Axillary Vein: The venous trunk of the upper limb; a continuation of the basilar and brachial veins running from the lower border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein.Subclavian Vein: The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.Venous Valves: Flaps within the VEINS that allow the blood to flow only in one direction. They are usually in the medium size veins that carry blood to the heart against gravity.Phlebography: Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.Spasm: An involuntary contraction of a muscle or group of muscles. Spasms may involve SKELETAL MUSCLE or SMOOTH MUSCLE.Axilla: Area of the human body underneath the SHOULDER JOINT, also known as the armpit or underarm.Axillary Artery: The continuation of the subclavian artery; it distributes over the upper limb, axilla, chest and shoulder.Punctures: Incision of tissues for injection of medication or for other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Punctures of the skin, for example may be used for diagnostic drainage; of blood vessels for diagnostic imaging procedures.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Administration, Intravenous: Delivery of substances through VENIPUNCTURE into the VEINS.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Defibrillators, Implantable: Implantable devices which continuously monitor the electrical activity of the heart and automatically detect and terminate ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) and VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION. They consist of an impulse generator, batteries, and electrodes.Varicose Veins: Enlarged and tortuous VEINS.Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Lymph Node Excision: Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)

Right atrial bypass grafting for central venous obstruction associated with dialysis access: another treatment option. (1/87)

PURPOSE: Central venous obstruction is a common problem in patients with chronic renal failure who undergo maintenance hemodialysis. We studied the use of right atrial bypass grafting in nine cases of central venous obstruction associated with upper extremity venous hypertension. To better understand the options for managing this condition, we discuss the roles of surgery and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement. METHODS: All patients had previously undergone placement of bilateral temporary subclavian vein dialysis catheters. Severe arm swelling, graft thrombosis, or graft malfunction developed because of central venous stenosis or obstruction in the absence of alternative access sites. A large-diameter (10 to 16 mm) externally reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (GoreTex) graft was used to bypass the obstructed vein and was anastomosed to the right atrial appendage. This technique was used to bypass six lesions in the subclavian vein, two lesions at the innominate vein/superior vena caval junction, and one lesion in the distal axillary vein. RESULTS: All patients except one had significant resolution of symptoms without operative mortality. Bypass grafts remained patent, allowing the arteriovenous grafts to provide functional access for 1.5 to 52 months (mean, 15.4 months) after surgery. CONCLUSION: Because no mortality directly resulted from the procedure and the morbidity rate was acceptable, this bypass grafting technique was adequate in maintaining the dialysis access needed by these patients. Because of the magnitude of the procedure, we recommend it only for the occasional patient in whom all other access sites are exhausted and in whom percutaneous dilation and/or stenting has failed.  (+info)

Axillary vein thrombosis mimicking muscular strain. (2/87)

Axillary vein thrombosis may occur on strenuous activity with a clinical picture similar to a simple strain. It carries significant morbidity but a good outcome is possible with early treatment. The aetiology, investigation, and treatment are discussed.  (+info)

Axillary vein transfer in trabeculated postthrombotic veins. (3/87)

PURPOSE: This study assessed whether axillary vein transfer can be successfully performed in trabeculated veins and whether patients with this severe form of postthrombotic syndrome can be helped by an aggressive approach. METHODS: A total of 102 axillary vein transfer procedures were carried out in 83 limbs with trabeculated veins. More than one venous segment was repaired in 38 limbs with a second axillary valve in 19, and a different technique was used in the remainder. The superficial and deep femoral veins were the most common target sites. "Bench repair" of leaky axillary valves was performed before the transfer in 32 cases. Venous stasis dermatitis or ulceration was present in 90% of the limbs. The operability rate and chance of successful valve reconstruction was high, even in the presence of severe venographic appearance. RESULTS: The actuarial transplant patency rate was 83% at 10 years. The actuarial freedom from recurrent ulceration rate was more than 60% at 10 years, similar to the results obtained in a matched group of axillary vein transfers to nontrabeculated veins. Severe preoperative ambulatory venous hypertension (venous filling time [VFT] of less than 5 seconds), which was present in 67% of patients, did not adversely affect outcome, but short VFTs that persisted after surgery did. VFT and VFI90 (venous filling index, air plethysmography) improved after valve transfer. Swelling disappeared or was significantly reduced in 55% of patients (11 of 20 patients) who had moderate or severe preoperative swelling. In 82% of patients (31 of 37 patients) who had mild or no preoperative swelling, the swelling remained stable after surgery, and in 18% of patients (6 of 37 patients), it became worse. Pain was significantly diminished in 70% of patients; 23% of patients with severe pain had complete resolution. CONCLUSION: Axillary vein transfer, in combination with other antirefluxive procedures when indicated, is safe, effective, and durable in patients with trabeculated veins and severe forms of postthrombotic syndrome. It may be considered as an option when conservative therapy or other types of surgery fail.  (+info)

Surgical intervention is not required for all patients with subclavian vein thrombosis. (4/87)

PURPOSE: The role of thoracic outlet decompression in the treatment of primary axillary-subclavian vein thrombosis remains controversial. The timing and indications for surgery are not well defined, and thoracic outlet procedures may be associated with infrequent, but significant, morbidity. We examined the outcomes of patients treated with or without surgery after the results of initial thrombolytic therapy and a short period of outpatient anticoagulation. METHODS: Patients suspected of having a primary deep venous thrombosis underwent an urgent color-flow venous duplex ultrasound scan, followed by a venogram and catheter-directed thrombolysis. They were then converted from heparin to outpatient warfarin. Patients who remained asymptomatic received anticoagulants for 3 months. Patients who, at 4 weeks, had persistent symptoms of venous hypertension and positional obstruction of the subclavian vein, venous collaterals, or both demonstrated by means of venogram underwent thoracic outlet decompression and postoperative anticoagulation for 1 month. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients were treated between June 1996 and June 1999. Of the 18 patients who received catheter-directed thrombolysis, complete patency was achieved in eight patients (44%), and partial patency was achieved in the remaining 10 patients (56%). Nine of 22 patients (41%) did not require surgery, and the remaining 13 patients underwent thoracic outlet decompression through a supraclavicular approach with scalenectomy, first-rib resection, and venolysis. Recurrent thrombosis developed in only one patient during the immediate period of anticoagulation. Eleven of 13 patients (85%) treated with surgery and eight of nine patients (89%) treated without surgery sustained durable relief of their symptoms and a return to their baseline level of physical activity. All patients who underwent surgery maintained their venous patency on follow-up duplex scanning imaging. CONCLUSION: Not all patients with primary axillary-subclavian vein thrombosis require surgical intervention. A period of observation while patients are receiving oral anticoagulation for at least 1 month allows the selection of patients who will do well with nonoperative therapy. Patients with persistent symptoms and venous obstruction should be offered thoracic outlet decompression. Chronic anticoagulation is not required in these patients.  (+info)

