte subsets are determined. Monocytic cells ...
Knockout mice that lack TOX have a severe defect in development of certain subsets of T lymphocytes. TOX is necessary for T ... Patients with cancer typically have high levels of TOX in their tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and anti-tumor immunity is ... TOX is highly expressed in the thymus, the site of development of T lymphocytes. ...
Berrington JE, Barge D, Fenton AC, Cant AJ, Spickett GP (May 2005). "Lymphocyte subsets in term and significantly preterm UK ... The two main types of lymphocytes are B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes. B lymphocytes make antibodies, and T lymphocytes help ... A lymphocyte is a type of white blood cell (leukocyte) in the immune system of most vertebrates. Lymphocytes include T cells ( ... A lymphocyte count is usually part of a peripheral complete blood cell count and is expressed as the percentage of lymphocytes ...
... differential signaling requirements for activation of assembled cyclin D3-cdk4 complexes in B-1 and B-2 lymphocyte subsets". ...
Ademmer; Ebert; Müller-Ostermeyer; Friess; Büchler; Schubert; Malfertheiner (April 1998). "Effector T lymphocyte subsets in ... 2006). "Profiling lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood under efalizumab treatment of psoriasis by multi epitope ligand ... "Automatic Recognition of Muscle-Invasive T-Lymphocytes Expressing Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV (CD26) and Analysis of the Associated ... "Poisson Numbers and Poisson Distributions in Subset Surprisology". Annals of Combinatorics. 8 (4): 473-485. doi:10.1007/s00026- ...
"In Vitro Measles Virus Infection of Human Lymphocyte Subsets Demonstrates High Susceptibility and Permissiveness of both Naive ... In the later stages of infection, the virus infects other immune cell types, including B cells and T lymphocytes also via ... Three receptors for the H protein have been identified to date: complement regulatory molecule CD46, the signaling lymphocyte ...
... these specific transcription factors activate or repress target genes critical in the differentiation of the lymphocyte subsets ... Studies have confirmed the ability of some ILC subsets to convert into a different subset in the presence of specific cytokines ... There are two subsets of ILC3s, NCR- and NCR+ ILC3s, with the displayed NCR on mice ILC3s being NKp46, in comparison to NKp44 ... All ILC subsets are present in the liver and regulate the immune response to protect the tissue from viral and bacterial ...
High impact information on Lymphocyte Subsets. *A relative simple lymphocyte-subset analysis was possible in decalcified ... FACS monitoring of lymphocyte-subsets in patients with discoid and subacute-cutaneous lupus erythematosus receiving low-dose ... Flow cytometry showed a significant higher number of the lymphocyte-subsets CD3, DR+ and CD4 in GD-ITL as compared to the ... Effect of Graves intrathyroidal lymphocytes. Effect of Graves disease intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) on xenotransplants of ...
TBBS: QN Lymphocyte Subsets (T, B and NK (CD45 Total Lymph Count, CD3 (T Cells), CD4 (T Cells); CD8 (T-Cells), CD19 (B-Cells), ...
During the initial phase of the disease, patients demonstrated an increase in the total lymphocyte counts (CD3). The ... Peripheral blood lymphocytes were analyzed using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled CD3, CD4, CD8, CD14, CD19, CD45, ... This prospective study was designed to investigate lymphocyte subsets in acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). ... TEKELİOĞLU, YAVUZ; MOCAN, HİLAL; MOCAN, M. ZİYA; and ERSÖZ, H. ÖNDER (2000) "Lymphocyte Subsets in Acute Post-Streptococcal ...
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) and lymphocyte subset (LS) content of approximately 8000 CB ... Characterization of Banked Umbilical Cord Blood Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells (HPC) and Lymphocyte Subsets (LS) and ...
