Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.United StatesRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Anesthetics, Inhalation: Gases or volatile liquids that vary in the rate at which they induce anesthesia; potency; the degree of circulation, respiratory, or neuromuscular depression they produce; and analgesic effects. Inhalation anesthetics have advantages over intravenous agents in that the depth of anesthesia can be changed rapidly by altering the inhaled concentration. Because of their rapid elimination, any postoperative respiratory depression is of relatively short duration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p173)Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Halothane: A nonflammable, halogenated, hydrocarbon anesthetic that provides relatively rapid induction with little or no excitement. Analgesia may not be adequate. NITROUS OXIDE is often given concomitantly. Because halothane may not produce sufficient muscle relaxation, supplemental neuromuscular blocking agents may be required. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p178)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Bias (Epidemiology): Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Anesthesia, Inhalation: Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Review Literature as Topic: Published materials which provide an examination of recent or current literature. Review articles can cover a wide range of subject matter at various levels of completeness and comprehensiveness based on analyses of literature that may include research findings. The review may reflect the state of the art. It also includes reviews as a literary form.Confounding Factors (Epidemiology): Factors that can cause or prevent the outcome of interest, are not intermediate variables, and are not associated with the factor(s) under investigation. They give rise to situations in which the effects of two processes are not separated, or the contribution of causal factors cannot be separated, or the measure of the effect of exposure or risk is distorted because of its association with other factors influencing the outcome of the study.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Manipulation, Osteopathic: Musculoskeletal manipulation based on the principles of OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE developed in 1874 by Dr Andrew Taylor Still.Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Nitrous Oxide: Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Duplicate Publication as Topic: Simultaneous or successive publishing of identical or near- identical material in two or more different sources without acknowledgment. It differs from reprinted publication in that a reprint cites sources. It differs from PLAGIARISM in that duplicate publication is the product of the same authorship while plagiarism publishes a work or parts of a work of another as one's own.Anesthetics, Intravenous: Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Methyl Ethers: A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.Financial Support: The provision of monetary resources including money or capital and credit; obtaining or furnishing money or capital for a purchase or enterprise and the funds so obtained. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Manuscripts, MedicalRange of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.CaliforniaSurgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Meta-Analysis as Topic: A quantitative method of combining the results of independent studies (usually drawn from the published literature) and synthesizing summaries and conclusions which may be used to evaluate therapeutic effectiveness, plan new studies, etc., with application chiefly in the areas of research and medicine.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Causality: The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Enflurane: An extremely stable inhalation anesthetic that allows rapid adjustments of anesthesia depth with little change in pulse or respiratory rate.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Osteopathic Physicians: Licensed physicians trained in OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE. An osteopathic physician, also known as D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathy), is able to perform surgery and prescribe medications.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Epidemiologic Research Design: The form and structure of analytic studies in epidemiologic and clinical research.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Plagiarism: Passing off as one's own the work of another without credit.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Anesthetics: Agents that are capable of inducing a total or partial loss of sensation, especially tactile sensation and pain. They may act to induce general ANESTHESIA, in which an unconscious state is achieved, or may act locally to induce numbness or lack of sensation at a targeted site.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Epidemiologic Studies: Studies designed to examine associations, commonly, hypothesized causal relations. They are usually concerned with identifying or measuring the effects of risk factors or exposures. The common types of analytic study are CASE-CONTROL STUDIES; COHORT STUDIES; and CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Transference (Psychology): The unconscious transfer to others (including psychotherapists) of feelings and attitudes which were originally associated with important figures (parents, siblings, etc.) in one's early life.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Radiographic Image Enhancement: Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Thiopental: A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the induction of general anesthesia or for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Publication Bias: The influence of study results on the chances of publication and the tendency of investigators, reviewers, and editors to submit or accept manuscripts for publication based on the direction or strength of the study findings. Publication bias has an impact on the interpretation of clinical trials and meta-analyses. Bias can be minimized by insistence by editors on high-quality research, thorough literature reviews, acknowledgement of conflicts of interest, modification of peer review practices, etc.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect: A form of fluorescent antibody technique commonly used to detect serum antibodies and immune complexes in tissues and microorganisms in specimens from patients with infectious diseases. The technique involves formation of an antigen-antibody complex which is labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Great BritainAging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Bibliography as Topic: Discussion of lists of works, documents or other publications, usually with some relationship between them, e.g., by a given author, on a given subject, or published in a given place, and differing from a catalog in that its contents are restricted to holdings of a single collection, library, or group of libraries. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.
