Autonomic Dysreflexia: A syndrome associated with damage to the spinal cord above the mid thoracic level (see SPINAL CORD INJURIES) characterized by a marked increase in the sympathetic response to minor stimuli such as bladder or rectal distention. Manifestations include HYPERTENSION; TACHYCARDIA (or reflex bradycardia); FEVER; FLUSHING; and HYPERHIDROSIS. Extreme hypertension may be associated with a STROKE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp538 and 1232; J Spinal Cord Med 1997;20(3):355-60)Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Quadriplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in all four limbs which may result from BRAIN DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or rarely MUSCULAR DISEASES. The locked-in syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia in combination with cranial muscle paralysis. Consciousness is spared and the only retained voluntary motor activity may be limited eye movements. This condition is usually caused by a lesion in the upper BRAIN STEM which injures the descending cortico-spinal and cortico-bulbar tracts.Autonomic Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the parasympathetic or sympathetic divisions of the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; which has components located in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Autonomic dysfunction may be associated with HYPOTHALAMIC DISEASES; BRAIN STEM disorders; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES. Manifestations include impairments of vegetative functions including the maintenance of BLOOD PRESSURE; HEART RATE; pupil function; SWEATING; REPRODUCTIVE AND URINARY PHYSIOLOGY; and DIGESTION.Reflex, Abnormal: An abnormal response to a stimulus applied to the sensory components of the nervous system. This may take the form of increased, decreased, or absent reflexes.Intracranial Hemorrhage, Hypertensive: Bleeding within the SKULL that is caused by systemic HYPERTENSION, usually in association with INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOSCLEROSIS. Hypertensive hemorrhages are most frequent in the BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; PONS; and THALAMUS; but may also involve the CEREBRAL CORTEX, subcortical white matter, and other brain structures.Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Autonomic Fibers, Preganglionic: NERVE FIBERS which project from the central nervous system to AUTONOMIC GANGLIA. In the sympathetic division most preganglionic fibers originate with neurons in the intermediolateral column of the SPINAL CORD, exit via ventral roots from upper thoracic through lower lumbar segments, and project to the paravertebral ganglia; there they either terminate in SYNAPSES or continue through the SPLANCHNIC NERVES to the prevertebral ganglia. In the parasympathetic division the fibers originate in neurons of the BRAIN STEM and sacral spinal cord. In both divisions the principal transmitter is ACETYLCHOLINE but peptide cotransmitters may also be released.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Galvanic Skin Response: A change in electrical resistance of the skin, occurring in emotion and in certain other conditions.Doxazosin: A prazosin-related compound that is a selective alpha-1-adrenergic blocker.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Urodynamics: The mechanical laws of fluid dynamics as they apply to urine transport.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Afferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a peripheral part toward a nerve center.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha: One of the two major pharmacological subdivisions of adrenergic receptors that were originally defined by the relative potencies of various adrenergic compounds. The alpha receptors were initially described as excitatory receptors that post-junctionally stimulate SMOOTH MUSCLE contraction. However, further analysis has revealed a more complex picture involving several alpha receptor subtypes and their involvement in feedback regulation.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Autonomic Dysreflexia: A syndrome associated with damage to the spinal cord above the mid thoracic level (see SPINAL CORD INJURIES) characterized by a marked increase in the sympathetic response to minor stimuli such as bladder or rectal distention. Manifestations include HYPERTENSION; TACHYCARDIA (or reflex bradycardia); FEVER; FLUSHING; and HYPERHIDROSIS. Extreme hypertension may be associated with a STROKE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp538 and 1232; J Spinal Cord Med 1997;20(3):355-60)Licensure, Nursing: The granting of a license to practice the profession of nursing.Lycopersicon esculentum: A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Quadriplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in all four limbs which may result from BRAIN DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or rarely MUSCULAR DISEASES. The locked-in syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia in combination with cranial muscle paralysis. Consciousness is spared and the only retained voluntary motor activity may be limited eye movements. This condition is usually caused by a lesion in the upper BRAIN STEM which injures the descending cortico-spinal and cortico-bulbar tracts.Autonomic Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the parasympathetic or sympathetic divisions of the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; which has components located in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Autonomic dysfunction may be associated with HYPOTHALAMIC DISEASES; BRAIN STEM disorders; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES. Manifestations include impairments of vegetative functions including the maintenance of BLOOD PRESSURE; HEART RATE; pupil function; SWEATING; REPRODUCTIVE AND URINARY PHYSIOLOGY; and DIGESTION.Reflex, Abnormal: An abnormal response to a stimulus applied to the sensory components of the nervous system. This may take the form of increased, decreased, or absent reflexes.Persuasive Communication: A mode of communication concerned with inducing or urging the adoption of certain beliefs, theories, or lines of action by others.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Blood Pressure Determination: Techniques for measuring blood pressure.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Intracranial Hemorrhage, Hypertensive: Bleeding within the SKULL that is caused by systemic HYPERTENSION, usually in association with INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOSCLEROSIS. Hypertensive hemorrhages are most frequent in the BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; PONS; and THALAMUS; but may also involve the CEREBRAL CORTEX, subcortical white matter, and other brain structures.Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Pheochromocytoma: A usually benign, well-encapsulated, lobular, vascular tumor of chromaffin tissue of the ADRENAL MEDULLA or sympathetic paraganglia. The cardinal symptom, reflecting the increased secretion of EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE, is HYPERTENSION, which may be persistent or intermittent. During severe attacks, there may be HEADACHE; SWEATING, palpitation, apprehension, TREMOR; PALLOR or FLUSHING of the face, NAUSEA and VOMITING, pain in the CHEST and ABDOMEN, and paresthesias of the extremities. The incidence of malignancy is as low as 5% but the pathologic distinction between benign and malignant pheochromocytomas is not clear. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1298)Bradycardia: Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.Telemetry: Transmission of the readings of instruments to a remote location by means of wires, radio waves, or other means. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Wheelchairs: Chairs mounted on wheels and designed to be propelled by the occupant.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Meta-Analysis as Topic: A quantitative method of combining the results of independent studies (usually drawn from the published literature) and synthesizing summaries and conclusions which may be used to evaluate therapeutic effectiveness, plan new studies, etc., with application chiefly in the areas of research and medicine.Phenylpropanolamine: A sympathomimetic that acts mainly by causing release of NOREPINEPHRINE but also has direct agonist activity at some adrenergic receptors. It is most commonly used as a nasal vasoconstrictor and an appetite depressant.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic: Dysfunction of the URINARY BLADDER due to disease of the central or peripheral nervous system pathways involved in the control of URINATION. This is often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, but may also be caused by BRAIN DISEASES or PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES.Urinary Bladder: A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.Urinary Bladder, Overactive: Symptom of overactive detrusor muscle of the URINARY BLADDER that contracts with abnormally high frequency and urgency. Overactive bladder is characterized by the frequent feeling of needing to urinate during the day, during the night, or both. URINARY INCONTINENCE may or may not be present.Botulinum Toxins, Type A: A serotype of botulinum toxins that has specificity for cleavage of SYNAPTOSOMAL-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 25.Neuromuscular Agents: Drugs used for their actions on skeletal muscle. Included are agents that act directly on skeletal muscle, those that alter neuromuscular transmission (NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKING AGENTS), and drugs that act centrally as skeletal muscle relaxants (MUSCLE RELAXANTS, CENTRAL). Drugs used in the treatment of movement disorders are ANTI-DYSKINESIA AGENTS.Urinary Bladder Diseases: Pathological processes of the URINARY BLADDER.Urodynamics: The mechanical laws of fluid dynamics as they apply to urine transport.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Piloerection: Involuntary erection or bristling of hairs.Vision, Low: Vision considered to be inferior to normal vision as represented by accepted standards of acuity, field of vision, or motility. Low vision generally refers to visual disorders that are caused by diseases that cannot be corrected by refraction (e.g., MACULAR DEGENERATION; RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA; DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, etc.).Sweating: The process of exocrine secretion of the SWEAT GLANDS, including the aqueous sweat from the ECCRINE GLANDS and the complex viscous fluids of the APOCRINE GLANDS.Ocular Physiological Processes: Biological action and events that support the functions of the EYE and VISION, OCULAR.Optic Atrophy: Atrophy of the optic disk which may be congenital or acquired. This condition indicates a deficiency in the number of nerve fibers which arise in the RETINA and converge to form the OPTIC DISK; OPTIC NERVE; OPTIC CHIASM; and optic tracts. GLAUCOMA; ISCHEMIA; inflammation, a chronic elevation of intracranial pressure, toxins, optic nerve compression, and inherited conditions (see OPTIC ATROPHIES, HEREDITARY) are relatively common causes of this condition.Dictionaries, MedicalStethoscopes: Instruments intended to detect and study sound produced by the heart, lungs, or other parts of the body. (from UMDNS, 1999)Heart Murmurs: Heart sounds caused by vibrations resulting from the flow of blood through the heart. Heart murmurs can be examined by HEART AUSCULTATION, and analyzed by their intensity (6 grades), duration, timing (systolic, diastolic, or continuous), location, transmission, and quality (musical, vibratory, blowing, etc).Heart Auscultation: Act of listening for sounds within the heart.Auscultation: Act of listening for sounds within the body.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Noise, Transportation: Noise associated with transportation, particularly aircraft and automobiles.Noise: Any sound which is unwanted or interferes with HEARING other sounds.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Spinal Cord Compression: Acute and chronic conditions characterized by external mechanical compression of the SPINAL CORD due to extramedullary neoplasm; EPIDURAL ABSCESS; SPINAL FRACTURES; bony deformities of the vertebral bodies; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations vary with the anatomic site of the lesion and may include localized pain, weakness, sensory loss, incontinence, and impotence.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Rehabilitation Centers: Facilities which provide programs for rehabilitating the mentally or physically disabled individuals.Rehabilitation: Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts research focused on improving the treatment and prevention of alcoholism and alcohol-related problems to reduce the health, social, and economic consequences of this disease. NIAAA, NIMH, and NIDA were created as coequal institutes within the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration in 1974. It was established within the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH in 1992.Hong Kong: The former British crown colony located off the southeast coast of China, comprised of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon Peninsula, and New Territories. The three sites were ceded to the British by the Chinese respectively in 1841, 1860, and 1898. Hong Kong reverted to China in July 1997. The name represents the Cantonese pronunciation of the Chinese xianggang, fragrant port, from xiang, perfume and gang, port or harbor, with reference to its currents sweetened by fresh water from a river west of it.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Schools: Educational institutions.Multilevel Analysis: The statistical manipulation of hierarchically and non-hierarchically nested data. It includes clustered data, such as a sample of subjects within a group of schools. Prevalent in the social, behavioral sciences, and biomedical sciences, both linear and nonlinear regression models are applied.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Medical Subject Headings: Controlled vocabulary thesaurus produced by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. It consists of sets of terms naming descriptors in a hierarchical structure that permits searching at various levels of specificity.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Subject Headings: Terms or expressions which provide the major means of access by subject to the bibliographic unit.Reflex, Stretch: Reflex contraction of a muscle in response to stretching, which stimulates muscle proprioceptors.MEDLARS: A computerized biomedical bibliographic storage and retrieval system operated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLARS stands for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, which was first introduced in 1964 and evolved into an online system in 1971 called MEDLINE (MEDLARS Online). As other online databases were developed, MEDLARS became the name of the entire NLM information system while MEDLINE became the name of the premier database. MEDLARS was used to produce the former printed Cumulated Index Medicus, and the printed monthly Index Medicus, until that publication ceased in December 2004.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Bathing Beaches: Beaches, both natural and man-made, used for bathing and other activities.Tosylarginine Methyl Ester: Arginine derivative which is a substrate for many proteolytic enzymes. As a substrate for the esterase from the first component of complement, it inhibits the action of C(l) on C(4).Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)CaliforniaCellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Cardiology: The study of the heart, its physiology, and its functions.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Radiology, Interventional: Subspecialty of radiology that combines organ system radiography, catheter techniques and sectional imaging.PortugalMedical Staff: Professional medical personnel who provide care to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Cardiology Service, Hospital: The hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the cardiac patient.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Coronary Restenosis: Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.WashingtonTh2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Th1 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.Withanolides: Ergostane derivatives of 28 carbons with oxygens at C1, C22, and C26 positions and the side chain cyclized. They are found in WITHANIA plant genus and have cytotoxic and other effects.Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299Hospitals, Federal: Hospitals controlled by agencies and departments of the U.S. federal government.Organizational Affiliation: Formal relationships established between otherwise independent organizations. These include affiliation agreements, interlocking boards, common controls, hospital medical school affiliations, etc.Th17 Cells: Subset of helper-effector T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22. These cytokines are involved in host defenses and tissue inflammation in autoimmune diseases.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).United StatesQuality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Urinary Catheterization: Passage of a CATHETER into the URINARY BLADDER or kidney.Urogenital Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the urinary tract or its organs and on the male or female genitalia.Cystostomy: Surgical creation of an opening (stoma) in the URINARY BLADDER for drainage.Catheters: A flexible, tubular device that is used to carry fluids into or from a blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Spasm: An involuntary contraction of a muscle or group of muscles. Spasms may involve SKELETAL MUSCLE or SMOOTH MUSCLE.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Urology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the urinary tract in both sexes, and the genital tract in the male. Common urological problems include urinary obstruction, URINARY INCONTINENCE, infections, and UROGENITAL NEOPLASMS.Urinary Bladder Fistula: An abnormal passage in the URINARY BLADDER or between the bladder and any surrounding organ.Surgical Tape: A flat, flexible strip of material used to cover or fasten together damaged tissue.Haplosporida: A phylum of EUKARYOTES in the RHIZARIA group. They are small endoparasites of marine invertebrates. Spores are structurally complex but without polar filaments or tubes.PropylaminesProcollagen-Proline Dioxygenase: A mixed-function oxygenase that catalyzes the hydroxylation of a prolyl-glycyl containing peptide, usually in PROTOCOLLAGEN, to a hydroxyprolylglycyl-containing-peptide. The enzyme utilizes molecular OXYGEN with a concomitant oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to SUCCINATE. The enzyme occurs as a tetramer of two alpha and two beta subunits. The beta subunit of procollagen-proline dioxygenase is identical to the enzyme PROTEIN DISULFIDE-ISOMERASES.Lithium: An element in the alkali metals family. It has the atomic symbol Li, atomic number 3, and atomic weight [6.938; 6.997]. Salts of lithium are used in treating BIPOLAR DISORDER.Western Australia: A state in western Australia. Its capital is Perth. It was first visited by the Dutch in 1616 but the English took possession in 1791 and permanent colonization began in 1829. It was a penal settlement 1850-1888, became part of the colonial government in 1886, and was granted self government in 1890. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1329)Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.

