Track and Field: Sports performed on a track, field, or arena and including running events and other competitions, such as the pole vault, shot put, etc.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Fractures, Comminuted: A fracture in which the bone is splintered or crushed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Skiing: A snow sport which uses skis to glide over the snow. It does not include water-skiing.Ischium: One of three bones that make up the coxal bone of the pelvic girdle. In tetrapods, it is the part of the pelvis that projects backward on the ventral side, and in primates, it bears the weight of the sitting animal.Tibial FracturesHip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Fractures, Closed: Fractures in which the break in bone is not accompanied by an external wound.Football: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular field. This is the American or Canadian version of the game and also includes the form known as rugby. It does not include non-North American football (= SOCCER).Foramen Magnum: The large hole at the base of the skull through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Metatarsal Bones: The five long bones of the METATARSUS, articulating with the TARSAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF TOES distally.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Tooth Avulsion: Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)Osteoporotic Fractures: Breaks in bones resulting from low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration characteristic of OSTEOPOROSIS.Radius FracturesFractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Running: An activity in which the body is propelled by moving the legs rapidly. Running is performed at a moderate to rapid pace and should be differentiated from JOGGING, which is performed at a much slower pace.Fractures, Stress: Fractures due to the strain caused by repetitive exercise. They are thought to arise from a combination of MUSCLE FATIGUE and bone failure, and occur in situations where BONE REMODELING predominates over repair. The most common sites of stress fractures are the METATARSUS; FIBULA; TIBIA; and FEMORAL NECK.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Ulna Fractures: Fractures of the larger bone of the forearm.Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary: The use of nails that are inserted into bone cavities in order to keep fractured bones together.Rib FracturesSkull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Mandibular Fractures: Fractures of the lower jaw.Tooth Fractures: Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.Finger Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the fingers.Brachial Plexus: The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.Replantation: Restoration of an organ or other structure to its original site.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Fractures, Compression: Crumbling or smashing of cancellous BONE by forces acting parallel to the long axis of bone. It is applied particularly to vertebral body fractures (SPINAL FRACTURES). (Blauvelt and Nelson, A Manual of Orthopedic Terminology, 1994, p4)Intra-Articular Fractures: Fractures of the articular surface of a bone.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Tooth Replantation: Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.Orbital Fractures: Fractures of the bones in the orbit, which include parts of the frontal, ethmoidal, lacrimal, and sphenoid bones and the maxilla and zygoma.Tendon Injuries: Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.Colles' Fracture: Fracture of the lower end of the radius in which the lower fragment is displaced posteriorly.Cystocele: A HERNIA-like condition in which the weakened pelvic muscles cause the URINARY BLADDER to drop from its normal position. Fallen urinary bladder is more common in females with the bladder dropping into the VAGINA and less common in males with the bladder dropping into the SCROTUM.Tooth Injuries: Traumatic or other damage to teeth including fractures (TOOTH FRACTURES) or displacements (TOOTH LUXATION).Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Pelvic Floor: Soft tissue formed mainly by the pelvic diaphragm, which is composed of the two levator ani and two coccygeus muscles. The pelvic diaphragm lies just below the pelvic aperture (outlet) and separates the pelvic cavity from the PERINEUM. It extends between the PUBIC BONE anteriorly and the COCCYX posteriorly.Amputation, Traumatic: Loss of a limb or other bodily appendage by accidental injury.Bony Callus: The bony deposit formed between and around the broken ends of BONE FRACTURES during normal healing.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.DislocationsPeriprosthetic Fractures: Fractures around joint replacement prosthetics or implants. They can occur intraoperatively or postoperatively.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Ankle Injuries: Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.Calcaneus: The largest of the TARSAL BONES which is situated at the lower and back part of the FOOT, forming the HEEL.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Meningocele: A congenital or acquired protrusion of the meninges, unaccompanied by neural tissue, through a bony defect in the skull or vertebral column.Bone Wires: Steel wires, often threaded through the skin, soft tissues, and bone, used to fix broken bones. Kirschner wires or apparatus also includes the application of traction to the healing bones through the wires.Nerve Transfer: Surgical reinnervation of a denervated peripheral target using a healthy donor nerve and/or its proximal stump. The direct connection is usually made to a healthy postlesional distal portion of a non-functioning nerve or implanted directly into denervated muscle or insensitive skin. Nerve sprouts will grow from the transferred nerve into the denervated elements and establish contact between them and the neurons that formerly controlled another area.Brachial Plexus Neuropathies: Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)Radiculopathy: Disease involving a spinal nerve root (see SPINAL NERVE ROOTS) which may result from compression related to INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; SPINAL CORD INJURIES; SPINAL DISEASES; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations include radicular pain, weakness, and sensory loss referable to structures innervated by the involved nerve root.