Author: Jane Johnson. 2nd Comment's Info. Comment text.... The element only includes the global HTML attributes such as ...
CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Wilder, Natalie; Daley, Claire; Sugarman, Jane; Partridge, James (April 2016). " ...
Crowley, D.A. (ed.); Baggs, A.P.; Freeman, Jane; Stevenson, Janet H. (1991). Victoria County History: A History of the County ... CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Pevsner, Nikolaus (1975). Cherry, Bridget, ed. The Buildings of England: Wiltshire. ...
Donawerth, Jane. "Authors : Harris, Clare Winger : SFE : Science Fiction Encyclopedia". sf-encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2016-05- ... Everett Bleiler, the author of a detailed review of the first ten years of science fiction magazines, is less complimentary, ... Authors whose work appeared in Amazing Stories Quarterly include Stanton A. Coblentz, Miles J. Breuer, A. Hyatt Verrill, and ... Bleiler mentions three authors, Coblentz, Taine, and Breuer, as having produced notably original material, but adds that their ...
CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Pevsner, Nikolaus; Cherry, Bridget (revision) (1975). The Buildings of England: ... Jane; Stevenson, Janet H. (1980). A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 10: Downton hundred; Elstub and Everleigh ...
London: Jane's. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Bridgman, Leonard (ed.) (1961). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1961 ... CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Gunston, Bill (1986). World Encyclopedia of Aero Engines. Wellingborough: Patrick ... Bridgman, Leonard (ed.) (1953). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1953-54. ... NC-840 Chardonneret Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1953-54. Type: Four-cylinder air-cooled inverted inline engine ...
Crowley, D.A. (ed.); Baggs, A.P.; Crittall, Elizabeth; Freeman, Jane; Stevenson, Janet H. (1980). Victoria County History: A ... CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Pevsner, Nikolaus; Cherry, Bridget (revision) (1975) [1963]. The Buildings of ...
Bridgman, Leonard (ed.) (1953). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1953-54. London: Jane's. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list ( ... CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) "Fiat G.46 4B". pilotfriend.com. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. ... p. 9. Bridgman, Leonard (ed.) (1938). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1938. London: Sampson Low and Marston Co. Ltd. pp. 67d - ... Bridgman, Leonard (ed.) (1938). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1938. London: Sampson Low and Marston Co. Ltd. pp. 67d - 68d. ...
Crowley, D.A. (ed.); Freeman, Jane; Stevenson, Janet H. (1987). A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 13: South-west ... CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Pevsner, Nikolaus; Cherry, Bridget (revision) (1975) [1963]. Wiltshire. The ...
Jian (Jane) Xu, Ph.D., CTO, IBM China Systems and Technology Labs; Distinguished Engineer of IBM Watson Research, focusing on ... "Huffington Post author page: Padmasree Warrior". Retrieved 28 April 2013. "Cisco ropes in former Motorola CTO Padmasree Warrior ... Jane Lubchenco is Nature's Newsmaker of the Year". Nature. pp. 1024-1028. doi:10.1038/4681024a. Retrieved 3 May 2013. Samenow, ... "Jane Lubchenco". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 3 May 2013. "OSU's Lubchenco confirmed as head of NOAA". The Oregonian. ...
London: Jane's. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link). ... ISBN 1-85605-375-X. Taylor, J.W.R. (ed.) (1969). Jane's All The ...
CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Kenneth R. Hall (2008). Secondary Cities and Urban Networking in the Indian Ocean ... 159-. ISBN 978-0-7391-2835-0. Jayne Werner; John K. Whitmore; George Dutton (21 August 2012). Sources of Vietnamese Tradition. ...