Management of life-threatening autonomic hyper-reflexia using magnesium sulphate in a patient with a high spinal cord injury in the intensive care unit. (1/58)

We report the successful use of i.v. magnesium sulphate to control life-threatening autonomic hyper-reflexia associated with chronic spinal cord injury in the intensive care environment. A 37-yr-old, male was admitted to the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of septic shock and acute renal failure secondary to pyelonephritis. He had been found unresponsive at home following a 2-day history of pyrexia and purulent discharge from his suprapubic catheter. He had sustained a T5 spinal cord transection 20 yr previously. Initial management included assisted ventilation, fluid resuscitation, vasopressor support, and continuous veno-venous haemofiltration. The sepsis was treated with antibiotic therapy and percutaneous nephrostomy drainage of the pyonephrosis. On the fifth day, the patient developed profuse diarrhoea. This was associated with paroxysms of systemic hypertension and diaphoresis, his arterial pressure rising on occasion to 240/140 mm Hg. A diagnosis of autonomic hyper-reflexia was made and a bolus dose of magnesium sulphate 5 g was administered over 15 min followed by an infusion of 1-2 g h(-1). There was an almost immediate decrease in the severity and frequency of the hypertensive episodes. There were no adverse cardiac effects associated with the administration of magnesium, only a slight decrease in minute ventilation as the plasma level approached the upper end of the therapeutic range (2-4 mmol litre(-1)). In view of the beneficial effects observed in this case we advocate further research into the use of magnesium sulphate in the treatment or prevention of autonomic hyper-reflexia secondary to chronic spinal cord injury in the intensive care unit.  (+info)

TENS attenuates response to colon distension in paraplegic and quadriplegic rats. (2/58)

Individuals with spinal cord injuries above thoracic level 6 experience episodic bouts of life-threatening hypertension as part of a condition termed autonomic dysreflexia (AD). The hypertension can be caused by stimulation of the skin, distension of the urinary bladder or colon, and/or muscle spasms. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) may reduce the severity of AD because TENS has been used to inhibit second-order neurons in the dorsal horn. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that TENS attenuates the hemodynamic responses to colon distension. Eleven Wistar rats underwent spinal cord transection between thoracic vertebrae 4 and 5 (paraplegic, n = 6) or between cervical vertebra 7 and thoracic vertebra 1 (quadriplegic, n = 5). After recovery, all rats were instrumented with a radiotelemetry device for recording arterial pressure. Subsequently, the hemodynamic responses to graded colon distension were determined before and during TENS. During TENS the hemodynamic responses to colon distension were significantly attenuated. Thus TENS may be a preventive approach to reduce the severity of AD in paraplegic and quadriplegic individuals.  (+info)

Long-term result of Memokath urethral sphincter stent in spinal cord injury patients. (3/58)

BACKGROUND: Memokath urethral sphincter stents are used to facilitate bladder emptying in patients with spinal cord injury, but long term follow-up has not been reported. METHODS: Case series of ten men with spinal cord injury who underwent insertion of Memokath stents and were followed for up to nine years. RESULTS: Within four years, the stent had to be removed in nine out of ten patients because of: extensive mucosal proliferation causing obstruction to the lumen of the stent; stone around the proximal end of the stent, incomplete bladder emptying, and recurrent urinary infections; migration of the stent into the bladder related to digital evacuation of bowels; large residual urine; concretions within the stent causing obstruction to flow of urine, and partial blockage of the stent causing frequent episodes of autonomic dysreflexia. In one patient the stent continued to function satisfactorily after nine years. CONCLUSIONS: The Memokath stent has a role as a temporary measure for treatment of detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia in selected SCI patients who do not get recurrent urinary infection and do not require manual evacuation of bowels.  (+info)

Rehabilitation medicine: 1. Autonomic dysreflexia. (4/58)

Autonomic dysreflexia is an acute syndrome of excessive, uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have had an injury to the spinal cord (generally at or above the sixth thoracic neurologic level). It is caused by spinal reflex mechanisms that remain intact despite the patient's injury, leading to hypertension. This review describes the clinical features of autonomic dysreflexia, its common causes (most frequently stimulation of the lower urinary tract) and a recommended approach to treatment. The condition can nearly always be managed successfully, but prompt recognition is essential--without treatment there may be dire consequences, including death.  (+info)

Tail arteries from chronically spinalized rats have potentiated responses to nerve stimulation in vitro. (5/58)