Representative gating strategy to identify T lymphocyte (A-N) and B lymphocyte (O-X) subsets. Posted on January 27, 2022. By ... Representative gating strategy to identify T lymphocyte (A-N) and B lymphocyte (O-X) subsets. HC with a value ?0.05. The ... cytotoxic T lymphocyte; Treg cell, regulatory T cell; Breg cell, regulatory B cell T lymphocyte The percentage of CD4+ T cells ... Treg cell, regulatory T cell; Tc cell, cytotoxic T lymphocyte; Tfh cell, follicular helper T cell; B10 cell, IL-10 producing ...
The technical storage or access that is used exclusively for statistical purposes. The technical storage or access that is used exclusively for anonymous statistical purposes. Without a subpoena, voluntary compliance on the part of your Internet Service Provider, or additional records from a third party, information stored or retrieved for this purpose alone cannot usually be used to identify you. ...
To more fully phenotypically characterize the lymphocyte subsets that are most influenced by dietary CLA supplementation and to ... The peripheral CD8+ lymphocyte subpopulation includes four distinct cell subsets: TCRgammadeltaCD8alphaalpha T cells, CD3 -- ... We found that as dietary CLA increases there is a linear increase in percentage of CD8 + peripheral lymphocytes (21.7, 22.3, ... CLA synergized with a Brachyspira hyodysenteriae bacterin vaccine to expand the TCRgammadeltaCD8alphaalpha and NK cell subsets ...
... and lymphocyte subsets were separately evaluated in these patients. Lymphocyte populations in cancer patients were compared to ... and lymphocyte subsets were separately evaluated in these patients. Lymphocyte populations in cancer patients were compared to ... and lymphocyte subsets were separately evaluated in these patients. Lymphocyte populations in cancer patients were compared to ... and lymphocyte subsets were separately evaluated in these patients. Lymphocyte populations in cancer patients were compared to ...
Cells - B-Lymphocyte Subsets PubMed MeSh Term *Overview. Overview. subject area of * Generation of Protective T Cell- ...
Altered T-lymphocyte subsets in hospitalized intravenous drug abusers. / Layon, J.; Idris, A.; Warzynski, M. et al. In: ... Altered T-lymphocyte subsets in hospitalized intravenous drug abusers. J. Layon, A. Idris, M. Warzynski, R. Sherer, D. Brauner ... Altered T-lymphocyte subsets in hospitalized intravenous drug abusers. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1984 ; Vol. 144, No. ... Altered T-lymphocyte subsets in hospitalized intravenous drug abusers. Archives of Internal Medicine. 1984;144(7):1376-1380. ...
Leucoagglutinin induces differential proliferation of lymphocyte subsets. S. P. Goedegebuure, R. J. van de Griend, C. P.M. ... Leucoagglutinin induces differential proliferation of lymphocyte subsets. / Goedegebuure, S. P.; van de Griend, R. J.; ... Leucoagglutinin induces differential proliferation of lymphocyte subsets. In: Biotherapy. 1989 ; Vol. 1, No. 1-2. pp. 73-83. ... Leucoagglutinin induces differential proliferation of lymphocyte subsets. Biotherapy. 1989 Mar;1(1-2):73-83. doi: 10.1007/ ...
McNerlan, S.E. ; Alexander, H.D. ; Rea, I.M. / Age-related reference intervals for lymphocyte subsets in whole blood of healthy ... McNerlan, S. E., Alexander, H. D., & Rea, I. M. (1999). Age-related reference intervals for lymphocyte subsets in whole blood ... Age-related reference intervals for lymphocyte subsets in whole blood of healthy individuals. / McNerlan, S.E.; Alexander, H.D ... McNerlan, SE, Alexander, HD & Rea, IM 1999, Age-related reference intervals for lymphocyte subsets in whole blood of healthy ...
Distinguishing between human lymphocyte subsets. Identification of cone cell inner and outer segments and to a lesser extent ...
The cause of the change in percentage of lymphocyte subsets with age, and the different effects on males and females is not ... this study to see if there were differences between males and females in the frequency of the different lymphocyte subsets with ... There is reported to be a decline in immune function and an alteration in the frequency of circulating lymphocytes with ... To investigate the effects of age and gender on human lymphocyte populations, we studied lymphocyte subsets and their ...
