An aurora kinase that is a component of the chromosomal passenger protein complex and is involved in the regulation of MITOSIS. It mediates proper CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION and contractile ring function during CYTOKINESIS.
A family of highly conserved serine-threonine kinases that are involved in the regulation of MITOSIS. They are involved in many aspects of cell division, including centrosome duplication, SPINDLE APPARATUS formation, chromosome alignment, attachment to the spindle, checkpoint activation, and CYTOKINESIS.
An aurora kinase that localizes to the CENTROSOME during MITOSIS and is involved in centrosome regulation and formation of the MITOTIC SPINDLE. Aurora A overexpression in many malignant tumor types suggests that it may be directly involved in NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION.
Aurora kinase C is a chromosomal passenger protein that interacts with aurora kinase B in the regulation of MITOSIS. It is found primarily in GERM CELLS in the TESTIS, and may mediate CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION during SPERMATOGENESIS.
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
Agents that inhibit PROTEIN KINASES.
Phosphotransferases that catalyzes the conversion of 1-phosphatidylinositol to 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Many members of this enzyme class are involved in RECEPTOR MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION and regulation of vesicular transport with the cell. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases have been classified both according to their substrate specificity and their mode of action within the cell.
A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.
A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.
A protein-serine-threonine kinase that is activated by PHOSPHORYLATION in response to GROWTH FACTORS or INSULIN. It plays a major role in cell metabolism, growth, and survival as a core component of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. Three isoforms have been described in mammalian cells.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
An intracellular signaling system involving the MAP kinase cascades (three-membered protein kinase cascades). Various upstream activators, which act in response to extracellular stimuli, trigger the cascades by activating the first member of a cascade, MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES; (MAPKKKs). Activated MAPKKKs phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES which in turn phosphorylate the MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES; (MAPKs). The MAPKs then act on various downstream targets to affect gene expression. In mammals, there are several distinct MAP kinase pathways including the ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway, the SAPK/JNK (stress-activated protein kinase/c-jun kinase) pathway, and the p38 kinase pathway. There is some sharing of components among the pathways depending on which stimulus originates activation of the cascade.
A microtubule structure that forms during CELL DIVISION. It consists of two SPINDLE POLES, and sets of MICROTUBULES that may include the astral microtubules, the polar microtubules, and the kinetochore microtubules.
The orderly segregation of CHROMOSOMES during MEIOSIS or MITOSIS.
A CALMODULIN-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of proteins. This enzyme is also sometimes dependent on CALCIUM. A wide range of proteins can act as acceptor, including VIMENTIN; SYNAPSINS; GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE; MYOSIN LIGHT CHAINS; and the MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p277)
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
Piperazines are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds containing a seven-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 4, often used in pharmaceuticals as smooth muscle relaxants, antipsychotics, antidepressants, and antihistamines, but can also be found as recreational drugs with stimulant and entactogen properties.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
Large multiprotein complexes that bind the centromeres of the chromosomes to the microtubules of the mitotic spindle during metaphase in the cell cycle.
A PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE family that was originally identified by homology to the Rous sarcoma virus ONCOGENE PROTEIN PP60(V-SRC). They interact with a variety of cell-surface receptors and participate in intracellular signal transduction pathways. Oncogenic forms of src-family kinases can occur through altered regulation or expression of the endogenous protein and by virally encoded src (v-src) genes.
Seven membered heterocyclic rings containing a NITROGEN atom.
Carbon-containing phosphoric acid derivatives. Included under this heading are compounds that have CARBON atoms bound to one or more OXYGEN atoms of the P(=O)(O)3 structure. Note that several specific classes of endogenous phosphorus-containing compounds such as NUCLEOTIDES; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and PHOSPHOPROTEINS are listed elsewhere.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.
BENZOIC ACID amides.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The additional presence of DIACYLGLYCEROLS markedly increases its sensitivity to both calcium and phospholipids. The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters.
The cellular signaling system that halts the progression of cells through MITOSIS or MEIOSIS if a defect that will affect CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION is detected.
A group of enzymes that are dependent on CYCLIC AMP and catalyze the phosphorylation of SERINE or THREONINE residues on proteins. Included under this category are two cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase subtypes, each of which is defined by its subunit composition.
A mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamily that regulates a variety of cellular processes including CELL GROWTH PROCESSES; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; APOPTOSIS; and cellular responses to INFLAMMATION. The P38 MAP kinases are regulated by CYTOKINE RECEPTORS and can be activated in response to bacterial pathogens.
A proline-directed serine/threonine protein kinase which mediates signal transduction from the cell surface to the nucleus. Activation of the enzyme by phosphorylation leads to its translocation into the nucleus where it acts upon specific transcription factors. p40 MAPK and p41 MAPK are isoforms.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
The cell center, consisting of a pair of CENTRIOLES surrounded by a cloud of amorphous material called the pericentriolar region. During interphase, the centrosome nucleates microtubule outgrowth. The centrosome duplicates and, during mitosis, separates to form the two poles of the mitotic spindle (MITOTIC SPINDLE APPARATUS).
The process by which the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided.
The chromosomal constitution of a cell containing multiples of the normal number of CHROMOSOMES; includes triploidy (symbol: 3N), tetraploidy (symbol: 4N), etc.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
High molecular weight proteins found in the MICROTUBULES of the cytoskeletal system. Under certain conditions they are required for TUBULIN assembly into the microtubules and stabilize the assembled microtubules.