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Maxillary Fractures: Fractures of the upper jaw.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.External Fixators: External devices which hold wires or pins that are placed through one or both cortices of bone in order to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment. These devices allow easy access to wounds, adjustment during the course of healing, and more functional use of the limbs involved.Zygomatic Fractures: Fractures of the zygoma.Finger Phalanges: Bones that make up the SKELETON of the FINGERS, consisting of two for the THUMB, and three for each of the other fingers.Nails, Ingrown: Excessive lateral nail growth into the nail fold. Because the lateral margin of the nail acts as a foreign body, inflammation and granulation may result. It is caused by improperly fitting shoes and by improper trimming of the nail.Maxillofacial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the face and jaw (either upper, lower, or both).Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal: Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency.Forearm Injuries: Injuries to the part of the upper limb of the body between the wrist and elbow.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Mydriasis: Dilation of pupils to greater than 6 mm combined with failure of the pupils to constrict when stimulated with light. This condition may occur due to injury of the pupillary fibers in the oculomotor nerve, in acute angle-closure glaucoma, and in ADIE SYNDROME.Pelvic Organ Prolapse: Abnormal descent of a pelvic organ resulting in the protrusion of the organ beyond its normal anatomical confines. Symptoms often include vaginal discomfort, DYSPAREUNIA; URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE; and FECAL INCONTINENCE.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Bone Density Conservation Agents: Agents that inhibit BONE RESORPTION and/or favor BONE MINERALIZATION and BONE REGENERATION. They are used to heal BONE FRACTURES and to treat METABOLIC BONE DISEASES such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Ligaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Tooth Ankylosis: Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Clavicle: A bone on the ventral side of the shoulder girdle, which in humans is commonly called the collar bone.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Vitreous Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage into the VITREOUS BODY.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Intercostal Nerves: The ventral rami of the thoracic nerves from segments T1 through T11. The intercostal nerves supply motor and sensory innervation to the thorax and abdomen. The skin and muscles supplied by a given pair are called, respectively, a dermatome and a myotome.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Optic Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the optic nerve induced by a trauma to the face or head. These may occur with closed or penetrating injuries. Relatively minor compression of the superior aspect of orbit may also result in trauma to the optic nerve. Clinical manifestations may include visual loss, PAPILLEDEMA, and an afferent pupillary defect.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Nail Diseases: Diseases of the nail plate and tissues surrounding it. The concept is limited to primates.Ureteroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the ureter.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Diaphyses: The shaft of long bones.Prolapse: The protrusion of an organ or part of an organ into a natural or artificial orifice.Fibula: The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.Supination: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm forward or upward. When referring to the foot, a combination of adduction and inversion movements of the foot.Traction: The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)Patellar Ligament: A band of fibrous tissue that attaches the apex of the PATELLA to the lower part of the tubercle of the TIBIA. The ligament is actually the caudal continuation of the common tendon of the QUADRICEPS FEMORIS. The patella is embedded in that tendon. As such, the patellar ligament can be thought of as connecting the quadriceps femoris tendon to the tibia, and therefore it is sometimes called the patellar tendon.Birth Injuries: Mechanical or anoxic trauma incurred by the infant during labor or delivery.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Posterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the anterolateral surface of the medial condyle of the femur, passes posteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the posterior intercondylar area of the tibia.Nails: The thin, horny plates that cover the dorsal surfaces of the distal phalanges of the fingers and toes of primates.Carpal Bones: The eight bones of the wrist: SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; TRIQUETRUM BONE; PISIFORM BONE; TRAPEZIUM BONE; TRAPEZOID BONE; CAPITATE BONE; and HAMATE BONE.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Odontoid Process: The toothlike process on the upper surface of the axis, which articulates with the CERVICAL ATLAS above.Obstetrical Forceps: Surgical instrument designed to extract the newborn by the head from the maternal passages without injury to it or the mother.Vertebroplasty: Procedures to repair or stabilize vertebral fractures, especially compression fractures accomplished by injecting BONE CEMENTS into the fractured VERTEBRAE.Medial Collateral Ligament, Knee: The ligament that travels from the medial epicondyle of the FEMUR to the medial margin and medial surface of the TIBIA. The medial meniscus is attached to its deep surface.Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Diphosphonates: Organic compounds which contain P-C-P bonds, where P stands for phosphonates or phosphonic acids. These compounds affect calcium metabolism. They inhibit ectopic calcification and slow down bone resorption and bone turnover. Technetium complexes of diphosphonates have been used successfully as bone scanning agents.