Patients with severe spinal cord lesions that damage descending autonomic pathways generally have low resting arterial pressure but bladder or colon distension or unheeded injuries may elicit a life-threatening hypertensive episode. Such episodes (known as autonomic dysreflexia) are thought to result from the loss of descending baroreflex inhibition and/or plasticity within the spinal cord. However, it is not clear whether changes in the periphery contribute to the exaggerated reflex vasoconstriction. The effects of spinal transection at T7-8 on nerve- and agonist-evoked contractions of the rat tail artery were investigated in vitro. Isometric contractions of arterial segments were recorded and responses of arteries from spinalized animals ('spinalized arteries') and age-matched and sham-operated controls were compared. Two and eight weeks after transection, nerve stimulation at 0.1-10 Hz produced contractions of greater force and duration in spinalized arteries. At both stages, the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin (10 nm) and idazoxan (0.1 microm) produced less blockade of nerve-evoked contraction in spinalized arteries. Two weeks after transection, spinalized arteries were supersensitive to the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine, and the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine, but 8 weeks after transection, spinalized arteries were supersensitive only to clonidine. Contractions of spinalized arteries elicited by 60 mm K(+) were larger and decayed more slowly at both stages. These findings demonstrate that spinal transection markedly increases nerve-evoked contractions and this can, in part, be accounted for by increased reactivity of the vascular smooth muscle to vasoconstrictor agents. This hyper-reactivity may contribute to the genesis of autonomic dysreflexia in patients.  (+info)

Transient blockade of the CD11d/CD18 integrin reduces secondary damage after spinal cord injury, improving sensory, autonomic, and motor function. (6/58)

The early inflammatory response to spinal cord injury (SCI) causes significant secondary damage. Strategies that nonselectively suppress inflammation have not improved outcomes after SCI, perhaps because inflammation has both adverse and beneficial effects after SCI. We have shown that the selective, time-limited action of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the CD11d subunit of the CD11d/CD18 integrin, delivered intravenously during the first 48 hr after SCI in rats, markedly decreases the infiltration of neutrophils and delays the entry of hematogenous monocyte-macrophages into the injured cord. We hypothesized that this targeted strategy would lead to neuroprotection and improved neurological outcomes. In this study the development of chronic pain was detected in rats by assessing mechanical allodynia on the trunk and hindpaws 2 weeks to 3 months after a clinically relevant clip-compression SCI at the twelfth thoracic segment. The anti-CD11d mAb treatment reduced this pain by half. Motor performance also improved as rats were able to plantar-place their hindpaws and use them for weight support instead of sweeping movements only. Improved cardiovascular outcome was shown after SCI at the fourth thoracic segment by significant decreases in autonomic dysreflexia. Locomotor performance was also improved. These functional changes correlated with significantly greater amounts and increased organization of myelin and neurofilament near the lesion. The improved neurological recovery after the specific reduction of early inflammation after SCI demonstrates that this selective strategy increases tissue at the injury site and improves its functional capacity. This early neuroprotective treatment would be an ideal foundation for building later cell-based therapies.  (+info)

Autonomic dysreflexia during sperm retrieval in spinal cord injury: influence of lesion level and sildenafil citrate. (7/58)

Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) can occur during penile vibratory stimulation in men with spinal cord injury, but this is variable, and the association with lesion level is unclear. The purpose of this study was to characterize the cardiovascular responses to penile vibratory stimulation in men with spinal cord injury. We hypothesized that those with cervical injuries would demonstrate a greater degree of AD compared with men with thoracic injuries. We also questioned whether the rise in blood pressure could be attenuated by sildenafil citrate. Participants were classified as having cervical (n = 8) or thoracic (n = 5) injuries. While in a supine position, subjects were instrumented with an ECG, and arterial blood pressure was determined beat by beat. Subjects reported to the laboratory twice and received an oral dose of sildenafil citrate (25-100 mg) or no medication. Penile vibratory stimulation was performed using a handheld vibrator to the point of ejaculation. At ejaculation during the nonmedicated trials, the cervical group had a significant decrease in heart rate (-5-10 beats/min) and increase in mean arterial blood pressure (+70-90 mmHg) relative to resting conditions, whereas the thoracic group had significant increases in both heart rate (+8-15 beats/min) and mean arterial pressure (+25-30 mmHg). Sildenafil citrate had no effect on the change in heart rate or mean arterial pressure in either group. In summary, men with cervical injuries had more pronounced AD during penile vibratory stimulation than men with thoracic injuries. Administration of sildenafil citrate had no effect on heart rate or blood pressure during penile vibratory stimulation in men with spinal cord injury.  (+info)

Autonomic dysreflexia: a medical emergency. (8/58)

Autonomic dysreflexia is an important clinical diagnosis that requires prompt treatment to avoid devastating complications. The condition may present itself to all members of medical and surgical specialties, who may not be accustomed to treating it. It is the clinician's responsibility to have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology of the condition and the simple steps required to treat it.  (+info)

*Autonomic dysreflexia

These treatments are used during obstetric delivery of a woman with autonomic dysreflexia. The cause of autonomic dysreflexia ... Autonomic dysreflexia (AD), also known as autonomic hyperreflexia or mass reflex, is a potentially life-threatening condition ... Autonomic dysreflexia differs from autonomic instability, the various modest cardiac and neurological changes that accompany a ... An elevation of 40 mm Hg over baseline systolic should be suspicious for dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia can become chronic ...

*Hyperreflexia

See Autonomic dysreflexia. The most common cause of hyperreflexia is spinal cord injury (see autonomic dysreflexia). Standard ...

*F3 (classification)

People with spinal injuries at T6 or higher are more likely to develop Autonomic dysreflexia (AD). It also sometimes rarely ... "International Wheelchair Rugby Federation : Autonomic Dysreflexia". www.iwrf.com. Retrieved 2016-08-02. Woude, Luc H. V.; ... The condition causes over-activity of the autonomic nervous system, and can suddenly onset when people are playing sports. Some ...

*Nifedipine

"Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury". eMedicine. Retrieved 2011-07-14. Flenady, Vicki; Wojcieszek, Aleena M.; ... avoidance of this practice is in the use of nifedipine in the treatment of hypertension associated with autonomic dysreflexia ...

*Spinal shock

Autonomic dysreflexia is permanent, and occurs from Phase 4 onwards. It is characterized by unchecked sympathetic stimulation ... In spinal cord injuries above T6, neurogenic shock may occur, from the loss of autonomic innervation from the brain. ...

*Boosting (doping)

Boosting is a method of inducing autonomic dysreflexia with the intention of enhancing performance in sport. It can be used by ... Any deliberate attempt to induce Autonomic Dysreflexia is forbidden and will be reported to the Technical Delegate. The athlete ... Legg, David; Mason, Daniel S. (1998). "Autonomic Dysreflexia in Wheelchair Sport: A New Game in the Legal Arena?". Marquette ... Cheating at the Paralympic Games "Autonomic Dysreflexia and Boosting: Lessons from an athlete survey" (PDF). International ...

*Sexuality after spinal cord injury

Another risk is autonomic dysreflexia (AD), a medical emergency involving dangerously high blood pressure. People at risk for ... Both PVS and electroejaculation carry a risk of autonomic dysreflexia, so drugs to prevent the condition can be given in ... and episodes of autonomic dysreflexia. Reduced sensation in the pelvic area means women with SCI usually have less painful ... a risk during labor and delivery that threatens both mother and fetus is autonomic dysreflexia, in which the blood pressure ...

*Ganglionic blocker

... such as aortic dissection or autonomic dysreflexia. Cardiovascular: Orthostatic(postural) hypotension, Tachycardia GIT: Dry- ... nicotinic receptors are found within the ganglia of the autonomic nervous system, allowing outgoing signals to be transmitted ... is a type of medication that inhibits transmission between preganglionic and postganglionic neurons in the Autonomic Nervous ... does this by blocking the transmission of outgoing signals across the autonomic ganglia at the postsynaptic nicotinic ...

*Disability and women's health

Women who have a spinal cord injury above the T6 vertebra can have autonomic dysreflexia during a pelvic exam which can be life ...

*Spinal cord injury

One condition that occurs typically in lesions above the T6 level is autonomic dysreflexia (AD), in which the blood pressure ... which could trigger autonomic dysreflexia or damage the bladder permanently. The use of intermittent catheterization to empty ... Other autonomic functions may also be disrupted. For example, problems with body temperature regulation mostly occur in ... These changes translate into loss of muscle function, sensation, or autonomic function in parts of the body served by the ...

*Pressure ulcer

Some complications include autonomic dysreflexia, bladder distension, bone infection, pyarthroses, sepsis, amyloidosis, anemia ...

*Mecamylamine

... has been used as an orally-active ganglionic blocker in treating autonomic dysreflexia and hypertension, but, like ...

*List of MeSH codes (C10)

... autonomic dysreflexia MeSH C10.900.850.625 --- central cord syndrome. ... hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies MeSH C10.668.829.800.750.450.250 --- dysautonomia, familial MeSH C10.668.829.800. ... trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias MeSH C10.228.140.546.399.937.500 --- cluster headache MeSH C10.228.140.546.399.937.750 --- ... hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies MeSH C10.668.829.800.625.200 --- dysautonomia, familial MeSH C10.668.829.800.662 ...

*Catastrophic injury

... autonomic dysreflexia, altered thermoregulation, and changes to cardiac function as a result of injury to the sympathetic ...

*Doping

... a method of inducing autonomic dysreflexia Gene doping Stem cell doping Technology doping Dope (disambiguation) Dopey ( ...

