The removal or interruption of some part of the autonomic nervous system for therapeutic or research purposes.
Diseases of the parasympathetic or sympathetic divisions of the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; which has components located in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Autonomic dysfunction may be associated with HYPOTHALAMIC DISEASES; BRAIN STEM disorders; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES. Manifestations include impairments of vegetative functions including the maintenance of BLOOD PRESSURE; HEART RATE; pupil function; SWEATING; REPRODUCTIVE AND URINARY PHYSIOLOGY; and DIGESTION.
The resection or removal of the nerve to an organ or part. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The resection or removal of the innervation of a muscle or muscle tissue.
The craniosacral division of the autonomic nervous system. The cell bodies of the parasympathetic preganglionic fibers are in brain stem nuclei and in the sacral spinal cord. They synapse in cranial autonomic ganglia or in terminal ganglia near target organs. The parasympathetic nervous system generally acts to conserve resources and restore homeostasis, often with effects reciprocal to the sympathetic nervous system.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Biosynthesis of GLUCOSE from nonhexose or non-carbohydrate precursors, such as LACTATE; PYRUVATE; ALANINE; and GLYCEROL.
A thermogenic form of adipose tissue composed of BROWN ADIPOCYTES. It is found in newborns of many species including humans, and in hibernating mammals. Brown fat is richly vascularized, innervated, and densely packed with MITOCHONDRIA which can generate heat directly from the stored lipids.
The generation of heat in order to maintain body temperature. The uncoupled oxidation of fatty acids contained within brown adipose tissue and SHIVERING are examples of thermogenesis in MAMMALS.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Involuntary contraction or twitching of the muscles. It is a physiologic method of heat production in man and other mammals.

Sino-aortic denervation augments the increase in blood pressure seen during paradoxical sleep in the rat. (1/71)

Using a computer assisted telemetric system, we have re-examined the effect of sino-aortic denervation (SAD) on the changes in arterial blood pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR) during sleep in the rat suitably recovered from the operation. Eight 1 hourly polygraphic recordings were performed 4 weeks after the initial SAD surgery. In the SAD rats, the increase in AP during paradoxical sleep (PS) was much larger than that in sham-operated rats. HR in the SAD rats increased on-going from slow-wave sleep to PS, but it showed no change in sham-operated rats. The present study suggests that chronic SAD causes the enhanced AP increase during PS concomitantly with the persistent hypertension and tachycardia across sleep-wake states.  (+info)

Autonomic control of skeletal muscle blood flow at the onset of exercise. (2/71)

The purpose of this study was to determine whether the autonomic nervous system is involved in skeletal muscle vasodilation at the onset of exercise. Mongrel dogs (n = 7) were instrumented with flow probes on both external iliac arteries. Before treadmill exercise at 3 miles/h, 0% grade, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg) and atropine (0.2 mg/kg) or saline was infused intravenously. Ganglionic blockade increased resting heart rate from 87 +/- 5 to 145 +/- 8 beats/min (P < 0.01) and reduced mean arterial pressure from 100 +/- 4 to 88 +/- 5 mmHg (P < 0.01). During steady-state exercise, heart rate was unaffected by ganglionic blockade (from 145 +/- 8 to 152 +/- 5 beats/min), whereas mean arterial pressure was reduced (from 115 +/- 4 to 72 +/- 4 mmHg; P < 0.01). Immediate and rapid increases in iliac blood flow and conductance occurred with initiation of exercise with or without ganglionic blockade. Statistical analyses of hindlimb conductance at 5-s intervals over the first 30 s of exercise revealed a statistically significant difference between the control and ganglionic blockade conditions at 20, 25, and 30 s (P < 0.01) but not at 5, 10, and 15 s of exercise. Hindlimb conductance at 1 min of exercise was 9.21 +/- 0.68 and 11.82 +/- 1.32 ml. min(-1). mmHg(-1) for the control and ganglionic blockade conditions, respectively. Because ganglionic blockade did not affect the initial rise in iliac conductance, we concluded that the autonomic nervous system is not essential for the rapid vasodilation in active skeletal muscle at the onset of exercise in dogs. Autonomic control of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise is manifested through vasoconstriction and not vasodilation.  (+info)

The influence of acute hypoxia and carotid body denervation on thermoregulation during non-rapid eye movement sleep in the developing lamb. (3/71)

We investigated the influence of ambient temperature on the thermoregulatory response to hypoxia in developing lambs before (at 4 and 14 days of age) and after (17 and 30 days of age) carotid body denervation (CBD). Lambs were studied during non-rapid eye movement sleep at thermoneutral (23-15 C) and cool (10-5 C) ambient temperatures, during normoxia and acute hypoxia (inspired oxygen content of 13 %). Measurements of oxygen consumption, arterial partial pressures of O2 and CO2, colonic temperature, incidence of shivering and plasma concentrations of thyroid hormones, cortisol, insulin and glucose were made under each condition. Oxygen consumption was higher at cool compared with thermoneutral ambient temperatures and decreased during hypoxia during cooling at all stages. At 4 days of age, only one lamb shivered during cooling in normoxia, but 4 out of 12 lambs shivered during hypoxia and colonic temperature fell, significantly, by 0.2 C. At 14 days, 8 out of 12 lambs shivered during cooling, of which 6 continued to shiver during hypoxia but colonic temperature did not change significantly. Plasma triiodothyronine concentrations increased on cooling at 4 and 14 days, an affect that was inhibited by hypoxia at 4, but not 14 days of age. At 17 days of age, i.e. post-CBD, plasma thyroid hormone concentrations and oxygen consumption were lower during cold exposure compared with intact lambs at 14 days of age. In CBD lambs, imposing further hypoxia resulted in colonic temperature falling 0. 6 C during cooling, with only 2 out of 10 lambs shivering. Plasma glucose and insulin, but not cortisol, concentrations decreased during hypoxia, irrespective of age or CBD. It is concluded that hypoxia has an important influence on metabolism and thermoregulation, which is modulated by age and environmental conditions. Compromised carotid body function, in lambs older than 2 weeks of age, can result in severe hypoxia and thermoregulatory dysfunction even with modest environmental cooling.  (+info)

Ileal short-chain fatty acids inhibit gastric motility by a humoral pathway. (4/71)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the nervous and humoral pathways involved in short-chain fatty acid (SCFA)-induced ileal brake in conscious pigs. The role of extrinsic ileal innervation was evaluated after SCFA infusion in innervated and denervated Babkin's ileal loops, and gastric motility was measured with strain gauges. Peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations were evaluated in both situations. The possible involvement of absorbed SCFA was tested by using intravenous infusion of acetate. Ileal SCFA infusion in the intact terminal ileum decreased the amplitude of distal and terminal antral contractions (33 +/- 1.2 vs. 49 +/- 1.2% of the maximal amplitude recorded before infusion) and increased their frequency (1.5 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.3 +/- 0.10/min). Similar effects were observed during SCFA infusion in ileal innervated and denervated loops (amplitude, 35 +/- 1.0 and 34 +/- 0. 8 vs. 47 +/- 1.3 and 43 +/- 1.2%; frequency, 1.4 +/- 0.07 and 1.6 +/- 0.06 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.14 and 1.0 +/- 0.12/min). Intravenous acetate did not modify the amplitude and frequency of antral contractions. PYY but not GLP-1 concentrations were increased during SCFA infusion in innervated and denervated loops. In conclusion, ileal SCFA inhibit distal gastric motility by a humoral pathway involving the release of an inhibiting factor, which is likely PYY.  (+info)

c-Fos expression in the midbrain periaqueductal gray during static muscle contraction. (5/71)

