Axinella: A genus of SPONGES in the family Axinellidae, comprised of a choanosomal skeleton differentiated in the axial and extra-axial region. The type species is Axinella polypoides.Porifera: The phylum of sponges which are sessile, suspension-feeding, multicellular animals that utilize flagellated cells called choanocytes to circulate water. Most are hermaphroditic. They are probably an early evolutionary side branch that gave rise to no other group of animals. Except for about 150 freshwater species, sponges are marine animals. They are a source of ALKALOIDS; STEROLS; and other complex molecules useful in medicine and biological research.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Astronomy: The science concerned with celestial bodies and the observation and interpretation of the radiation received in the vicinity of the earth from the component parts of the universe (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Natural Science Disciplines: The sciences dealing with processes observable in nature.Vesicovaginal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the URINARY BLADDER and the VAGINA.Williams Syndrome: A disorder caused by hemizygous microdeletion of about 28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, including the ELASTIN gene. Clinical manifestations include SUPRAVALVULAR AORTIC STENOSIS; MENTAL RETARDATION; elfin facies; impaired visuospatial constructive abilities; and transient HYPERCALCEMIA in infancy. The condition affects both sexes, with onset at birth or in early infancy.HistoryAttentional Blink: Temporary visual deficit or impaired visual processing occurring in a rapid serial visual presentation task. After a person identifies the first of two visual targets, the ability to detect the second target is impaired for the next few hundred milliseconds. This phenomenon is called attentional blink.Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Cnidaria: A phylum of radially symmetrical invertebrates characterized by possession of stinging cells called nematocysts. It includes the classes ANTHOZOA; CUBOZOA; HYDROZOA, and SCYPHOZOA. Members carry CNIDARIAN VENOMS.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Hydrozoa: A class in the phylum CNIDARIA which alternates between polyp and medusa forms during their life cycle. There are over 2700 species in five orders.Sea Anemones: The order Actiniaria, in the class ANTHOZOA, comprised of large, solitary polyps. All species are carnivorous.Suberites: A genus of velvety smooth SPONGES in the family Suberitidae, characterized by the ectosomal and choanosomal skeletons dominated by tylostyles (pin-like spicules with a pinched bulbous end).Hydrogel: A network of cross-linked hydrophilic macromolecules used in biomedical applications.Hydrogels: Water swollen, rigid, 3-dimensional network of cross-linked, hydrophilic macromolecules, 20-95% water. They are used in paints, printing inks, foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Tissue Engineering: Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.Cellular Microenvironment: Local surroundings with which cells interact by processing various chemical and physical signals, and by contributing their own effects to this environment.Biological Products: Complex pharmaceutical substances, preparations, or matter derived from organisms usually obtained by biological methods or assay.Actinobacteria: Class of BACTERIA with diverse morphological properties. Strains of Actinobacteria show greater than 80% 16S rDNA/rRNA sequence similarity among each other and also the presence of certain signature nucleotides. (Stackebrandt E. et al, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. (1997) 47:479-491)ChileRNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Actinomycetales: An order of gram-positive, primarily aerobic BACTERIA that tend to form branching filaments.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Ion Channels: Gated, ion-selective glycoproteins that traverse membranes. The stimulus for ION CHANNEL GATING can be due to a variety of stimuli such as LIGANDS, a TRANSMEMBRANE POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE, mechanical deformation or through INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Calcium Channels: Voltage-dependent cell membrane glycoproteins selectively permeable to calcium ions. They are categorized as L-, T-, N-, P-, Q-, and R-types based on the activation and inactivation kinetics, ion specificity, and sensitivity to drugs and toxins. The L- and T-types are present throughout the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and the N-, P-, Q-, & R-types are located in neuronal tissue.Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying: Potassium channels where the flow of K+ ions into the cell is greater than the outward flow.Ion Channel Gating: The opening and closing of ion channels due to a stimulus. The stimulus can be a change in membrane potential (voltage-gated), drugs or chemical transmitters (ligand-gated), or a mechanical deformation. Gating is thought to involve conformational changes of the ion channel which alters selective permeability.Potassium Channel Blockers: A class of drugs that act by inhibition of potassium efflux through cell membranes. Blockade of potassium channels prolongs the duration of ACTION POTENTIALS. They are used as ANTI-ARRHYTHMIA AGENTS and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.New MexicoUnited States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Urticaceae: The nettles plant family of the order Urticales, subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida. Many have stinging hairs on stems and leaves. Flowers are small and greenish in leaf axils. The fruit is dry and one-seeded.Capsicum: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. The hot peppers yield CAPSAICIN, which activates VANILLOID RECEPTORS. Several varieties have sweet or pungent edible fruits that are used as vegetables when fresh and spices when the pods are dried.Glycosides: Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)Chemoreceptor Cells: Cells specialized to detect chemical substances and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Chemoreceptor cells may monitor external stimuli, as in TASTE and OLFACTION, or internal stimuli, such as the concentrations of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE in the blood.Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Triterpenes