... conventional CD4+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in most patients and higher clonality by TCRβ sequencing. Analyses of ... The secondary objective was to assess the effect of anti-OX40 on lymphocyte subsets in the tumor and blood. Neoadjuvant anti- ... The secondary objective was to assess the effect of anti-OX40 on lymphocyte subsets in the tumor and blood. Neoadjuvant anti- ... conventional CD4+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in most patients and higher clonality by TCRβ sequencing. Analyses of ...
T lymphocyte subsets; clinical diagnosis; immunoglobulins; signaling lymphocyte activation molecule ... Association of SH2 domain-containing protein 1A, immunoglobulins and T lymphocyte subsets with Epstein- Barr virus infections. ... Association of SH2 domain-containing protein 1A, immunoglobulins and T lymphocyte subsets ... We aimed to analyze the levels and associations of SH2 domain-containing protein 1A (SH2D1A), immunoglobulins and T lymphocyte ...
Various subsets of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells with different cytokine productions develop in the mouse thymus, but ... Lymphocyte Subsets / metabolism * Mice, Inbred BALB C * Mutation / genetics* * Natural Killer T-Cells / immunology* ... Various subsets of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells with different cytokine productions develop in the mouse thymus, but ...
ILC subsets positive for interleukin-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα) produce distinct sets of effector cytokines. However, the molecular ... Similar to CD4(+) T helper (Th) cell subsets, ... Lymphocyte Subsets / immunology * Lymphocyte Subsets / ... Similar to CD4(+) T helper (Th) cell subsets, ILC subsets positive for interleukin-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα) produce distinct sets ... Here, we report that GATA3 was indispensable for the development of all IL-7Rα(+) ILC subsets and T cells but was not required ...
Homeostasis of IL-15 dependent lymphocyte subsets in the liver. Cytokine 2016 Jun;82:95-101. Date. 01/19/2016. Pubmed ID. ... Thus, homeostasis of IL-15-dependent lymphocyte subsets is also regulated by trans-presentation of IL-15 by non-hematopoietic ... CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes. Dendritic Cells. Homeostasis. Interleukin-15. Liver. Macrophages. Mice. Mice, Knockout. Receptors, ... T cell subsets. Here we show that hepatocyte and macrophage- specific expression of IL-15Rα is required to maintain the ...
Lymphocyte subsets were defined as the following combinations: CD3+/CD45+ for CD3 T-lymphocytes; CD3+/CD4/+/CD45+ for CD4 T- ... lymphocytes; CD3+/CD8+/CD45+ for CD8 T-lymphocytes; CD19+/CD45+ for B-lymphocytes; and CD3+/CD(16+56)+/CD45+ for natural killer ... Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets for 28 patients with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 at hospitalization, ...
Correlations between change in disease activity and changes in peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in patients with juvenile ... title = "Correlations between change in disease activity and changes in peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in patients with ... Correlations between change in disease activity and changes in peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in patients with juvenile ... T1 - Correlations between change in disease activity and changes in peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in patients with ...
Features of effector lymphocyte subsets in patients with uveal melanoma in recurrent and chronic herpesvirus infection - PDF ( ... Home , Archives , Vol 11, No 6 (2021) , Features of effector lymphocyte subsets in patients with uveal melanoma in recurrent ...
Concanavalin A-stimulated proliferation of T cell subset-depleted lymphocyte populations isolated from Fasciola hepatica- ... Concanavalin A-stimulated proliferation of T cell subset-depleted lymphocyte populations isolated from Fasciola hepatica- ...
... in lymphocyte subsets, B lymphocytes and CD 8 T lymphocytes ratios were found to decrease. In addition, CD 3 T lymphocyte ... Investigation on the relationship between lymphocyte subsets, immunoglobulin levels and adenosine deaminase activities in ... lymphocyte, and monocyte ratios were decrease when these values were compared to changes between days. Furthermore, ... ratios decreased on the 61 d and CD 4 T lymphocyte ratios increased on the 21, 41, 51 and 61 d. IgM and IgG levels decreased ...