The standard author abbreviation E.M.McClint. is used to indicate this person as the author when citing a botanical name. ... Radcliffe, Jane. "Elizabeth McClintock (1912-2004)" (PDF). California Academy of Sciences. IPNI. E.M.McClint. "Elizabeth ... McClintock -- botanist, author". SFGate. Retrieved 2017-01-25. Trees of Golden Gate Park and San Francisco. By Elizabeth ...
London: Jane's. p. 124. ISBN 0-7106-0148-4. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Flight 6 May 1926, p.275. Flight 9 ... 1928). Jane's all the World's Aircraft 1928. London: Sampson Low, Marston & company, ltd. p. 45d-46d. Taylor, Michael J.H. ( ... Jane's all the World's Aircraft 1928 Type: Water-cooled 60° V-12 Bore: 115 mm (4.53 in) Stroke: 150 mm (5.91 in) Displacement: ...
Charnin-Aker, Jane. "The Ballplayers - Doug Jones". BaseballLibrary.com. Archived from the original on 2007-09-10. Retrieved ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) B. Hill, Justice (2006-05-07). "Consistent Wickman claims saves mark". MLB.com. ...
Rendall, Jane (1984). Great Britain: feminist politics and the politics of class. New York: Schocken Book. ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Lamb, Anne Richelieu (1844). Can Women Regenerate Society?. London: Harrison and ...
Huberman (Liskov), Barbara Jane (1968). "A program to play chess end games". Stanford University Department of Computer Science ... Barbara Liskov is the author of three books and over one hundred technical papers. In 1970, she married Nathan Liskov. Their ... "Jane Siegel: Obituary". San Francisco Chronicle (via Legacy.com). January 24, 2010. Retrieved 2014-11-18. Guttag, John (2005-01 ... "Barbara Jane Liskov". Encyclopædia Britannica. 2016. Karagianis, Liz (Fall 2009). "Top Prize". MIT Spectrum. Retrieved 10 July ...
A portrait or photograph of the author remains printed on the inside of the front cover. The focus is now on cover art, with ... Austen, Jane (2003). Mansfield Park. Penguin Classics. pp. 440-465. ISBN 9780141439808. Maus, Katharine (1998). Four Revenge ... "What's new". Peter Keating: Author and vegetarian cook. Retrieved 23 June 2017. "Culture and Anarchy and Other Selected Prose ...
Wyatt, Flora R., Margaret Coggins, Jane Hunter Imber. Popular nonfiction authors for children: A biographical and thematic ... A biographical encyclopedia of medical travel authors. Edwin Mellen Press, 2010-. ISBN 9780773436817. Miller, Jane Eldridge. ... Who was who among English and European authors, 1931-1949: Based on entries which first appeared in The author's and writer's ... Authors: Critical and biographical references. Scarecrow Press, 1993. ISBN 0810826798. Contemporary authors online. Gale ...
London: Jane's Yearbooks. ISBN 0-354-00094-2. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's ... econ cruise - 60% power Taylor, John W.R. (ed.) (1971). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1971-72. ... and non-folding wings Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1971-72 General characteristics Crew: one pilot Capacity: 1 ...
CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) "Naco, Sonora". Retrieved December 17, 2009. Eppinga, Jane (2002). Nogales: Life and ...
Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Jane's Publishing. ISBN 1-85170-324-1. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link). ... ISBN 1-874023-56-5. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Taylor, Michael J. H. (Editor) (1989). ...
CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Bruehl, Stephen; Apkarian, A. Vania; Ballantyne, Jane C.; Berger, Ann; Borsook, ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Khokhar, Jibran Y.; Ferguson, Charmaine S.; Zhu, Andy Z.X.; Tyndale, Rachel F. ( ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Darke, Shane; Sims, Jamie; McDonald, Skye; Wickes, Wendy (2000-05-01). " ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) "Naloxone". Human Metabolome Database - Version 4.0. 23 October 2017. Retrieved ...
CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Brandt, Anthony (2011). The Man Who Ate His Boots. pp. 307-8. Brandt, Anthony ( ... 311-2. Franklin, Lady Jane; Elce, Erika Behrisch (1 March 2009). As Affecting the Fate of My Absent Husband: Selected Letters ...
