Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Ethical Theory: A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Principle-Based Ethics: An approach to ethics that focuses on theories of the importance of general principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Individuation: A process of differentiation having for its goal the development of the individual personality.Ethical Analysis: The use of systematic methods of ethical examination, such as CASUISTRY or ETHICAL THEORY, in reasoning about moral problems.Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Right to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Confucianism: A school of thought and set of moral, ethical, and political teachings usually considered to be founded by Confucius in 6th-5th century B.C. China. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995)Virtues: Character traits that are considered to be morally praiseworthy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Jehovah's Witnesses: Members of a religious denomination founded in the United States during the late 19th century in which active evangelism is practiced, the imminent approach of the millennium is preached, and war and organized government authority in matters of conscience are strongly opposed (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). Jehovah's Witnesses generally refuse blood transfusions and other blood-based treatments based on religious belief.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Coercion: The use of force or intimidation to obtain compliance.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Higher Nervous Activity: A term used in Eastern European research literature on brain and behavior physiology for cortical functions. It refers to the highest level of integrative function of the brain, centered in the CEREBRAL CORTEX, regulating language, thought, and behavior via sensory, motor, and cognitive processes.Advance Directives: Declarations by patients, made in advance of a situation in which they may be incompetent to decide about their own care, stating their treatment preferences or authorizing a third party to make decisions for them. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Philosophy, MedicalPhilosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Dehumanization: The process by which a person or group of persons comes to be regarded or treated as lacking in human qualities.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Authoritarianism: The personality pattern or syndrome consisting of behavioral and attitudinal characteristics reflecting a preoccupation with the factors of power and authority in interpersonal relationships.Women's Rights: The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.Paternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a father.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Ethics, Institutional: The moral and ethical obligations or responsibilities of institutions.Treatment Refusal: Patient or client refusal of or resistance to medical, psychological, or psychiatric treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Presumed Consent: An institutional policy of granting authority to health personnel to perform procedures on patients or to remove organs from cadavers for transplantation unless an objection is registered by family members or by the patient prior to death. This also includes emergency care of minors without prior parental consent.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Secularism: Indifference to, or rejection of, RELIGION or religious considerations. (From Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Feminism: The theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes and organized activity on behalf of women's rights and interests. (Webster New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Ethics, Nursing: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of nurses themselves, their patients, and their fellow practitioners, as well as their actions in the care of patients and in relations with their families.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Western World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across the wide geographical area of Europe, as opposed to the East, Asia, and Africa. The term was used by scholars through the late medieval period. Thereafter, with the impact of colonialism and the transmission of cultures, Western World was sometimes expanded to include the Americas. (Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Reproductive Rights: Reproductive rights rest on the recognition of the basic right of all couples and individuals to decide freely and responsibly the number, spacing and timing of their children and to have the information and means to do so, and the right to attain the highest standard of sexual and reproductive health. They also include the right of all to make decisions concerning reproduction free of discrimination, coercion and violence.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Mentally Disabled Persons: Persons diagnosed as having significantly lower than average intelligence and considerable problems in adapting to everyday life or lacking independence in regard to activities of daily living.Literature, ModernMother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Genetic Privacy: The protection of genetic information about an individual, family, or population group, from unauthorized disclosure.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Terminally Ill: Persons with an incurable or irreversible illness at the end stage that will result in death within a short time. (From O'Leary et al., Lexikon: Dictionary of Health Care Terms, Organizations, and Acronyms for the Era of Reform, 1994, p780)Dependency (Psychology): The tendency of an individual or individuals to rely on others for advice, guidance, or support.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Physician-Nurse Relations: The reciprocal interaction of physicians and nurses.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary: Active euthanasia of a patient at the patient's request and/or with the patient's consent.Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Volition: Voluntary activity without external compulsion.Nursing, Supervisory: Administration of nursing services for one or more clinical units.Ethics: The philosophy or code pertaining to what is ideal in human character and conduct. Also, the field of study dealing with the principles of morality.