Cardiac and great vessel thrombosis in Behcet's disease. (5/87)

Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing systemic vasculitis in which orogenital ulceration is a prominent feature. The disease affects many systems and causes hypercoagulability. We present a 27-year-old male patient who exhibited widespread great vessel thrombosis including right atrial and ventricular thrombi in the setting of right-sided infectious endocarditis and orogenital aphthous ulcerations and erythema nodosum due to BD. We reviewed the enigmatic prothrombotic state of BD, and discuss our prior experiences in this field.  (+info)

Outcome after thrombolysis and selective thoracic outlet decompression for primary axillary vein thrombosis. (6/87)

PURPOSE: Treatment for primary subclavian-axillary vein thrombosis (SAVT) at our institution consists of thrombolysis and anticoagulation for 3 months. Thoracic outlet decompression has been performed for a small number of patients. We wanted to review the functional outcomes of patients treated in such a manner. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The records of all patients treated for a first episode of SAVT at our hospital over the past 10 years were reviewed. Demographics, comorbidities, method of diagnosis, and treatment for SAVT were recorded. Long-term follow-up was obtained by chart review and asking patients to complete the DASH (disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand) questionnaire that was developed by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients, 20 men and eight women, with a mean age of 36 were treated during the study period. The median time between onset of symptoms and treatment was 5.5 (range, 1-100) days. All patients had confirmation of the diagnosis by venography. Twenty-five patients received thrombolytic treatment with catheter-directed infusions of urokinase; in the other three patients the vein was chronically occluded. Twelve patients had some degree of residual stenosis and were treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty after thrombolysis. During the study period two patients underwent decompressive surgery. Twenty-one patients responded to the DASH questionnaire a mean of 2.9 years (range, 2 months to 8 years) after the episode of SAVT. Six (28%) of 21 patients were completely symptom free, 13 patients (62%) had DASH scores consistent with mild symptoms, and two patients had more severe symptoms. Twenty percent (4 of 21) of patients report some difficulty with work. CONCLUSIONS: Thrombolysis, followed by selective thoracic outlet decompression on the basis of the severity of patients' symptoms can be used as a therapeutic approach to SAVT without undue morbidity. The DASH questionnaire is a useful tool to evaluate results after therapy for SAVT.  (+info)

Venous thromboembolism in infancy and childhood. (7/87)

A retrospective study of Scottish hospital inpatients aged 15 years or less has revealed, over a 4-year period, 36 cases of venous thrombosis or phlebitis. Of these 10 were considered to have deep venous thrombosis; 2 cases were associated with obvious pulmonary embolism and 2 cases developed chronic venous insufficiency. change in the coding allocations are proposed. There are "high risk" situations in childhood disease in which a diagnosis of venous thromboembolic disease should be considered and investigated.  (+info)

New performed catheter for entry into pulmonary artery in complete transposition of great arteries. (8/87)

A new performed, semi-rigid, polyethylene catheter, with built-in torque control, has been devised for entry to the pulmonary artery in complete transposition of the great arteries. It has been used 19 times in 17 patients: 18 times the pulmonary artery was entered from the right atrium (via the left atrium and ventricle) in a time between 40 s and 15 min (median 5 min); the patients' ages were 2 days to 6 years (median 8 months) and their weights were 3.1 to 13.3 kg (median 6.9 (kg: in the remaining 1 day-old patient, the procedures was terminated because of atrial flutter. The catheter was introduced into the axillary vein in 3 patients and thesaphenous or femoral vein in the remainder. It is suitable for angiocardiography, and the other heart chambers and vessels were easily entered. Thus the catheter has certain advantages over previously described methods for entry to the pulmonary artery, particularly when there is inferior vena caval thrombosis, or when angiocardiography is necessary. Its use does depend on the presence of an interatrial communication, so a method for entry to the pulmonary artery by retrograde catheterization from the axillary artery using a different catheter is also presented; this was successful in 2 patients with ventriculal sepatal defect.  (+info)

*Axilla

The contents of the axilla include the axillary vein and artery, as well as the brachial plexus, lymph nodes and fat. The ... Axillary intertrigo[edit]. Excessive perspiration can result in axillary intertrigo. Intertrigo is an inflamed skin condition ... Five groups of axillary lymph nodes and the associated lymphatics. *Axillary fat and areolar tissue in which the other contents ... The anterior boundary is called the anterior axillary fold and this is rounded in shape and formed by the lower border of the ...

*Venous translucence

Primary subclavian-axillary vein thrombosis. CircuÍation 1968;38:737 . Topper, David. Newton on the number of colours in the ... Axillary, subclavian and brachiocephalic vein obstruction. Surgery 1977; 82:816. Comerota, AJ; Katz, ML et al. Venous duplex ... Axillary-subclavian vein thrombosis: changing patterns of etiology, diagnostic and thera- peutic modalities. Am Surg 1991;57: ... Deep vein thrombosis: US assessment using vein compression. Radiology 1987;162:191. Cohan, RH; Leder, RA et al. Extravascular ...

*Leopold von Schrötter

This disorder involves primary thrombosis of the axillary vein or subclavian vein. Among his written works is a treatise on ...

*Paget-Schroetter disease

These DVTs typically occur in the axillary or subclavian veins. The condition is relatively rare. It usually presents in young ... Drapanas, T; Curran, WL (1966). "Thrombectomy in the treatment of "effort" thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian veins". ... and Leopold von Schrötter later linked the clinical syndrome to thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian veins. Hughes, E. S. ... Paget-Schroetter disease, also known as Paget-von Schrötter disease, is a form of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a ...

*Centrosema pubescens

Flowers are generally pale violet with darker violet veins, born in axillary racemes. Fruit is a flat, long, dark brown pod 7.5 ...

*Arm

The cephalic vein travels on the lateral side of the arm and terminates as the axillary vein. It passes through the ... The two main veins are the basilic and the cephalic veins. There is a connecting vein between the two, the median cubital vein ... This artery is a continuation of the axillary artery. The point at which the axillary becomes the brachial is distal to the ... Veins on the arm may be taken when a coronary artery bypass graft is needed. In other animals, the term arm can also be used ...

*Forequarter amputation

The neurovascular bundle consisting of the axillary artery, axillary vein and brachial plexus is ligated and cut. The area of ... Control and divide subsc art and vein. Divide large nerve trunks around these as prox as poses. Then come onto chest wall immed ...