The periaqueductal gray (PAG) of the midbrain is involved in the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this study was to determine if static contraction of the skeletal muscle, which increases arterial blood pressure and heart rate, activates neuronal cells in the PAG by examining Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI). Muscle contraction was induced by electrical stimulation of the L7 and S1 ventral roots of the spinal cord in anesthetized cats. An intravenous infusion of phenylephrine (PE) was used to selectively activate arterial baroreceptors. Extensive FLI was observed within the ventromedial region (VM) of the rostral PAG, the dorsolateral (DL), lateral (L), and ventrolateral (VL) regions of the middle and caudal PAG in barointact animals with muscle contractions, and in barointact animals with PE infusion. However, muscle contraction caused a lesser number of FLI in the VM region of the rostral PAG, the DL, L, and VL regions of the middle PAG and the L and VL regions of the caudal PAG after barodenervation compared with barointact animals. Additionally, the number of FLI in the DL and L regions of the middle PAG was greater in barodenervated animals with muscle contraction than in barodenervated control animals. Thus these results indicated that both muscle receptor and baroreceptor afferent inputs activate neuronal cells in regions of the PAG during muscle contraction. Furthermore, afferents from skeletal muscle activate neurons in specific regions of the PAG independent of arterial baroreceptor input. Therefore, neuronal cells in the PAG may play a role in determining the cardiovascular responses during the exercise pressor reflex.  (+info)

Hepatic parasympathetic (HISS) control of insulin sensitivity determined by feeding and fasting. (6/71)

In response to insulin, a hormone [hepatic insulin sensitizing substance (HISS)] is released from the liver to stimulate glucose uptake in skeletal muscle but not liver or gut. The aim was to characterize dynamic control of HISS action in response to insulin and regulation of release by hepatic parasympathetic nerves. Insulin action was assessed by the rapid insulin sensitivity test, where the index is the glucose required (mg/kg) to maintain euglycemia after a bolus of insulin. Blocking HISS release by interruption of the hepatic parasympathetic nerves by surgical denervation, atropine, or blockade of hepatic nitric oxide synthase produced similar degrees of insulin resistance and revealed a similar dynamic pattern of hormone action that began 3--4 min after, and continued for 9--10 min beyond, insulin action (50 mU/kg). HISS action accounted for 56.5 +/- 3.5% of insulin action at insulin doses from 5 to 100 mU/kg (fed). We also tested the hypothesis that HISS release is controlled by the feed/fast status. Feeding resulted in maximal HISS action, which decreased progressively with the duration of fasting.  (+info)

Nitric oxide-dependent in vitro secretion of amylase from innervated or chronically denervated parotid glands of the rat in response to isoprenaline and vasoactive intestinal peptide. (7/71)

The basal in vitro release of amylase was similar from rat parotid lobules of innervated and chronically denervated glands and was unaffected by the inhibitors used in this study. The secretion of amylase induced by isoprenaline or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was reduced by one-third to one-half from the lobules of the innervated glands and even more so from the lobules of the denervated glands by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanyl cyclase which is activated by nitric oxide (NO) and catalyses the cGMP production. The use of N (omega)-propyl-L-arginine (N-PLA) revealed that the evoked secretion of amylase in the denervated glands depended on the activity of neuronal type NO synthase to synthesize NO. Since the denervated gland is virtually devoid of NO synthase-containing nerve fibres, the neuronal type NO synthase was most probably of a non-neuronal source. NO-dependent amylase secretion was agonist related, since amylase secretion evoked by bethanechol and neuropeptide Y was not reduced by ODQ or N-PLA. Hence, under physiological conditions, activation of beta-adrenoceptors (sympathetic activity) and VIP receptors (parasympathetic activity) is likely to cause secretion of parotid amylase partly through a NO/cGMP-dependent intracellular pathway involving the activity of neuronal type NO synthase, possibly of acinar origin.  (+info)

Heartbeat control in leeches. II. Fictive motor pattern. (8/71)

The rhythmic beating of the tube-like hearts in the medicinal leech is driven and coordinated by rhythmic activity in segmental heart motor neurons. The motor neurons are controlled by rhythmic inhibitory input from a network of heart interneurons that compose the heartbeat central pattern generator. In the preceding paper, we described the constriction pattern of the hearts in quiescent intact animals and showed that one heart constricts in a rear-to-front wave (peristaltic coordination mode), while the other heart constricts in near unison over its length (synchronous coordination mode) and that they regularly switch coordination modes. Here we analyze intersegmental and side-to-side-coordination of the fictive motor pattern for heartbeat in denervated nerve cords. We show that the intersegmental phase relations among heart motor neurons in both coordination modes are independent of heartbeat period. This finding enables us to combine data from different experiments to form a detailed analysis of the relative phases, duty cycle, and intraburst spike frequency of the bursts of the segmental heart motor neurons. The fictive motor pattern and the constriction pattern seen in intact leeches closely match in their intersegmental and side-to-side coordination, indicating that sensory feedback is not necessary for properly phased intersegmental coordination. Moreover, the regular switches in coordination mode of the fictive motor pattern mimic those seen in intact animals indicating that these switches likely arise by a central mechanism.  (+info)

Autonomic denervation is a medical term that refers to the interruption or loss of nerve supply to the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system is the part of the nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, and pupil dilation.

Autonomic denervation can occur due to various reasons, including surgical procedures, trauma, degenerative diseases, or medical conditions such as diabetes. The interruption of nerve supply can lead to a range of symptoms depending on the specific autonomic functions that are affected.

For example, autonomic denervation in the heart can lead to abnormal heart rhythms or low blood pressure. In the digestive system, it can cause problems with motility and secretion, leading to symptoms such as bloating, constipation, or diarrhea. Autonomic denervation in the eyes can result in pupil abnormalities, dry eyes, or light sensitivity.

Treatment for autonomic denervation depends on the underlying cause and the specific symptoms that are present. In some cases, medication may be used to manage symptoms, while in others, surgical intervention may be necessary to repair or restore nerve function.

The Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) is a part of the nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, pupillary response, urination, and sexual arousal. It consists of two subdivisions: the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, which generally have opposing effects and maintain homeostasis in the body.

Autonomic Nervous System Diseases (also known as Autonomic Disorders or Autonomic Neuropathies) refer to a group of conditions that affect the functioning of the autonomic nervous system. These diseases can cause damage to the nerves that control automatic functions, leading to various symptoms and complications.