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Hospital-Physician Relations: Includes relationships between hospitals, their governing boards, and administrators in regard to physicians, whether or not the physicians are members of the medical staff or have medical staff privileges.Geriatric Nursing: Nursing care of the aged patient given in the home, the hospital, or special institutions such as nursing homes, psychiatric institutions, etc.Judicial Role: The kind of action or activity proper to the judiciary, particularly its responsibility for decision making.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Social Participation: Involvement in community activities or programs.Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Informed Consent By Minors: Voluntary authorization by a person not of usual legal age for diagnostic or investigative procedures, or for medical and surgical treatment. (from English A, Shaw FE, McCauley MM, Fishbein DB Pediatrics 121:Suppl Jan 2008 pp S85-7).Humanism: An ethical system which emphasizes human values and the personal worth of each individual, as well as concern for the dignity and freedom of humankind.Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Pregnant Women: Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Family Nursing: The provision of care involving the nursing process, to families and family members in health and illness situations. From Lippincott Manual of Nursing Practice. 6th ed.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Resuscitation Orders: Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Human Experimentation: The use of humans as investigational subjects.Biomedical Enhancement: The use of technology-based interventions to improve functional capacities rather than to treat disease.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.Drama: A composition in prose or verse presenting in dialogue or pantomime a story involving various characters, usually intended to be acted on a stage and to be regarded as a form of entertainment. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Abortion, Therapeutic: Abortion induced to save the life or health of a pregnant woman. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Maternal-Fetal Relations: The bond or lack thereof between a pregnant woman and her FETUS.Hippocratic Oath: An oath, attributed to Hippocrates, that serves as an ethical guide for the medical profession.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Uncertainty: The condition in which reasonable knowledge regarding risks, benefits, or the future is not available.Codes of Ethics: Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.Codependency (Psychology): A relational pattern in which a person attempts to derive a sense of purpose through relationships with others.Research Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Morale: The prevailing temper or spirit of an individual or group in relation to the tasks or functions which are expected.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Deinstitutionalization: The practice of caring for individuals in the community, rather than in an institutional environment with resultant effects on the individual, the individual's family, the community, and the health care system.Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Nursing Research: Research carried out by nurses, generally in clinical settings, in the areas of clinical practice, evaluation, nursing education, nursing administration, and methodology.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Abortion, Eugenic: Abortion performed because of possible fetal defects.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.United StatesLiving Wills: Written, witnessed declarations in which persons request that if they become disabled beyond reasonable expectation of recovery, they be allowed to die rather than be kept alive by extraordinary means. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Quebec: A province of eastern Canada. Its capital is Quebec. The region belonged to France from 1627 to 1763 when it was lost to the British. The name is from the Algonquian quilibek meaning the place where waters narrow, referring to the gradually narrowing channel of the St. Lawrence or to the narrows of the river at Cape Diamond. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p993 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p440)Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Conscience: The cognitive and affective processes which constitute an internalized moral governor over an individual's moral conduct.Nurse-Patient Relations: Interaction between the patient and nurse.Great BritainHomebound Persons: Those unable to leave home without exceptional effort and support; patients (in this condition) who are provided with or are eligible for home health services, including medical treatment and personal care. Persons are considered homebound even if they may be infrequently and briefly absent from home if these absences do not indicate an ability to receive health care in a professional's office or health care facility. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p309)Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Sex Preselection: Methods for controlling genetic SEX of offspring.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Negotiating: The process of bargaining in order to arrive at an agreement or compromise on a matter of importance to the parties involved. It also applies to the hearing and determination of a case by a third party chosen by the parties in controversy, as well as the interposing of a third party to reconcile the parties in controversy.Human Characteristics: The fundamental dispositions and traits of humans. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Nontherapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is not intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed. Phase I drug studies (CLINICAL TRIALS, PHASE I AS TOPIC) and research involving healthy volunteers are examples of nontherapeutic human experimentation.Patient Preference: Individual's expression of desirability or value of one course of action, outcome, or selection in contrast to others.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Nursing: The field of nursing care concerned with the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Enterostomy: Creation of an artificial external opening or fistula in the intestines.Gender Identity: A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Geriatrics: The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Hospitalists: Physicians who are employed to work exclusively in hospital settings, primarily for managed care organizations. They are the attending or primary responsible physician for the patient during hospitalization.Physical Therapy Specialty: The auxiliary health profession which makes use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction of anatomic or physiological origin.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.