The mechanism was perhaps related to inhibiting lymphocyte apoptosis and promoting the balance of Th1/Th2 cell subsets. ... increased the proportion of S phase and G2/M phase in peripheral blood lymphocytes, increased the counts of CD4+ T cells and ... the ratio of CD4+/CD8+, and reduced the inhibition rate of splenic lymphocytes. MP affected the production of cytokines by ... lymphocyte cycle, and proliferation, cytokine, and protein expression levels. ,i,Results,/i,. The weight loss and immune organ ...
Essential roles of SATB1 in specifying T lymphocyte subsets. Cell Rep. 19, 1176-1188 (2017). ... 6a, b). The specific increase of lung CD69+ Trm T-cell subset by the loss of CCL5 suggests that Trm T-cell populations in the ... In addition, we observe a proportional increase of CD44+ CD69+ Trm T subset in the lungs by the loss of CCL5 expression. ... Currently, the precise function of CD44+ CD103−CD69+ Trm T-cell subset in lungs remains unclear, even though it is hypothesized ...
CD27, a lymphocyte-specific member of the TNF/NGF-R family, is expressed on the majority of peripheral blood T cells. ... Regulation of CD27 expression on subsets of mature T-lymphocytes. R Q Hintzen; R Q Hintzen ... CD45RA-CD45RO+ subset lacks the molecule. In contrast, within the CD8+ compartment CD27- subsets were found both in the CD45RA+ ... R Q Hintzen, R de Jong, S M Lens, M Brouwer, P Baars, R A van Lier; Regulation of CD27 expression on subsets of mature T- ...
ZAP-70 is expressed by a subset of normal human B-lymphocytes displaying an activated phenotype. / Nolz, J. C.; Tschumper, R. C ... ZAP-70 is expressed by a subset of normal human B-lymphocytes displaying an activated phenotype. Leukemia. 2005 Jun;19(6):1018- ... ZAP-70 is expressed by a subset of normal human B-lymphocytes displaying an activated phenotype. In: Leukemia. 2005 ; Vol. 19, ... Dive into the research topics of ZAP-70 is expressed by a subset of normal human B-lymphocytes displaying an activated ...
Lui et al find that regarding the analysis of lymphocyte subsets in HIV-infected patients, the number of CD3+ and CD8+ ... Analysis of lymphocyte subsets in HIV-negative neurosyphilis patients. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2013 Feb. 75(2):165-8. [QxMD ... Which findings on lymphocyte analysis of HIV infected patients suggest neurosyphilis?. What are the recommendations for follow- ... lymphocytes was higher in the neurosyphilis patients than in controls and that the number of natural killer cells in the ...
  • Levels of lymphocyte subsets were determined by flow cytometry. (providence.org)
  • Also, whole blood was recovered, and the number of circulating total leukocytes, as well as specific lymphocyte subsets, was determined by flow cytometry. (cdc.gov)
  • Production of interferons and change of the lymphocyte subpopulation phenotype in peripheral blood at cervical papillomavirus infection. (wikigenes.org)
  • 001). The peripheral CD8+ lymphocyte subpopulation includes four distinct cell subsets: TCRgammadeltaCD8alphaalpha T cells, CD3 --CD8alphaalpha lymphocytes (NK cells) and TCRalphabetaCD8alphabeta T cells, and TCRalphabetaCD4+CD8alphaalpha, and putatively TCRalphabetaCD4 --CD8alphaalpha T cells. (iastate.edu)
  • Our data demonstrate that ZAP-70 is expressed in a subpopulation of tonsillar and splenic normal B-lymphocytes that express an activated phenotype. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Enumeration of CD4+ lymphocytes in HIV-positive participants and age-matched controls was performed on cryopreserved whole blood using the method reported by Fiebig et. (cdc.gov)
  • De Paoli P, Reitano M, Battistin S, Castiglia C, Santini G. Enumeration of human lymphocyte subsets by monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry: a comparative study using whole blood or mononuclear cells separated by density gradient centrifugation. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • Comparison of tumor biopsies before and after treatment reveals an increase of activated, conventional CD4+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in most patients and higher clonality by TCRβ sequencing. (bepress.com)
  • Researchers determined that the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) present in esophageal cancer tumors correlated with patient long-term survival rates. (sciencedaily.com)
  • A subset of these are called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). (sciencedaily.com)
  • CD45 lymphocyte count was designated the total lymphocyte count. (cdc.gov)