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Retrograde Degeneration: Pathologic changes that occur in the axon and cell body of a neuron proximal to an axonal lesion. The process is characterized by central chromatolysis which features flattening and displacement of the nucleus, loss of Nissl bodies, and cellular edema. Central chromatolysis primarily occurs in lower motor neurons.Contusions: Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.Causalgia: A complex regional pain syndrome characterized by burning pain and marked sensitivity to touch (HYPERESTHESIA) in the distribution of an injured peripheral nerve. Autonomic dysfunction in the form of sudomotor (i.e., sympathetic innervation to sweat glands), vasomotor, and trophic skin changes may also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1359)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Basketball: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular court having a raised basket at each end.Scaphoid Bone: The bone which is located most lateral in the proximal row of CARPAL BONES.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Tarsal Bones: The seven bones which form the tarsus - namely, CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid, navicular, and the internal, middle, and external cuneiforms.Jaw Fractures: Fractures of the upper or lower jaw.Chondroma: A benign neoplasm derived from mesodermal cells that form cartilage. It may remain within the substance of a cartilage or bone (true chondroma or enchondroma) or may develop on the surface of a cartilage (ecchondroma or ecchondrosis). (Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)Alendronate: A nonhormonal medication for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis in women. This drug builds healthy bone, restoring some of the bone loss as a result of osteoporosis.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Battered Child Syndrome: A clinical condition resulting from repeated physical and psychological injuries inflicted on a child by the parents or caregivers.Skull Fracture, Basilar: Fractures which extend through the base of the SKULL, usually involving the PETROUS BONE. Battle's sign (characterized by skin discoloration due to extravasation of blood into the subcutaneous tissue behind the ear and over the mastoid process), CRANIAL NEUROPATHIES, TRAUMATIC; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OTORRHEA are relatively frequent sequelae of this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p876)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Patella: The flat, triangular bone situated at the anterior part of the KNEE.Peroneal Neuropathies: Disease involving the common PERONEAL NERVE or its branches, the deep and superficial peroneal nerves. Lesions of the deep peroneal nerve are associated with PARALYSIS of dorsiflexion of the ankle and toes and loss of sensation from the web space between the first and second toe. Lesions of the superficial peroneal nerve result in weakness or paralysis of the peroneal muscles (which evert the foot) and loss of sensation over the dorsal and lateral surface of the leg. Traumatic injury to the common peroneal nerve near the head of the FIBULA is a relatively common cause of this condition. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p31)Pubic Bone: A bone that forms the lower and anterior part of each side of the hip bone.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Fractures, Cartilage: Breaks in CARTILAGE.Foot Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Rhizotomy: Surgical interruption of a spinal or cranial nerve root. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Polymethyl Methacrylate: Polymerized methyl methacrylate monomers which are used as sheets, moulding, extrusion powders, surface coating resins, emulsion polymers, fibers, inks, and films (From International Labor Organization, 1983). This material is also used in tooth implants, bone cements, and hard corneal contact lenses.Orthopedic Fixation Devices: Devices which are used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Kyphoplasty: Procedures to restore vertebrae to their original shape following vertebral compression fractures by inflating a balloon inserted into the vertebrae, followed by removal of the balloon and injection of BONE CEMENTS to fill the cavity.Varicose Veins: Enlarged and tortuous VEINS.Palpation: Application of fingers with light pressure to the surface of the body to determine consistence of parts beneath in physical diagnosis; includes palpation for determining the outlines of organs.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Arm Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.Splints: Rigid or flexible appliances used to maintain in position a displaced or movable part or to keep in place and protect an injured part. (Dorland, 28th ed)Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Immobilization: The restriction of the MOVEMENT of whole or part of the body by physical means (RESTRAINT, PHYSICAL) or chemically by ANALGESIA, or the use of TRANQUILIZING AGENTS or NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS. It includes experimental protocols used to evaluate the physiologic effects of immobility.Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Eye Injuries, Penetrating: Deeply perforating or puncturing type intraocular injuries.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Soft Tissue Injuries: Injuries of tissue other than bone. The concept is usually general and does not customarily refer to internal organs or viscera. It is meaningful with reference to regions or organs where soft tissue (muscle, fat, skin) should be differentiated from bones or bone tissue, as "soft tissue injuries of the hand".Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Talus: The second largest of the TARSAL BONES. It articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA to form the ANKLE JOINT.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.AxisHemiarthroplasty: A partial joint replacement in which only one surface of the joint is replaced with a PROSTHESIS.Monteggia's Fracture: Fracture in the proximal half of the shaft of the ulna, with dislocation of the head of the radius.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Etidronic Acid: A diphosphonate which affects calcium metabolism. It inhibits ectopic calcification and slows down bone resorption and bone turnover.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Braces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.