  • The 412th Test Wing's Emerging Technologies Combined Test Force conducted its first autonomy flight test Feb. 26-28, 2019, at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. (aerotechnews.com)
  • As system parts are becoming increasingly decoupled, gaining at the same time in terms of local autonomy, this article elaborates on the effects this trend has on verification and validation techniques. (springer.com)
  • We aim to develop the science of autonomy toward a future with robots and AI systems integrated into everyday life, supporting people with cognitive and physical tasks. (mit.edu)
  • In the 1980s we did not have commercial GPS, and therefore it was really hard to develop autonomous flying robots. (amnh.org)
  • From the Cauca people of Colombia to the communities of Kerala in southwestern India and on to creating spaces for freedom the asamblistas and piqueteros of the Argentinean uprisings, people worldwide are developing political and social forms rooted in differing concepts of autonomy. (narconews.com)
  • In response to neoliberalism and the particular educational need, the Zapatistas have developed an alternative educational autonomous pedagogy that is defined and administered by the indigenous communities and which is independent of the ideological impositions of those in power. (inmotionmagazine.com)
  • Kreowski, H.-J.: Modeling Iteracting Logistic Processes by Communities of Autonomous Systems, talk on activities of DFG-SFB 637 (Selbststeuerung logistischer Prozesse). (springer.com)
  • [ 4 ] It is the most populous (8,285,692 inhabitants in 2009) [ 5 ] and the second largest, in terms of land area, of the seventeen autonomous communities of the Kingdom of Spain. (thefullwiki.org)
  • Special care is taken to ensure that the developed and/or controlled robotic systems achieve energetic and decisional autonomy. (lirmm.fr)
  • In 2016 The Defense Science Board conducted a study at the request of the Undersecretary of Defense for AT&L that concluded "that there are both substantial operational benefits and potential perils associated with the use of autonomy" in Defense systems. (aiaa.org)
  • Previous research provides evidence as to the influence of teachers' autonomy-supportive behaviors on students' autonomous motivation in physical education (PE). (springer.com)
  • The present study investigated whether an autonomy-supportive intervention designed to promote motor skills learning (experimental group), compared with conventional teaching (control group), would increase autonomous motivation, knowledge structures, skill learning, and performance and whether it decrease controlled motivation in students over a semester. (springer.com)
  • Compared to students in the control group, students in the experimental group reported greater autonomous motivation and game performance in the post-test. (springer.com)
  • We conclude that the intervention was successful in enhancing students' autonomous motivation and performance. (springer.com)
  • Teachers' Autonomy Support and Positive Physical-Education Outcomes Paper presented at the 10th Anniversary Meeting of the Society for the Study of Motivation, Boston. (springer.com)
  • The effects of instructors' autonomy support and students' autonomous motivation on learning organic chemistry: A self-determination theory perspective. (springer.com)
  • Deci and Ryan state that "To the extend that social contexts do not allow satisfaction of the three basic psychological needs for competence, relatedness and autonomy, they will diminish motivation, impair the natural development process, and lead to alienation and poorer performance. (learnlab.org)
  • In this track, we explore the challenges associated with Autonomy and Machine Intelligence, especially focusing on maturation and deployment of technologies and techniques that will help engender trust in systems leveraging stochastic, non-deterministic autonomous capabilities. (aiaa.org)
  • Attending this conference will mean not only will you gain a clear understanding of Military Robotics and Autonomous System technologies but you will also have the chance to be part of a community of leaders and experts that will impact the growth of these technological assets. (smi-online.co.uk)
  • Today Hank explains hypothetical and categorical imperatives, the universalizability principle, autonomy, and what it means to treat people as ends-in-themselves, rather than as mere means. (wn.com)
  • PRASAR BHARATI is supposed to be an autonomous body, weaned off government control. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Autonomy is the ability to control both the actions you take, as well as regulating the self through various tasks. (learnlab.org)
  • If they enter into agreements with other organisations, including governments, or raise capital from external sources, they do so on terms that ensure democratic control by their members and maintain their cooperative autonomy. (libcom.org)
  • what makes an autonomous learner. (usingenglish.com)
  • what are some of the factors that hinder a learner of being autonomous. (usingenglish.com)
  • Although learner autonomy has received a great deal of attention from researchers and policy makers, 2008 presents an opportunity to pause and reflect on what has been achieved and, based on that experience, to explore the areas in the field of learner autonomy that ELT professionals need to research and develop in the future. (tesol.org)
  • This one-day symposium will provide an opportunity for ELT professionals to learn from and interact with leading professionals in the field on the important topic of learner autonomy. (tesol.org)
  • This Centre for Defence Enterprise (CDE) themed competition is looking for proposals for technologies that will reliably generate power for man-portable and robotic and autonomous systems (RAS). (innovateuk.org)