*May-Thurner syndrome

Paget-Schroetter disease - Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in the axillary or subclavian veins, related to TOS. Budd- ... Compression of the left common iliac vein may be seen on pelvic CT. In contrast to the right common iliac vein, which ascends ... in the iliofemoral vein. The specific problem is compression of the left common iliac vein by the overlying right common iliac ... While this is the suspected cause of the syndrome, the left iliac vein is frequently seen to be compressed in asymptomatic ...

*Jeremy Bonderman

Bonderman missed most of the 2008 season because he had procedures done to remove a blood clot in his axillary vein. On June 13 ...

*Empididae

The posteror part of the wings on the basal side of the anal vein bears the designation of axillary or anal lobe. In species ... Radial vein R4+5 is often forked and the discal-medial cell (dm) is almost always present. The venation of the wings in minute ... with a highly developed axillary lobe, the margin may form an angle with the margin of the alula.This is termed the axillary ...

*Cardiac contractility modulation

... the cephalic vein or axillary vein. The leads are then advanced through the superior vena cava to their position in the right ... In some instances it may be impossible to guide the leads thorough the main veins in the upper half of the body to the heart ... During implantation, the leads are inserted into the subclavian vein below the clavicle or, less often, ...

*Medial cutaneous nerve of arm

It passes through the axilla, at first lying behind, and then medial to the axillary vein, and communicates with the ...

*Meiogyne

Leaves membraneous and with prominent veins. Flowers axillary, medium to large. Sepals 3, valvate, connate at base. Petals 6, ... Flowers are axillary and not extra-axillary or leaf-opposed. Arrangement of the[citation needed] is diverging from a broad base ...

*Fanniidae

The axillary vein is strongly curved towards the wingtip, so if extended, the axillary and anal veins would meet before ...

*Lateral pectoral nerve

It passes across the axillary artery and vein, pierces the clavipectoral (coracoclavicular) fascia, and is distributed to the ... The medial and lateral pectoral nerves form a connection, or loop, around the axillary artery, called ansa pectoralis. The ... thoracoacromial artery and vein, plus the lateral pectoral nerve) may be the guide for local anesthetic applications in order ... anterior thoracic nerve and form with it a loop in front of the first part of the axillary artery. Although this nerve is ...

*Long thoracic nerve

The nerve descends through the cervicoaxillary canal behind (posterior to) the brachial plexus and the axillary artery and vein ... The right brachial plexus (infraclavicular portion) in the axillary fossa; viewed from below and in front. Brachial plexus ... specifically radical mastectomies that involve removal of axillary lymph nodes. Injuries to the nerve can result from carrying ...

*Thoracodorsal artery

"Major Branches of the Axillary Artery" lesson3axillaryart&vein at The Anatomy Lesson by Wesley Norman (Georgetown University). ... Anatomy figure: 05:04-21 at Human Anatomy Online, SUNY Downstate Medical Center - "The axillary artery and its major branches ...

*Brachial lymph nodes

... are group of four to six lymph nodes which lies in relation to the medial and posterior aspects of the axillary vein; the ... The efferent vessels pass partly to the central and subclavicular groups of axillary glands and partly to the inferior deep ... afferents of these glands drain the whole arm with the exception of that portion whose vessels accompany the cephalic vein. ...

*Andreas Vesalius

... the axillary vein of the right elbow be cut), commonly known as the Venesection Letter, which demonstrated a revived ... He not only verified Estienne's findings on the valves of the hepatic veins, but also described the azygos vein, and discovered ... He not only verified Estienne's observations on the valves of the hepatic veins, but also described the vena azygos, and ... while veins carried blood to the lesser organs such as the stomach from the right ventricle. In order for this theory to be ...

*Central venous catheter

... internal jugular vein), chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein), groin (femoral vein), or through veins in the arms (also ... or vein (lower pH/pO2, higher pCO2). During subclavian vein central line placement, the catheter can be accidentally pushed ... via the basilic or cephalic veins) rather than a vein in the neck or chest. The tip is positioned in the superior vena cava. ... is a catheter placed into a large vein. Catheters can be placed in veins in the neck ( ...

*Medial pectoral nerve

It passes behind the first part of the axillary artery, curves forward between the axillary artery and vein, and unites in ...

*Vena comitans

... veins): Axillary artery and the axillary vein Subclavian artery and the subclavian vein Gray's page #641 Photo of Venae ... Vena comitans is Latin for accompanying vein. It refers to a vein that is usually paired, with both veins lying on the sides of ... Radial artery and radial veins Ulnar artery and ulnar veins Brachial artery and brachial veins Examples of arteries that do not ... They usually have a single, similarly sized vein which is not as intimately associated with the artery. Examples of arteries ...

*List of MeSH codes (A07)

... retinal vein MeSH A07.231.908.077 --- axillary vein MeSH A07.231.908.106 --- azygos vein MeSH A07.231.908.130 --- ... femoral vein MeSH A07.231.908.380 --- hepatic veins MeSH A07.231.908.427 --- iliac vein MeSH A07.231.908.498 --- jugular veins ... mesenteric veins MeSH A07.231.908.670.567 --- portal vein MeSH A07.231.908.670.730 --- splenic vein MeSH A07.231.908.670.874 ... umbilical veins MeSH A07.231.908.713 --- pulmonary veins MeSH A07.231.908.752 --- renal veins MeSH A07.231.908.783 --- retinal ...

*Parenteral nutrition

... or axillary) vein is preferred due to its ease of access and lowest infectious complications compared to the jugular and ... when administered through vein access in a limb rather than through a central vein as central venous nutrition (CVN). ... femoral vein insertions.[1] Blood clots[edit]. Chronic IV access leaves a foreign body in the vascular system, and blood clots ...

*Ilex asprella

Reticulate veins with 6 to 8 pairs of pinnate lateral veins. White flowers in axillary umbels with slender pedicels, dioecy. ...

*Axillary nerve

The axillary nerve travels through the quadrangular space with the posterior circumflex humeral artery and vein. The nerve lies ... Axillary nerve Axillary nerve Axillary nerve Axillary nerve This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th ... An example of injury to the axillary nerve includes axillary nerve palsy. Injury to the nerve results in: Paralysis of the ... The axillary nerve supplies two muscles in the arm: deltoid (a muscle of the shoulder), and teres minor (one of the rotator ...

*Leaf

Analyses of vein patterns often fall into consideration of the vein orders, primary vein type, secondary vein type (major veins ... Structures located there are called "axillary". External leaf characteristics, such as shape, margin, hairs, the petiole, and ... The vein or veins entering the leaf from the petiole are called primary or first order veins. The veins branching from these ... The number of vein endings is very variable, as is whether second order veins end at the margin, or link back to other veins.[ ...