London: Jane's Publishing. ISBN 0-7106-0705-9. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's ... Taiwan (Republic of China) Republic of China Air Force Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1980-81 General ... Taylor, John W.R. (ed.) (1980). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1980-81. ...
Author: Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Harumi Jyonouchi, MD. Updated: May 16, 2011 ... Bannister, Barbara A.; Jones, Jane. Infection : microbiology and management 3rd ed. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Pub. 2006: 435. ... Jane; Savinykh, Natalia; Dopico, Xaquin Castro. Neonatal and adult recent thymic emigrants produce IL-8 and express complement ...
Jane Roberts (1792 - after 1861) was an English author active in the 1830s, best known for her account of a two-year voyage to ... Jane Roberts - Diary and Notebook 1833-1839 and 1851, Volume 1 Jane Roberts - Diary and Notebook 1833-1839 and 1851, Volume 2. ... Jane Roberts first book, "Two Years at Sea" was published by Richard Bentley in 1834 and dedicated to the Earl of Munster, a ... Jane Roberts also wrote a quantity of poetry, some of which was published anonymously, and a number of unpublished poems and ...
"Read". Jane Alexander author. 2014-10-29. Retrieved 2017-11-24. "Jane Alexander - The Last Treasure Hunt". The List. 2015-03-17 ... "Jane Alexander". The University of Edinburgh. Retrieved 2017-11-24. "The Last Treasure Hunt". Jane Alexander author. 2014-10-28 ... "Jane Alexander :: National Association of Writers in Education ::". www.nawe.co.uk. Retrieved 2017-11-24. "About". Jane ... Jane Alexanders The top 10 treasure hunts in fiction on The Guardian The Fiction Desk interview on In Yon Green Hill To ...
She is the author of several books, including The Whole Life Adoption Book. ... Jayne Schooler is an adoptive parent in Columbus, Ohio. ... Jayne Schooler. Jayne Schooler is the author of several books, ... Jayne Schooler - June 1, 2007 - Talking, Tough Topics In this excerpt from her book, Jayne Schooler offers adoptive parents ... Jayne Schooler - May 24, 2017 - Ages & Stages, Health & Development, Parenting, Preteens "Mom, just drop us off at the corner!" ...
The mission of Tyndale House Publishers is to minister to the spiritual needs of people, primarily through literature consistent with biblical principles. Tyndale publishes Christian fiction, nonfiction, childrens books, and other resources, including Bibles in the New Living Translation (NLT).
All of IRISCommunities & CollectionsBy Issue DateAuthorsTitlesSubjectsThis CollectionBy Issue DateAuthorsTitlesSubjects ... Salvage, Jane; Heijnen, Serge; World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe (‎Copenhagen : WHO Regional Office for ... Regional Office for Europe; Salvage, Jane (‎World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe, 1994)‎ ... Nursing in Europe : a resource for better health / edited by Jane Salvage and Serge Heijnen  ...
All of IRISCommunities & CollectionsBy Issue DateAuthorsTitlesSubjectsThis CollectionBy Issue DateAuthorsTitlesSubjects ...
Liu, Fangbing; Lunsford, Elaine P.; Tong, Jingli; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Gibbs, Summer L.; Yu, Jane J; Choi, Hak Soo; Henske, ... Trindade, Anil Julius; Medvetz, Douglas A; Neuman, Nicole A.; Myachina, Faina; Yu, Jane J; Priolo, Carmen; Henske, Elizabeth ... Jane J.; Owen, Caroline A.; Huang, Hayden; Baron, Rebecca M.; Henske, Elizabeth P. (Wiley Periodicals, Inc., 2014) ...
By way of introduction...Jayne is also the author of a book of poems titled Forms of Intercession. Her writing has appeared in ... A Virginia native, Jayne has spent most of her professional life working in the field of mental health. And...shes a blogger, ... Guess what? Jayne has graciously offered an autographed copy of her book as a giveaway on the site. So, leave your comment ... After I read and reviewed the amazing novel Tomato Girl (review here), I contacted the writer, Jayne Pupek, to let her know how ...