It can be involved in an avulsion fracture. Right femur. Posterior surface. Right hip-joint from the front. Capsule of hip- ... "Non-traumatic lesser trochanter avulsion: a report of three cases". Iowa Orthop J. 18: 150-4. PMC 2378165 . PMID 9807723. ...
Neonatal/pediatric neurosurgery is often required for avulsion fracture repair. Lesions may heal over time and function return ... Peleg D, Hasnin J, Shalev E (1997). "Fractured clavicle and Erb's palsy unrelated to birth trauma". American Journal of ... Erb's palsy can also affect neonates affected by a clavicle fracture unrelated to dystocia.[11] ...
An avulsion fracture of the head of the fibula refers to the fracture of the fibular head because of a sudden contraction of ... Type C: Fracture of the fibula proximal to the syndesmosis.. A Maisonneuve fracture is a spiral fracture of the proximal third ... Fractures[edit]. The most common type of fibula fracture is located at the distal end of the bone, and is classified as ankle ... Therefore, this ligament is prone to injury in this type of avulsion fracture.[5] ...
Segond fracture - an avulsion fracture of the lateral tibial condyle. *Gosselin fracture - a fractures of the tibial plafond ... Spinal fracture *Cervical fracture *Fracture of C1, including Jefferson fracture. *Fracture of C2, including Hangman's fracture ... Arm fracture *Humerus fracture (fracture of upper arm) *Supracondylar fracture. *Holstein-Lewis fracture - a fracture of the ... a) closed fracture (b) open fracture (c) transverse fracture (d) spiral fracture (e) comminuted fracture (f) impacted fracture ...
Neonatal/pediatric neurosurgery is often required for avulsion fracture repair. Lesions may heal over time and function return ... Erb's palsy can also affect neonates affected by a clavicle fracture unrelated to dystocia. A similar injury may be observed at ... "Fractured clavicle and Erb's palsy unrelated to birth trauma". American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 177 (5): 1038-40 ...
MRI Images demonstrating avulsion fracture of the hamstring muscle origin. ...
Common injuries include fracture, avulsion, strangulation, entrapment, and amputation. Penile fractures are the result of ... Degloving and avulsion injuries involve the removal of the penis skin, which is a serious medical emergency. Treatment of these ... Penile fractures are caused by trauma to the erect penis, typically by suddenly bending it laterally during penetrative ... Fractures are treated with emergency surgery, and can be diagnosed with ultrasound, especially in pediatric cases. ...
Rothschild, B.; Tanke, D. H.; Ford, T. L. (2001). "Theropod stress fractures and tendon avulsions as a clue to activity". In ... five foot bones referred to Marshosaurus were examined for signs of stress fracture, but none were found. The Morrison ...
OSD may result in an avulsion fracture, with the tibial tuberosity separating from the tibia (usually remaining connected to a ... This can cause multiple subacute avulsion fractures along with inflammation of the tendon, leading to excess bone growth in the ... Baltaci, H., Ozer, V., and Tunay, B. (2004). Rehabilitation of avulsion fracture of the tibial tuberosity. Knee Surgery, Sports ... Complete fracture (through articular surface) including high chance of meniscal damage. This type of fracture usually requires ...
Shabat, Shay; Sagiv, Paul; Stern, Avi; Nyska, Meir (2002). "Avulsion fracture of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon ('Jersey ... Henry, SL; Katz, MA; Green, DP (2009). "Type IV FDP avulsion: lessons learned clinically and through review of the literature ... and presence of a concomitant fracture. Often, surgical pins are inserted into the injured digit to stabilize the bone and ...
Clinically, an avulsion fracture of the ischial tuberosity may occur. Avulsion fractures of the hip bone (avulsion or tearing ... These fractures occur at tubercles (bony projections that lack secondary ossification centers). Avulsion fractures occur where ... Wootton, JR; Cross, MJ; Holt, KW (July 1990). "Avulsion of the ischial apophysis. The case for open reduction and internal ...