Girolline, an antitumor compound isolated from a sponge, induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and accumulation of polyubiquitinated p53. (1/5)

Girolline, an antitumor compound isolated from a sponge, has been reported to inhibit the termination step of protein synthesis in vivo. In this study, we found that girolline induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in several tumor cell lines. Immunochemical analysis revealed that polyubiquitinated p53 was accumulated in girolline-treated cells, while other polyubiquitinated cellular proteins were not accumulated, indicating that the effect of girolline is specific for p53. On the other hand, girolline did not inhibit proteasome activity in vitro, and accumulation of polyubiquitinated p53 was scarcely detected in the presence of leptomycin B, an inhibitor of nuclear export. Based on the above findings, we propose that girolline affects the step of recruitment of polyubiquitinated p53 to the proteasome.  (+info)

Streptomyces axinellae sp. nov., isolated from the Mediterranean sponge Axinella polypoides (Porifera). (2/5)

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Bromopyrrole alkaloids as lead compounds against protozoan parasites. (3/5)

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New tetromycin derivatives with anti-trypanosomal and protease inhibitory activities. (4/5)

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Further investigation of the Mediterranean sponge Axinella polypoides: isolation of a new cyclonucleoside and a new betaine. (5/5)

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*Axinella

1885 Axinella blanca Axinella bookhouti Axinella damicornis Axinella dissimilis (Bowerbank, 1866) Axinella flustra Axinella ... Axinella polycapella Axinella polypoides Axinella pyramidata Stephens, 1916 Axinella rugosa Axinella thielei (Topsent, 1898) ... Axinella mammillata (Hanitsch, 1890) Axinella microdragma (Lendenfeld, 1897) Axinella multiformis (Vosmaer, 1885) Axinella ... Axinella agnata Topsent, 1896 Axinella agregia (Ridley, 1881) Axinella arctica Vosmaer, ...

*Streptomyces axinellae

... is a bacterium species from the genus of Streptomyces which has been isolated from the sponge Axinella ... nov., isolated from the Mediterranean sponge Axinella polypoides (Porifera)". International Journal of Systematic and ... nov., isolated from the Mediterranean sponge Axinella polypoides (Porifera)". International Journal of Systematic and ...

*Krunoslav Babić

Sponge species Axinella babici is named in his honor. He died in Opatija. Pogledi na biologičke i bionomičke odnose u ...

*Aliwal Shoal

intricata Exallosorus harveyanus Lobophora variegata Stypopodium multipartitum Zonaria subarticulata Porifera Axinella ...

*Cenarchaeum

The marine archaean Cenarchaeum symbiosum lives within (it is an endosymbiont of) the sponge Axinella mexicana. See the NCBI ...

*Archaea

For example, the marine archaean Cenarchaeum symbiosum lives within (is an endosymbiont of) the sponge Axinella mexicana. ...

*John Hooper (marine biologist)

Isolation and structure of the cell growth inhibitory constituents from the western Pacific marine sponge Axinella sp". Journal ...

*Discovery and development of tubulin inhibitors

Halichondrin B was first isolated from Halichondria okadai, and later from the unrelated sponges Axinella carteri and Phankella ...

*List of sponges of Ireland

Axinella damicornis Axinella dissimilis Axinella flustra Axinella infundibuliformis Axinella parva Axinella pyramidata Axinella ...