A family of protein serine/threonine kinases which act as intracellular signalling intermediates. Ribosomal protein S6 kinases are activated through phosphorylation in response to a variety of HORMONES and INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS. Phosphorylation of RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 by enzymes in this class results in increased expression of 5' top MRNAs. Although specific for RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S6 members of this class of kinases can act on a number of substrates within the cell. The immunosuppressant SIROLIMUS inhibits the activation of ribosomal protein S6 kinases.
A family of 6-membered heterocyclic compounds occurring in nature in a wide variety of forms. They include several nucleic acid constituents (CYTOSINE; THYMINE; and URACIL) and form the basic structure of the barbiturates.
A 44-kDa extracellular signal-regulated MAP kinase that may play a role the initiation and regulation of MEIOSIS; MITOSIS; and postmitotic functions in differentiated cells. It phosphorylates a number of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS; and MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS.
A benign neoplasm derived from mesodermal cells that form cartilage. It may remain within the substance of a cartilage or bone (true chondroma or enchondroma) or may develop on the surface of a cartilage (ecchondroma or ecchondrosis). (Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)
Agents which affect CELL DIVISION and the MITOTIC SPINDLE APPARATUS resulting in the loss or gain of whole CHROMOSOMES, thereby inducing an ANEUPLOIDY.
A serine-threonine protein kinase family whose members are components in protein kinase cascades activated by diverse stimuli. These MAPK kinases phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES and are themselves phosphorylated by MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES. JNK kinases (also known as SAPK kinases) are a subfamily.
A subgroup of mitogen-activated protein kinases that activate TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR AP-1 via the phosphorylation of C-JUN PROTEINS. They are components of intracellular signaling pathways that regulate CELL PROLIFERATION; APOPTOSIS; and CELL DIFFERENTIATION.
Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
A glycogen synthase kinase that was originally described as a key enzyme involved in glycogen metabolism. It regulates a diverse array of functions such as CELL DIVISION, microtubule function and APOPTOSIS.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.
A family of serine-threonine kinases that bind to and are activated by MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS such as RAC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS and CDC42 GTP-BINDING PROTEIN. They are intracellular signaling kinases that play a role the regulation of cytoskeletal organization.
Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
Phosphoprotein with protein kinase activity that functions in the G2/M phase transition of the CELL CYCLE. It is the catalytic subunit of the MATURATION-PROMOTING FACTOR and complexes with both CYCLIN A and CYCLIN B in mammalian cells. The maximal activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 is achieved when it is fully dephosphorylated.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Azoles of two nitrogens at the 1,2 positions, next to each other, in contrast with IMIDAZOLES in which they are at the 1,3 positions.
Highly conserved protein-serine threonine kinases that phosphorylate and activate a group of AGC protein kinases, especially in response to the production of the SECOND MESSENGERS, phosphatidylinositol 3,4,-biphosphate (PtdIns(3,4)P2) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3).
A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.
Chromones are a class of chemical compounds that contain a benzopyran-4-one core structure, which are found in various natural and synthetic substances, including some medications used to treat asthma and allergies.
Regulatory signaling systems that control the progression through the CELL CYCLE. They ensure that the cell has completed, in the correct order and without mistakes, all the processes required to replicate the GENOME and CYTOPLASM, and divide them equally between two daughter cells. If cells sense they have not completed these processes or that the environment does not have the nutrients and growth hormones in place to proceed, then the cells are restrained (or "arrested") until the processes are completed and growth conditions are suitable.
Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.
The phase of cell nucleus division following METAPHASE, in which the CHROMATIDS separate and migrate to opposite poles of the spindle.
Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
Quinazolines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds consisting of a benzene ring fused to a pyrazine ring, which are synthesized and used as intermediates in pharmaceuticals, particularly in the production of various drugs such as antimalarials, antihypertensives, and antitumor agents.
A fibrillar collagen found primarily in interstitial CARTILAGE. Collagen type XI is heterotrimer containing alpha1(XI), alpha2(XI) and alpha3(XI) subunits.
Nucleoproteins, which in contrast to HISTONES, are acid insoluble. They are involved in chromosomal functions; e.g. they bind selectively to DNA, stimulate transcription resulting in tissue-specific RNA synthesis and undergo specific changes in response to various hormones or phytomitogens.
Protein kinases that control cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes and require physical association with CYCLINS to achieve full enzymatic activity. Cyclin-dependent kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.
Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) are serine-threonine protein kinases that initiate protein kinase signaling cascades. They phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES; (MAPKKs) which in turn phosphorylate MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES; (MAPKs).
Derivatives of the steroid androstane having two double bonds at any site in any of the rings.
A mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamily that is widely expressed and plays a role in regulation of MEIOSIS; MITOSIS; and post mitotic functions in differentiated cells. The extracellular signal regulated MAP kinases are regulated by a broad variety of CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS and can be activated by certain CARCINOGENS.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK where cleavage begins. Upon fertilization the cytoplasm streams from the vegetal pole away from the yolk to the animal pole where cleavage will occur. This germinal area eventually flattens into a layer of cells (BLASTODERM) that covers the yolk completely.
Morpholines are organic compounds containing a morpholine ring, which is a saturated six-membered heterocycle made up of four carbon atoms and two oxygen atoms (OCC1CCO), often used as functional groups in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and materials science due to their versatile chemical properties.
A superfamily of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES that are activated by diverse stimuli via protein kinase cascades. They are the final components of the cascades, activated by phosphorylation by MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES, which in turn are activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES).
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.