"Theropod stress fractures and tendon avulsions as a clue to activity". In Tanke, D.H., and Carpenter, K. Mesozoic Vertebrate ... Other reports of pathologies in Ceratosaurus fossils include a stress fracture in a referred foot bone as well as a broken ... when Georg Baur speculated that the fusion in the type specimen was the result of a healed fracture. However, examples of fused ...
Absolute contraindications include patient refusal, open wounds, fractures, tendon avulsions, severe osteoporosis and ...
The principal causes of death were a skull fracture and avulsion of her right arm. She was inducted to the Canadian Golf Hall ...
... or fractures of the facial bones such as nasal fractures and fractures of the jaw, as well as trauma such as eye injuries. ... Soft tissue injuries include abrasions, lacerations, avulsions, bruises, burns and cold injuries. Commonly injured facial bones ... and III fractures (right). Le Fort I fractures, also called Guérin or horizontal maxillary fractures, involve the maxilla, ... Le Fort II fractures, also called pyramidal fractures of the maxilla, cross the nasal bones and the orbital rim. Le Fort III ...
It can be mistaken for an avulsion fracture of lateral tubercle of talus (Shepherd fracture) or a fracture of the Stieda ... On X-rays, an os ulnostyloideum is sometimes mistaken for an avulsion fracture of the styloid process. However, the distinction ... They pose a risk of being misdiagnosed as bone fractures on radiography. The os ulnostyloideum is an ulnar styloid process that ...
ISBN 0-7864-4859-8. Rothschild, B.; Tanke, D.H. & Ford, T.L. (2001). "Theropod stress fractures and tendon avulsions as a clue ... 14 foot bones referred to Coelophysis were examined for signs of stress fracture, but none were found. Most specimens of ...
Rothschild, B.; Tanke, D. H.; Ford, T. L. (2001). "Theropod stress fractures and tendon avulsions as a clue to activity". In ... On its left side it had a fractured scapula and radius, and fibriscesses (like abscesses) in the ulna and the outer phalanx ... the American paleontologist Bruce Rothschild and colleagues examined 60 Dilophosaurus foot bones for signs of stress fractures ...
Humeral fractures and shoulder dislocations can also cause this type of injury with high energy injuries. Root avulsion or ... Root avulsion injury can be further divided based on the location of the lesion: pre- and postganglionic lesions. In a ... In this case, anterior roots are more prone than posterior roots for avulsion, thus the C8 and T1 nerve roots are more prone to ... The severity of nerve injuries may vary from a mild stretch to the nerve root tearing away from the spinal cord (avulsion). " ...
In running and jumping movements, extreme contraction of the knee extensors can result in avulsion fractures of the tuberosity ... Tibial tuberosity fractures are infrequent fractures, most common in adolescents. ... However, if the fracture fragment is displaced, then surgery is necessary to allow for normal function. Tenderness in the ... ISBN 0-7817-3552-1. Lau, Kelvin; Ramachandran, Manoj (2006). "Tibial Tubercle Fracture". eMedicine. Retrieved December 2008. ...
It had fractured ribs, too. Bruce Rothschild and others also examined the evidence for tendon avulsions during their survey of ... Rothschild, B., Tanke, D. H., and Ford, T. L., 2001, Theropod stress fractures and tendon avulsions as a clue to activity, In: ... A 10 cm fracture runs down the long axis at the midlength of the right fibula. Multiple ribs bear healed fractures and the ... The presence of stress fractures or tendon avulsions provide evidence for very active predatory rather than scavenging diets in ...
The direct impact can cause an avulsion fracture where a portion of bone is removed by a muscle. The pain is due to the cluneal ... Operative treatment is rarely indicated and is reserved for patients suffering from significant displacement or fractures of ...
"An en bloc avulsion fracture of tibial tuberosity and Gerdy's tubercle in an adolescent basketball player: A case report". Knee ... It can be fractured along with the tibial tuberosity. It has been used as a source for bone grafts. The peroneal nerve runs ...
Radiographs are helpful in determining the possible presence of an avulsion fracture of the proximal phalanx insertion site of ... Bennett's fracture Rolando fracture Clifford R. Wheeless, III, MD (October 3, 2012). "Surgical Treatment of Acute Gamekeeper's ...
