Hypergammaglobulinemia: An excess of GAMMA-GLOBULINS in the serum due to chronic infections or PARAPROTEINEMIAS.Autoimmune Diseases: Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.Murine Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Acquired defect of cellular immunity that occurs in mice infected with mouse leukemia viruses (MuLV). The syndrome shows striking similarities with human AIDS and is characterized by lymphadenopathy, profound immunosuppression, enhanced susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and B-cell lymphomas.Splenomegaly: Enlargement of the spleen.Lymphatic Diseases: Diseases of LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; or LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Aleutian Mink Disease: A slow progressive disease of mink caused by the ALEUTIAN MINK DISEASE VIRUS. It is characterized by poor reproduction, weight loss, autoimmunity, hypergammaglobulinemia, increased susceptibility to bacterial infections, and death from renal failure. The disease occurs in all color types, but mink which are homozygous recessive for the Aleutian gene for light coat color are particularly susceptible.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Lupus Vulgaris: A form of cutaneous tuberculosis. It is seen predominantly in women and typically involves the NASAL MUCOSA; BUCCAL MUCOSA; and conjunctival mucosa.Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia: Large benign, hyperplastic lymph nodes. The more common hyaline vascular subtype is characterized by small hyaline vascular follicles and interfollicular capillary proliferations. Plasma cells are often present and represent another subtype with the plasma cells containing IgM and IMMUNOGLOBULIN A.Hepatitis, Autoimmune: A chronic self-perpetuating hepatocellular INFLAMMATION of unknown cause, usually with HYPERGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA and serum AUTOANTIBODIES.Hepatomegaly: Enlargement of the liver.Antibodies, Antinuclear: Autoantibodies directed against various nuclear antigens including DNA, RNA, histones, acidic nuclear proteins, or complexes of these molecular elements. Antinuclear antibodies are found in systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic: A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. It is of unknown etiology, but is thought to represent a failure of the regulatory mechanisms of the autoimmune system. The disease is marked by a wide range of system dysfunctions, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the formation of LE cells in the blood or bone marrow.Aleutian Mink Disease Virus: A species of PARVOVIRUS that causes a disease in mink, mainly those homozygous for the recessive Aleutian gene which determines a desirable coat color.Coombs Test: A test to detect non-agglutinating ANTIBODIES against ERYTHROCYTES by use of anti-antibodies (the Coombs' reagent.) The direct test is applied to freshly drawn blood to detect antibody bound to circulating red cells. The indirect test is applied to serum to detect the presence of antibodies that can bind to red blood cells.Sjogren's Syndrome: Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease in which the salivary and lacrimal glands undergo progressive destruction by lymphocytes and plasma cells resulting in decreased production of saliva and tears. The primary form, often called sicca syndrome, involves both KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS SICCA and XEROSTOMIA. The secondary form includes, in addition, the presence of a connective tissue disease, usually rheumatoid arthritis.gamma-Globulins: Serum globulins that migrate to the gamma region (most positively charged) upon ELECTROPHORESIS. At one time, gamma-globulins came to be used as a synonym for immunoglobulins since most immunoglobulins are gamma globulins and conversely most gamma globulins are immunoglobulins. But since some immunoglobulins exhibit an alpha or beta electrophoretic mobility, that usage is in decline.Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Disorders characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissue, general or unspecified.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Immunoglobulins: Multi-subunit proteins which function in IMMUNITY. They are produced by B LYMPHOCYTES from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES. They are comprised of two heavy (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) and two light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) with additional ancillary polypeptide chains depending on their isoforms. The variety of isoforms include monomeric or polymeric forms, and transmembrane forms (B-CELL ANTIGEN RECEPTORS) or secreted forms (ANTIBODIES). They are divided by the amino acid sequence of their heavy chains into five classes (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A; IMMUNOGLOBULIN D; IMMUNOGLOBULIN E; IMMUNOGLOBULIN G; IMMUNOGLOBULIN M) and various subclasses.Plasma Cells: Specialized forms of antibody-producing B-LYMPHOCYTES. They synthesize and secrete immunoglobulin. They are found only in lymphoid organs and at sites of immune responses and normally do not circulate in the blood or lymph. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989, p169 & Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p20)Prednisolone: A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Leishmaniasis, Visceral: A chronic disease caused by LEISHMANIA DONOVANI and transmitted by the bite of several sandflies of the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia. It is commonly characterized by fever, chills, vomiting, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, leukopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, emaciation, and an earth-gray color of the skin. The disease is classified into three main types according to geographic distribution: Indian, Mediterranean (or infantile), and African.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Mice, Inbred C57BLAutoimmunity: Process whereby the immune system reacts against the body's own tissues. Autoimmunity may produce or be caused by AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Immunoglobulin M: A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Autoantigens: Endogenous tissue constituents that have the ability to interact with AUTOANTIBODIES and cause an immune response.Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental: An experimental animal model for central nervous system demyelinating disease. Inoculation with a white matter emulsion combined with FREUND'S ADJUVANT, myelin basic protein, or purified central myelin triggers a T cell-mediated immune response directed towards central myelin. The pathologic features are similar to MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, including perivascular and periventricular foci of inflammation and demyelination. Subpial demyelination underlying meningeal infiltrations also occurs, which is also a feature of ENCEPHALOMYELITIS, ACUTE DISSEMINATED. Passive immunization with T-cells from an afflicted animal to a normal animal also induces this condition. (From Immunol Res 1998;17(1-2):217-27; Raine CS, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p604-5)Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System: Disorders caused by cellular or humoral immune responses primarily directed towards nervous system autoantigens. The immune response may be directed towards specific tissue components (e.g., myelin) and may be limited to the central nervous system (e.g., MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS) or the peripheral nervous system (e.g., GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME).Mice, Inbred MRL lpr: A mouse substrain that is genetically predisposed to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus-like syndrome, which has been found to be clinically similar to the human disease. It has been determined that this mouse strain carries a mutation in the fas gene. Also, the MRL/lpr is a useful model to study behavioral and cognitive deficits found in autoimmune diseases and the efficacy of immunosuppressive agents.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Acidosis, Renal Tubular: A group of genetic disorders of the KIDNEY TUBULES characterized by the accumulation of metabolically produced acids with elevated plasma chloride, hyperchloremic metabolic ACIDOSIS. Defective renal acidification of URINE (proximal tubules) or low renal acid excretion (distal tubules) can lead to complications such as HYPOKALEMIA, hypercalcinuria with NEPHROLITHIASIS and NEPHROCALCINOSIS, and RICKETS.Nephrocalcinosis: A condition characterized by calcification of the renal tissue itself. It is usually seen in distal RENAL TUBULAR ACIDOSIS with calcium deposition in the DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULES and the surrounding interstitium. Nephrocalcinosis causes RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Acidosis: A pathologic condition of acid accumulation or depletion of base in the body. The two main types are RESPIRATORY ACIDOSIS and metabolic acidosis, due to metabolic acid build up.Urinary Calculi: Low-density crystals or stones in any part of the URINARY TRACT. Their chemical compositions often include CALCIUM OXALATE, magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite), CYSTINE, or URIC ACID.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Hypokalemia: Abnormally low potassium concentration in the blood. It may result from potassium loss by renal secretion or by the gastrointestinal route, as by vomiting or diarrhea. It may be manifested clinically by neuromuscular disorders ranging from weakness to paralysis, by electrocardiographic abnormalities (depression of the T wave and elevation of the U wave), by renal disease, and by gastrointestinal disorders. (Dorland, 27th ed)Acid-Base Equilibrium: The balance between acids and bases in the BODY FLUIDS. The pH (HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION) of the arterial BLOOD provides an index for the total body acid-base balance.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Blood DonorsDiagnostic Techniques and Procedures: Methods, procedures, and tests performed to diagnose disease, disordered function, or disability.HIV-1: The type species of LENTIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of AIDS. It is characterized by its cytopathic effect and affinity for the T4-lymphocyte.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Abbreviations as Topic: Shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity.