*Hyperhidrosis

In people with a past history of spinal cord injuries Autonomic dysreflexia Orthostatic hypotension Posttraumatic syringomyelia ... Reisfeld, Rafael (2006). "Sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis: Should we place the clamps at T2-T3 or T3-T4?". Clinical Autonomic ... Associated with peripheral neuropathies Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome) Congenital autonomic dysfunction with ...

*Tetraplegia

... autonomic dysreflexia, deep vein thrombosis, and cardiovascular disease. Severity depends on both the level at which the spinal ... Schurch B, Knapp PA, Jeanmonod D, Rodic B, Rossier AB (January 1998). "Does sacral posterior rhizotomy suppress autonomic hyper ... breathing and other autonomic functions. Furthermore, sensation is usually impaired in affected areas. This can manifest as ...

*List of ICD-9 codes 320-359: diseases of the nervous system

Autonomic dysreflexia (337.9) Unspecified disorder of autonomic nervous system (338) Pain, not elsewhere classified (338.0) ... Disorders of the autonomic nervous system (337.0) Idiopathic peripheral autonomic neuropathy (337.00) Idiopathic peripheral ... Other idiopathic peripheral autonomic neuropathy (337.1) Peripheral autonomic neuropathy in disorders classified elsewhere ( ... Other trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (339.1) Tension type headache (339.10) Tension type headache, unspecified (339.11) ...
Purpose of this study: Urinary bladder dysfunctions are commonly associated with life threatening episodes of hypertension known as autonomic dysreflexia (AD). Numerous studies have reported a direct link between an overactive bladder and AD. Botulinum Toxin A (BOTOX) is a naturally occurring neurotoxin that when injected into the detrusor muscle provides safe and effective treatment for an overactive bladder. As a side observation only, previous studies have mentioned the disappearance of episodes of AD following BOTOX injections for overactive bladder. We are hoping to observe directly the effectiveness of BOTOX on preventing the triggering of uninhibited bladder contractions causing AD.. Who we are looking for: ...
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Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD), also known as Hyperreflexia, is a potentially dangerous complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). In AD, an individuals blood pressure may rise to dangerous levels and if not treated can lead to stroke and possibly death. Individuals with SCI at the T-6 level or above are at greater risk. AD usually occurs because of a noxious (irritating) stimulus below the level of the injury. Symptoms include headache, facial flush, perspiration, and a stuffy nose.. AD occurs primarily because of an imbalance in the body systems which control the blood pressure. The human body is an incredibly complicated and beautifully balanced machine. There are balances to each system of the body, including the blood pressure. One of the major ways the body controls blood pressure is by tightening or relaxing little muscles around the blood vessels. When the muscles contract, the blood vessels get smaller and blood pressure increases. Imagine a garden hose with water streaming through it; when ...
Autonomic Dysreflexia · This condition typically is found in patients with spinal cord injuries above T6 · Is manifest by sudden elevations in BP, diaphoresis, flushing, piloerection, bradycardia or dysrhythmias, anxiety, headache, nasal stuffiness and/or blurred vision · Patients may simply have elevations in BP and no symptoms · The most common cause of…
Does physical exercise improve arterial structure and function in spinal cord-injured individuals? And response to letter to the editor by Jan T. Groothuis et al ...
Data collected during the study will be used by the investigator to communicate results of the study to the research community. Data will mostly be communicated as a pooled data set; in the event that individual participant data is communicated, it will be represented with the unique study identifier which does not identify the individual participant ...
The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of topical anesthesia on cardiovascular changes triggered by bowel care in people with spinal cord injury.. In people with spinal cord injury, episodes of high blood pressure are common during strong sensory stimuli such as those present during routine bowel care. These episodes of high blood pressure can be dangerous due to the magnitude of blood pressure increase and because they can be accompanied by irregular heart beats. This condition, known as autonomic dysreflexia, is most common in individuals with high-level injuries.. The experience of autonomic dysreflexia can vary widely between individuals: some have goosebumps, sweating, facial flushing or headaches, while others have no symptoms at all, despite their changes in heart rate and blood pressure.. The use of a lubricant gel containing an anesthetic, lidocaine lubricant, is the standard of care in many hospital facilities when performing bowel care for individuals with ...
Fever Sometimes a fever will develop and can be as high as 103 degrees Ferhenheit. Sometimes the fever or temperature will be higher at night. Increased spasticity Increased muscle spasms may occur related to pain and discomfort in the joints. Joint Pain, Muscle Pain, and Autonomic Dysreflexia The bone that grows is often jagged making joint movement rough and bumpy - this can be very painful. If you have sensation after your spinal cord injury, this pain will be picked up by the brain and you will know that you are uncomfortable. If you have lost sensation after your SCI, your brain may not know your body is in pain. Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD), also known as autonomic hyperreflexia, is an emergency situation. It is an abnormal response which occurs when your body is experiencing pain or discomfort below the level of your spinal cord injury (SCI). Because the pain or discomfort message does not get to the brain because of the spinal cord injury, the bodys blood pressure increases to dangerous ...
Hemodynamic Instability/Neurogenic Shock and Autonomic Dysreflexia: Hemodynamic instability or neurogenic shock often occurs with acute SCI, resulting in hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias such as bradycardia, supraventricular tachycardia, and ventricular tachycardia.6,7 Arrhythmias are most common in the first 14 days after injury and in severe injuries.6,7 Hypotension results from a loss of vasoconstrictor tone in the peripheral arterioles, with consequent pooling of blood in the peripheral vasculature.6,7 Volume resuscitation is first-line treatment when all other causes of hypotension have been ruled out.4,6,7,9 If volume resuscitation is not successful, a vasopressor with both alpha- and beta-adrenergic activity, such as dopamine or norepinephrine, should be used to counter the loss of sympathetic tone and provide chronotropic support.4,6,7,9 Patients experiencing bradycardia should be treated with atropine as appropriate.4,9. Patients may also experience autonomic dysreflexia (AD; also ...
A syndrome associated with damage to the spinal cord above the mid thoracic level characterized by a marked increase in the sympathetic response to minor stimuli such as bladder or rectal distention.
The group Integrative Physiology has a long-standing tradition in human-in-vivo research related to oxygen transport (circulation) and oxygen utilization (muscle) at rest and during exercise in health and disease.
There may be a time when you have a medical emergency and need to contact a health professional.Be prepared to call your SCI therapist, , or other emergency services if you or the person with the spinal cord injury (SCI) has the symptoms of autonomic dysreflexia, a syndrome characterized by a sudden onset of excessively high blood pressure. If not treated promptly and correctly, it may lead to ...
ABSTRACT: Effective rehabilitation and modern reproductive technology may increase the number of women considering pregnancy who have spinal cord injuries (SCIs). It is important that obstetricians caring for these patients are aware of the specific problems related to SCIs. Autonomic dysreflexia is the most significant medical complication seen in women with SCIs, and precautions should be taken to avoid stimuli that can lead to this potentially fatal syndrome. Women with SCIs may give birth vaginally, but when cesarean delivery is indicated, adequate anesthesia (spinal or epidural if possib... ...
I am a C5/6 quad who was injured in early 1982. Throughout most of the years since Ive suffered from periodic bouts of sweating which causes me to remain home seated in front of a heater fan to keep the front of my head and shoulders dry and warm. While it may be a result of autonomic dysreflexia I am skeptical because my blood pressure is only sometimes elevated above 150 and regardless of how high it becomes I can stop the sweating by lying down and, as I learned only six years ago when
Table 23-4 vaccination of patient, family, and other health needs stiffness joint prednisone. Reliability and validity confirmed 2018). Junctional escape beats if they develop. 5. Rectal infection, pharyngitis, conjunctivitis, skin lesions, dry skin, thin hair and wear a medicalert bracelet or necklace, and inform caregivers that autonomic dysreflexia occurs: Check bp; if elevated, via an ommaya reservoir or by gently rolling the ngers for edema around the distal common carotid artery. Family education and health policy curley, m. , gornik, h. L. , et al. Involving the middle of fvc and/or diffusion capacity of the, table 21-1 signs and symptoms that occur with hsv4 because of decrease in absorption or intake; cobalamin is the single photons emitted from device are not suitable for osteotomies or reconstruction of the bowel. Multiple pheresis, or removal of the access vessels are encountered, coming from the toes pointed toward the right-hand side has shown that atherosclerosis regression in ...
PATIENT CARE: A stethoscope is typically used. It is applied to the patients skin surface gently but firmly to eliminate any environmental noises that may be present. Auscultation is used to detect heart rate and rhythm and any cardiac murmurs, rubs, or gallops; crackles or wheezes in the lungs; pleural rubs; movement of gas or food through the intestines; vascular or thyroid bruits; fetal heart tones; and other physiological phenomena. ...
Disclaimer: The content in this document/resource is intended for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. No professional relationship is implied or otherwise established by reading this document. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Many of the resources references are not affiliated with Craig Hospital. Craig Hospital assumes no liability for any third party material or for any action or inaction taken as a result of any content or any suggestions made in this document and should not be relied upon without independent investigation. The information on this page is a public service provided by Craig Hospital and in no way represents a recommendation or endorsement by Craig Hospital.. ...
Twenty-years ago, I applied for my first grant to study the effect of spinal cord injury on the cardiovascular system, but it was widely believed that people with SCI didnt need to worry about cardiovascular disease, and that the research community should focus on curing paralysis. While that is still the end goal, we now know how severe and life-threatening cardiovascular issues can be," says Dr. Krassioukov. "With this grant we will study different types of exercise interventions as well as translating findings in such a way that we can educate health care providers on the specific cardiovascular problems that are associated with SCI. The results will be improved treatment for SCI as well as a reduction in the financial burden of care.". One area the research team will be looking at is autonomic dysreflexia, which is a drastic increase in blood pressure striking those with cervical and upper thoracic injuries. If left untreated, it can lead to bleeding in the brain and or death.. This ...