... cadavers and discovered that stress to the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament could lead to this type of avulsion fracture ... In honor of his discovery, a fracture of the anteriolateral tibial epiphysis is now called a Tillaux fracture - often ... This fracture is unique because it occurs during a certain period of adolescence, when there is a differential rate of growth ... A similar fracture to the posterolateral tibia was later identified by surgeon Henri Chaput, thus being referred to as a ...
Fractures and cartilage damage (Sx2, 800-829). General. *Avulsion fracture. *Chalkstick fracture ... Boxer's fracture. Other names. Metacarpal neck fracture of the little finger, scrapper's fracture,[1] bar room fracture, street ... 20% of hand fractures[4]. A boxer's fracture is the break of the 5th metacarpal bones of the hand near the knuckle.[4] ... X-ray is used to display the fracture and the angulations of the fracture. A CT scan may be done in very rare cases to provide ...
... avulsion and fractures of natural teeth or prosthetic restorations (de Sousa and Mourao 2015; Vogel et al. 2009; Gaudio et al. ... Walton, R., Tamse, A. Diagnosis of vertical root fractures. in: A. Tamse, I. Tsesis, E. Rosen (Eds.) Vertical Root Fractures in ... Multiple posterior teeth may fracture as a result of emergency intubation procedure and the diagnosis of such fractures may be ... Multiple posterior teeth may fracture during emergency intubation procedure and the diagnosis of such fractures may be delayed ...
Definition of avulsion fracture. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions ... avulsion fracture. Definition: a fracture that occurs when a joint capsule, ligament, or muscle insertion or origin is pulled ... Synonym(s): strain fracture. Further information. Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed ...
The tuberosity avulsion fracture (also known as pseudo-Jones fracture or dancers fracture is a common fracture of the fifth ... An avulsion fracture is a bone fracture which occurs when a fragment of bone tears away from the main mass of bone as a result ... Mallet finger Segond fracture "Avulsion fracture: How is it treated?". Mayo Clinic. April 8, 2010. Retrieved April 22, 2010. ... A tibial tuberosity avulsion fracture is an incomplete or complete separation of the tibial tuberosity from the tibia. This ...
... Topic Overview. What is an avulsion fracture?. An avulsion fracture occurs when an injury causes a ligament ... An avulsion fracture may be caused by direct force, such as a hard tackle in football. Indirect force-such as a sudden turn in ... Small fractures are usually treated with ice and rest. You may need a splint or a cast. These fractures rarely cause any ... X-rays are usually used to diagnose a fracture.. How is it treated?. ...
ASIS Avulsion Fracture, AIIS Avulsion Fracture, Ischial Tuberosity Avulsion Fracture, Anterior Superior Iliac Spine Fracture, ... Hip Avulsion Fracture, Anterior Superior Iliac Spine Avulsion Fracture, Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine Avulsion Fracture, ... Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine Fracture, Ischial Tuberosity Fracture. ... ASIS Avulsion Fracture, AIIS Avulsion Fracture, Ischial Tuberosity Avulsion Fracture, Anterior Superior Iliac Spine Fracture, ...
Ankle avulsion fractures can occur as a complication of ankle sprains, where the ligament tears, puling a small piece of bone ... Avulsion fracture explained. Avulsion fractures can occur anywhere in the body, usually at joints. the ankle is one of the most ... Ankle avulsion fracture symptoms. *Symptoms of an ankle avulsion fracture are very similar to an ankle sprain. ... More severe avulsion fractures or fractures in children may require casting for 6-8 weeks to allow the bone to heal. ...
Care guide for Avulsion Fracture (Discharge Care). Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard treatment options ... Learn more about Avulsion Fracture (Discharge Care). Micromedex® Care Notes. *Ankle Fracture ... An avulsion fracture is when a small piece of bone breaks and pulls away from a larger bone. Part or all of the piece may break ... An avulsion fracture may happen when a muscle, tendon, or ligament is pulled very hard. This can occur during a fall or while ...
Avulsion fracture of the anterior tibial eminence is an uncommon injury. If bone union does not occur, knee extension will be ... A Case of Nonunion Avulsion Fracture of the Anterior Tibial Eminence. Satoru Atsumi, Yuji Arai, Shuji Nakagawa, Hiroaki Inoue, ... These findings indicate that arthroscopic debridement of an avulsed fragment for nonunion of an avulsion fracture of the ... Plain radiography showed nonunion of the avulsion fracture region, and arthroscopy showed that the avulsed fragment impinged ...