  • Ly6C high MC exhibited activated neutrophil degranulation, lysosome, cytokine production/receptor interaction and myeloid cell activation pathways, and Ly6C low MC presented features of lymphocyte immunity pathways in both mice. (frontiersin.org)
  • Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection results from 1 of 2 similar retroviruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) that destroy CD4+ lymphocytes and impair cell-mediated immunity, increasing risk of certain. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Murine MC are divided into three subsets based on surface expression of lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus C (Ly6C) ( 3 , 4 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Lymphocyte populations in cancer patients were compared to those of nonsmokers and a smoking patient population. (elsevierpure.com)
  • To investigate the effects of age and gender on human lymphocyte populations, we studied lymphocyte subsets and their expression of activation markers in peripheral blood in healthy people above the age of 21, and analyzed this according to gender. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Evidence from this study indicates that pulmonary exposure to certain welding fumes cause decrements in systemic immune cell populations, specifically circulating T-lymphocytes, and these alterations in immune cell number are not dependent exclusively on Mn, but likely a combination of other metals present in welding fume. (cdc.gov)
  • Breg cell, regulatory B cell T lymphocyte The percentage of CD4+ T cells at different stages of differentiation were calculated, and significant differences between the AS patients and HCs are shown in Fig.?2. (scienza-under-18.org)
  • B10 cell, IL-10 producing regulatory B cell The number of regulatory lymphocytes detected in the blood of the AS patients changed significantly after Anbainuo treatment, with the percentage of Treg FLJ20315 cells (CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127? (scienza-under-18.org)
  • Altered cellular immune function has been demonstrated in patients with lung cancer, including decreased numbers of circulating lymphocytes and changes in the percentage of lymphocytes in various functional subsets. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The cause of the change in percentage of lymphocyte subsets with age, and the different effects on males and females is not fully understood but warrants further study. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Changes in the percentage of peripheral blood CD 19 positive lymphocytes (B cells) correlated with changes in disease activity (Spearman rank coefficients = 0.47, p = 0.02). (northwestern.edu)
  • With CD45 gating, the relative numbers of beads and lymphocyte subsets are enumerated, and their absolute numbers and percentage values are calculated. (cdc.gov)
  • Single-platform technology (SPT) is designed to enable de- system and managing the health care of persons infected with terminations of both absolute and percentage lymphocyte sub- human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ( 1-4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Various subsets of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells with different cytokine productions develop in the mouse thymus, but the factors driving their differentiation remain unclear. (nih.gov)
  • We hypothesized that CLA modifies peripheral lymphocyte phenotype, regardless of the environment. (iastate.edu)
  • Owing to the prognostic value of B-CLL ZAP-70 expression, this phenotype may reflect intrinsic biological differences between the two subsets of disease. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Effect of Graves' disease intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) on xenotransplants of human thyroid tissue in athymic nude mice. (wikigenes.org)
  • This study aims to explore molecule signaling mediating MC subset differentiation in HHcy and control mice. (frontiersin.org)
  • Ly6C high MC expressed higher levels of macrophage (MΦ) markers, whereas, Ly6C low MC highly expressed lymphocyte markers in both mice. (frontiersin.org)
  • HHcy in Cbs -/- mice reinforced inflammatory features in Ly6C high MC by upregulating inflammatory TFs ( Ets1 and Tbx21 ) and strengthened lymphocytes functional adaptation in Ly6C low MC by increased expression of CD3, DR3, ICOS, and Fos . (frontiersin.org)
  • The levels of SH2D1A, signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) and SLAM-associated protein (SAP) were significantly higher in the IM group than those in the control and CAEBV groups (P (bvsalud.org)