*Axillary artery

... MedicalMnemonics.com: 1208 852 663 lesson3axillaryart&vein at ... Suprascapular and axillary nerves of right side, seen from behind. Brachial plexus and axillary artery Axillary artery Axillary ... The axillary artery is accompanied by the axillary vein, which lies medial to the artery, along its length. In the axilla, the ... The veins of the right axilla, viewed from in front. The right brachial plexus (infraclavicular portion) in the axillary fossa ...
For this reason, the axillary vein seems to be a rational alternative approach. In this narrative review, we evaluate the usefulness of the infraclavicular access to the axillary vein. The existing evidence suggests that infraclavicular approach to the axillary vein is a reliable method of central vein catheterization, especially when performed with ultrasound guidance.. Full Text Reference:. Gawda, R., Czarnik, T. and Łysenko, L. (2016) Infraclavicular access to the axillary vein - new possibilities for the catheterization of the central veins in the intensive care unit. Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy. November 21st. [Epub ahead of print].. doi: 10.5603/AIT.a2016.0055.. Thank you to our partners for supporting IVTEAM ...
The axillary vein is one of the major veins of the upper limb. It is formed by the union of the paired brachial veins and the basilic vein and contributes to the drainage of the axilla, arm and superolateral chest wall. Summary origin: formed b...
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Diagnosis Code I82.A11 information, including descriptions, synonyms, code edits, diagnostic related groups, ICD-9 conversion and references to the diseases index.
Innerbody is the largest home health and wellness guide online, helping over one million visitors each month learn about health products and services. Our mission is to provide objective, science-based advice to help you make more informed choices.. ...
After reviewing the postoperative chest X ray film, we will check the position of the central venous catheter tip. The possible pisition of catheter tip is as follows:. (1) Superior vena cava and Rirht Atrium junction (2)Right internal jugular vein (3)Left Internal jugular vein (4)Right Axillary vein (5)Lt. Axillary vein ...
Vena comitans is Latin for accompanying vein. It refers to a vein that is usually paired, with both veins lying on the sides of an artery. They are found in close proximity to arteries so that the pulsations of the artery aid venous return. Because they are generally found in pairs, they are often referred to by their plural form: venae comitantes. Venae comitantes are usually found with certain smaller arteries, especially those in the extremities. Larger arteries, on the other hand, generally do not have venae comitantes. They usually have a single, similarly sized vein which is not as intimately associated with the artery. Examples of arteries and their venae comitantes: Radial artery and radial veins Ulnar artery and ulnar veins Brachial artery and brachial veins Examples of arteries that do not have venae comitantes (i.e. those that have "regular" veins): Axillary artery and the axillary vein Subclavian artery and the subclavian vein Grays page #641 Photo of Venae comitantes of the ...
Abstract:. Vein access can be challenging for a variety of patients. The development of robots-assisted central or peripheral veins puncture would facilitate life of health professionals and patients. New robots are under development for this purpose and probably they will become available for practical use in the near future. These techniques may decrease significantly the cost of medicine, which currently uses less informatics resources than other industries.. ...
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In human anatomy, the axillary artery is a large blood vessel that conveys oxygenated blood to the lateral aspect of the thorax, the axilla (armpit) and the upper limb. Its origin is at the lateral margin of the first rib, before which it is called the subclavian artery. After passing the lower margin of teres major it becomes the brachial artery. The axillary artery is often referred to as having three parts, with these divisions based on its location relative to the Pectoralis minor muscle, which is superficial to the artery. First part - the part of the artery medial to the pectoralis minor Second part - the part of the artery posterior to the pectoralis minor Third part - the part of the artery lateral to the pectoralis minor. The axillary artery is accompanied by the axillary vein, which lies medial to the artery, along its length. In the axilla, the axillary artery is surrounded by the brachial plexus. The second part of the axillary artery is the reference for the locational descriptions ...
The axillary block aims to block the terminal branches of the brachial plexus which include the median, ulnar, radial and musculocutaneous nerves. The musculocutaneous nerve often departs from the lateral cord in the proximal axilla and is commonly spared by the axillary approach. The median, ulnar and radial nerves lie next to the axillary artery and are surrounded by the biceps, coracobrachialis and triceps muscles. It is important to locate and occlude the axillary vein(s) by transducer applied pressure to avoid unintentional intravascular injection ...
Maybe the injury caused by the violent ballooning causes venous spasm? The vein constricts and contact with surrounding nerves and tissues is reduced? Veins do spasm...but I dont know if they spasm in our heads. Also, that spasming wouldnt be ...
Central Venous Cannulation Simulator- Designed for learning and practicing CVC techniques, the Life/form Central Venous Cannulation Simulator is directed to the emergency medical field. ACLS and ATLS participants will find this simulator to be the id
The pectoralis minor is also an internal rotator of the humerus. When facilitated it can inhibit the external rotators of the humerus, including the long head of the biceps, the posterior deltoid, and the infraspinatus. A common shoulder injury that occurs from this is that the long head of the biceps comes out of its groove and moves medially towards the short head of the biceps. Release of the pectoralis minor followed by relocation of the long head of the biceps tendon is very effective in these cases. http://youtu.be/vDUI4IR8OzY. The pectoralis minor also contributes to kinetic chain dysfunctions. For example, in the front line, the pectoralis minor often inhibits the psoas. In the diagonal line, it can inhibit the contralateral psoas. This is a factor in gait dysfunction. Also in gait it can inhibit the backward swing motion of the contralateral arm and the backward swing of the ipsilateral leg. Right thoracic rotation can be inhibited by the right pectoralis minor because of its ...
Definition of basilic vein of forearm. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
Right basilic vein transposition. End-stage renal disease with need for a long-term hemodialysis access. Excellent flow through fistula following the procedure.
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The use of invasive monitoring technologies and aggressive hemodynamic resuscitation protocols has increased. Therefore, the ability to gain rapid and accurate vascular access has become a skill that it is imperative for critical and emergency care physicians to possess.
... is necessary in patients whose kidneys have failed (renal failure) and require access to circulate and filter their blood. The access is usually in the arm or leg and allows blood to be removed and returned quickly, efficiently, and safely during dialysis.. Creating the access is a surgical procedure. The options for access may include:. ...
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List of causes of Axillary Swelling and Significant infection and Skeletal symptoms, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Emergency Medicine is a specialty which closely reflects societal challenges and consequences of public policy decisions. The emergency department specifically deals with social injustice, health and economic disparities, violence, substance abuse, and disaster preparedness and response. This journal focuses on how emergency care affects the health of the community and population, and conversely, how these societal challenges affect the composition of the patient population who seek care in the emergency department. The development of better systems to provide emergency care, including technology solutions, is critical to enhancing population health. ...
Looking for axillaries? Find out information about axillaries. Of, pertaining to, or near the axilla or armpit. Placed or growing in the axis of a branch or leaf Explanation of axillaries
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies. ...
... is performed to employ anesthesia to the upper extremity. The best it works for the anesthesia for below elbow. Infraclavicu..
A series of subclavian vein catheterisations is described in patients using the supraclavicular approach, with a high success rate and few complications. 290 of the 370 patients were mechanically ventilated at the time of the procedure. How they did it:. ...
The single-chair dip is a compound exercise, meaning it targets more than one muscle group at a time. The exercise works both of the chest muscles -- the pectoralis major and the pectoralis minor -- ...
Does anyone know of the location of a good access procedure or ad-in for linear regression analysis (I dont mind paying if its is only abailable...
Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Circulation.. NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk mail. We do not capture any email address. ...