Jane Mohler is the author of this article in the Journal of Visualized Experiments: Måling Frailty hos HIV-infiserte individer ... Articles by Jane Mohler in JoVE. * Medicine. Måling Frailty hos HIV-infiserte individer. Identifisering av svake pasienter er ... Articles by Jane Mohler. In JoVE (1). *Måling Frailty hos HIV-infiserte individer. Identifisering av svake pasienter er det ... Other articles by Jane Mohler on PubMed. * Critical Pathway for Cardiac Rehabilitation After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention ...
Author Collins Hemingway will officially launch Volume II of The Marriage of Miss Jane Austen Trilogy, a new ... Author Collins Hemingway Hosts Book Launch for The Marriage of Miss Jane Austen: Volume II at Jane Austen Festival in Bath, ... Author Collins Hemingway will officially launch Volume II of The Marriage of Miss Jane Austen Trilogy, a new historical novel ... The novel is now available at Amazon and Jane Austen Books and information about The Marriage of Miss Jane Austen trilogy can ...
Machine learning is the next big thing in computing; are you ready for it? Hiring data scientists or ML experts isnt easy or cheap. But the rise of machine learning-as-a-service (MLaaS) suggests that you wont need to. Today, we take a look at five of the top machine learning service providers to see which one works the best for you.. ...
by Jane Lamerdin, Hanako Daino-Laizure, Neil W. Charter and Abhishek Saharia ...
Diane Morgan, Author, Chronicle Books, Author, E. Jane Armstrong, Photographer Chronicle Books $24.95 (192p) ISBN 978-0-8118- ... The prolific author (Dressed to Grill, Delicious Dips, etc.) introduces several unusual cooking techniques, urging readers to ...
... the authors publishing company. Written permission from the Austen Authors administrators or the individual author must be ... as Jane Fairfax in Emma refuses some arrowroot "of very superior quality"; we cringe as Mrs. Jennings in Sense & Sensibility ... But, while Jane Austen wasnt a foodie, she did use food in all her stories. Food revealed motivation, clarified relationships ... Jane Fairfax didnt dislike arrowroot. She was bolding telling Emma, operating as Highburys Lady Bountiful, that she "was not ...
Park is the author of this article in the Journal of Visualized Experiments: Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging van de ... If you are Jane H. Park and would like to personalize this page please email our Author Liason for assistance. ... Bruce M. Damon1,2,3,4, Ke Li1,2, Richard D. Dortch1,2, E. Brian Welch1,2, Jane H. Park1,2,4, Amanda K. W. Buck1,2, Theodore F. ... Jane H. Park has not added a biography.. ... Jane H. Park. Institute of Imaging Science. Vanderbilt ...
Author Archives: Jane Honeck. Recent Articles. Financially Conscious - an Oxymoron? Posted on December 10, 2010 by Jane Honeck ...
... author of How To Rock Your Life showing at Cutting Room - New York on 04/07/18 7:00 PM EDT. Tickets starting at $15 available ... Darling featuring Hayley Jane and Ryan Montbleau with special guests Hannah Gill (Duo) and Taraleigh Weathers, ... Yes, Darling featuring Hayley Jane and Ryan Montbleau. with special guests Hannah Gill (Duo). and Taraleigh Weathers, author of ...
You didnt try to "be" Jane and I appreciated that. But Jane was on every page.. -Jane from Austin, Texas ... "OMG im soooo excited for your book…I just read Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict again for like the bajilllionth time!". - ...
This is a video demonstrating how to start an IV line to a patient. Its complete with the step-by-step process needed in starting an IV line as well as the.... ...
... the author copies of How Do Dinosaurs Go Up and Down, and the author copies of Creepy Monster, Sleepy Monsters. Daughter Heidi ... Had lunch with friend Claire at the Cheese Farm, dinner at friend Vanessas house, afternoon tea with Janie Douglas at Rufflets ... I did some banking, some grocery shopping, bumped into friend Janie Douglas at the grocery store and returned (weather overcast ... tea in Janie and Tom Douglas garden, antiquing, and whew! I think thats it. ...