  • In agreement with earlier findings, all CD4+CD45RA+CD45RO- T cells were found to express CD27, whereas a small fraction of the CD4+CD45RA-CD45RO+ subset lacks the molecule. (aai.org)
  • Identification of a molecule uniquely expressed on a gamma/delta TCR+ subset within bovine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Phenotypic analysis of lymphocyte subsets and apoptosis were evaluated with flow cytometry. (karger.com)
  • Serum from145 iGCTs patients were collected and lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. (researchsquare.com)
  • Lymphocyte subset analysis by flow cytometry. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • Clinical Applications of Flow Cytometry: Quality Assurance and Immunophenotyping of Lymphocytes: Approved Guideline. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • Lymphocyte immunophenotyping by flow cytometry in normal adults: comparison of fresh whole blood lysis technique, Ficoll-Paque separation and cryopreservation. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • In this study we have established culture conditions that allow the preferential and rapid expansion of either T cell receptor (TCR) + /CD3 + 16 - T lymphocytes or TCR - /CD3 - 16 - natural killer (NK) cells, or the non-selective outgrowth of both subsets. (wustl.edu)
  • In seven patients (44%), the abnormal ratio resulted from an increase in the absolute number of suppressor cells with a normal number of helper T lymphocytes. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Here, we report that GATA3 was indispensable for the development of all IL-7Rα(+) ILC subsets and T cells but was not required for the development of classical natural killer cells. (nih.gov)
  • Thus, homeostasis of IL-15-dependent lymphocyte subsets is also regulated by trans-presentation of IL-15 by non-hematopoietic cells in the tissue environment. (mcw.edu)
  • However, it remains unclear whether CLL-B cells aberrantly acquire ZAP-70 expression during the transformation process or whether ZAP-70 may be expressed under certain conditions in normal human B-lymphocytes. (elsevierpure.com)
  • CD4+ T-cells and other lymphocyte subsets in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). (cdc.gov)
  • Furthermore, MP increased WBC and HGB counts and reduced the ratio of G0/G1 phase obviously, increased the proportion of S phase and G2/M phase in peripheral blood lymphocytes, increased the counts of CD4+ T cells and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+, and reduced the inhibition rate of splenic lymphocytes. (hindawi.com)
  • Recent studies using neutralizing anti-CCL5 antibodies have suggested that the constitutive expression of CCL5 plays a regulatory role in maintaining tissue-resident memory (Trm) T cells in the human vaginal tract 9 and mouse skin 10 , suggesting that constitutive CCL5 expression in noninflamed conditions, hereafter referred to as homeostatic CCL5 expression, might be important for homeostasis of tissue-resident lymphocytes. (nature.com)
  • CD27, a lymphocyte-specific member of the TNF/NGF-R family, is expressed on the majority of peripheral blood T cells. (aai.org)
  • There is evidence that also in vivo, CD4+ cells that have persistently been stimulated by Ag, accumulate within the CD45RA-CD27- subset. (aai.org)
  • HIV infection is characterized by a decrease and, eventually, a depletion of CD4+ T-lymphocytes (helper T cells). (cdc.gov)
  • Using immunophenotyping, HIV-positive blood samples and age-matched controls were tested for the proportion of lymphocytes that are T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, CD4+ T cells (helper T cells), and CD8+ T cells (suppressor/inducer T cells). (cdc.gov)
  • Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis is known to persist within granulomas, distinct lesions represented by a caseonecrotic core surrounded by epithelioid macrophages, T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, Langhans-type multinucleated giant cells and fibroblasts. (usda.gov)
  • and (iii) the dramatic reductions to lymphocyte numbers and function 1-2 h after exercise reflects a transient and time-dependent redistribution of immune cells to peripheral tissues, resulting in a heightened state of immune surveillance and immune regulation, as opposed to immune suppression. (frontiersin.org)
  • about 75% of the lymphocytes are T cells, 20% B cells, and 5% NK cells. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The mechanism was perhaps related to inhibiting lymphocyte apoptosis and promoting the balance of Th1/Th2 cell subsets. (hindawi.com)
  • SH2D1A was positively correlated with immunoglobulin A , immunoglobulin G and TL subsets (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+) (P (bvsalud.org)