... Scott D. McKay,1,2 Andrew ... Isolated popliteal tendon avulsion fractures are relatively uncommon in the pediatric population as other posterolateral ... As the treatment for isolated popliteal tendon avulsion fractures is still unclear, the report here may contribute to ... knee injuries without ligamentous instability and were subsequently diagnosed with isolated popliteus tendon avulsion fractures ...
These fractures usually happen due to a forceful muscle contraction. In children, avulsion fractures are common in areas of the ... Avulsion fractures occurs when a ligament or tendon attached to a bone partially detaches, taking a bone fragment with it. ... In children, avulsion fractures are common in areas of the bone made up of cartilage. These types of fractures are rarely ... Avulsion fractures are sometimes successfully treated with cast immobilization if the injury is more severe. The fractured area ...
Calcaneal avulsion fractures may occur spontaneously, most often in patients with diabetes. The fracture may be missed because ...
The tuberosity avulsion fracture (also known as pseudo-Jones fracture or dancers fracture[3] is a common fracture of the fifth ... Segond fracture. References[edit]. *^ "Avulsion fracture: How is it treated?". Mayo Clinic. April 8, 2010. Retrieved April 22, ... An avulsion fracture is a bone fracture which occurs when a fragment of bone tears away from the main mass of bone as a result ... Dental avulsion[edit]. Main article: Dental avulsion. Traumatic complete displacement of a tooth from its socket in alveolar ...
In avulsion fractures, a tendon or ligament pulls off a small piece of bone. ...
The case of an avulsion fracture occurring in an 18 year old athlete after repeated running is presented. The fracture involved ... Avulsion of the iliac crest apophysis: a rare fracture in adolescent athletes. Ann Emerg Med1993;22:1218-20. ... Avulsion fractures of the anterior superior iliac crest in open apophyses are rare injuries, occurring in younger patients aged ... Bilateral avulsion fractures of the anterior superior iliac spine in sprinters. Skeletal Radiol1985;13:65-7. ...
A CASE OF SUPERFICIAL PERONEAL NERVE INJURY WITH OLD LATERAL MALLEOLAR AVULSION FRACTURE OF THE ANKLE [in Japanese] * * 末吉 泰信 ...
Transosseous Suture Fixation of Avulsion Fracture of the Ulnar Collateral Ligament of the Thumb Metacarpophalangeal Joint. ... A simple technique of internal fixation of an avulsion fracture of the distal attachment of the UCL on the proximal phalanx of ... A simple technique of internal fixation of an avulsion fracture of the distal attachment of the UCL on the proximal phalanx of ... Transosseous Suture Fixation of Avulsion Fracture of the Ulnar Collateral Ligament of the Thumb Metacarpophalangeal Joint.. ...
This fracture represents a type 3 avulsion fracture of the PCL as it is comminuted and displaced. Other important structures ... This fracture represents a type 3 avulsion fracture of the PCL as it is comminuted and displaced. Other important structures ... Cruciate ligament avulsion fractures: Anatomy, biomechanics, injury patterns, and approach to management. Emerg Radiol.;: 1-12 ... The type 3 avulsion fracture of the PCL indicates a completely displaced fragment. ...
... arthroscopic suture bridge fixation with crossover ties of PCL tibial avulsion fracture using two tibial tunnels and a... ... This technique can be a useful treatment option for PCL tibial avulsion fracture even with small comminuted fracture due to ... Xu Z, Chen D, Shi D, Jiang Q (2012) Case report: osteochondral avulsion fracture of the posteromedial bundle of the PCL in knee ... Zhang H, Hong L, Wang XS, Zhang J, Liu X, Feng H (2011) All-arthroscopic repair of arcuate avulsion fracture with suture anchor ...
What is the best treatment for an avulsion fracture of the talus? Consult with dr. This needs to be thoroughly assessed by a ... specialist - you can be seen for clinical evaluation, as the size of the fracture fragment and its position is very important. ... Avulsion-fracture: In general, fractures take 6-8 weeks to heal. An avulsion is a small fracture usually with a soft tissue ... Toe fracture: Undisplaced fracture means there is a fracture but bones are still in close proximity. Avulsion fracture means ...
Volar (palmar) plate avulsion fracture. Case contributed by Dr Maulik S Patel ...
Extension avulsion fracture of the upper thoracic spine with associated oesophageal injury ... Extension avulsion fracture of the upper thoracic spine with associated oesophageal injury ...