Ah, dear and patient (and constant) readers, I am not dead. Not nearly dead. I have just been spinning about like a top, trying to get things done, becoming occasionally undone, and feeling ever increasingly guilty about this journal. So here you have a massive catch-up, a months worth. I will sound a lot busier than I actually have been because you are getting it all in one swell foop, as Mr. Spooner would have said.. Travel:. Yes, I got to Scotland on June 4, with no major hiccups, not like last year when a volcanic eruption made travel. . .um. . . interesting. Or the year before when my eardrum burst three hours before I had to leave for the Edinburgh airport. And except for a rather heavy landing and the fact that my wonderful friend Debby mistook the plane I was in on for another one which was an hour late and I had to hang around the airport without sleep for an extra hour, everything went smoothly.. Book Stuff:. *I have (finally and happily) sold my novel Trash Mountain and a picture ...
Have you ever heard of metabolic syndrome? If you or one of your friends or a member of your family is going through it, then you probably knew about it..... ...
Post subject: Author Philip K. Dicks letter to edtr. Mark Hurst re Jaynes ... Jaynes says, and I think rightly, that this falling silent of the godly voices is what has come down to us as the myth of the ... Jaynes has not really gone far enough (he says, however, that he plans to push his work further in a forthcoming book). He ... Thus I wrote to Jaynes that although we do not hear the gods any more, that does not mean that they are no longer there and no ...
Author Philip K. Dicks letter to edtr. Mark Hurst re Jaynes. Discussion of the influence of Jayness theory on works of ... Author Philip K. Dicks letter to edtr. Mark Hurst re Jaynes. * Quote ... Julian Jaynes Society. Board Index. JJS Discussion Forum. The Bicameral Mind in Fiction, Film, and Popular Culture. ... Jaynes says, and I think rightly, that this falling silent of the godly voices is what has come down to us as the myth of the ...
You searched for: Author Lee, Huey-Jane Remove constraint Author: Lee, Huey-Jane Academic Unit Biostatistics Remove constraint ... Chen, Ting-Bin; Yiao, Szu-Yu; Sun, Yu; Lee, Huey-Jane; Yang, Shu-Chien; Chiu, Ming-Jang; Chen, Ta-Fu; Lin, Ker-Neng; Tang, Li- ...
  • Author Collins Hemingway will officially launch Volume II of The Marriage of Miss Jane Austen Trilogy, a new historical novel based on Austen's life, on the opening day of the Jane Austen Festival on Saturday, 10 September, in the beautiful UNESCO World Heritage city of Bath, England. (prweb.com)
  • The book launch in Bath, Jane Austen's one-time home during the early 1800s, is a 'full-circle' milestone for me,' said Hemingway. (prweb.com)
  • She is now finishing a book about author-love called Jane Austen's Cults and Cultures , which traces permutations of ""Jane mania"" from 1817 to the present, and also working on another called Raising the Novel, which explores modern efforts to create a novelistic canon by elevating novels to keystones of high culture. (wiley.com)
  • Louise West, curator of the Jane Austen House Museum, says she and the trustees are aware of Lindsay Ashford's hypothesis, but have not yet reached any decisions about testing the Austen's hair for arsenic. (scientificamerican.com)
  • No one who reads Jane Austen's words with any attention and reflection can possibly be alt-right," Elaine Bander, a retired professor and a former officer of the Jane Austen Society of North America, told the New York Times . (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice has now been entirely retold in texts and emojis, in Emoji Pride and Prejudice . (indigo.ca)
  • In this laugh out loud re-telling of Jane Austen's famous work , you'll get a condensed, modern interpretation of the world's greatest love story. (indigo.ca)
  • On the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death, Keiren Phelan, a trustee of Jane Austen's House Museum and editor of the website Literary Winchester, retraces the author's life and literary career through some of the most significant locations in her biography. (biography.com)
  • However, Jane Austen's first 25 years were spent very happily in her father's rectory at Steventon, eight miles west of Basingstoke. (biography.com)
  • One shouldn't look for autobiography in Jane Austen's fiction but she is extremely prescient in her first published novel Sense and Sensibility , begun in 1795 when she was 20 and polished and polished thereafter until publication in 1811, about 15 months after moving into Chawton Cottage. (biography.com)