Autoimmune disease. Classically Sjögren's syndrome, but it is also associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid ... arthritis and even hypergammaglobulinemia. Hypokalaemia is often severe in these cases. Hereditary causes include mutations of ... Wrong, O; Davies HEF (1959). "The Excretion of Acid in Renal Disease". QJM. 28 (110): 259-313. PMID 13658353. Walsh SB, Shirley ... citrate tablets which not only replace potassium but also inhibit calcium excretion and thus do not exacerbate stone disease as ...
Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, have also rarely caused false positive results. Most false negative ... Nonspecific reactions, hypergammaglobulinemia, or the presence of antibodies directed to other infectious agents that may be ... or does not have a disease. Generally the prior probability is estimated using the prevalence of a disease within a population ... In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control announced an initiative for voluntary, routine testing of all Americans aged 13-64 ...
An excess is known as hypergammaglobulinemia. A deficiency is known as hypogammaglobulinemia. A disease of gamma globulins is ... Another theory on how gamma globulin administration works in autoimmune disease is by overloading the mechanisms that degrade ... Gamma globulin injections are usually given in an attempt to temporarily boost a patient's immunity against disease. Being a ... Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) may be used in Kawasaki disease. Intravenous gamma globulin was FDA-approved in 2004 to ...
Autoimmune disease is the second most common clinical manifestation and one that most often requires treatment. Autoimmune ... Another sign is autoimmune cytopenias and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia and a family history of ALPS or non-malignant ... These include: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, Autoimmune neutropenia, Autoimmune thrombocytopenia. Other signs can affect organ ... No longer considered a subtype of ALPS but distinct disesase Treatment is most commonly directed at autoimmune disease and may ...
... including autoimmune hemolytic anemia, severe allergies (both food and environmental), asthma, and reactive airway disease. The ... Other suggestive laboratory findings include decreased numbers of B cells, T cells, and NK cells; and hypergammaglobulinemia. ... Disease Markers. 29 (3-4): 131-139. doi:10.3233/DMA-2010-0737. ISSN 1875-8630. PMC 3835385 . PMID 21178272. Su, Helen C. (2010- ... Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases. 6: 76. doi:10.1186/1750-1172-6-76. ISSN 1750-1172. PMC 3226432 . PMID 22085750. Zhang, Qian ...
Autoimmune disease not elsewhere classified (279.5) Graft-versus-host disease (279.8) Other specified disorders involving the ... Polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia (273.1) Monoclonal paraproteinemia (273.2) Other paraproteinemias (273.3) Macroglobulinemia ... Glycogenosis von Gierke's disease McArdle's disease Pompe's disease (271.1) Galactosemia (271.2) Hereditary fructose ... Lipidoses Gaucher's disease Niemann-Pick disease Sea-blue histiocyte syndrome (272.8) Other disorders of lipoid metabolism (273 ...
... hemoglobin sc disease MeSH C15.378.420.155.668 --- sickle cell trait MeSH C15.378.420.463 --- hemoglobin c disease MeSH C15.378 ... autoimmune MeSH C15.378.071.141.150 --- anemia, hemolytic, congenital MeSH C15.378.071.141.150.095 --- anemia, ... hypergammaglobulinemia MeSH C15.378.147.542.640 --- monoclonal gammopathies, benign MeSH C15.378.147.607 --- hypoproteinemia ... heavy chain disease MeSH C15.378.147.780.490.512 --- immunoproliferative small intestinal disease MeSH C15.378.147.780.650 --- ...
Autoimmune thrombocytopenia and anemia sometimes seen in patients with SMZL. Circulating villous lymphocytes are sometimes ... A monoclonal paraprotein is detected in a third of patients without hypergammaglobulinemia or hyperviscosity. Reactive germinal ... and/or a blood serum albumin levels of less than 3.5 g/dL are likely to have more an aggressive disease course and a shorter ...
A decreased level of albumin, however, is common in many diseases, including liver disease, malnutrition, malabsorption, ... Depression of C3 occurs in autoimmune disorders as the complement system is activated and the C3 becomes bound to immune ... The gamma globulins may be elevated (hypergammaglobulinemia), decreased (hypogammaglobulinaemia), or have an abnormal peak or ... chronic liver disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases. A narrow spike ...