Autonomic Nervous System Diseases can be classified into two main categories:

1. Primary Autonomic Nervous System Disorders: These are conditions that primarily affect the autonomic nervous system without any underlying cause. Examples include:
* Pure Autonomic Failure (PAF): A rare disorder characterized by progressive loss of autonomic nerve function, leading to symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension, urinary retention, and constipation.
* Multiple System Atrophy (MSA): A degenerative neurological disorder that affects both the autonomic nervous system and movement coordination. Symptoms may include orthostatic hypotension, urinary incontinence, sexual dysfunction, and Parkinsonian features like stiffness and slowness of movements.
* Autonomic Neuropathy associated with Parkinson's Disease: Some individuals with Parkinson's disease develop autonomic symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension, constipation, and urinary dysfunction due to the degeneration of autonomic nerves.
2. Secondary Autonomic Nervous System Disorders: These are conditions that affect the autonomic nervous system as a result of an underlying cause or disease. Examples include:
* Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy: A complication of diabetes mellitus that affects the autonomic nerves, leading to symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension, gastroparesis (delayed gastric emptying), and sexual dysfunction.
* Autoimmune-mediated Autonomic Neuropathies: Conditions like Guillain-Barré syndrome or autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy can cause autonomic symptoms due to the immune system attacking the autonomic nerves.
* Infectious Autonomic Neuropathies: Certain infections, such as HIV or Lyme disease, can lead to autonomic dysfunction as a result of nerve damage.
* Toxin-induced Autonomic Neuropathy: Exposure to certain toxins, like heavy metals or organophosphate pesticides, can cause autonomic neuropathy.

Autonomic nervous system disorders can significantly impact a person's quality of life and daily functioning. Proper diagnosis and management are crucial for improving symptoms and preventing complications. Treatment options may include lifestyle modifications, medications, and in some cases, devices or surgical interventions.

Denervation is a medical term that refers to the loss or removal of nerve supply to an organ or body part. This can occur as a result of surgical intervention, injury, or disease processes that damage the nerves leading to the affected area. The consequences of denervation depend on the specific organ or tissue involved, but generally, it can lead to changes in function, sensation, and muscle tone. For example, denervation of a skeletal muscle can cause weakness, atrophy, and altered reflexes. Similarly, denervation of an organ such as the heart can lead to abnormalities in heart rate and rhythm. In some cases, denervation may be intentional, such as during surgical procedures aimed at treating chronic pain or spasticity.

Muscle denervation is a medical term that refers to the loss of nerve supply to a muscle or group of muscles. This can occur due to various reasons, such as injury to the nerves, nerve compression, or certain medical conditions like neuromuscular disorders. When the nerve supply to the muscle is interrupted, it can lead to muscle weakness, atrophy (wasting), and ultimately, paralysis.

In denervation, the communication between the nervous system and the muscle is disrupted, which means that the muscle no longer receives signals from the brain to contract and move. Over time, this can result in significant muscle wasting and disability, depending on the severity and extent of the denervation.

Denervation may be treated with various therapies, including physical therapy, medication, or surgical intervention, such as nerve grafting or muscle transfers, to restore function and prevent further muscle wasting. The specific treatment approach will depend on the underlying cause and severity of the denervation.

The Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) is the part of the autonomic nervous system that primarily controls vegetative functions during rest, relaxation, and digestion. It is responsible for the body's "rest and digest" activities including decreasing heart rate, lowering blood pressure, increasing digestive activity, and stimulating sexual arousal. The PNS utilizes acetylcholine as its primary neurotransmitter and acts in opposition to the Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS), which is responsible for the "fight or flight" response.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Gluconeogenesis is a metabolic pathway that occurs in the liver, kidneys, and to a lesser extent in the small intestine. It involves the synthesis of glucose from non-carbohydrate precursors such as lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, and certain amino acids. This process becomes particularly important during periods of fasting or starvation when glucose levels in the body begin to drop, and there is limited carbohydrate intake to replenish them.

Gluconeogenesis helps maintain blood glucose homeostasis by providing an alternative source of glucose for use by various tissues, especially the brain, which relies heavily on glucose as its primary energy source. It is a complex process that involves several enzymatic steps, many of which are regulated to ensure an adequate supply of glucose while preventing excessive production, which could lead to hyperglycemia.

Adipose tissue, brown, also known as brown adipose tissue (BAT), is a type of fat in mammals that plays a crucial role in non-shivering thermogenesis, which is the process of generating heat and maintaining body temperature through the burning of calories. Unlike white adipose tissue, which primarily stores energy in the form of lipids, brown adipose tissue contains numerous mitochondria rich in iron, giving it a brown appearance. These mitochondria contain a protein called uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which allows for the efficient conversion of stored energy into heat rather than ATP production.

Brown adipose tissue is typically found in newborns and hibernating animals, but recent studies have shown that adults also possess functional brown adipose tissue, particularly around the neck, shoulders, and spine. The activation of brown adipose tissue has been suggested as a potential strategy for combating obesity and related metabolic disorders due to its ability to burn calories and increase energy expenditure. However, further research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms underlying brown adipose tissue function and its therapeutic potential in treating these conditions.

Thermogenesis is the process of heat production in organisms. In a medical context, it often refers to the generation of body heat by metabolic processes, especially those that increase the rate of metabolism to produce energy and release it as heat. This can be induced by various factors such as cold exposure, certain medications, or by consuming food, particularly foods high in thermogenic nutrients like protein and certain spices. It's also a key component of weight loss strategies, as increasing thermogenesis can help burn more calories.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

Shivering is a physical response to cold temperature or emotional stress, characterized by involuntary muscle contractions and relaxations. It's a part of the body's thermoregulation process, which helps to generate heat and maintain a normal body temperature. During shivering, the muscles rapidly contract and relax, producing kinetic energy that is released as heat. This can be observed as visible shaking or trembling, often most noticeable in the arms, legs, and jaw. In some cases, prolonged or intense shivering may also be associated with fever or other medical conditions.