Free, official coding info for 2020 ICD-10-CM S25.392D - includes detailed rules, notes, synonyms, ICD-9-CM conversion, index and annotation crosswalks, DRG grouping and more.
Aquatic herbs, with verticillate or alternate leaves, the emersed ones entire, dentate or pectinate, the submerged ones pinnatifid into capillary segments, the axillary commonly monoecious 2-bracted f...
Find the best pulmonary venous hypertension doctors in Chennai. Get guidance from medical experts to select pulmonary venous hypertension specialist in Chennai from trusted hospitals - credihealth.com
Your doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals at BIDMC will help you learn about your disease, the tests you will have, the preparations you need to make before the dialysis access operation, the recovery period, your medications, and much more. Your dialysis access team is your primary source of information and is always available to answer your questions and address your concerns.
In this article you will find the anatomy, branches and mnemonics related to the axillary artery. Learn all about this blood vessel now at Kenhub!
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The AT Kelly Torso was designed for training central venous access and chest decompression with the added benefit of airway management features.. ...
Interventional Nephrology: Dialysis access Vascular access is critical to dialysis patient. Creation and maintenance of dialysis access consumes a major share …
Free, official coding info for 2018 ICD-10-CM S25.319S - includes detailed rules, notes, synonyms, ICD-9-CM conversion, index and annotation crosswalks, DRG grouping and more.
Bacterial colonisation of central venous access devices (CVADs) is a major cause of morbidity and potential cause of mortality in children receiving cancer chemotherapy. Catheter related bacterial infections can occur in the form of exit site infection (erythema, tenderness or swelling with positive skin swab), tunnel infection (erythematous tracking along the catheter path), colonisation of the line (positive blood culture from CVAD or fever/rigor with line flush, peripheral venous cultures sterile) or true catheter related bacteraemia (bacterial isolation from central and peripheral blood cultures)(Bishop). Device removal is frequently advised to manage the infection. However, it can result in significant morbidity, which includes the need for general anaesthesia during removal and reinsertion of a new line, and delay in chemotherapy. Particular problems arise with recurrent infections following CVAD colonisation. These concerns prompted early researchers to try alternative measures using ...
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Central venous cannulation, with or without a flow-directed pulmonary artery catheter, is commonly performed in patients undergoing cardiac surgery to measure central filling pressure and cardiac output, and to administer medications and fluids. The
Your Dialysis Access Team has made sure you are well prepared to leave the hospital. But we are always here to answer your questions, and address any concerns you have about what to watch for when you return home, staying healthy, guidelines for activities, your diet and nutrition, and maintaining your health.
Fever is defined as a temperature higher than 37.5 ° C axillary and 38 ° C rectally. It is usual to consider that taking axillary temperature underestimates
Kor pulmonal kronik pada kasus ini bila terjadi anastomisis cabang-cabang arteri dan vena pulmonalis pada dinding bronkus akan terjadi arterio-venous shunt, terjadi gangguan oksigenasi darah, timbul sianosis sentral, selanjutnya terjadi hipoksemia. Pada keadaan lanjut akan terjadi hipertensi pulmonal, kor pulmoner kronik,. Selanjutnya akan terjadi gagal jantung kanan ...
4. Lumbar puncture and the child before touching stoma to reestablish pathway. Approximately 1 cm low suspicion features have a small sliver for frozen-section examination to check fit of prostheses, and speech, and language development is the most common cause of acute scis is tremendous for the diagnosis of axillary-subclavian thrombosis primarily includes catheter-directed thrombolysis fogarty embolectomy catheter. 9. No signs of infection. Preventing adverse effects in tissue to confirm diagnosis and management of stroke if carotid/vertebral arteries are dissected and retracted toward the glottis is fore- shortened, the airway using the protege everflex nitinol stent in the right submandibular salivary gland origin, sarcomas, esthesioneuroblastomas, lymphomas, sinonasal undifferentiated carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas, and the clinical features and physi- ologic functions. Nutritional guidelines are not able to observe. The most frequent form in the right upper alveolus. 5. Stress the ...
1. Legler D, Nugent M. Doppler localization of the internal jugular vein facilitates central venous cannulation. Anesthesiology. 1984;60(5):481-2.. 2. Rothschild JM. Ultrasound guidance of central vein catheterization. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No 43. Making Health Care Safer A critical Analysis of Patient Safety Practices. AHRQ. 2001;43:245-53.. 3. Brass P, Hellmich M, Kolodziej L, et al. Ultrasound guidance versus anatomical landmarks for internal jugular vein catheterization. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;1:CD006962.. 4. Leung J, Duffy M, Finckh A. Real-Time ultrasonographically-guided Internal jugular vein catheterization in the emergency department increases success rates and reduces complications: a randomized, prospective study. Ann Emerg Med. 2006;48(5):540-7.. 5. Fields JM, Piela NE, Au AK, et al. Risk factors associated with difficult venous access in adult ED patients. Am J Emerg Med. 2014;32(10):1179-82.. 6. Alexandrou E. The One Million Global Catheters PIVC worldwide ...
Click the title to purchase the article.. Objectives:. "Axillary artery cannulation is commonly used in thoracic aortic surgery, often utilizing a sidearm graft. Although our institutional preference is femoral cannulation, we use axillary cannulation in select cases with a dirty aorta on computed tomography scan or intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography. Since 2011, we have routinely used an open Seldinger-guided approach for axillary cannulation. Here, we report our experience with open Seldinger-guided technique, evaluating its safety and efficacy."1. ...
This ultrasound training video is designed to review the arterial and venous anatomy within the upper extremities, illustrate the advantages of AV fistulas over other indwelling devices, demonstrate complications of dialysis access procedures and state the sonographic criteria for stenosis and dysfunction.
View details of top venous hypertension hospitals in Bangalore. Get guidance from medical experts to select best venous hypertension hospital in Bangalore
Medical definition of axillary artery: the part of the main artery of the arm that lies in the axilla and that is continuous with the subclavian…
Good Morning all,I have a 80+ y/o female, A&0x3, s/p knee replacement (infected), get a PICC about about three weeks ago. Re-admitted for SOB. CT showed a PE. Doppler of lower extemities was clean, doppler of basilic showed a DVT without ettensnion (at PICC site). Pt is non-symptomatic. no swelling, no tenderness, no redness. If not for the PE and later diagnostics, wed have no clue she had the DVT. Her INR is therapeutic, shes ready to go home for three more weeks of IV ABX. Now my question: Do I move the PICC over to the other arm? Or since she is not symptomatic and we are keeping her INR therapeutic, do I leave the PICC where it is? With all the info at AVA about thrombus rates, my initial thought is to leave it be, and have family and clinic monitor. I suggested doppler studies at two week intervals but radiology shot me down, saying there was no data to support that practice.
The part of the main artery of the arm that lies in the armpit and is continuous with the subclavian artery above and the brachial artery below ...
Given the findings, we identified an unimpeded path to the medial, lateral, and posterior cords by taking a more lateral approach. Had we not been able to identify a safe infraclavicular approach, an axillary nerve block combined with a musculocutaneous nerve block would also have provided anesthesia for surgery of the elbow to the hand. Scan of the entire infraclavicular area allowed us to avoid vascular puncture, identify key targets, and provide safe regional anesthesia for the operation ...
Weeks of a lingering cough and chest pressure are no match for SMRT. Find out how working SMRT on the axillary muscles and lower vertebrae helped relieve all pressure in a matter of minutes.
Our medical supply store carries Filac 3000 EZ Oral/Axillary Complete Electronic Thermometer, Home Diagnostics, Thermometers and many more Covidien medical supplies
Teaching Files with CT Medical Imaging and case studies on Anatomical Regions including Adrenal, Colon, Cardiac, Stomach, Pediatric, Spleen, Vascular, Kidney, Small Bowel, Liver, Chest | CTisus
Teaching Files with CT Medical Imaging and case studies on Anatomical Regions including Adrenal, Colon, Cardiac, Stomach, Pediatric, Spleen, Vascular, Kidney, Small Bowel, Liver, Chest | CTisus
1997-2006 Healthboard.com. Healthboard.com is a purely informational website, and should not be used as a substitute for professional legal, medical or technical advice. ...
Know how to take a temperature; Oral, rectal, axillary, tympanic and temporal. That way no matter what equipment your facility has, youre ready.
An annual erect finely viscid-pubescent much-branched herb, with narrow entire or few-toothed leaves, and small blue flowers in loose axillary cymes. Calyx broadly campanulate, 10 - nerved, nearly equ...