*List of MeSH codes (B01)

... axinella MeSH B01.500.802.160 --- callyspongia MeSH B01.500.802.175 --- crambe sponge MeSH B01.500.802.200 --- dysidea MeSH ...
Background Marine sponge species are of significant interest to many scientific fields including marine ecology, conservation biology, genetics, host-microbe symbiosis and pharmacology. One of the most intriguing aspects of the sponge
Simone P. de Lira; Mirna H. R. Seleghim; David E. Williams; Frederic Marion; Pamela Hamill; Fran ois Jean; Raymond J. Andersen; Eduardo Hajdu; Roberto G. S. Berlinck. How to cite this article Lira SP, Seleghim MHR, Williams DE, Marion F, Hamill P, Jean F, et al. A SARS-Coronovirus 3CL Protease Inhibitor Isolated from the Marine Sponge Axinella cf. corrugata: Structure Elucidation and Synthesis. J. Braz. Chem. Soc. 2007;18(2):440-443 ...
On March 20, the Seventh National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, Native people in the United States issued a challenge to health providers, government ...
Cancer is considered as one of the deadliest diseases in the medical field. Apart from the preventive therapies, it is important to find a curative measure which holds no loopholes and acts accurately and precisely to curb cancer. Over the past few decades, there have been advances in this field and there are many antitumor compounds available on the market, which are of natural as well as synthetic origin. Marine chemotherapy is well recognized nowadays and profound development has been achieved by researchers to deal with different molecular pathways of tumors. However, the marine environment has been less explored for the production of safe and novel antitumor compounds. The reason is a number of shortfalls in this field. Though ample reviews cover the importance and applications of various anticancerous compounds from marine natural products, in the present review, we have tried to bring the current status of antitumor research based on marine inhibitors of cancer signaling pathways. In addition,
Chemical investigation of the Mediterranean sponge Sarcotragus spinosulus led to the isolation of a new hydroxylated nonaprenylhydroquinone, along with two known metabolites, hepta- and octaprenylhydroquinones. The structure of the new metabolite was assigned by extensive 1D and 2D NMR analyses and MS studies. The antileukemic effect of the three compounds towards the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells line K562 was also evaluated.
Thi-Ngoc-Dung Nguyen, Omid Feizbakhsh, Estelle Sfecci, Blandine Baratte, Claire Delehouze, et al.. Kinase-Based Screening of Marine Natural Extracts Leads to the Identification of a Cytotoxic High Molecular Weight Metabolite from the Mediterranean Sponge Crambe tailliezi. Marine drugs, MDPI, 2019, 17 (10), pp.569. ⟨10.3390/md17100569⟩. ⟨hal-02366157⟩ ...
INTRODUCTION: Fluoroacetate (FA) is a highly toxic metabolic poison found in eight species of plants - including Dichapetalum and Gastrolobium - growing in Australia, South and Central Africa and South America. The level of FA in some plants can reach up to 5 g kg-1 dry weight and can cause death of livestock and domestic animals. Moreover, FA can be found in fog and rain-drops in some industrial regions. The best known representative of FA is its sodium salt (SFA, compound 1080), which is used in several countries for controlling populations of some vertebrates. Although extremely toxic, FA has positive properties: it can prevent development of tolerance to morphine, and has radioprotective power due to its capacity to reduce body temperature and oxygen consumption. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the antitumor properties of SFA in monotherapy regime and in combination with a known antitumor compound. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice bearing Ehrlich tumor carcinoma were treated daily with SFA, 1.25mg/kg ...
Propidium iodide, an antitumor compound, was diffused into crystals of a complex between RNase A and deoxytetraadenylate (dpA)4). This complex has four deoxyoligomers bound per protein molecule. A difference Fourier analysis at 2.9 A showed that the principal binding site for the propidium in the crystals was a hydrophobic depression on the side of RNase away from the active site and apparently involves methionine 13 and phenylalanine 8. Binding of propidium at this site produces small conformational changes that effect binding of nucleotides at the active site of the enzyme. Fluorescence titrations in the presence and absence of nucleotide inhibitors suggested that propidium iodide is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme with a Kl of approximately 1 mM. No significant binding of propidium to the 16 nucleotides of single-stranded DNA associated with each protein molecule was observed. ...