"Autonomic Renal Denervation Ameliorates Experimental Glomerulonephritis". Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 19 (7 ... Love, J. A.; Yi, E.; Smith, T. G. (2007). "Autonomic pathways regulating pancreatic exocrine secretion". Autonomic Neuroscience ... Edwards, A. V.; Jones, C. T. (1993). "Autonomic control of adrenal function". Journal of Anatomy. 183 (Pt 2): 291-307. PMC ... Nance, D. M.; Sanders, V. M. (2007). "Autonomic innervation and regulation of the immune system (1987-2007)". Brain, Behavior, ...
Renal Sympathetic Denervation, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia12/7/2014 (Articles with short description, Short ... At the time, her episodes were termed 'diencephalic autonomic epilepsy'. It was believed that both her sympathetic and ... The future may hold non-pharmacologic solutions such as renal sympathetic denervation. Perkes, Iain; Baguley, Ian J.; Nott, ... Singh, DK; Singh, N (September 2011). "Paroxysmal Autonomic Instability with Dystonia in a Child: Rare Manifestation of an ...
July 2006). "Impact of liver transplantation on cardiac autonomic denervation in familial amyloid polyneuropathy". Medicine ( ... The aggregation of one precursor protein leads to peripheral neuropathy and/or autonomic nervous system dysfunction. These ... are a rare group of autosomal dominant diseases wherein the autonomic nervous system and/or other nerves are compromised by ...
Denervation changes recorded by EMG are the same as those seen with axonotmetic injury. There is a complete loss of motor, ... This type of nerve damage may cause paralysis of the motor, sensory, and autonomic, and is mainly seen in crush injury. If the ... Electromyography (EMG) performed 2 to 4 weeks later shows fibrillations and denervation potentials in musculature distal to the ... There is frequently greater involvement of motor than sensory function with autonomic function being retained. In ...
... may show evidence of chronic denervation and reinnervation. Autonomic testing, including quantitative sweat testing, can reveal ... Occasionally, biopsy of skin, nerve, or muscle may be performed, which can show signs of denervation and amyloid deposition ... Sudomotor function through electrochemical skin conductance may provide a measure of subclinical autonomic involvement. The ... muscular weakness and autonomic dysfunction. In its terminal state, the kidneys and the heart are affected. FAP is ...
Therefore, the diabetic heart shows clear denervation as the pathology progresses. This denervation correlates with ... The autonomic innervations of the myocardium in diabetic cardiomyopathy are altered and contribute to myocardial dysfunction. ... While the heart can function without help from the nervous system, it is highly innervated with autonomic nerves, regulating ... Other causes of denervation are ischemia from microvascular disease and thus appear following the development of ...
It is also present in many patients with Parkinson's disease or Lewy body dementias resulting from sympathetic denervation of ... This rarely leads to fainting unless the person has developed true autonomic failure or has an unrelated heart problem.[ ... The numerous possible causes for orthostatic hypotension include certain medications (e.g. alpha blockers), autonomic ... including autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy, multiple system atrophy, and other forms of dysautonomia. It is also associated ...
A variety of autonomic tests are employed to exclude autonomic disorders that could underlie symptoms, while endocrine testing ... Another subtype, neuropathic POTS, is associated with denervation of sympathetic nerves in the lower limbs. In this subtype, it ... June 2021). "Long-COVID postural tachycardia syndrome: an American Autonomic Society statement". Clinical Autonomic Research. ... June 2021). "Long-COVID postural tachycardia syndrome: an American Autonomic Society statement". Clinical Autonomic Research. ...
This hypotensive response depends on an intact renal medulla and is not altered by renal denervation or the inhibition of the ... renin-angiotensin system (RAS) or autonomic nervous function Gothberg, 1994 - Gothberg G. Physiology of the renomedullary ...
The autonomic nervous system is not anatomically exact and connections might exist which are unpredictably affected when the ... Goebel, F.-D.; Füessl, H.S. (1983). "Mönckeberg's sclerosis after sympathetic denervation in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects ... ETS patients are being studied using the autonomic failure protocol headed by David Goldstein, M.D. Ph.D., senior investigator ... Sympathectomy developed in the mid-19th century, when it was learned that the autonomic nervous system runs to almost every ...
... denervation MeSH E04.525.210.080 - autonomic denervation MeSH E04.525.210.080.600 - parasympathectomy MeSH E04.525.210.080. ... muscle denervation MeSH E04.525.210.550 - nerve block MeSH E04.525.210.560 - nerve crush MeSH E04.525.210.700 - rhizotomy MeSH ...
Köberle and his group of collaborators were able to prove that they were caused also by an extensive denervation of the ... by extensively quantifying the number of neurons of the autonomic nervous system in the Auerbach's plexus, that: 1) they were ... characterizing it as a disease of the autonomic nervous system, which establishes itself during the acute phase and provokes ... long term and slowly installing denervation. Since the trypanosoma does not seem to damage neurons directly, Köberle and other ...
Examination does not typically show signs of a motor deficit, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system or impairment of the ... Needle electromyography studies generally reveal no signs of denervation. Megavitamin-B6 syndrome is characterized mainly by ... and autonomic functions. The primary treatment for megavitamin-B6 syndrome is to stop taking supplemental vitamin B6. Physical ... central nervous system, although in severe cases motor and autonomic imparement can occur. When examined, patients typically ...
Bunch, W H; Deck, J D; Romer, J (1977-01-01). "The effect of denervation on bony overgrowth after below knee amputation in rats ... Duncan, Cp; Shim, Ss (1977-08-01). "J. Edouard Samson Address: the autonomic nerve supply of bone. An experimental study of the ... Klein, L.; Dawson, M. H.; Heiple, K. G. (1977). "Turnover of collagen in the adult rat after denervation". The Journal of Bone ... Obtunded or absent RAP often accompanies sensory denervation. In neuropathic soft tissue lesions, such as those in diabetics ...
Additionally, patients with Holmes-Adie Syndrome can also experience problems with autonomic control of the body. This second ... pilocarpine may constrict the tonic pupil due to cholinergic denervation supersensitivity. A normal pupil will not constrict ... and affects the pupil of the eye and the autonomic nervous system. It is named after the British neurologists William John Adie ... "Asymptomatic Severe Vagal and Sympathetic Cardiac Denervation in Holmes-Adie's Syndrome". Case Reports in Neurological Medicine ...
Ross syndrome is a non life-threatening benign condition but delay in diagnosis can result in slow progression of autonomic ... Ross AT (November 1958). "Progressive selective sudomotor denervation; a case with coexisting Adie's syndrome". Neurology. 8 ( ... Ross Syndrome is a progressive autonomic dysfunction that can occur in any age, ethnicity, or gender. The average age of ... "Clinical presentation and autonomic profile in Ross syndrome". Journal of Neurology. 268 (10): 3852-3860. doi:10.1007/s00415- ...
Autonomic dysreflexia is permanent, and occurs from Phase 4 onwards. It is characterized by unchecked sympathetic stimulation ... The reason reflexes return is the hypersensitivity of reflex muscles following denervation - more receptors for ... In spinal cord injuries above T6, neurogenic shock may occur, from the loss of autonomic innervation from the brain. ...
This, ultimately, leads to a condition known as denervation supersensitivity as the post-synaptic nerves will become ... and general autonomic discharge. The actions of aprepitant are said to be entirely central, thus requiring passage of the drug ...
The autonomic nerves (ganglionated plexi) that may cause AF may be eliminated as well. Subsequently, the left side of the chest ... "Pulmonary vein denervation enhances long-term benefit after circumferential ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation". ... A concept gaining support is that paroxysmal AF is mediated in part by the autonomic nervous system and that the intrinsic ... Supporting this is the finding that targeting these autonomic sites improves the likelihood of successful elimination of AF by ...