Infraclavicular access to the axillary vein for central venous accessInfraclavicular access to the axillary vein for central venous access

The existing evidence suggests that infraclavicular approach to the axillary vein is a reliable method of central vein ... Infraclavicular access to the axillary vein - new possibilities for the catheterization of the central veins in the intensive ... You are at:Home»Intravenous Literature»Infraclavicular access to the axillary vein for central venous access ... In this narrative review, we evaluate the usefulness of the infraclavicular access to the axillary vein" Gawda et al (2016).. ...
more infohttp://www.ivteam.com/intravenous-literature/infraclavicular-access-to-the-axillary-vein-for-central-venous-access/

Axillary VeinAxillary Vein

The axillary vein is formed where the basilic and brachial veins come together, in the deep tissue of the upper arm. ...
more infohttps://www.innerbody.com/anatomy/cardiovascular/axillary-vein

PRIMARY AXILLARY VEIN THROMBOSIS | The BMJPRIMARY AXILLARY VEIN THROMBOSIS | The BMJ

PRIMARY AXILLARY VEIN THROMBOSIS. Br Med J 1935; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.3905.895 (Published 09 November 1935) ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/2/3905/895

Axillary vein | Define Axillary vein at Dictionary.comAxillary vein | Define Axillary vein at Dictionary.com

Axillary vein definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it up ... axillary vein in Medicine Expand. axillary vein n. The continuation of the basilic and brachial veins that runs from the lower ... After death clots were found extending from the heart into the axillary vein. ... border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein. ...
more infohttp://www.dictionary.com/browse/axillary-vein

Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma of Axillary Vein: An Imminent Va...: Ingenta ConnectEpithelioid Hemangioendothelioma of Axillary Vein: An Imminent Va...: Ingenta Connect

The Southeastern Surgical Congress owns and publishes The American Surgeon monthly. It is the official journal of the Congress and the Southern California Chapter of the American College of Surgeons, which all members receive each month. The journal brings up to date clinical advances in surgical knowledge in a popular reference format. In addition to publishing papers presented at the annual meetings of the associated organizations, the journal publishes selected unsolicited manuscripts. If you have a manuscript youd like to see published in The American Surgeon select "Information for Authors" from the Related Information options below. A Copyright Release Form must accompany all manuscripts submitted ...
more infohttps://www.ingentaconnect.com/contentone/sesc/tas/2010/00000076/00000009/art00013

Axillary vein - WikipediaAxillary vein - Wikipedia

Axillary vein Axillary vein Moore, Keith L. et al. (2010) Clinically Oriented Anatomy, 6th Ed, p.718 Moore, Keith L. et al. ( ... Other tributaries include the subscapular vein, circumflex humeral vein, lateral thoracic vein and thoraco-acromial vein. It ... This large vein is formed by the brachial vein and the basilic vein. At its terminal part, it is also joined by the cephalic ... There is one axillary vein on each side of the body. Its origin is at the lower margin of the teres major muscle and a ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axillary_vein

How To: Axillary Vein Cannulation | SonoSiteHow To: Axillary Vein Cannulation | SonoSite

Discussion on helpful scanning techniques and anatomy landmarks used to perform an Axillary Vein Cannulation. Topics: patient ... and transducer position, identification of structures near the vein, vein depth, & insertion technique.. ...
more infohttps://www.sonosite.com/af/media-library/how-axillary-vein-cannulation

How To: Axillary Vein Cannulation | SonoSiteHow To: Axillary Vein Cannulation | SonoSite