  • Jane Austen's House Museum, an independent museum dedicated to the life and work of Jane Austen, is where the author spent the last eight years of her life and wrote or revised all her novels. (biography.com)
  • come together in a collection of original poems by two of our most celebrated authors for young people: J. Patrick Lewis and Jane Yolen. (google.com)
  • Jane Yolen, not a twin herself - but with multiple sets in her family - has written or edited more than three hundred books, including the poetry collections Switching on the Moon , illustrated by G. Brian Karas, and Here's a Little Poem , illustrated by Polly Dunbar. (google.com)
  • Jane Yolen divides her time between Massachusetts and Scotland. (google.com)
  • Jane Yolen was born in New York City in 1939. (colorincolorado.org)
  • Jane Yolen and her husband divide their time between western Massachusetts and St. Andrews, Scotland. (colorincolorado.org)
  • Today we're super excited to celebrate the cover reveal for BRIAR ROSE by Jane Yolen, releasing April 19, 2016 from Tor Teen. (yabookscentral.com)
  • Born and raised in New York City, JANE YOLEN attended Smith College and received a master's in education from the University of Massachusetts. (yabookscentral.com)
  • Austen achieved success as an author during the years of 1811 to 1816 with her novels Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1815), and the joint publication of Northanger Abbey/Persuasion shortly after her death in 1817. (prweb.com)
  • Editor's note: In the 1960s, activist Jane Jacobs (who would have turned 100 on May 4, 2016) questioned whether massive urban planning projects work, and objected to demolishing old neighborhoods for sterile new buildings and highways. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Jayne, Mike, Fairness Doctrine 2.0: The Ever-Expanding Definition of Neutrality Under the First Amendment (2018). (ssrn.com)
  • Siska, MPHc, Lindsey and Mulcahey, Mary Jane, "Predictive Factors of Social Participation among Children with Spinal Cord Injuries: An Analysis of the Pediatric Measure of Participation Calibrated Item Bank" (2018). (jefferson.edu)
  • Through the Advanced Search Page , you can find items by searching specific terms such as Title, Author, Subject, ISBN, etc or you can narrow your focus using our amazing set of criteria parameters. (alibris.com)
  • Ashford asked librarians at Goucher College in Baltimore, which holds the Burkes's vast Jane Austen collection , to search for records of the arsenic test. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Narrow your search by one or multiple authors. (urban.org)
  • The novel is now available at Amazon and Jane Austen Books and information about The Marriage of Miss Jane Austen trilogy can be found at the Austen Marriage website . (prweb.com)
  • He has authored eleven books dealing with information systems, organizations, and society. (google.com)
  • Jane Price Laudon is a management consultant in the information systems area and the author of seven books. (google.com)
  • She is the author, coauthor, or coeditor of several books, including Threads: Gender, Labor, and Power in the Global Apparel Industry , also published by the University of Chicago Press. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • The author of more than 200 books, including Sister Light, Sister Dark, Owl Moon, and The Devil's Arithmetic, she has won the Caldecott Medal, two Nebula Awards, the World Fantasy Award, the Jewish Book Award, and two Christopher Medals. (yabookscentral.com)
  • Find all the books, read about the author, and more. (amazon.com)
  • After I read and reviewed the amazing novel Tomato Girl (review here ), I contacted the writer, Jayne Pupek, to let her know how moving it was for me. (blogspot.com)
  • OMG i'm soooo excited for your book…I just read Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict again for like the bajilllionth time! (janeaustenaddict.com)
  • In 14th-century France, parti-colouring, the use of two bright contrasting colours on the same plate, was especially popular and was described by Guillaume Tirel (also known as Taillevent), one of the primary authors of the later editions of Le Viandier. (janeausten.co.uk)
  • Jane Roberts' first book, "Two Years at Sea" was published by Richard Bentley in 1834 and dedicated to the Earl of Munster, a connection that stemmed from her father's links with the 10th Dragoons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jayne is also the author of a book of poems titled Forms of Intercession . (blogspot.com)
  • That was one of the really fun things about your book, "Lizzy and Jane" - food was actually one of the ways they related to each other and got in the way of and also forwarded the relationships. (austenauthors.net)