This disease is known for an indolent clinical course and incidental discovery. The most common physical finding is moderate ... February 1985). "Leukemia of large granular lymphocytes: association with clonal chromosomal abnormalities and autoimmune ... Immunoglobulin derangements including hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies, and circulating immune complexes are commonly ... The neoplastic cells of this disease display a mature T-cell immunophenotype, with the majority of cases showing a CD4-/CD8+ T- ...
Some children with autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorders are heterozygous for a mutation in the gene that codes for the Fas ... Evans syndrome Leukaemia Lymphoma Lymphocytosis Myeloma Myeloproliferative disease "Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: ... along with hypergammaglobulinemia and paraproteinemias. follicular lymphoma chronic lymphocytic leukemia acute lymphoblastic ... Interstitial Lung Diseases: Merck Manual Professional". Retrieved 2008-12-09. Winter, S.S. Lymphoproliferative disorders. ...
A decreased level of albumin, however, is common in many diseases, including liver disease, malnutrition, malabsorption, ... Depression of C3 occurs in autoimmune disorders as the complement system is activated and the C3 becomes bound to immune ... hypergammaglobulinemia), decreased (hypogammaglobulinaemia), or have an abnormal peak or peaks. Note that immunoglobulins may ... chronic liver disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases. ...
... hypergammaglobulinemia was most commonly associated with autoimmune diseases. In female patients with hypergammaglobulinemia, ... Hypergammaglobulinemia in the pediatric population as a marker for underlying autoimmune disease: a retrospective cohort study ... Hypergammaglobulinemia in the pediatric population as a marker for underlying autoimmune disease: a retrospective cohort study ...
... is a chronic autoimmune disease that can cause severe fatigue and joint pain. Well show you photos to help you identify your ... An autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system attacks the body because it confuses it for something foreign. There are ... Hypergammaglobulinemia is an uncommon condition characterized by elevated levels of immunoglobulins in your blood. ... The disease isnt linked to a certain gene, but people with lupus often have family members with other autoimmune conditions. ...
But what are the causes of this hypergammaglobulinemia? A team headed by INRSs Professor Simona Stäger has successfully ... Some autoimmune diseases and persistent infections are characterized by high levels of antibodies in the blood. ... Some autoimmune diseases and persistent infections are characterized by high levels of antibodies in the blood. But what are ... "Innate Immune B Cell Activation by Leishmania donovani Exacerbates Disease and Mediates Hypergammaglobulinemia." The Canadian ...
Autoimmune hepatitis is when your bodys infection-fighting system (immune system) attacks your liver cells. This causes ... Home Health Conditions and Diseases Hepatitis Autoimmune Hepatitis Autoimmune Hepatitis. Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest ... Experts dont know what causes autoimmune hepatitis.. It is linked to a disorder called hypergammaglobulinemia. This disorder ... Autoimmune antibodies. These are used to see if you have autoimmune hepatitis or another liver disease with similar symptoms. ...
Autoimmune disease. Classically Sjögrens syndrome, but it is also associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid ... arthritis and even hypergammaglobulinemia. Hypokalaemia is often severe in these cases. Hereditary causes include mutations of ... Wrong, O; Davies HEF (1959). "The Excretion of Acid in Renal Disease". QJM. 28 (110): 259-313. PMID 13658353. Walsh SB, Shirley ... citrate tablets which not only replace potassium but also inhibit calcium excretion and thus do not exacerbate stone disease as ...
A particular form of chronic liver disease prevalent among young women with an excessive increase in protein and υ-globulin was ... Extreme hypergammaglobulinemia in young women with liver disease of unknown etiology. J. Clin. Invest. 1951; 30: 654-659Google ... Disease recurrence and rejection following liver transplantation for autoimmune chronic active liver disease. Transplantation ... Auto Immune Polyendocrine Syndrome Auto Immune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type Iral Hepat Rece Ptor Exper Ience These keywords were ...
Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic disease of unknown cause, characterized by continuing hepatocellular inflammation and ... Extreme hypergammaglobulinemia in young women with liver disease of unknown etiology. J Clin Invest. 1950. 30:654. ... The disease often is associated with other autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune hepatitis cannot be explained on the basis of ... 9] The term autoimmune hepatitis was selected to replace terms such as autoimmune liver disease and autoimmune chronic active ...
Some antibodies may also be significant for the prognosis of the disease development and internal organs involvement. In the ... this does not stop an interest in other autoantibodies and the significance of their presence for the course of this disease. ... The presence of certain autoantibodies in the serum of patients facilitates the diagnosis of particular autoimmune diseases. ... Liver (autoimmune disease) PBC. RF. Dryness, hypergammaglobulinemia, and leukopenia. ACPA. Arthralgia and arthritis. ...
Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, have also rarely caused false positive results. Most false negative ... Nonspecific reactions, hypergammaglobulinemia, or the presence of antibodies directed to other infectious agents that may be ... or does not have a disease. Generally the prior probability is estimated using the prevalence of a disease within a population ... In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control announced an initiative for voluntary, routine testing of all Americans aged 13-64 ...
Learn about associated conditions, such as autoimmune diseases and Kawasaki disease. Also find out about diagnosis and ... Autoimmune Diseases: Types, Symptoms, Causes and More. An autoimmune disease is a condition in which your immune system attacks ... Hypergammaglobulinemia. Hypergammaglobulinemia is an uncommon condition characterized by elevated levels of immunoglobulins in ... Youre more likely to develop this disease if you have an autoimmune condition, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic ...
... the disease may have an autoimmune cause and is often associated with autoimmune disease. Although acute hemorrhage associated ... is a rare hemorrhagic disease in which autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII- (FVIII-) neutralizing antibodies ( ... In humans, elevated BAFF levels are associated with several B-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases with hypergammaglobulinemia [40 ... Autoimmune Diseases. AHA is often associated with autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus ...
However, the wide spectrum of clinical findings and heterogeneity of disease, even among family members with identical ... However, the wide spectrum of clinical findings and heterogeneity of disease, even among family members with identical ... Hypergammaglobulinemia in the pediatric population as a marker for underlying autoimmune disease: a retrospective cohort study ... Similar to other autoimmune diseases, associations with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variants have been reported in small, ...
HIV infection has been associated with increased rates of B cell lymphomas, autoimmune diseases, and hypergammaglobulinemia. ... Mechanisms of hypergammaglobulinemia and impaired antigen-specific humoral immunity in HIV-1 infection. Blood 103: 2180-2186. ... Impact of HIV-associated immunosuppression on malaria infection and disease in Malawi. J. Infect. Dis. 193: 872-878. ... Division of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN ...
Autoimmune antibodies. These are used to see if you have autoimmune hepatitis or another liver disease with similar symptoms. ... Experts dont know what causes autoimmune hepatitis.. It is linked to a disorder called hypergammaglobulinemia. This disorder ... Autoimmune Hepatitis. What is autoimmune hepatitis?. Autoimmune hepatitis is when your bodys infection-fighting system (immune ... It is a long-term or chronic inflammatory liver disease.. There are 2 types of autoimmune hepatitis: type 1 (classic) or type 2 ...
CXCL13 expression has been associated with lymphoid neogenesis in autoimmune diseases (26, 27, 29) and during Helicobacter ... Malaria infection is associated with B cell pathology, including hypergammaglobulinemia (37), autoantibody production (38), and ... are elevated during chronic autoimmune diseases of humans, and are therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis (49, 50). ... Immune complexes play a role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (18) and Lyme arthritis (19), and ...
... as well as in patients with autoimmune vasculitis to learn more about the role of these cells in autoimmune disease. After ... development of ANoA and serum IgG1 hypergammaglobulinemia. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Bank1 and Nfkb1) verified by additional QTL ... BACKGROUND: Autoimmune diseases require the involvement and activation of immune cells and occur when the body builds up an ... Patients with autoimmune vasculitis, irrespective of disease activity, had lower percentage and absolute numbers of circulating ...