  • Optimal proliferation of lymphocytes was obtained using a combination of irradiated allogeneic peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and irradiated Epstein Barr virus (EBV) transformed lymphoblastoid B cell lines (B-LCL). (wustl.edu)
  • 3. Lopez-Gonzalez MA, Lucas M, Sanchez B, Mata F, Delgado F. Adenoidal and tonsillar lymphocyte subsets in AIDS children. (bvsalud.org)
  • It is common to evaluate lymphocytes subsets in virus infection, immunodeficiency diseases and cancer. (researchsquare.com)
  • Kidd P, Vogt R. Report of the workshop on the evaluation of T-cell subsets during HIV infection and AIDS. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • In acute viremia due to HIV or other viruses, lymphocytes may undergo accelerated destruction from active infection with the virus, may be trapped in the spleen or lymph nodes, or may migrate to the respiratory tract. (msdmanuals.com)
  • STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) and lymphocyte subset (LS) content of approximately 8000 CB units were characterized, and these results were correlated with donor ethnicity, birth weight, gestational age, sex, and type of delivery. (emmes.com)
  • Monocyte subsets display age-dependent alterations at fasting and undergo non-age-dependent changes following consumption of a meal. (usda.gov)
  • polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and neutrophil ratios increased and eosinophil, mononuclear leukocytes, lymphocyte, and monocyte ratios were decrease when these values were compared to changes between days. (yyu.edu.tr)
  • If the complete blood count reveals lymphocytopenia, testing for immunodeficiency and analysis of lymphocyte subpopulations should follow, usually after the patient has recovered from any acute event. (msdmanuals.com)
  • To more fully phenotypically characterize the lymphocyte subsets that are most influenced by dietary CLA supplementation and to elucidate the functional implications of their expansion, we conducted the second experiment. (iastate.edu)
  • Finally, we established 3 groups of transcriptional models to describe Ly6C high to Ly6C low MC subset differentiation, immune checkpoint regulation, Ly6C high MC to MΦ subset differentiation and Ly6C low MC to lymphocyte functional adaptation. (frontiersin.org)
  • HHcy reinforced inflammatory feature in Ly6C high MC and strengthened lymphocytes functional adaptation in Ly6C low MC. (frontiersin.org)
  • Regulation of CD27 expression on subsets of mature T-lymphocytes. (aai.org)
  • This study was undertaken to analyze the regulation of CD27 on different T-cell subsets and to determine whether the loss of CD27 expression is an irreversible event and may thereby mark T-cell differentiation. (aai.org)
  • This study retrospectively analyzed serum lymphocyte subsets and survival outcomes in intracranial germ cell tumors (iGCTs) patients. (researchsquare.com)
  • Lesions at all time-points contained large numbers of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with lesser numbers of CD8+ T-lymphocytes and few gamma/delta T-lymphocytes. (usda.gov)
  • During the initial phase of the disease, patients demonstrated an increase in the total lymphocyte counts (CD3). (tubitak.gov.tr)
  • We quantitated lymphocyte subsets in 54 patients with lung cancer including patients with limited (stages 1 and 2) nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, n = 23), advanced (stage 3) NSCLC (n = 16), and small cell cancer (SCLC, n = 15). (elsevierpure.com)
  • Serum albumin was decreased in 15 lung cancer patients, and lymphocyte subsets were separately evaluated in these patients. (elsevierpure.com)
  • A decrease in population of T-lymphocytes subsets is frequent in patients with SCLC, advanced NSCLC, and lung cancer patients with hypoalbuminemia. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Eisenstein, DM, O'Gorman, MRG & Pachman, LM 1997, ' Correlations between change in disease activity and changes in peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis ', Journal of Rheumatology , vol. 24, no. 9, pp. 1830-1832. (northwestern.edu)
  • Lymphocyte B and T cell subsets in peripheral blood from patients with asbestosis. (bmj.com)
  • The guidelines describe single-platform technology (SPT), a process in which absolute counts of lymphocyte subsets are measured from a single tube by a single instrument. (cdc.gov)
  • To investigate whether changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes correlate with changes in disease activity in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). (northwestern.edu)