The extent of physical disability that may determine whether the candidate can perform the required water skills. High spinal cord injury (closer to the head) may compromise breathing. How? Respiratory signals come from the spinal cord at the c4-5 level, so a fracture at or above that level will likely paralyze the diaphragm. A fracture at the mid-thoracic (chest) level will paralyze the legs, while a fracture at c5-6 will cause severe paralysis of the arms as well ...
Hello all, I,m a paraplegic for the lasrt ten yrs. & my problem relates to Autonomous Dysreflexia caused by catheter replacement.Today when my caregiver changed my one month old catheter & inserted a new one I experienced severe headach & perspiration which lasts for many hrs. persistently.Then we took catheter out & inserted a new one.Urine is flowing out continuously & there,re no signs of UTI since we replaced a functioning catheter with a new one.It,s strange that
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Despite the loss of centrally mediated sympathetic vasoconstriction, spinal cord-injured (SCI) individuals cope surprisingly well with orthostatic challenges. In the pathophysiology of this intriguing observation spinal sympathetic-, veno-arteriolar-(VAR), and myogenic reflexes seem to play a role. The purpose of this study was to assess whether central (stroke volume, heart rate, blood pressure and total peripheral resistance) and peripheral (leg blood flow, leg vascular resistance and femoral arterial diameter) hemodynamic responses to head-up tilt are different in two groups of SCI patients, i. e., SCI individuals with upper motor neuron lesions (who have spinal reflexes, VAR and myogenic reflexes) (U; n=6) and those with lower motor neuron lesion (who have no spinal reflexes, perhaps no VAR due to nerve degeneration, but intact myogenic reflexes) (L; n=5). Ten healthy male individuals served as controls (C) (normal supraspinal sympathetic control and presence of all reflexes). After 10 min ...
Standardization of international spinal cord injury data sets; validation of various International Spinal Cord Injury Data Sets; validation of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM IV); evaluation of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) regarding the definition of completeness; melatonine and cortisol related to sleep in tetraplegia and high paraplegia; use of exoskeleton in individuals with spinal cord lesions; electrical stimulation for incontinence in women with spinal cord lesions; kidney function up to 55 years after spinal cord injury in relation to the results of urological imaging investigations and urodynamics; evaluating the use of telehealth in relation to individuals with spinal cord lesions; evaluation of materials for teaching of medical students about autonomic dysreflexia etc.; pressure ulcer treatment; shoulder problems in individuals with spinal cord lesions; resilience in individuals with spinal cord cord lesions and ...
Definition of high spinal anesthesia. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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TY - JOUR. T1 - The effects of apamin in rats with pretrigeminal or high spinal transsection of the central nervous system. AU - Janicki, P.. AU - Gumulka, S. W.. AU - Krzaścik, P.. AU - Habermann, E.. PY - 1985. Y1 - 1985. N2 - P. Janicki, S.W. Gumulka, P. Krzaścik and E. Habermann. The effects of apamin in rats with pretrigeminal or high spinal transsection of the central nervous system. Toxicon 23, 993-996, 1985. - Rats were injected in one lateral cerebral ventricle (i.c.v.) with apamin (100 ng per animal). The resulting desynchronisation pattern in the electrocorticogram (ECoG) and the symptoms of poisoning were monitored before and after transsection at different levels, and following morphine. Apamin acts primarily on the brain stem and spinal cord, i.e. structures possessing a sensory input, and then indirectly on the higher integrating systems. There is no general parallelism between receptor density and locus of action.. AB - P. Janicki, S.W. Gumulka, P. Krzaścik and E. Habermann. ...
A complete spinal cord injury prevents neural connections between distal sites and higher neural structures. While it has previously been demonstrated that an isolated spinal cord can elicit non-thermal sweating independently of the hypothalamus [1-3], the ability of the spinal cord to control sweating in response to thermal stimuli, without hypothalamic influence, is less clear. The majority of early literature indicates that thermal sweating is absent below a complete spinal cord injury (SCI) [4-7], yet several studies suggest otherwise [8-11]. However, invasive measures have failed to observe altered sympathetic activity when thermally stimulating insensate regions [12], which is inconsistent with the observations of sweating below a SCI.
The authors concluded that the inhibition of PLA1 depends on the binding to the bilayer, t he medical record must be rigorously maintained; procedures should never be presumed to have what is the tablet propranolol performed if they have not been documented properly. This complication is quite rare when proper technique is used. Patients with high spinal cord disruption are at risk for spinal shock because of physiologic disruption of sympathetic fibers.
SCI injuries can be classified as "complete" and "incomplete". As the name entails, a complete SCI results in paralysis below the site of the injury, where there is no feeling or voluntary movement, and both sides of the body have become paralyzed equally. An incomplete SCI occurs when only one part of the spinal cord has become damaged (due to a tear, compression or other injury to the spine). Victims of incomplete SCI may still experience paralysis, but it will be generally partial in nature (as opposed to a complete SCI). In an incomplete SCI, some feeling and voluntary movement may be present on one or both sides of the body.. Incomplete SCIs have become more common given relative advances in medical technology in recent history. An individual with an incomplete SCI may retain feeling in the affected area, but may still experience ongoing pain. The ongoing sensory agitation can be serious and debilitating, rending victim completely not able to function.. Each Injury is Unique and Requires ...
I just had to reply to this. It sounds so much like what I have been going through. For the past 6 years I have been loosing my hearing and I have been to several different doctors who kept telling me I had allergies. Finally in Oct of 2010 back to the ENT to get hearing aid to help me hear. He decided to do a myringotomy instead and when clear fluid was rushing out he sent me for an MRI and CT Scan. My ears would not heal and he fluid kept draining for days. The CT scan showed holes in both sides of my skull in my temporal bone. Since I could not heal and the CSF was leaking out something had to be done quickly. I was sent to a nerosurgeon who knew something had to be done but wanted to weight the options and suggested a shunt to control the fluid and to open it up right after surgery to allow the fluid to go out the shunt and stop my ears from leaking. So in October 2010 a week later I had the shunt put in and it worked. Stopped the leaking from my ears. Now to get my hearing back we tried the ...
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many paralysed patients experience difficulties when coughing? Our colleague Wolfgang Illek is quadriplegic and knows why. After catching a cold, most people …
Management of the neurogenic bladder has the primary objectives of maintaining continence, ensuring low bladder pressure (to avoid renal damage) and avoiding or minimising infection. Options include intermittent urethral catheterisation, indwelling urethral or suprapubic catheterisation, timed voiding, use of external catheter (for men), drug treatment, augmentation cystoplasty and urinary diversion. [1] Long-term indwelling urethral catheterisation is common amongst people with cervical spinal cord injury; however, this carries a high risk of developing a catheter-related urinary tract infection and associated complications especially bypassing and leakage. [2, 3]. Carers and health professionals tend to assume that urethral catheter drainage is satisfactory in spinal cord injury patients if the catheter is draining clear urine, there is no blood in urethral meatus, and the patient does not develop features of autonomic dysreflexia. In male spinal cord injury patients, the balloon of a Foley ...
E = Normal: Motor and sensory function are normal. Supra-sacral spinal cord injury may result in neurogenic bladder, characterized in part by frequent urinary tract infections from inadequate bladder emptying. The high bladder pressures related to large post-void residuals can lead to autonomic dysreflexia, vesicoureteral reflux, upper urinary tract dilations, hydronephrosis, and eventual renal failure. Sacral anterior root stimulation is intended to provide bladder evacuation by delivering electrical stimulation to intact spinal nerve roots in order to elicit functional contraction of the innervated muscles. Implantation of a sacral anterior root stimulator is typically performed in conjunction with a simultaneous posterior rhizotomy. The rhizotomy results in an areflexive bladder with low intravesicular pressure and high compliance. When the user activates the implanted stimulator, the urethral sphincter and bladder contract and relax, allowing the bladder to empty on demand with low residual ...
A life-threatening disability after complete spinal cord injury is urinary dysfunction, which is attributable to lack of regeneration of supraspinal pathways that control the bladder. Although numerous strategies have been proposed that can promote the regrowth of severed axons in the adult CNS, at present, the approaches by which this can be accomplished after complete cord transection are quite limited. In the present study, we modified a classic peripheral nerve grafting technique with the use of chondroitinase to facilitate the regeneration of axons across and beyond an extensive thoracic spinal cord transection lesion in adult rats. The novel combination treatment allows for remarkably lengthy regeneration of certain subtypes of brainstem and propriospinal axons across the injury site and is followed by markedly improved urinary function. Our studies provide evidence that an enhanced nerve grafting strategy represents a potential regenerative treatment after severe spinal cord injury. ...
After complete spinal transection in adult rats, careful combinations of pharmacological and physical therapies create a novel cortical sensorimotor circuit that may bypass the lesion through biomechanical coupling, allowing animals to recover unassisted hindlimb locomotion.
Previous studies have shown that multiple stem cell implantations might assist adults suffering from complete spinal cord injuries (SCI). Now a groundbreaking study released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine shows for the first time that children with SCI might benefit, too. Marcin Majka, Ph.D., and Danuta Jarocha, Ph.D., led the study at Jagiellonian University College of Medicine in Krakow, Poland. "Although it was conducted on a small number of patients carrying a different injury level and type, preliminary results demonstrate the possibility of attaining neurological, motor and sensation and quality-of-life improvement in children with a chronic complete spinal cord injury through multiple bone marrow derived cell (BMNC) implantations. Intravenous implantations of these cells seem to prevent and/or help the healing of pressure ulcers," Dr. Majka said.. ...