Soussignan, Robert (2002). "Duchenne smile, emotional experience, and autonomic reactivity: A test of the facial feedback ... Facial Feedback and Neural Activity within Central Circuitries of Emotion-New Insights from Botulinum Toxin-Induced Denervation ... "Effects of Nonverbal Dissimulation on Emotional Experience and Autonomic Arousal". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology ... Facial Feedback and Neural Activity within Central Circuitries of Emotion-New Insights from Botulinum Toxin-Induced Denervation ...
Alterations in the autonomic nervous system can lead to orthostatic hypotension (low blood pressure on standing), oily skin, ... Iodine-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy can help locate denervation of the muscles of the heart which can ... Alternatively, multiple systems atrophy or MSA usually has early onset of autonomic dysfunction (such as orthostasis), and may ... Finally, after ten years most people with the disease have autonomic disturbances, sleep problems, mood alterations and ...
4) Denervation supersensitivity. Like any denervated muscle, the iris becomes supersensitive to its normal neurotransmitter (in ... Both of these muscles are involuntary since they are controlled by the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system ... Autonomic ganglia of the head and neck, Parasympathetic ganglia, Ophthalmic nerve, Oculomotor nerve). ...
... denervation supersensitivity, ischemic lesions and stress. It has also been suggested that histamine controls the mechanisms by ... Autonomic & Autacoid Pharmacology. 35 (4): 51-8. doi:10.1111/aap.12037. PMID 27028114. Andersen HH, Elberling J, Arendt-Nielsen ...
They set out to determine which nerves were involved, but denervation did not block the response. In a flash of inspiration ... The Bayliss and Starling Society was founded in 1979 as a forum for scientists with research interests in central and autonomic ...
Examples of autonomic dysfunction caused by LEMS include erectile dysfunction in men, constipation, and, most commonly, dry ... This induces a transient flaccid paralysis and chemical denervation localized to the striated muscle that it has affected. The ... This rare disease can be marked by a unique triad of symptoms: proximal muscle weakness, autonomic dysfunction, and areflexia. ...
In 1973, Hosbuchi reported alleviating the denervation facial pain of anesthesia dolorosa through ongoing electrical ... the global pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline announced an initiative in bioelectric medicine in which the autonomic ...
The muscles controlling micturition are controlled by the autonomic and somatic nervous systems. During the storage phase, the ... The hyperactive state in the former condition suggests the development of denervation hypersensitization even though the ... Physiologically, urination involves coordination between the central, autonomic, and somatic nervous systems. Brain centres ...
Several studies have suggested that the function of denervation-induced myoD may be to prevent the muscle atrophy induced by ... the physiological factors responsible for this change being under the influence of the autonomic nervous system. This example ... 2007) Permanent denervation of rat Tibialis Anterior after bilateral sciatectomy: Determination of chronaxie by surface ... The increase in myoD levels after denervation is possibly related not only to activation and proliferation of the satellite ...
The main group of sensory neuron diseases are hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) such as HSAN I, HSAN II, and ... However, while the drug delayed the onset of ALS, it did not increase lifespan or prevent denervation. Human trials of valproic ... and motor neuron loss and denervation were halted. No human trials have been conducted. Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune ... nourishment in early onset mouse SMA models resulted in improved motor function and survival and delays progressive denervation ...
Reisfeld, Rafael (2006). "Sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis: Should we place the clamps at T2-T3 or T3-T4?". Clinical Autonomic ... Some people have experienced cardiac sympathetic denervation, which can result in a 10% decrease in heart rate both at rest and ... In people with a history of spinal cord injuries Autonomic dysreflexia Orthostatic hypotension Posttraumatic syringomyelia ... Associated with peripheral neuropathies Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome) Congenital autonomic dysfunction with ...
... irrespective of diet and/or autonomic denervation. Whether the numerical decrease in CA130 observed after autonomic denervation ... irrespective of diet and/or autonomic denervation. Whether the numerical decrease in CA130 observed after autonomic denervation ... irrespective of diet and/or autonomic denervation. Whether the numerical decrease in CA130 observed after autonomic denervation ... irrespective of diet and/or autonomic denervation. Whether the numerical decrease in CA130 observed after autonomic denervation ...
"Autonomic Renal Denervation Ameliorates Experimental Glomerulonephritis". Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 19 (7 ... Love, J. A.; Yi, E.; Smith, T. G. (2007). "Autonomic pathways regulating pancreatic exocrine secretion". Autonomic Neuroscience ... Edwards, A. V.; Jones, C. T. (1993). "Autonomic control of adrenal function". Journal of Anatomy. 183 (Pt 2): 291-307. PMC ... Nance, D. M.; Sanders, V. M. (2007). "Autonomic innervation and regulation of the immune system (1987-2007)". Brain, Behavior, ...
Autonomic neuropathies can be hereditary or acquired in nature. ... Autonomic neuropathies are a collection of syndromes and ... diseases affecting the autonomic neurons, either parasympathetic or sympathetic, or both. ... 36] Autonomic denervation may be related to antineuronal antibodies; the neuropathy does not appear to respond to a gluten-free ... Acquired Autonomic Neuropathies. The acquired autonomic neuropathies are much more prevalent than the inherited ones. Here, we ...
The role of the autonomic nervous system in the genesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been well studied; however, the ... Autonomic denervation added to pulmonary vein isolation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a randomized clinical trial. J Am ... Clinical evidence of autonomic dysfunction due to atrial fibrillation: implications for rhythm control strategy. *Varun Malik1, ... Role of autonomic reflexes in syncope associated with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1993;22(4):1123-9. ...
Some people with LQTS may need a left cardiac sympathetic denervation (LCSD) or sympathectomy. This minimally invasive ... procedure involves cutting some autonomic nerves to reduce the frequency of arrhythmic events. ... 2015). Left cardiac sympathetic denervation: Should we sweat the side effects? https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCEP. ...
These findings suggest that in db/db mice, there is both somatic and autonomic denervation of distal targets and that this is ... The difference in EQ`s effect on somatic and autonomic nerves might be due to autonomic neuropathy being more severe than ... Liu, Y. et al. Sensory and autonomic function and structure in footpads of a diabetic mouse model. Sci. Rep. 27(7), 41401 (2017 ... Bissinger, A. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy: Why should cardiologists care about that?. J. Diabetes Res. 2017, 5374176 (2017). ...
What is the autonomic nervous system?. What is the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the neuroanatomy of neurogenic ... Associated internal sphincter denervation may occur. If the peripheral sympathetic nerves are damaged, the internal sphincter ... The autonomic nervous system lies outside of the central nervous system. It regulates the actions of the internal organs under ... Acute management of autonomic dysreflexia is to decompress the rectum or bladder. Decompression usually will reverse the ...
What is the autonomic nervous system?. What is the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the neuroanatomy of neurogenic ... Associated internal sphincter denervation may occur. If the peripheral sympathetic nerves are damaged, the internal sphincter ... The autonomic nervous system lies outside of the central nervous system. It regulates the actions of the internal organs under ... Acute management of autonomic dysreflexia is to decompress the rectum or bladder. Decompression usually will reverse the ...