BACKGROUND: Autoimmune diseases require the involvement and activation of immune cells and occur when the body builds up an ... development of ANoA and serum IgG1 hypergammaglobulinemia. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Bank1 and Nfkb1) verified by additional QTL ... There are several valuable mouse models to investigate the underlying mechanisms causing systemic autoimmune diseases in which ... such as systemic autoimmune diseases. The goal of GWAS is to identify these genetic risk factors in order to make predictions ...
Hypergammaglobulinemia in the pediatric population as a marker for underlying autoimmune disease: a retrospective cohort study ... Role of intravenous immunoglobulin in the treatment of Kawasaki disease. Int J Rheum Dis. 2018 Jan; 21(1):64-69. View abstract ... Predicting Coronary Artery Aneurysms in Kawasaki Disease at a North American Center: An Assessment of Baseline z Scores. J Am ... Risk Model Development and Validation for Prediction of Coronary Artery Aneurysms in Kawasaki Disease in a North American ...
... suggesting that SLE is a complex disease driven by different lymphocyte subsets with high heterogeneity of clinical ... Although SLE is suggested to be a Th2-driven disease, elevation of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines occurs in both humans and mice, ... lpr mice develop a lupus-like autoimmune disease characterized by severe panisotypic hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibody ... The polarized situation between Th1 and Th2 cells is established to be important in animal models and human autoimmune diseases ...
To evaluate the prevalence of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases in GD1 patients, we conducted a multicenter national study ... Polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia may be related to the presence of autoantibodies. The clinical significance of such ... Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Metabolism, Inborn Errors. Genetic Diseases, Inborn. ... Gaucher Disease. Sphingolipidoses. Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Nervous System. Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn. Brain ...
Sicca symptoms are the hallmarks of the disease which may also present with various organ manifestations. Due to... ... Sj gren s syndrome is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of unknown origin, attacking in particular the tear and ... As with most autoimmune diseases, the etiology of Sj gren s syndrome is not yet fully understood (e2 e5, 19). Current concepts ... as well as polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia as a sign of increased B cell activity. ...
... such as autoimmune pancreatitis, orbital disease and major salivary gland involvement, the disease tends to be recognized and ... Diseases that mimic hematologic manifestations of IgG4-RD (lymphadenopathy, eosinophilia and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia ... similar to lymphadenopathy in multicentric Castleman disease or autoimmune disease. ... IgG4-related disease in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Clin Immunol. 2017;180:97-99. ...
High level of antibodies in the blood (hypergammaglobulinemia) is one of the features for autoimmune diseases and chronic ... Cancer, Alzheimers disease and other age-related diseases develop over the course of aging, and certain proteins are shown to ... Innate Immune B Cell Activation by Leishmania donovani Exacerbates Disease and Mediates Hypergammaglobulinemia. Cell Reports, ... can cause an increased incidence of kidney disease, ovary disease and obesity in their F3 progeny. ...
... attempts were made to exploit selective ignition of controlled cellular suicide as therapeutic strategy in malignant diseases. ... In brief, a role for TNF has been suggested in autoimmune diseases, such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, ... hypergammaglobulinemia and accumulation of CD4−CD8− T-cells [97]. ... Beside autoimmune diseases, a role for the TL1A/DR3 system in atherosclerosis [133] and tumourigenesis [145,146] has been ...
BACKGROUND: Autoimmune diseases require the involvement and activation of immune cells and occur when the body builds up an ... development of ANoA and serum IgG1 hypergammaglobulinemia. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Bank1 and Nfkb1) verified by additional QTL ... Anti-FHL1 autoantibodies were detected in 25% of IIM patients, while patients with other autoimmune diseases or muscular ... There are several valuable mouse models to investigate the underlying mechanisms causing systemic autoimmune diseases in which ...