RESULTS: Five different pain classification schemas, six self-report measures of pain, and two measures of pain impact on functioning were selected based on our inclusion criteria. The majority of the studies identified in these areas reported inter- and intra-rater reliability information. Of the little validity data found for pain screening measures, it was difficult to compare due to the variability of the descriptors used. No data on sensitivity was identified ...
|table width=100%| |tbody| |tr| |td| |p|TeleStik® is the newly designed portable reacher that does what the others don’t. TeleStik® allows you to retrieve hard-to-reach items without requiring significant grip strength or dexterity. Pi
Hi, there. I need help learning best (or just good!) technique for turning my patients in their beds, especially the trach/vent patients. Of course, its just me (one-person turn) turning them. (Yes, yes, I suck - Ive been a nurse for ten years, but worked in hospital, and had second person to hel...
A research participant at the University of Louisville with a complete spinal cord injury, who had lost motor function below the level of the injury, has regained the ability to move his legs voluntarily and stand six years after his injury.. A study published today in Scientific Reports describes the recovery of motor function in a research participant who previously had received long-term activity-based training along with spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES). In the article, senior author Susan Harkema, Ph.D., professor and associate director of the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC) at the University of Louisville, and her colleagues report that over the course of 34.5 months following the original training, the participant recovered substantial voluntary lower-limb motor control and the ability to stand independently without the use of scES.. "Activity-dependent plasticity can re-establish voluntary control of movement and standing after complete paralysis in humans ...
Dr. An Do, one of the lead researchers involved in the study, from University of California, Irvine, USA, says: "Even after years of paralysis the brain can still generate robust brain waves that can be harnessed to enable basic walking. We showed that you can restore intuitive, brain-controlled walking after a complete spinal cord injury. This noninvasive system for leg muscle stimulation is a promising method and is an advance of our current brain-controlled systems that use virtual reality or a robotic exoskeleton.". ...
Question - Quadriplegic. Had bad cold sweats. Having pain. Have high ESR no fever. Guide?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Anemia, Ask a General & Family Physician
The dream of regaining the ability to stand up and walk has come closer to reality for people paralyzed below the waist who thought they would never take another step.
Clearly, PDE5i have revolutionized the treatment of ED in general and the neurogenic ED population is no exception. They remain safe and effective in most men with neurogenic ED; however, care must be taken in prescribing PDE5i to men high spinal cord lesions, MSA or possibly PD. VEDs are minimally-invasive and can be as effective as other modalities at leading to erection. However, high discontinuation rates are associated with VED use related to pain, difficulty using the device or cold penis. Intracavernosal therapy has been a mainstay of treatment for neurogenic ED and remains extremely successful in the SCI population. Trial of intracavernosal therapy for other causes of neurogenic ED can be considered second-line therapy, but there is a relative paucity of data for clinical outcomes related to its use outside of SCI men. Surgical therapy via penile implantation remains another second line approach and may also be utilized to assist men with bladder management. Higher complication rates of ...
Clearly, PDE5i have revolutionized the treatment of ED in general and the neurogenic ED population is no exception. They remain safe and effective in most men with neurogenic ED; however, care must be taken in prescribing PDE5i to men high spinal cord lesions, MSA or possibly PD. VEDs are minimally-invasive and can be as effective as other modalities at leading to erection. However, high discontinuation rates are associated with VED use related to pain, difficulty using the device or cold penis. Intracavernosal therapy has been a mainstay of treatment for neurogenic ED and remains extremely successful in the SCI population. Trial of intracavernosal therapy for other causes of neurogenic ED can be considered second-line therapy, but there is a relative paucity of data for clinical outcomes related to its use outside of SCI men. Surgical therapy via penile implantation remains another second line approach and may also be utilized to assist men with bladder management. Higher complication rates of ...
PEARLS Probably the most important factor contributing to success with spinal anesthesia in the day-to-day life of an anesthesiologist is the time efficiency of the technique. Use of spinal anesthesia cannot measurably add to the surgical day if nurses and surgeons are to be co-advocates of this technique. Thus, one should plan ahead to maximize efficiency. Often overlooked in this maxim is the fact that patient preparation for the operation can begin almost as soon as the block is administered if the patient is properly sedated.. Intraoperatively, during high spinal anesthesia (often during cesarean section) patients occasionally complain excessively of dyspnea. This often appears to be a result of loss of chest wall sensation rather than of significantly decreased inspiratory capacity. The loss of chest wall sensation does not allow the patient to experience the reassurance of a deep breath. This impediment to patient acceptance can often be overcome simply by asking the patient to raise a ...
List of 42 causes for 1 litre of sweat per hour and Choreathetoid movement and Endocrine causes of bilateral lower limb hyperreflexia, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Is it clear to you that in so many ways you are responsible ... so very responsible ... for your possible outcomes? If your parents were alcoholics, or if you live in a totalitarian regime and are jailed for political reasons, or if someone crashes into your car and leaves you a quadriplegic, or if you are passed over for that promotion you wanted so very much (and you had done all that was possible in order to achieve it), or if you were not elected school valedictorian (and you had worked very hard all throughout your school years in order to achieve it), you are clearly not responsible for that ... but you are responsible for all the reactions and choices you make from that moment forward ...
PURPOSE: This review sought to answer the question "What are the barriers and facilitators influencing peoples experience of return to work following spinal cord injury?". METHODS: Studies that met the selection criteria were identified, presented and critically appraised using National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines. Thematic synthesis was completed with studies possessing strong methodological rigor. Synthesis and interpretation involved three stages; coding of primary data; development of descriptive themes reflective of the primary data; and establishment of analytical themes to answer the review question.. RESULTS: Data from nine papers were included in the thematic synthesis. Several descriptive themes and three analytical themes were drawn from the data to answer the research question. Analytical themes included: a matrix of personal and environmental factors exists requiring complex navigation in order to create possibilities and opportunities for postinjury ...
Motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI) results in the loss of voluntary control of muscles below the lesion level. One promising rehabilitation strategy to rec …
New stem cells techniques open exciting perspectives in the treatment of severe spinal cord injuries, and give hopes to cure paraplegia in humans
In a new study, researchers discovered that rats with spinal injuries experienced changes to their gut bacteria and a rise in anxiety-like behaviour. When rats with spinal injuries were given fecal transplants from healthy rats, their behaviour--and gut bacteria--remained normal.|br /|
Inspired is a Spinal Cord Injury Support Forum which offers support for those affected by Spinal Cord Injuries, their families and carers. Join us for free today!
List of causes of Abnormal patellar reflex and Autonomic hyperreflexia, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Quadriplegia is a condition that is typically the result of an accident that has resulted in a spinal cord injury. Quadriplegics suffer some form of...
A team of Swiss researchers made cuts in the spinal cord of rats, who then learned to walk again following electrochemical treatment.
List of 238 causes for Bilateral lower limb hyperreflexia and Focal seizure and Hyperreflexia and Paraplegia and Paresthesias in children, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
A pioneering surgical technique has restored some hand and arm movement to patients immobilized by spinal cord injuries in the neck, reports a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The researchers assessed outcomes of nerve-transfer surgery in nine quadriplegic patients. Every patient in the study reported improved hand and arm function.
In class, Tarsicio Junior Castro, 10, reviewed the oceans and their living organisms. And, like his 4th-grade classmates at Twain School in Wheeling, he dreamed of splashing in the waves and
Regaining unlimited mobility, including the ability to walk, is a main goal for spinal-cord-injured (SCI) patients. Still, more limited accomplishments -- such as bladder and bowel control -- would significantly improve quality of life for those lacking them. Conferences and publications have cited such endpoints as under-studied. In the 1990s, Fred Geisler and I were…
I have lived with multiple sclerosis for over 25 years. In 1993 the disease kicked into full gear, ravaging my body and rendering me a quadriplegic within 10 years.. My life and my familys were completely turned upside down and changed forever. I struggled with bouts of illness, feeling as if my body was completely out of control. I had periods of depression and was hospitalized several times. I had toxic medications shot into my veins and my muscles. No matter what we tried, multiple sclerosis did what it wanted to do. As multiple sclerosis continued its rampage through my body, that was indeed my perceived reality. ...
INTRODUCTION. Somatic hyperreflexia following interruption by spinal cord lesions of inhibitory impulses from higher centers is well known. There is, perhaps, less awareness of the analogous autonomic hyperreflexia.1-6 Since the major splanchnic outflow in this system is from the T4 or T6 to L2 segments of the cord, dramatic dysfunction of the autonomic system is seen primarily following lesions above this level, i.e., high thoracic and cervical cord lesions. At least 85% of quadriplegic patients develop autonomic hyperreflexia characterized by paroxysmal hypertension (Bors, personal communication).. A diagrammatic sketch of the tracts concerned is shown in figure 1. Afferent pathways are ...
This method had been applied to more than 250 patients(the data was collected in Jan 2012). Among the patients we treated in 2010 and 2011, nearly 75% complete spincal cord injury patients gained improvements, and almost 100% of patients whose injury was within one year of treatment responded well and their ASIA scores increased more than 10 points. The fact that we are able to restore lost neurological function (loss that a very short time ago was considered to be permanent) in these sever cases is very exciting. We look forward to continuing making continued progress in this area of Stem Cell Therapy (SCT) and spinal cord injuries (SCI ...
Choose Male Fertility Specialists™ - Dr. Bastuba is an international leader when it comes to Spinal Cord Injury Sperm Retrieval. Visit us in San Diego, CA!