This NMA showed that PVI in combination with additional CA strategies, such as autonomic modulation and additional lines, seem ... alone for PVI with renal denervation (RR: 0.60, CI: 0.38-0.94), PVI with ganglia-plexi ablation (RR: 0.62, CI: 0.41-0.94), PVI ... Autonomic denervation added to pulmonary vein isolation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a randomized clinical trial. J Am ... Effect of renal denervation and catheter ablation vs catheter ablation alone on atrial fibrillation recurrence among patients ...
Cardiac autonomic activity during wakefulness and sleep in REM sleep behavior disorder. Sleep 1996;19:367-9. ... 5 and recent studies suggest peripheral postganglionic sympathetic denervation may occur even earlier.6 24 Symptoms of ... Cardiac autonomic regulation during sleep in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder. Sleep 2007;30:1019-25. ... Autonomic dysfunction. In Stage 1 disease, there is prominent α-synuclein staining of unmyelinated projection neurons of the ...
Finally, a few small observational studies have suggested that autonomic ganglionic plexi ablation or denervation may play a ... Finally, a few small observational studies have suggested that autonomic ganglionic plexi ablation or denervation may play a ...
Autonomic cardiac denervation reduces the incidence of atrial fibrillation after coronary revascularization  Authors:Melo, ...
Autonomic Denervation. The present invention teaches a method and apparatus for user control and operation of physiological ... Method and apparatus for programming of autonomic neuromodulation for the treatment of obesity. InactiveUS20090187230A1. Reduce ... Method, apparatus, and surgical technique for autonomic neuromodulation for the treatment of disease. InactiveUS20060167498A1. ... Method and apparatus for conformal electrodes for autonomic neuromodulation for the treatment of obesity and other conditions. ...
Autonomic Denervation/ae [Adverse Effects]. 650 ## - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM. Topical term or geographic name entry ...
Autonomic denervation has also been a promising preventative measure for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This critical ...
Cardiac autonomic innervation • Radionuclide imaging is suitable for assessing global LV and regional myocardial autonomic ... Diagnosis • Myocardial denervation has been studied as an early marker of cardiac involvement in patients with familial amyloid ... Cardiac autonomic innervation • may play an important role in the regulation of myocardial perfusion, heart rate, and ... Cardiac autonomic innervation • Sympathetic innervation • originates from the right and left stellate ganglia, which provide ...
... cardiac neurohormonal regulation is accomplished through the balanced effects of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic ... Device-Based Approaches to Modulate the Autonomic Nervous System Renal Denervation. Renal Denervation and Atrial ... Notably, autonomic stimulation is also a potent modulator of cardiac electrophysiology. Manipulating the autonomic nervous ... the potential applications of autonomic modulation will continue to expand significantly. The techniques of renal denervation, ...
Cardiac Sympathetic Denervation for Refractory Ventricular Arrhythmias. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017;69:3070-3080. ... The bodys autonomic nervous system responds to insults such as infarction in a way that it thinks is adaptive, but from an ... Autonomic modulation for refractory ventricular arrhythmias: Going beyond the heart. 27th June 2018. 3731 ... Huang WA, Boyle NG and Vaseghi M. Cardiac Innervation and the Autonomic Nervous System in Sudden Cardiac Death. Card ...
Autonomic neuropathies can be hereditary or acquired in nature. ... Autonomic neuropathies are a collection of syndromes and ... diseases affecting the autonomic neurons, either parasympathetic or sympathetic, or both. ... 36] Autonomic denervation may be related to antineuronal antibodies; the neuropathy does not appear to respond to a gluten-free ... Acquired Autonomic Neuropathies. The acquired autonomic neuropathies are much more prevalent than the inherited ones. Here, we ...
... earlier studies reported on cardiac sympathetic denervation [88, 89]. Little remains discovered, however, about the status of ... 6. Relationship between Gut Microbiota and Autonomic Dysfunction in Metabolic Diseases. Indeed, autonomic control is aected by ... Two types of autonomic dysfunction can be associated with diabetes, either intrinsic or extrinsic [5]. The first is related to ... Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is one of the earliest manifestations of type 2 diabetes (T2D). It constitutes the major ...
Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is one of the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus which can involve one or more ... As outlined above, vagal denervation typically precedes sympathetic involvement in diabetes. A recent study shows that a fall ... Verrotti A, Loiacono G, Mohn A, Chiarelli F: New insights in diabetic autonomic neuropathy in children and adolescents. Eur J ... Behera D, Das S, Dash RJ, Jindal SK: Cough reflex threshold in diabetes mellitus with and without autonomic neuropathy. ...
Specifically, autonomic system denervation has significant implications for commonly used perioperative drugs. This study ...
Autonomic Neuropathy (Autonomic Nerve Disease): Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and ... Autonomic neuropathy is a symptom complex associated with the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system that is responsible ... Impact of liver transplantation on cardiac autonomic denervation in familial amyloid polyneuropathy. Medicine (Baltimore). 2006 ... Autonomic Nerve Disease Autonomic neuropathy is a symptom complex associated with the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous ...
Autonomic denervation in the experimental American trypanosomiasis in rats: Functional response to neurotoxins. SUMMARY OF ... Autonomic dysfunction. Familial Alzheimer disease. Senescence. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S. T. U. V. W ...
... and autonomic dysfunction. There are a number of symptomatic drugs for PD motor signs, but the pharmacological resources for ... which appear in the early stages of the disease and largely depend on dopaminergic nigrostriatal denervation. Intermediate and ... which appear in the early stages of the disease and largely depend on dopaminergic nigrostriatal denervation. Intermediate and ... and autonomic dysfunction. There are a number of symptomatic drugs for PD motor signs, but the pharmacological resources for ...
The mechanism of QT interval prolongation is still unknown, but correlation of regional sympathetic denervation of the heart ( ... Four-dimensional multiscale modeling of ECG indexes of diabetic autonomic neuropathy: QT interval prolongation which predicts ... Different patterns of regional denervation in cardiac images of diabetic patients guided the simulation of pathological changes ... develop a computer model to link QT interval prolongation to regional cardiac sympathetic denervation at the cellular level. ...
Haemodynamics of the pressor effect of oral water in human sympathetic denervation due to autonomic failure. Mating season is ...
Autonomic Denervation Added to Pulmonary Vein Isolation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: A Randomized Clinical Trial. J Am ... Minimally Invasive Pulmonary Vein Isolation and Partial Autonomic Denervation for Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation. ... Linz D, Hohl M, Nickel A, Mahfoud F, Wagner M, Ewen S, Schotten U, Maack C, Wirth K, Bohm M. Effect of renal denervation on ... Kawashima T. The autonomic nervous system of the human heart with special reference to its origin, course, and peripheral ...
Surgical autonomic denervation results in altered colonic motility: an explanation for low anterior resection syndrome? Surgery ... surgical autonomic denervation, loss of the rectal reservoir function and preoperative radiotherapy. The level of anastomosis ... may be due to loss of the rectal reservoir function for the decreased ability to store feces and surgical autonomic denervation ...
Comparison between renal denervation and metoprolol on the susceptibility of ventricular arrhythmias in rats with myocardial ... Autonomic neuroscience : basic & clinical. 2017;205:1-11. Mosqueda-Garcia R. Evaluation of autonomic failure. Disorders of the ... The relation of autonomic biomarkers to the patients outcome with acute coronary syndrome Authors. * Zana Abdi Directorate of ... Autonomic biomarkers, Chromogranin A, Plasma and RBC Cholinesterase activity, Acute coronary syndrome Abstract. Objectives: ...