"Posterior Cruciate Ligament Avulsion Fractures, Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine" on DeepDyve, the largest online ... Posterior Cruciate Ligament Avulsion Fractures. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Avulsion Fractures Katsman, Anna; Strauss, Eric; ... avulsion fracture, (2) review the indications for nonoperative and operative management of patients with PCL avulsion fractures ... avulsion fracture, (2) review the indications for nonoperative and operative management of patients with PCL avulsion fractures ...
9 seems to twist her ankle last week at school but wasnt putting weight on it so we took her to A&E where an avulsion fracture ... Avulsion fracture on the outside of the ankle - any chance of a cast that can be walked on?. (7 Posts) ... Avulsion fracture on the outside of the ankle - any chance of a cast that can be walked on? ... Dd aged 9 seems to twist her ankle last week at school but wasnt putting weight on it so we took her to A&E where an avulsion ...
Nondisplaced avulsion fracture of left ischium, initial encounter for closed fracture. 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Billable/ ... Short description: Nondisplaced avulsion fracture of left ischium, init. *The 2020 edition of ICD-10-CM S32.615A became ... Fracture of ischium. 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code Type 1 Excludes*fracture of ischium with ... S32.614D …… subsequent encounter for fracture with routine healing S32.614G …… subsequent encounter for fracture with delayed ...
After arthroscopic poking reduction of fracture, tibial eminence avulsion fractures were fixed with the Ethibond non-absorbable ... Methods: Between January 2009 and March 2012, 32 patients with ACL tibial eminence avulsion fractures were treated. There were ... Paper: [Effectiveness of arthroscopic treatment of anterior cruciate ligament tibial eminence avulsion fracture with non- ... Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment of ACL tibial eminence avulsion fracture with Ethibond non-absorbable suture fixation ...
  • Normally, people suffer from a traumatic fracture as a result of them having performed an activity that subjected the bone to enduring excessive pressure, stress, or a deep impact -- for instance, a fall, or a vehicular accident. (buzzle.com)
  • Open fractures are highly contaminated and must be débrided and copiously irrigated in the operating room. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Open fractures require antibiotics and an emergent orthopedic consultation. (medscape.com)
  • Management of open fractures of the lower limb. (medscape.com)
  • Howard M, Court-Brown CM. Epidemiology and management of open fractures of the lower limb. (medscape.com)
  • Following open fractures or open reduction procedures, a wound is created that must heal with scar tissue-another tissue to be remodeled and considered during rehabilitation. (scribd.com)
  • As there is cartilage at the end of many bones at the joint, a fracture may also include a break in the cartilage. (healthtap.com)
  • Fractures and broken bones are the same thing. (healthtap.com)
  • An X-ray or a CT scan to check for broken bones and a bone scan to determine the site of the fracture may be taken to conclude the diagnosis. (nicktingmd.com)
  • An avulsion fracture in any of these bones can cause the individual to feel a sharp pain at the site of the fracture, particularly if they attempt to move the area. (facty.com)
  • The elderly are far susceptible to fractures than the pediatric population since their bones become brittle through senescence. (buzzle.com)
  • Different bones in the body have different capacities to bear impact, and hence vary in degree of susceptibility to fractures. (buzzle.com)
  • Certain medical conditions, such as osteopenia, osteoporosis, bone marrow cancer, bone cyst, or inherited bone disorders debilitate the bones to such an extent that a superficial impact, too, may cause the bones to fracture. (buzzle.com)
  • Results of corrective surgical procedures, such as capsulectomies for joint release and tenolysis to restore tendon gliding, were poor for patients with fractures.16,43,101,113 Joints with stiffness and abnormal articular surfaces, due to limited reduction techniques in small bones, faced the choice of fusion (arthrodesis) or joint replacement (arthroplasty). (scribd.com)
  • In Ellis II and III fractures in which the dentin or pulp is exposed, the clinician caring for the tooth fracture in the acute setting must create a seal over these injured teeth to protect the pulp from intraoral flora and potential infection. (medscape.com)
  • OTA/AO Classification Is Highly Predictive of Acute Compartment Syndrome After Tibia Fracture: A Cohort of 2885 Fractures. (medscape.com)
  • Signs include loss of the power of movement, pain with acute tenderness over the site of fracture, swelling and bruising, deformity and possible shortening, unnatural mobility, and crepitus or grating heard when the ends of the bone rub together. (tabers.com)
  • Children: Sometimes growth spurts would lead to avulsion fractures. (newlifeticket.com)