Autonomic dysreflexia - WikipediaAutonomic dysreflexia - Wikipedia

These treatments are used during obstetric delivery of a woman with autonomic dysreflexia. The cause of autonomic dysreflexia ... Autonomic dysreflexia (AD), also known as autonomic hyperreflexia or mass reflex, is a potentially life-threatening condition ... Autonomic dysreflexia differs from autonomic instability, the various modest cardiac and neurological changes that accompany a ... An elevation of 40 mm Hg over baseline systolic should be suspicious for dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia can become chronic ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autonomic_dysreflexia

Autonomic dysreflexia: MedlinePlus Medical EncyclopediaAutonomic dysreflexia: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

... autonomic) nervous system to stimulation. This reaction may include: ... Autonomic dysreflexia is an abnormal, overreaction of the involuntary ( ... Autonomic dysreflexia is an abnormal, overreaction of the involuntary (autonomic) nervous system to stimulation. This reaction ... Cowan H. Autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury. Nurs Times. 2015;111(44):22-24. PMID: 26665385 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001431.htm

Autonomic Dysreflexia Resources - Craig HospitalAutonomic Dysreflexia Resources - Craig Hospital

Autonomic Dysreflexia Resources. Ver en español Resources. * Autonomic Dysreflexia Wallet Card También disponible en español A ...
more infohttps://craighospital.org/resources/topics/autonomic-dysreflexia

Factsheet #17: What is Autonomic Dysreflexia?Factsheet #17: What is Autonomic Dysreflexia?

What is Autonomic Dysreflexia?. Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD), also known as Hyperreflexia, is a potentially dangerous ...
more infohttp://www.makoa.org/nscia/fact17.html

Autonomic Dysreflexia from Bladder SpasmsAutonomic Dysreflexia from Bladder Spasms

I have only experienced autonomic dysreflexia twice since he took me off of the bladder spasm medication. And it wasnt bad, ... Autonomic Dysreflexia from Bladder Spasms My urologist had me quit taking my oxybutynin to see if that would help with my ... I have only experienced autonomic dysreflexia twice since he took me off of the bladder spasm medication. And it wasnt bad, ... I have only experienced autonomic dysreflexia twice since he took me off of the bladder spasm medication. And it wasnt bad, ...
more infohttp://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?264583-Autonomic-Dysreflexia-from-Bladder-Spasms&s=cf4292f90bc3def6baa495eaaa060cf8

Autonomic Dysreflexia from Bladder SpasmsAutonomic Dysreflexia from Bladder Spasms

I have only experienced autonomic dysreflexia twice since he took me off of the bladder spasm medication. And it wasnt bad, ... Autonomic Dysreflexia from Bladder Spasms My urologist had me quit taking my oxybutynin to see if that would help with my ... I have only experienced autonomic dysreflexia twice since he took me off of the bladder spasm medication. And it wasnt bad, ... I have only experienced autonomic dysreflexia twice since he took me off of the bladder spasm medication. And it wasnt bad, ...
more infohttp://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?264583-Autonomic-Dysreflexia-from-Bladder-Spasms&s=07e49b24b7013a2990ae5456a1054dd8&p=1878711

Autonomic Dysreflexia (Aftercare Instructions) - What You Need to KnowAutonomic Dysreflexia (Aftercare Instructions) - What You Need to Know

Care guide for Autonomic Dysreflexia (Aftercare Instructions). Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard ... Learn more about Autonomic Dysreflexia (Aftercare Instructions). Associated drugs. *Autonomic Dysreflexia. IBM Watson ... Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is a condition that causes sudden, extremely high blood pressure. AD is most common in people with a ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/cg/autonomic-dysreflexia-aftercare-instructions.html

Autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury | Clinical | Nursing TimesAutonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury | Clinical | Nursing Times

Autonomic dysreflexia often goes unrecognised in patients with spinal cord injury. Health professionals must be able to ... Autonomic dysreflexia often goes unrecognised in patients with spinal cord injury. Health professionals must be able to ...
more infohttps://www.nursingtimes.net/clinical-archive/neurology/autonomic-dysreflexia-in-spinal-cord-injury/5091395.article

Mecamylamine for Autonomic Dysreflexia Prophylaxis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govMecamylamine for Autonomic Dysreflexia Prophylaxis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Mecamylamine for Autonomic Dysreflexia Prophylaxis. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of ... Autonomic Dysreflexia. Spinal Cord Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Trauma, Nervous System. ... Autonomic dysreflexia. A survey of current treatment. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 1991 Oct;70(5):234-41. ... Autonomic dysreflexia after spinal cord injury: Systemic pathophysiology and methods of management. Auton Neurosci. 2018 Jan; ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03914677?map_cntry=US&map_state=US%3AMI&rank=46

What is Autonomic Dysreflexia? | Gillette Childrens Specialty HealthcareWhat is Autonomic Dysreflexia? | Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare

Autonomic dysreflexia (AD), also known as hyperreflexia, can be a medical emergency that affects people with spinal cord ... Many people with spinal cord injuries will experience autonomic dysreflexia. Most do not need emergency care once they have ... For more information about autonomic dysreflexia, contact your health care provider. If you believe your child may be ...
more infohttps://www.gillettechildrens.org/your-visit/patient-education/autonomic-dysreflexia

Spinal Cord Injury: Autonomic Dysreflexia - WellSpan Health LibrarySpinal Cord Injury: Autonomic Dysreflexia - WellSpan Health Library

Autonomic dysreflexia is a syndrome in which there is a sudden onset of excessively high blood pressure. It is more common in ... If you feel you have autonomic dysreflexia:. *Sit up straight, or raise your head so you are looking straight ahead. If you can ... Autonomic dysreflexia is a syndrome in which there is a sudden onset of excessively high blood pressure. It is more common in ... Autonomic dysreflexia occurs when something happens to your body below the level of your injury. This can be a pain or irritant ...
more infohttps://www.wellspan.org/health-library/Document.aspx?id=ug2980

Autonomic dysreflexiaAutonomic dysreflexia

Learn more about the causes and symptoms of autonomic dysreflexia here. ... Our carers are fully trained to recognise the signs of autonomic dysreflexia. ... Autonomic dysreflexia, also known as hyperreflexia, means an over-activity of the autonomic nervous system causing an abrupt ... Causes of autonomic dysreflexia. Mel Dawson, head of Clinical at Helping Hands comments, "There can be many stimuli that cause ...
more infohttps://www.helpinghandshomecare.co.uk/home-care-services/condition-led-care/autonomic-dysreflexia/

Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury: Overview, Pathophysiology, Causes of Autonomic DysreflexiaAutonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury: Overview, Pathophysiology, Causes of Autonomic Dysreflexia

Autonomic dysreflexia is a potentially dangerous clinical syndrome that develops in individuals with spinal cord injury, ... Causes of Autonomic Dysreflexia. Episodes of autonomic dysreflexia can be triggered by many potential causes. [9] Essentially, ... encoded search term (Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury) and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury What to Read ... Prevention of Autonomic Dysreflexia. Patients who have previously experienced autonomic dysreflexia may be able to prevent the ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/322809-overview

Autonomic Dysreflexia after Spinal Cord Injury | ICORDAutonomic Dysreflexia after Spinal Cord Injury | ICORD

Autonomic Dysreflexia after Spinal Cord Injury. July 18th, 2013. , 0 comments By Jennifer Pisarek ... Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD) is a potentially life threatening complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Individuals with SCI at ... 2010). Recurrent autonomic dysreflexia exacerbates vascular dysfunction after spinal cord injury. The Spine Journal, 10 (12), ...
more infohttp://icord.org/2013/07/autonomic-dysreflexia-after-spinal-cord-injury/

Autonomic Dysreflexia Causes Chronic Immune Suppression after Spinal Cord Injury | Journal of NeuroscienceAutonomic Dysreflexia Causes Chronic Immune Suppression after Spinal Cord Injury | Journal of Neuroscience

Autonomic Dysreflexia Causes Chronic Immune Suppression after Spinal Cord Injury. Yi Zhang, Zhen Guan, Brenda Reader, Todd ... Autonomic Dysreflexia Causes Chronic Immune Suppression after Spinal Cord Injury. Yi Zhang, Zhen Guan, Brenda Reader, Todd ... 1996) Silent autonomic dysreflexia during voiding in men with spinal cord injuries. J Urol 155:519-522, doi:10.1016/S0022-5347( ... 1998) Autonomic dysreflexia during urodynamics. Spinal Cord 36:756-760, doi:10.1038/sj.sc.3100684, pmid:9848482. ...
more infohttp://www.jneurosci.org/content/33/32/12970

Autonomic dysreflexia | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.orgAutonomic dysreflexia | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org

Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is a life-threatening condition prevalent amongst patients with high spinal cord injury (SCI) and ... Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is a life-threatening condition prevalent amongst patients with high spinal cord injury (SCI) and ... 6. Karlsson AK: Autonomic dysreflexia. Spinal Cord 37:383-391, 1999. *7. Krassioukov A, Claydon VE: The clinical problems in ... 3. Curt A, Nitsche B, Rodic B, Schurch B, Dietz V: Assessment of autonomic dysreflexia in patients with spinal cord injury. J ...
more infohttps://radiopaedia.org/articles/autonomic-dysreflexia-1

AUTONOMIC DYSREFLEXIA AFTER BRAINSTEM TUMOR RESECTION: A Case ReportAUTONOMIC DYSREFLEXIA AFTER BRAINSTEM TUMOR RESECTION: A Case Report