  • In reading Jaynes’ book I discover that although he is very certain (and very correct) that these inner command voices issued out of man’s right hemispheres, in no way is Jaynes really sure what specifically the voices were, if you follow me. (julianjaynes.org)
  • It's a sad day for the reality-based community, within the critiques of Jane Goodall's new book 'Seeds of Hope' we find that in addition to plagiarism and sloppiness with facts, she's fallen for anti-GMO crank Jeffrey Smith's nonsense. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Hart, the veteran crime writer, presents her central character, Jane Lawless, with such consistent and off-handed good humour that readers hardly notice the trails she and her character have blazed…The plot in the new book, gossipy and clever, features one cold case and another that's hot and scandalous. (indiebound.org)
  • Jane Grigson's book on fish cookery takes the reader through the alphabet from anchovies to zander giving recipes and historical, geographical and culinary information. (penguin.co.uk)
  • Jane Mayer spent five years conducting hundreds of interviews-including with several sources within the network-and scoured public records, private papers, and court proceedings in reporting this book. (google.co.uk)
  • Are you the Author or Publisher of a book? (fishpond.com.au)
  • Jane N Zuckerman (UK), Gary Brunette (USA) and Peter Leggat (Australia) Jane Zuckerman, Academic Centre for Travel Medicine and Vaccines, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference, Research and Training in Travel Medicine, University College London Medical School, University College London, UK. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • Dr Jane Zuckerman is Director of the Academic Centre for Travel Medicine and Vaccines, a WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference, Research and Training in Travel Medicine. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • Robert R. Janes is the Editor-in-Chief of Museum Management and Curatorship , a Visiting Research Fellow at the School of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester (UK), an Adjunct Professor of Archaeology at the University of Calgary, Canada, and the former President and CEO of the Glenbow Museum (1989-2000). (routledge.com)
  • One morning in 2000, Dr. Jane Hightower walked into her exam room to find a patient with disturbing symptoms she couldn't explain. (powells.com)
  • She is the author of Romantic Austen: Sexual Politics and the Literary Canon (Cambridge, 2002, 2008), as well as several essays on Austen, and the co-editor, with Gillian Russell, of Romantic Sociability: Social Networks and Literary Culture in Britain, 1770-1840 (Cambridge, 2002, 2006). (wiley.com)
  • Not content with discovering mercury-contaminated food as the reason for her patients' strange symptoms, Jane Hightower follows the threads even further. (powells.com)
  • A.K. Jayne has written and edited print and online content since 2006. (ehow.com)
  • She is a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, member of the Society of Authors, and founder member of Writers in Oxford. (penguin.co.uk)
  • With relevant coverage of todays Digital Firm that is fully integrated throughout the 7th edition of Management Information Systems, the authors clearly illustrate the impact of information technology on business through vivid examples, engaging and interactive exercises, and the most current information. (google.com)
  • Kindle edition by Jane Jamison. (amazon.com)
  • Jane Roberts also wrote a quantity of poetry, some of which was published anonymously, and a number of unpublished poems and draft plots for novels survive in her notebooks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lorna Jane, one of Australia's top retail companies and leading Activewear brand, has recently reached a benchmark with its Facebook following, hitting 350,000 'Likes' on the world's biggest social media site Facebook, going from zero 18 months ago. (prweb.com)
  • Janes provides pragmatic solutions grounded in a theoretical context, and highlights important issues in the management of museums that cannot be ignored. (routledge.com)
  • Jane Roberts (1792 - after 1861) was an English author active in the 1830s, best known for her account of a two-year voyage to Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) during which she visited and described the Swan River Colony. (wikipedia.org)
  • After rabbits, foxes, brambles and the cane toad, you would have thought Australia would have had enough of invasive exotic species, writes Jane Wright. (theecologist.org)