Discussion on helpful scanning techniques and anatomy landmarks used to perform an Axillary Vein Cannulation. Topics: patient ... and transducer position, identification of structures near the vein, vein depth, & insertion technique.. ...
more infohttps://www.sonosite.com/asean/media-library/how-axillary-vein-cannulation

Axillary Artery Injury Caused by Fracture of Humerus Neck and Its Repair Using Basilic Vein GraftAxillary Artery Injury Caused by Fracture of Humerus Neck and Its Repair Using Basilic Vein Graft

... Vikas Deep Goyal,1 Vipin ... Repair of axillary artery can be done either by direct repair or by using grafts like saphenous vein, prosthetic grafts, or ... Repair of the axillary artery was done using basilic vein graft harvested through the same incision. Postprocedure pulsations ... Basilic vein can be a useful graft for upper limb vascular injuries. Advantages of using basilic vein for upper limb vascular ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/cris/2014/430583/

PRIMARY THROMBOSIS OF THE AXILLARY AND SUBCLAVIAN VEINS* | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of PhysiciansPRIMARY THROMBOSIS OF THE AXILLARY AND SUBCLAVIAN VEINS* | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians

Primary thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian veins can be defined as a thrombosis of these veins occurring after some ... PRIMARY THROMBOSIS OF THE AXILLARY AND SUBCLAVIAN VEINS1. Ann Intern Med. ;35:454-463. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-35-2-454 ... PRIMARY THROMBOSIS OF THE AXILLARY AND SUBCLAVIAN VEINS1 REVERDY H. JONES JR., M.D. ... Fondaparinux reduced a composite of VTE complications or death in superficial leg-vein thrombosis Annals of Internal Medicine; ...
more infohttps://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/674752/primary-thrombosis-axillary-subclavian-veins

Axillary vein | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.orgAxillary vein | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org

It is formed by the union of the paired brachial veins and the basilic vein and contributes to the drainage of the axilla, arm ... The axillary vein is one of the major veins of the upper limb. ... axillary vein *cephalic vein. * basilic vein *median cubital ... The axillary vein is one of the major veins of the upper limb. It is formed by the union of the paired brachial veins and the ... The cephalic vein is a tributary of the first part of the axillary vein (above the pectoralis minor) and enters the vein after ...
more infohttps://radiopaedia.org/articles/axillary-vein-1?lang=us

Progressive Pulmonary Vascular Obstruction and Cor Pulmonale Due to Repeated Embolism from Axillary Vein Thrombosis | Annals of...Progressive Pulmonary Vascular Obstruction and Cor Pulmonale Due to Repeated Embolism from Axillary Vein Thrombosis | Annals of...

Progressive Pulmonary Vascular Obstruction and Cor Pulmonale Due to Repeated Embolism from Axillary Vein Thrombosis RAUL E. ... A case of posttraumatic axillary vein thrombosis in an otherwise healthy young man gave rise to rapidly progressive obstructive ... Progressive Pulmonary Vascular Obstruction and Cor Pulmonale Due to Repeated Embolism from Axillary Vein Thrombosis. Ann Intern ...
more infohttp://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/684760/progressive-pulmonary-vascular-obstruction-cor-pulmonale-due-repeated-embolism-from

Review of ultrasound-guided subclavian/axillary vein cannulationReview of ultrasound-guided subclavian/axillary vein cannulation

You are at:Home»Intravenous Literature»Review of ultrasound-guided subclavian/axillary vein cannulation ... The technique also allows for increased compressibility of the subclavian/axillary vein in the event of bleeding complication. ... Revisiting Ultrasound-Guided Subclavian/Axillary Vein Cannulations. Journal of Intensive Care Medicine. January 1st. . ... This is achieved by directing the needle toward the subclavian vein at a point where it traverses over the second rib, ...
more infohttp://www.ivteam.com/intravenous-literature/review-of-ultrasound-guided-subclavianaxillary-vein-cannulation/

emDOCs.net - Emergency Medicine EducationUS Probe: Ultrasound Guided Subclavian/Axillary Vein Catheterization - emDOCs.net -...emDOCs.net - Emergency Medicine EducationUS Probe: Ultrasound Guided Subclavian/Axillary Vein Catheterization - emDOCs.net -...

Figure 6. Axillary vein (blue) and axillary artery (red) are identified.. 4. Follow the axillary vein laterally until it is not ... the basilic vein becomes the axillary vein. Once it passes the lateral border of the first rib, the axillary vein then becomes ... Identify the axillary vein and artery in short-axis, as well as the pleural line. Differentiate the vein from artery with the ... The axillary vein and subclavian vein accompany their corresponding arteries along their course with some variation in ...
more infohttp://www.emdocs.net/us-probe-ultrasound-guided-subclavian-axillary-vein-catheterization/

Axillary-Subclavian Vein Thrombosis | definition of Axillary-Subclavian Vein Thrombosis by Medical dictionaryAxillary-Subclavian Vein Thrombosis | definition of Axillary-Subclavian Vein Thrombosis by Medical dictionary

What is Axillary-Subclavian Vein Thrombosis? Meaning of Axillary-Subclavian Vein Thrombosis medical term. What does Axillary- ... Looking for online definition of Axillary-Subclavian Vein Thrombosis in the Medical Dictionary? Axillary-Subclavian Vein ... Axillary-Subclavian Vein Thrombosis , definition of Axillary-Subclavian Vein Thrombosis by Medical dictionary https://medical- ... redirected from Axillary-Subclavian Vein Thrombosis) effort thrombosis. an abnormal condition in which a clot develops within ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Axillary-Subclavian+Vein+Thrombosis

2018 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code S45.202S: Unspecified injury of axillary or brachial vein, left side, sequela2018 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code S45.202S: Unspecified injury of axillary or brachial vein, left side, sequela

Unspecified injury of axillary or brachial vein, left side, sequela. 2016 2017 2018 Billable/Specific Code POA Exempt *S45.202S ... Short description: Unsp injury of axillary or brachial vein, left side, sequela ... S45.20 Unspecified injury of axillary or brachial vein S45.201 Unspecified injury of axillary or brachial vein, right side ... S45.2 Injury of axillary or brachial vein ... S45.211 Laceration of axillary or brachial vein, right side ...
more infohttp://www.icd10data.com/ICD10CM/Codes/S00-T88/S40-S49/S45-/S45.202S