  • The term lupus has been used to identify a number of immune diseases that have similar clinical presentations and laboratory features, but SLE is the most common type of lupus . (healthline.com)
  • However, the wide spectrum of clinical findings and heterogeneity of disease, even among family members with identical mutations, is increasingly recognized. (frontiersin.org)
  • Although SLE is suggested to be a Th2-driven disease, elevation of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines occurs in both humans and mice, suggesting that SLE is a complex disease driven by different lymphocyte subsets with high heterogeneity of clinical manifestations and organ involvement. (hindawi.com)
  • Because of the complexity of this disease, some of its clinical manifestations may require interdisciplinary treatment. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Thus, it is crucial for physicians of various specialties to be informed about current aspects of clinical manifestations of the disease, the revised classification criteria, and current treatment options. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Acute cor pulmonale is a clinical syndrome characterized by signs of right heart failure (right ventricular hypertrophy) of sudden onset and results from the abrupt increase of pulmonary vascular resistance due to diseases that affect the function and/or the structure of the lung, of which pulmonary embolism is the most common cause. (scielo.br)
  • Recent studies show that relapsing polychondritis patients with tracheobronchial involvement are distinct from others in terms of clinical characteristics, therapeutic management, and disease evolution. (bvsalud.org)
  • This may allow an inflammatory host response with certain clinical features that resemble autoimmune manifestations ( 41 ). (asm.org)
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmunity disease, which exhibits a variety of clinical manifestations. (biomedcentral.com)
  • All people with ALPS have signs of lymphoproliferation, which makes it the most common clinical manifestation of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Autoimmune disease is the second most common clinical manifestation and one that most often requires treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical symptoms and laboratory findings of SLE improved with appropriate treatment by corticosteroids and azathioprine, and remission of the liver disease was achieved as well. (clinmedjournals.org)
  • Among these diseases, the specific clinical and pathologic features of each disorder likely reflect the initiating and propagating stimuli that determine the specific tissues targeted, and the inflammatory effector mechanisms that predominate. (mhmedical.com)
  • When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. (unime.it)
  • This report shows that the link between eosinophilia, IgG4, and clinical manifestations is not simple and provides useful insight into the immunopathology of hypereosinophilic syndrome and IgG4-related disease. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Depending on what tissue is involved results in the clinical symptoms such as rash , arthritis , kidney disease etc. (healthtap.com)
  • Infectious diseases were the next largest category of diseases, followed with much less frequency by malignant, drug-related, and other conditions. (duhnnae.com)
  • citation needed] In the US, the Food and Drug Administration requires that all donated blood be screened for several infectious diseases, including HIV-1 and HIV-2, using a combination of antibody testing (EIA) and more expeditious nucleic acid testing (NAT). (wikipedia.org)
  • Careful diagnostic testing for easily confused infectious diseases is very important. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Failure to consider infectious diseases that may mimic LIP can lead to misdiagnosis. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • A five-year-old male, infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), was admitted at the division of infectious diseases of this hospital with cough, tachydyspnea, fever, and breathing difficulty. (scielo.br)
  • In January 2013, a 30-year-old white woman with no relevant medical history was admitted to the Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, General Hospital of Vienna, in Vienna, Austria, because of a 3-week history of high fevers (up to 39.9°C), chills, and night sweats accompanied by headache, muscle pain, and malaise. (cdc.gov)
  • DPLN is the most common, severe, and important form of LN. Hematuria and proteinuria are present in all DPLN patients with active disease, and the nephrotic syndrome, hypertension, and renal insufficiency are all frequently seen. (hindawi.com)
  • Autoimmune pancreatitis with associated renal lesions. (appliedradiology.com)
  • The transplantation of spleen cells from old NZB/Bl mice with renal disease induced both the structural and the functional changes of membranous glomerulonephritis in young NZB/Bl mice within a few weeks and well in advance of its usual spontaneous occurrence. (rupress.org)
  • In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Leukemia must be differentiated from various diseases that cause weight loss , night sweats , hepatosplenomegaly , and palpable lymph nodes , such as hairy cell leukemia , prolymphocytic leukemia, follicular lymphoma , and mantle cell lymphoma . (wikidoc.org)
  • Hypergammaglobulinaemia is frequently observed in type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1), being either polyclonal or monoclonal gammopathies. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Approximately 11% of patients with MM have a completely normal SPE, with the monoclonal protein only identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Approximately 8% of MM patients have hypogammaglobulinemia without a quantifiable M-spike on SPE, but identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Accordingly, a normal serum SPE does not rule out the disease and should not be used to screen for the disorder. (mayocliniclabs.com)