  • It is important to note that the lymphocytes in the blood represent only a small proportion of the total lymphocyte pool, and the lymphocyte count may not always correlate with the composition and numbers of lymphocytes in other lymphoid (eg, nodes, spleen) and non-lymphoid (eg, lung, liver) tissues. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In contrast, within the CD8+ compartment CD27- subsets were found both in the CD45RA+ and CD45RA- subpopulations. (aai.org)
  • Circulating activated lymphocyte subsets as potential blood biomarkers of cancer progression. (providence.org)
  • The objective of this study was to predict the value of lymphocyte subsets in cancer progression. (providence.org)
  • Distinguishing between human lymphocyte subsets. (wikipedia.org)
  • To discriminate between these two possibilities, we assessed ZAP-70 expression in normal human B-lymphocytes. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Ly6C high MC is the pro-inflammatory subset and the counterpart of human CD14 ++ CD16 + intermediate MC which contributes to systemic and tissue inflammation in various metabolic disorders, including hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy). (frontiersin.org)
  • Human MC were initially divided into three subsets based on the cell surface expression of CD14 and CD16, and recently classified based on CD40 expression ( 2 - 5 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Murine Ly6C high and Ly6C middle MC subsets perform pro-inflammatory functions, which are considered the counterpart of human CD14 ++ CD16 + intermediate MC or CD14 + CD40 + inflammatory MC ( 4 , 5 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • To understand the correlation between changes in disease status (including CRP, BASDAI, and ASDAS) and changes in lymphocyte frequency after Anbainuo therapy, Spearmans rank correlation analyses showed that the decrease in CRP was positively correlated with the increase in the frequency of Tregs (CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127? (scienza-under-18.org)
  • Clinical changes in disease expression measured by a disease activity score were correlated with changes in percentages of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets. (northwestern.edu)
  • There were no significant correlations in disease activity with changes of T cell subsets or the T cell activation markers CD25 or DR. Conclusion. (northwestern.edu)
  • Because lymphocytes account for only 20 to 40% of the total white blood cell (WBC) count, lymphocytopenia may go unnoticed if the WBC count is checked without a differential. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Dynamic monitoring of serum lymphocyte subsets can be used as an auxiliary indicator for prognosis judgment. (researchsquare.com)
  • McNerlan, SE, Alexander, HD & Rea, IM 1999, ' Age-related reference intervals for lymphocyte subsets in whole blood of healthy individuals ', Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation , vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 89-92. (ulster.ac.uk)
  • Circulating activated lymphocyte subsets as potential blood biomarkers" by Ying-Yi Wang, Na Zhou et al. (providence.org)
  • The secondary objective was to assess the effect of anti-OX40 on lymphocyte subsets in the tumor and blood. (bepress.com)
  • Influence of racial background on the distribution of T-cell subsets and Leu 11-positive lymphocytes in healthy blood donors. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • The welding fume with the lower concentration of Mn had no significant effect on the numbers of blood lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets compared to control values. (cdc.gov)
  • Cumulative physiological stress is associated with age-related changes to peripheral T lymphocyte subsets in healthy humans. (usda.gov)
  • There is reported to be a decline in immune function and an alteration in the frequency of circulating lymphocytes with advancing age. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Homeostasis of IL-15 dependent lymphocyte subsets in the liver. (mcw.edu)
  • The number of leukocyte subsets, granulocyte and lymphocyte were also regulated by dose dependent manner. (scirp.org)
  • In addition, the same group expressed significant decreases in the number of circulating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes after a single exposure, and significant reductions in the number of circulating total lymphocytes, primarily CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes, after repeated exposures (compared to control values). (cdc.gov)