  • therefore, autonomic dysfunction may manifest with numerous clinical phenotypes and various laboratory and neurophysiologic abnormalities. (medscape.com)
  • This study provides novel clinical evidence of autonomic dysfunction in PAF patients. (springer.com)
  • Two types of autonomic dysfunction can be associated with diabetes, either intrinsic or extrinsic [5]. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • The first is related to an insult caused directly to autonomic nerves, whereas the other can be secondary to cardiovascular dysfunction, such as dilated cardiomyopathy and aortic stiffness. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Studies concerned with investigating the major contributors to cardiac autonomic dysfunction in T2D have indicated that it is primarily intrinsic in nature [6, 7]. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Interestingly, metabolic inflammatory processes are evident in the cardiovascular, neuronal, and neurovascular systems, indicating their possible involvement in the etiology of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in the metabolic syndrome [33-35]. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Autonomic neuropathy is a symptom complex associated with the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system that is responsible for the control of everyday body functions including blood pressure , heart rate, sweating , bowel and bladder function. (symptoma.mt)
  • Furthermore, autonomic dysfunction contributes to delayed gastric emptying, putting patients at risk for aspiration of gastric contents. (symptoma.mt)
  • Risk factors for developing bowel dysfunction are low-level anastomosis, end-to-end anastomosis, anastomotic leakage, acute or chronic inflammation, surgical autonomic denervation, loss of the rectal reservoir function and preoperative radiotherapy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Fatigue and autonomic dysfunction in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. (csgh.info)
  • The etiology of autonomic dysfunction can be primary or idiopathic and secondary causes. (medscape.com)
  • In addition, autonomic dysfunction is associated with various medications. (medscape.com)
  • The risk of recurrence was significantly decreased compared to pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) alone for PVI with renal denervation (RR: 0.60, CI: 0.38-0.94), PVI with ganglia-plexi ablation (RR: 0.62, CI: 0.41-0.94), PVI with additional ablation lines (RR: 0.8, CI: 0.68-0.95) and PVI in combination with bi-atrial modification (RR: 0.32, CI: 0.11-0.88). (biomedcentral.com)
  • For instance, clinical trials of vagal stimulation and spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of heart failure are currently underway, and renal denervation has been studied recently in the treatment of resistant hypertension. (aerjournal.com)
  • Similarly, renal denervation may play a role in the treatment of atrial fibrillation, as well as in controlling refractory ventricular arrhythmias. (aerjournal.com)
  • 5 Additionally, renal denervation show early promising data. (cardiacrhythmnews.com)
  • Bradfield JS, Vaseghi M and Shivkumar K. Renal denervation for refractory ventricular arrhythmias. (cardiacrhythmnews.com)
  • Comparison between renal denervation and metoprolol on the susceptibility of ventricular arrhythmias in rats with myocardial infarction. (jocms.org)
  • Familial amyloid polyneuropathy, the hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathies, Fabry disease, and the porphyrias are genetic diseases in which autonomic neuropathy is a common feature. (medscape.com)
  • Liver transplantation, currently the most effective treatment for FAP, may slow the development of autonomic neuropathy, but not in all cases. (medscape.com)
  • Currently, 5 types of hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) have been defined (see Table 1). (medscape.com)
  • Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major complication of diabetes that affects predominantly sensory and autonomic axons. (nature.com)
  • Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is one of the earliest manifestations of type 2 diabetes (T2D). (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is one of the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus which can involve one or more organ systems. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Changes in respiratory system in diabetic patients are caused mainly by microangiopathy of pulmonary capillaries with thickened basal membrane, changes in collagen, and by autonomic neuropathy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Motor examination is also important because a somatic peripheral neuropathy is frequently associated with an autonomic neuropathy. (symptoma.mt)
  • Training Effects The presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) impairs exercise tolerance and lowers maximal heart rate 4. (symptoma.mt)
  • Prolonging action potential duration in the basal septal region in the model produced ECG and QT interval similar to that of D2 subjects, suggesting sympathetic denervation in this region in patients with definite neuropathy. (uky.edu)
  • Diabetes leads to neuropathy in many individuals and is manifested by the impact on the motor, autonomic, and sensory components of the nervous system. (bladeresearchinc.com)
  • In addition to the acquired causes, inherited disorders like hereditary sensory-autonomic neuropathy (HSAN), familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP), Tangier disease, and Fabry disease also exist. (medscape.com)
  • This regulation occurs through the sympathetic and parasympathetic system (the autonomic nervous system), and their direct innervation of body organs and tissues that starts in the brainstem. (wikipedia.org)
  • Huang WA, Boyle NG and Vaseghi M. Cardiac Innervation and the Autonomic Nervous System in Sudden Cardiac Death. (cardiacrhythmnews.com)
  • The role of the autonomic nervous liver innervation in the control of energy metabolism. (csgh.info)
  • Mignini F, Sabbatini M, D'Andrea V, Cavallotti C (2010) Intrinsic innervation and dopaminergic markers after experimental denervation in rat thymus. (eurotoxpath.org)
  • Bulloch K, Pomerantz W (1984) Autonomic nervous system innervation of thymic-related lymphoid tissue in wildtype and nude mice. (eurotoxpath.org)
  • Manipulating the autonomic nervous system in studies designed to treat heart failure and hypertension have revealed that autonomic modulation may have a role in the treatment of common atrial and ventricular arrhythmias as well. (aerjournal.com)
  • Mechanisms and management of refractory ventricular arrhythmias in the age of autonomic modulation. (cardiacrhythmnews.com)
  • Cardiac Sympathetic Denervation for Refractory Ventricular Arrhythmias. (cardiacrhythmnews.com)
  • The Cardiac Arrhythmia Center, under the direction of world-renowned Dr. Kalyanam Shivkumar, MD, PhD (UCLA), is the only program in the Northeastern United States that performs autonomic modulation for the treatment of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. (montefiore-arrhythmia.org)
  • Normally, cardiac neurohormonal regulation is accomplished through the balanced effects of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic stimulation, along with the hormonal regulation of the renin-angiotensinaldosterone system (RAAS). (aerjournal.com)
  • Role of the autonomic nervous system in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias: pathophysiology and therapy implications. (jocms.org)
  • Franciosi S, Perry FKG, Roston TM, Armstrong KR, Claydon VE, Sanatani S. The role of the autonomic nervous system in arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. (jocms.org)
  • The bladder and urethra are innervated by 3 sets of peripheral nerves arising from the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and somatic nervous system. (medscape.com)
  • Small myelinated fibers transmit preganglionic autonomic efferents (B fibers) and somatic afferents (A delta fibers). (medscape.com)
  • Unmyelinated (C) fibers transmit postganglionic autonomic efferents as well as somatic and autonomic afferents. (medscape.com)
  • This NMA showed that PVI in combination with additional CA strategies, such as autonomic modulation and additional lines, seem to increase the efficacy of PVI alone. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Indeed, autonomic modulation by way of beta-blockade is a standard treatment of these conditions. (aerjournal.com)