Axillary vein - wikidocAxillary vein - wikidoc

Anterior view of right upper limb and thorax - axillary vein and the distal part of the basilic vein and cephalic vein. ... Its tributaries include the basilic vein and cephalic vein, which are both superficial veins. It terminates at the lateral ... There is one axillary vein on each side of the body. Its origin is at the lower margin of the teres major muscle and a ... median sacral vein external iliac: inferior epigastric - deep circumflex iliac vein. internal iliac - posterior: iliolumbar - ...
more infohttp://es.wikidoc.org/index.php/Axillary_vein

Axillary Vein | ANATOMIC.USAxillary Vein | ANATOMIC.US

Axillary Vein In human anatomy, the axillary vein is a large blood vessel that conveys blood from the lateral aspect of the ... Its tributaries include the basilic vein and cephalic vein, which are both superficial veins. It terminates at the lateral ... There is one axillary vein on each side of the body. Its origin is at the lower margin of the teres major muscle and a ... In human anatomy, the axillary vein is a large blood vessel that conveys blood from the lateral aspect of the thorax, axilla ( ...
more infohttp://beta.anatomic.us/atlas/axillary-vein/

Labial veins, posterior | definition of labial veins, posterior by Medical dictionaryLabial veins, posterior | definition of labial veins, posterior by Medical dictionary

What is labial veins, posterior? Meaning of labial veins, posterior medical term. What does labial veins, posterior mean? ... Looking for online definition of labial veins, posterior in the Medical Dictionary? labial veins, posterior explanation free. ... and joins with the brachial veins to form the axillary vein.. basilic vein, median a vein sometimes present as the medial ... Labbé vein. See: Labbé vein. lesser saphenous vein. Short saphenous vein.. lingual vein. The dorsal or the deep lingual vein, ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/labial+veins%2C+posterior

ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S45.21 Laceration of axillary or brachial veinICD-10 Diagnosis Code S45.21 Laceration of axillary or brachial vein

Short Description: Laceration of axillary or brachial vein Long Description: Laceration of axillary or brachial vein This is ... It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are ...
more infohttps://icdlist.com/icd-10/s4521

Axilla - WikipediaAxilla - Wikipedia

The contents of the axilla include the axillary vein and artery, as well as the brachial plexus, lymph nodes and fat. The ... Axillary intertrigo[edit]. Excessive perspiration can result in axillary intertrigo. Intertrigo is an inflamed skin condition ... Five groups of axillary lymph nodes and the associated lymphatics. *Axillary fat and areolar tissue in which the other contents ... The anterior boundary is called the anterior axillary fold and this is rounded in shape and formed by the lower border of the ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axilla

ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S45.299 Oth injury of axillary or brachial vein, unspecified sideICD-10 Diagnosis Code S45.299 Oth injury of axillary or brachial vein, unspecified side

Oth injury of axillary or brachial vein, unspecified side Long Description: Other specified injury of axillary or brachial vein ... It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are ...
more infohttps://icdlist.com/icd-10/s45299

Axillary vein thrombosis induced by an increasingly popular oscillating dumbbell exercise device: a case reportAxillary vein thrombosis induced by an increasingly popular oscillating dumbbell exercise device: a case report

Axillary vein thrombosis. Thrombolytic therapy mechanical thrombectomy. Paget-Schroetter syndrome. Thoracic outlet syndrome. ... Axillary vein thrombosis induced by an increasingly popular oscillating dumbbell exercise device: a case report. ... Imaging revealed an occlusive thrombus in the right axillary, proximal brachial and basilic veins. The patient was treated with ... Due to the growing popularity of modified dumbbells and the possible risk for axillary vein thrombosis, consideration should be ...
more infohttps://repository.arizona.edu/handle/10150/610314

Shoulder Nerves & Vessels Diagram & Function | Body MapsShoulder Nerves & Vessels Diagram & Function | Body Maps

It is joined by the cephalic vein and the basilic vein. *Cephalic vein: This large vein branches off the axillary vein after ... Axillary vein: This vein drains into the larger subclavian vein on its way to the heart. ... Basilic vein: Opposite the cephalic vein, the basilic vein travels through the shoulder near the triceps muscle on the ... This same vessel evolves into the axillary artery in the armpit region. Its branches serve the outer surface of the chest and ...
more infohttps://www.healthline.com/human-body-maps/shoulder-nerves-vessels
  • postnatally, all veins except the pulmonary carry dark unoxygenated blood. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Sinus venosus-type atrial septal defect can be associated with anomalous drainage of the upper right pulmonary vein into the superior vena cava. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Surgical correction provides reconstruction of superior vena cava and rerouting of the pulmonary vein into the left atrium. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The Pulmonary Veins, unlike other veins, contain arterial blood, which they return from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart. (theodora.com)
  • the capacity of the pulmonary veins, however, only slightly exceeds that of the pulmonary arteries. (theodora.com)
  • Variations are determined by the position of the musculocutaneous nerve relative to the median nerve and by the position of the ulnar nerve relative to the axillary vein. (nysora.com)
  • The axillary brachial plexus block (including the musculocutaneous nerve) results in anesthesia of the upper limb from the mid-arm down to and including the hand. (nysora.com)
  • supracardinal v's paired vessels in the embryo developing later than the subcardinal veins and persisting chiefly as the lower segment of the inferior vena cava. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • anastomotic vein, inferior a vein that interconnects the superficial middle cerebral vein and the transverse sinus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This vessel ramifies in the substance of the liver and there breaks up into a minute network of capillary-like vessels, from which the blood is conveyed by the hepatic veins to the inferior vena cava. (theodora.com)
  • A physician should have a thorough foreknowledge of the procedure and its complications before placing a central vein catheter. (medscape.com)
  • Versajet-assisted hydraulic epilation is an ideal surgical procedure for the treatment of axillary osmidrosis that decreases complications and recurrence. (springer.com)
  • When his swelling persisted beyond 7 days he requested further intervention, and was offered surgical excision of the affected vein with first rib resection to decompress the thoracic outlet. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • At 3-month follow-up he had no residual swelling of his arm, and was scheduled to undergo positional venography to assess the patency of the subclavian vein and exclude thoracic outlet compression of the vein when he was lost to follow-up. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • A duplex Doppler of the arm revealed no thrombus formation, and the veins were reported as having normal compressibility. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Ultrasonographically guided insertion of a 15-cm catheter into the deep brachial or basilic vein in patients with difficult intravenous access. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Placement of a central vein catheter is a common procedure, and house staff require substantial training and supervision to become facile with this technique. (medscape.com)
  • His surgery was performed 2 weeks after the initial presentation, and included the above-mentioned treatment and a saphenous vein graft to anastamose the subclavian vein. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Imaging studies are done to provide objective verification of the presence of thrombus in the subclavian vein and may include chest radiography, ultrasonography (US), venography, computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (medscape.com)