Nine small-sized (15-50 cm3) D. avara specimens were collected at 9-12 m depth on pieces of native rock from the LEscala region in northeastern Spain. Specimens were transported to The Netherlands and maintained in a 550 l aquarium with biofiltration. Over the entire three months period of this study, sponges were fed two times a day with marine broths made from fish and shrimps, and/or manufactured shellfish diets (INVE, Belgium CAR-1), and three to four times a week with cultured microalgae (Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Nannochloropsis sp.): initial concentrations were 2×10−5 to 3×10−5 particles ml−1.. Inflow/outflow velocities, flow rates and local background velocities (LBV) were derived using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) in a 7.5 l flow tank (figure 4 in the electronic supplementary material). A mixture of 0.5-6.0 μm in diameter hollow glass beads (J. J. Bos, NL) was seeded onto the flow tank (approx. 100 000 particles ml−1) to reflect laser light and trace flow streamlines ...
Microbial Processes And Products from the Author: José-Luis Barredo. The development of recombinant DNA techniques over the last 20 years has greatly expanded the opportunities for using microorganisms to produce a broad range of valuable substances. In Microbial Processes and Products, outstanding leaders in using microorganisms as cell factories describe in detail their best laboratory procedures for many processes and products mediated by microorganisms. An overview chapter describes how to develop strain improvement programs and strategies to optimize fermentation processes. Taking advantage of the most recent developments in such processes, the authors offer step-by-step experimental methods for the optimal design of microbial metabolite production, including semisynthetic derivatives of cephalosporins, erythromycin, antitumor compounds, plasmids for gene therapy and DNA vaccination, L-lysine, vitamins B2 and B12, the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin, the carotenoids b-carotene and ...
Outstanding experts in the use of microorganisms as cell factories describe in step-by-step detail their best laboratory procedures for a wide range of processes and products mediated by microorganisms. The diverse chemicals and biochemicals produced can be used in human health, nutrition, and environmental protection, and include semisynthetic derivatives of cephalosporins, erythromycin, antitumor compounds, plasmids for gene therapy and DNA vaccination , L-lysine, Vitamins B2 and B12, the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin, the carotenoids ß-carotene and astaxanthin, the polysaccharide gellan, and bacteria-producing bacteria for sausage fermentation, and many more. Also illustrated are the uses of phenylacetyl-CoA catabolon for the enzymatic synthesis of penicillins, aromatic biotransformation, syntheses of novel bioplastics, biosensor design, and the synthesis of drug vehicles. This book offers laboratory and industrial scientists a wealth of readily reproducible techniques for the microbial ...
Cytochalasin H (Paspalin P1) (BVT-0447), CAS 53760-19-3, is a high purity chemical. Isolated from Phomopsis sp. Potent mycotoxin. Phytotoxin. Actin polymerization inhibitor. Antitumor compound. Immunosuppressive agent. Potential anti-parkinson agent.
Melflufen is designed for targeted delivery of alkylating moieties to tumor cells. In contrast to other alkylating agents that are hydrophilic, the lipophilicity of melflufen leads to rapid and extensive distribution into tissues and cells. Inside cells, melflufen may directly bind DNA or is readily metabolized by intracellular peptidases into the well-known antitumor compound melphalan, or by esterases into des-ethylmelflufen, which also has alkylating properties. Due to the high activity of peptidases and esterases in human tumor cells, the formation of melflufens metabolites is rapid in these cells with subsequent inflow of more melflufen. Since des-ethylmelflufen and melphalan are relatively hydrophilic, there is a possibility for intracellular trapping of these alkylators ...
Results Mean age of the overall population was 60±15 years. A left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% was found in 28% of the patients and 27.1% of the patients were diabetics. Comorbidities were represented by chronic renal failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and peripheral artery disease in 11, 11.7 and 27.3% of the cases, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate was 2.8%. Early postoperative morbidity included myocardial infarction (2.2%), stroke (0.9%), mesenteric ischaemia (0.7%) and mediastinitis (2.2%).. The Kaplan-Meier 8-year survival rates for patients less than 65 and between 65 and 74 years of age were 88% and 66%, respectively (p,0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that patients age 65 years or greater at baseline (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.3 to 4, p,0.001), acute coronary syndrome (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.4, p=0.02), chronic renal failure (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.4 to 5.2, p,0.001), peripheral artery disease (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.8 to 5.5, p,0.001) and LVEF ≤45% (OR ...