  • While strain may result from the failure to achieve a variety of goals, Agnew and others focus on the failure to achieve three related goals: money, status/respect, and - for adolescents - autonomy from adults. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This study concluded that "DoD must accelerate its exploitation of autonomy--both to realize the potential military value and to remain ahead of adversaries who also will exploit its operational benefits. (aiaa.org)
  • However, few studies have considered the impact of teachers' autonomy-supportive behaviors on enhancing knowledge structures and motor skills learning in PE. (springer.com)
  • in so doing, it reduces patients' power to exercise autonomy and it also makes them vulnerable even to outright coercion by those who provide them with needed health services. (mcmaster.ca)
  • A voluntary uncoerced decision, made by a sufficiently competent or autonomous person, on the basis of adequate information and deliberation, to accept rather than reject some proposed course of action that will affect him or her. (mcmaster.ca)
  • Public schools have an obligation to question and refute appear to conflict with the autonomy or freedom of choice policies that do not benefit their students and their com- of children, parents, and school staff, or the interests of munities and a corresponding responsibility to protect food and beverage companies. (cdc.gov)
  • As the trend towards fully autonomous driving and connectivity accelerates, the ability to deliver these innovations depends more than ever on advanced electronics and software development. (dac.com)
  • According to the New York Times , the Project was dogged by disagreements over whether or not the company should make a fully- or semi-autonomous car. (thenextweb.com)
  • Due to our inescapable reliance on others, no one is fully autonomous, but each person self-legislates in varying degrees and scope. (ama-assn.org)
  • Even those without fully realized autonomy retain capacity to make some meaningful choices. (ama-assn.org)
  • The first aim of this work was to examine the independent influence of students' perceived autonomy support for leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), from different school community agents, on motivational outcomes in a LTPA context and objective PA levels. (mdpi.com)
  • Using both a variable- and person-centered approach, the second aim was to examine how different combinations of autonomy-support were associated with students' motivational outcomes in a LTPA context and PA levels. (mdpi.com)
  • Autonomy support for LTPA from the PE teacher, mother, father, and peers were the only agents that significantly and positively predicted motivational outcomes in a LTPA context and PA levels. (mdpi.com)
  • While the two- and three-way interactions of some of these four significant sources significantly increased the explained variance of some motivational outcomes, the plots revealed that the lowest values of motivational outcomes were associated with low values of perceived autonomy support. (mdpi.com)
  • The "high autonomy support" group reported the most optimal outcomes, whereas the "low autonomy support" group showed the opposite pattern. (mdpi.com)
  • However, mixed autonomy support profiles did not differ in any of the outcomes. (mdpi.com)
  • Through diagnosis and treatment, doctors shape Bauby's identity and support his autonomy. (ama-assn.org)
  • To determine whether current school environments meet an ethical threshold or whether these environments fall short and should be altered, we will apply Beauchamp and Childress's 4 foundational principles for a discourse on the ethics of a biomedical intervention: autonomy (addressing conflict around individualism), beneficence (addressing the social benefit), nonmaleficence (addressing the issue of doing no harm), and justice (addressing equity in burdens and benefits) (7). (cdc.gov)
  • Beers ponders on the dangers of the inability to foresee the consequences of the variety explosion due to come in the future as everybody wants more and more autonomy. (wn.com)
  • The Embedded Systems and Software sessions and the Autonomous Systems sessions at DAC provide a forum for discussing the challenges of embedded design and an opportunity for leaders in the industry and academia to come together to exchange ideas and roadmaps for the future for this rapidly expanding area. (dac.com)
  • Ultimately, convenience (and autonomy) are the most important features to rational adults, and an auto-correct feature would deny users either of those. (typepad.com)
  • It might for example be cheaper to keep your autonomous car on the road with no human passenger at all, hopping between parking spaces to avoid traffic wardens, rather than paying for a parking space in your apartment or office building. (credit-suisse.com)
  • The " spirit of Decembe r" (Giorgos, Exarxeia, Athens, 2015) released passions and desires which have gradually been transformed into a creative re-appropriation of the city and the setting up of new autonomous spaces. (opendemocracy.net)
  • Spaces where we observe life and therefore also food production are currently being re-(self)-organized to facilitate the search for the necessary conditions to pursue "taking back our lives in our own hands", i.e, political autonomy both from the state and capital. (opendemocracy.net)
  • As this radical policy trend gains in momentum, Inside the Autonomous School considers whether this model is achieving its desired aims. (worldcat.org)
  • Under these circumstances, and since the 2008 capitalist (debt) crisis, we have seen how the autonomy of cities is being challenged by radical movements across the southern European peripheries. (opendemocracy.net)
  • We must consider whether schools have an ethical obligation to serve the common good in this area, even if the actions they take appear to conflict with the autonomy or freedom of choice of children, parents, and school staff, or the interests of food and beverage companies. (cdc.gov)
  • Part 1 presents a basic framework for ethical decision-making in healthcare, while Part 2 explains the relevant ethical principles: beneficence and nonmaleficence, justice, respect for autonomy, veracity, fidelity, and avoidance of killing. (ecampus.com)