  • There is a significant interest in developing non-pharmacological methods of autonomic modulation as well. (aerjournal.com)
  • Autonomic and hormonal input modulate multiple facets of cellular electrophysiology - action potential duration, ion channel kinetics and intracellular calcium dynamics (just to name a few) - which translate into macroscopic manifestations of autonomic modulation such as heart rate variability, atrioventricular (AV) conduction time and QT interval variability. (aerjournal.com)
  • Etiology of the denervation is unknown, but viral and autoimmune causes are suspected, and certain tumors may cause achalasia either by direct obstruction or as a paraneoplastic process. (msdmanuals.com)
  • DM can appear as clinically evident with symptoms of sensory or autonomic nervous systems, but may also be present subclinically without any apparent symptoms. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Autonomic denervation added to pulmonary vein isolation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a randomized clinical trial. (springer.com)
  • Other more expensive measures such as detailed autonomic testing, cardiac MIBG-scintigraphy, dopaminergic imaging and transcranial ultrasound may be especially useful in defining disease risk in those identified through primary screening. (bmj.com)
  • Cardinal motor features of Parkinson's disease (PD) include bradykinesia, rest tremor, and rigidity, which appear in the early stages of the disease and largely depend on dopaminergic nigrostriatal denervation. (hindawi.com)
  • Autonomic neuropathies are a collection of syndromes and diseases affecting the autonomic neurons, either parasympathetic or sympathetic, or both. (medscape.com)
  • 2 Autonomic imbalance-increased sympathetic output relative to parasympathetic-is a clear trigger and modulator of VT. (cardiacrhythmnews.com)
  • Pulmonary vein region ablation in experimental vagal atrial fibrillation: role of pulmonary veins versus autonomic ganglia. (springer.com)
  • which causes destruction of autonomic ganglia, may result in achalasia. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Alterations in resting autonomic tone can be pathogenic in many cardiovascular disease states, such as heart failure and hypertension. (aerjournal.com)
  • HSAN III (Riley-Day syndrome) is autosomal recessive in Ashkenazi Jews, with early childhood onset of autonomic crises. (medscape.com)
  • Autonomic neuroscience : basic & clinical. (jocms.org)
  • Selective Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Denervation for Painful Arthritis: Clinical Outcomes and Cadaveric Study. (umassmed.edu)
  • Heneka MT. Noradrenergic denervation facilitates the release of acetylcholine and serotonin in the hippocampus: towards a mechanism underlying upregulations described in MCI patients. (umassmed.edu)
  • Although a patient may present with symptoms related to a single portion of the autonomic system, the physician must be vigilant for other affected parts of the autonomic system. (medscape.com)
  • Other simple screens based upon autonomic symptoms, depression and personality changes, quantitative motor testing and other sleep disorders may also be useful markers, but have not been extensively tested. (bmj.com)
  • Sometimes, other autonomic symptoms may prevent prior to POTS. (symptoma.mt)
  • Autonomic neuropathies can be hereditary or acquired in nature. (medscape.com)
  • The pathophysiology of autonomic neuropathies is variable and depends upon the underlying medical conditions. (medscape.com)
  • We have chosen to classify the autonomic neuropathies into hereditary and acquired. (medscape.com)
  • The acquired autonomic neuropathies may then be subsequently subdivided into primary or secondary. (medscape.com)
  • All forms of inherited autonomic neuropathies are rare. (medscape.com)
  • Patterson E, Po SS, Scherlag BJ, Lazzara R. Triggered firing in pulmonary veins initiated by in vitro autonomic nerve stimulation. (springer.com)
  • Here, we used the rat cervical sympathetic trunk (CST), an autonomic nerve in which non-myelinating SCs are the predominant cell type, to isolate zinc-finger protein (ZFP) cDNAs by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. (tamu.edu)
  • Rarely, a mutation in the gelsolin gene, which produces a protein important in cytoskeletal actin function, may also lead to amyloid deposition in autonomic nerves. (medscape.com)
  • CA130 was determined in parotid saliva from 8 rats fed different diets, with or without autonomic denervation. (umn.edu)
  • CA130 could be determined in parotid saliva of rats, irrespective of diet and/or autonomic denervation. (umn.edu)
  • Mutant transthyretin produced in the liver accumulates as amyloid deposits in the peripheral nervous system and autonomic nervous system. (medscape.com)
  • Because the autonomic nervous system maintains internal physiologic homeostasis, disorders of this system can be present with both central as well as peripheral nervous system localization. (medscape.com)
  • Bettoni M, Zimmermann M. Autonomic tone variations before the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. (springer.com)
  • The body's autonomic nervous system responds to insults such as infarction in a way that it thinks is adaptive, but from an arrhythmia standpoint is maladaptive and pro-arrhythmic. (cardiacrhythmnews.com)
  • Denervation" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (umassmed.edu)
  • This review will attempt to provide a state-of-the-art on the potential antiarrhythmic efficacy of renal artery denervation, spinal cord stimulation and direct vagal stimulation. (aerjournal.com)
  • Notably, autonomic stimulation is also a potent modulator of cardiac electrophysiology. (aerjournal.com)
  • Role of circadian rhythm and autonomic nervous system in liver function: a hypothetical basis for improving the management of hepatic encephalopathy. (csgh.info)
  • Disorders of the autonomic nervous system. (jocms.org)
  • Given the complex nature of this system, a stepwise approach to autonomic disorders is required for proper understanding. (medscape.com)
  • VT occurs in structural heart disease because of a combination of predominantly scar-related re-entry in combination with a "maladaptive" autonomic response leading to a relative hyeradrenergic state. (cardiacrhythmnews.com)
  • Mosqueda-Garcia R. Evaluation of autonomic failure. (jocms.org)
  • In some forms, the degree and type of autonomic system involvement varies extensively. (medscape.com)
  • These types differ in their presentation, the portions of the autonomic nervous system affected, their associated genes, and inheritance pattern. (medscape.com)
  • Specifically, autonomic system denervation has significant implications for commonly used perioperative drugs. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Role of the Autonomic Nervous System in the Pathophysiology of Obesity. (csgh.info)
  • Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. (bvsalud.org)
  • Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS. (bvsalud.org)
  • The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is a very complex, multifaceted neural network that maintains internal physiologic homeostasis. (medscape.com)
  • The goal for this article remains focused at step III on the anatomy of the autonomic nervous system, as follows. (medscape.com)
  • Autonomic denervation has also been a promising preventative measure for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. (fortunejournals.com)
  • Different patterns of regional denervation in cardiac images of diabetic patients guided the simulation of pathological changes. (uky.edu)
  • CR in HT patients is similar to that of other heart surgery patients with only one unique exception, autonomic denervation. (eacpr.org)
  • The goal of this study is to 1) reproduce QT interval prolongation seen in diabetics, and 2) develop a computer model to link QT interval prolongation to regional cardiac sympathetic denervation at the cellular level. (uky.edu)
  • The mechanism of QT interval prolongation is still unknown, but correlation of regional sympathetic denervation of the heart (revealed by cardiac imaging) with QT interval in 12-lead ECG has been proposed. (uky.edu)
  • Achalasia is thought to be caused by a loss of ganglion cells in the myenteric plexus of the esophagus, resulting in denervation of esophageal muscle. (msdmanuals.com)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Denervation" by people in this website by year, and whether "Denervation" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (umassmed.edu)