Autonomic dysreflexia after brainstem tumor resection. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 1993;72:395-397.Autonomic dysreflexia is a poorly ... Autonomic dysreflexia was elicited as a consequence of the noxious input of the gastric ulcer. In other cases of brainstem ... unrecognized episodes of autonomic dysreflexia may occur. This case also indicates that sympathetic supraspinal control is ... Postoperatively he exhibited signs of autonomic failure. He later developed recurrent paroxysmal episodes of abdominal pain, ...
more infohttps://insights.ovid.com/ajpmr/199312000/00002060-199312000-00011

Fatal collapse due to autonomic dysreflexia during manual self-evacuat | IMCRJFatal collapse due to autonomic dysreflexia during manual self-evacuat | IMCRJ

Conclusion: There were delays in 1) recognizing that his episodes of collapse in the lavatory were due to autonomic dysreflexia ... Keywords: spinal cord injury, autonomic dysreflexia, fatality, topical lidocaine, bowel evacuation, colostomy ... lidocaine jelly to prevent or limit autonomic dysreflexia occurring during manual bowel evacuation; and 3) considering ... which could have prevented the occurrence of autonomic dysreflexia caused by manual evacuation. ...
more infohttps://www.dovepress.com/fatal-collapse-due-to-autonomic-dysreflexia-during-manual-self-evacuat-peer-reviewed-article-IMCRJ

Head Nurse: Mucus, autonomic dysreflexia, and vaguely irritated bovines.Head Nurse: Mucus, autonomic dysreflexia, and vaguely irritated bovines.

Autonomic Dysreflexia Here beginneth the first lesson: autonomic dysreflexia is, according to Tabers Cyclopedic Medical ... Mucus, autonomic dysreflexia, and vaguely irritated bovines. Mucus I have a cold. Or a sinus infection; I cant tell which. All ... At about one oclock, this poor guy went into an almost-endless cycle of autonomic dysreflexia. His bladder wasnt full, he ...
more infohttp://head-nurse.blogspot.com/2004/09/mucus-autonomic-dysreflexia-and.html

Fesoterodine for Amelioration of Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD) Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) - Full Text View -...Fesoterodine for Amelioration of Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD) Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) - Full Text View -...

Fesoterodine for Amelioration of Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD) Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). The safety and scientific ... Autonomic Dysreflexia. Wounds and Injuries. Spinal Cord Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. ... Autonomic Dysreflexia. Urodynamic Studies. 24 Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring. Cerebral Blood Flow. ... This study will be investigating the effects of fesoterodine on autonomic dysreflexia (AD) in patients with spinal cord ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02676154

Autonomic Dysreflexia - Spinal Cord Injury Research EvidenceAutonomic Dysreflexia - Spinal Cord Injury Research Evidence

A discussion based on current research on the role and incidence of autonomic dysreflexia as a complication of chronic spinal ... Autonomic Dysreflexia. Autonomic Dysreflexia. Download as a PDF. Acute SCI patients may also experience autonomic dysreflexia, ... Effect of Disrupted Autonomic Control on the Cardiovascular System. *Cardiovascular Complications during Acute SCI *Neurogenic ...
more infohttps://scireproject.com/evidence/acute-evidence/cardiovascular-complications-during-acute-phase-of-spinal-cord-injury/cardiovascular-complications-during-acute-sci/autonomic-dysreflexia/

Paradoxical effects of continuous high dose gabapentin treatment on autonomic dysreflexia after complete spinal cord injury.Paradoxical effects of continuous high dose gabapentin treatment on autonomic dysreflexia after complete spinal cord injury.

... can have profound effects on the autonomic and cardiovascular systems, notably with injuries above high-thor... ... Paradoxical effects of continuous high dose gabapentin treatment on autonomic dysreflexia after complete spinal cord injury. ... Paradoxical effects of continuous high dose gabapentin treatment on autonomic dysreflexia after complete spinal cord injury.. * ... Paradoxical effects of continuous high dose gabapentin treatment on autonomic dysreflexia after complete spinal cord injury. ...
more infohttps://medworm.com/740800945/paradoxical-effects-of-continuous-high-dose-gabapentin-treatment-on-autonomic-dysreflexia-after-comp/

Autonomic Dysreflexia - Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust
	Autonomic Dysreflexia - Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust

Autonomic Dysreflexia We do not yet have a formal information sheet on Autonomic Dysreflexia. ... Dysreflexia_Alert_Card.pdf The following link is to the Paralyzed Veterans of America website information on Autonomic ... However you can download the Autonomic Dysreflexia Alert Card here (as a pdf) to print and carry with you. ... This link is to a 14 page pdf - Paralyzed Veterans of America website information on Autonomic Dysreflexia ...
more infohttp://www.salisbury.nhs.uk/InformationForPatients/Departments/SpinalTreatment_Centre/Patients_Carers/Pages/AutonomicDysreflexia.aspx

Updated: BOTOX for neurogenic bladder and prevention of autonomic dysreflexia following spinal cord injury | ICORDUpdated: BOTOX for neurogenic bladder and prevention of autonomic dysreflexia following spinal cord injury | ICORD

Updated: BOTOX for neurogenic bladder and prevention of autonomic dysreflexia following spinal cord injury. Researcher(s): Dr. ... Have a known history of autonomic dysreflexia,. *Have good hand function and are currently intermittently catheterizing or have ... Updated: BOTOX for neurogenic bladder and prevention of autonomic dysreflexia following spinal cord injury ... bladder dysfunctions are commonly associated with life threatening episodes of hypertension known as autonomic dysreflexia (AD ...
more infohttp://icord.org/studies/2015/09/botox-ad/

Prediction of autonomic dysreflexia during urodynamics: a prospective cohort study | BMC Medicine | Full TextPrediction of autonomic dysreflexia during urodynamics: a prospective cohort study | BMC Medicine | Full Text

Therefore, we aimed to determine predictors of autonomic dysreflexia in individuals with spinal cord injury during urodynamic ... We used logistic regression to reveal predictors of autonomic dysreflexia during urodynamic investigation. We found that level ... In patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to spinal cord injury, autonomic dysreflexia is independently ... Considering the health risks associated with autonomic dysreflexia, such as seizures, stroke, retinal bleeding, or even death, ...
more infohttps://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-018-1040-8
  • This is a preliminary study of the antihypertensive drug mecamylamine, used in the specific circumstance of hypertension caused by autonomic dysreflexia (AD), a condition that affects people with spinal cord injury (SCI). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Autonomic dysreflexia is a potentially dangerous and, in rare cases, lethal clinical syndrome that develops in individuals with spinal cord injury , resulting in acute, uncontrolled hypertension. (medscape.com)
  • Am J Phys Med Rehabil 1993;72:395-397.Autonomic dysreflexia is a poorly understood entity, typically occurring in the spinal cord-injured patient, with paroxysmal hypertension, bradycardia, severe throbbing headache, anxiety and sweating above the level of the lesion. (ovid.com)
  • Paradoxical effects of continuous high dose gabapentin treatment on autonomic dysreflexia after complete spinal cord injury. (medworm.com)
  • OBJECTIVE To determine the existence and frequency of silent autonomic dysreflexia in subjects with a complete spinal cord injury (SCI) above the neurologic level of T6. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Eltorai I, Kim R, Vulpe M, Kasravi H, Ho W. Fatal cerebral hemorrhage due to autonomic dysreflexia in a tetraplegic patient: case report and review. (parqol.com)
  • After signing the informed consent form, at visit 1, subjects will complete an interview to evaluate past medical history, an autonomic dysfunction questionnaire, a physical examination (including an autonomic assessment and specialty SCI exam), vital signs measurement, and baseline testing of the electrical activity of the heart (electrocardiography or ECG testing). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Autonomic dysreflexia was elicited as a consequence of the noxious input of the gastric ulcer. (ovid.com)
  • Briefly, autonomic dysreflexia develops in individuals with a neurologic level of spinal cord injury at or above the sixth thoracic vertebral level (T6). (medscape.com)
  • Autonomic dysreflexia is common amongst people whose seventh to twelfth thoracic vertebra have been damaged due to injuries. (mbbch.com)
  • At autopsy, no other significant disease was found that might have caused death, and given the clinical history, the cause of death was recorded as autonomic dysreflexia. (dovepress.com)
  • The use of stimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines which can result in urinary retention, and the use of CNS depressants and other psychoactive drugs can also lead to urinary retention and constipation thus leading to autonomic dysreflexia when in use over an extended period of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • An elevation of 40 mm Hg over baseline systolic should be suspicious for dysreflexia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Number of participants that experience a decrease in severity of autonomic dysreflexia (AD) from baseline following 12-weeks of study medication. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Number of participants that experience an improvement from baseline of self-reported severity and frequency of AD as reported with the Autonomic Dysreflexia Health Related-Quality of Life (AD HR-QoL) questionnaire and reflected by a decrease in score. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • People with multiple sclerosis , Guillain-Barre syndrome, or certain brain injuries can also suffer from autonomic dysreflexia. (mbbch.com)
  • Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is a potentially but often unrecognized life-threatening condition that requires immediate attention. (parqol.com)
  • This module is about Autonomic Dysreflexia and the importance of timely recognition and management of this life threatening condition. (nsw.gov.au)
  • Further stratification by lesion level showed level-dependent significantly increased adjusted odds of autonomic dysreflexia, i.e., from C1-C4 (AOR 16.2, 95% CI 5.9-57.9) to T4-T6 (AOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.2), compared to lesions at T7 or below. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A wallet card on autonomic dysreflexia that you can carry with you. (craighospital.org)
  • However you can download the Autonomic Dysreflexia Alert Card here (as a pdf) to print and carry with you. (salisbury.nhs.uk)