Cell cycle-dependent expression and centrosome localization of a third human aurora/Ipl1-related protein kinase, AIK3. (1/454)

We earlier isolated cDNAs encoding novel human protein kinases AIK and AIK2 sharing high amino acid sequence identities with Drosophila Aurora and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ipl1 kinases whose mutations cause abnormal chromosome segregation. In the present study, a third human cDNA (AIK3) highly homologous to aurora/IPL1 was isolated, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. This cDNA encodes 309 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 35.9 kDa. C-terminal kinase domain of AIK3 protein shares high amino acid sequence identities with those of Aurora/Ipl1 family protein kinases including human AIK, human AIK2, Xenopus pEg2, Drosophila Aurora, and yeast Ipl1, whereas the N-terminal domain of AIK3 protein shares little homology with any other Aurora/Ipl1 family members. AIK3 gene was assigned to human chromosome 19q13.43, which is a frequently deleted or rearranged region in several tumor tissues, by fluorescence in situ hybridization, somatic cell hybrid panel, and radiation hybrid cell panel. Northern blot analyses revealed that AIK3 expression was limited to testis. The expression levels of AIK3 in several cancer cell lines were elevated severalfold compared with normal fibroblasts. In HeLa cells, the endogenous AIK3 protein level is low in G1/S, accumulates during G2/M, and reduces after mitosis. Immunofluorescence studies using a specific antibody have shown that AIK3 is localized to centrosome during mitosis from anaphase to cytokinesis. These results suggest that AIK3 may play a role(s) in centrosome function at later stages of mitosis.  (+info)

The survivin-like C. elegans BIR-1 protein acts with the Aurora-like kinase AIR-2 to affect chromosomes and the spindle midzone. (2/454)

Baculoviral IAP repeat proteins (BIRPs) may affect cell death, cell division, and tumorigenesis. The C. elegans BIRP BIR-1 was localized to chromosomes and to the spindle midzone. Embryos and fertilized oocytes lacking BIR-1 had defects in chromosome behavior, spindle midzone formation, and cytokinesis. We observed indistinguishable defects in fertilized oocytes and embryos lacking the Aurora-like kinase AIR-2. AIR-2 was not present on chromosomes in the absence of BIR-1. Histone H3 phosphorylation and HCP-1 staining, which marks kinetochores, were reduced in the absence of either BIR-1 or AIR-2. We propose that BIR-1 localizes AIR-2 to chromosomes and perhaps to the spindle midzone, where AIR-2 phosphorylates proteins that affect chromosome behavior and spindle midzone organization. The human BIRP survivin, which is upregulated in tumors, could partially substitute for BIR-1 in C. elegans. Deregulation of bir-1 promotes changes in ploidy, suggesting that similar deregulation of mammalian BIRPs may contribute to tumorigenesis.  (+info)

The aurora-related kinase AIR-2 recruits ZEN-4/CeMKLP1 to the mitotic spindle at metaphase and is required for cytokinesis. (3/454)

BACKGROUND: The Aurora/Ipl1p-related kinase AIR-2 is required for mitotic chromosome segregation and cytokinesis in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Previous studies have relied on non-conditional mutations or RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) to inactivate AIR-2. It has therefore not been possible to determine whether AIR-2 functions directly in cytokinesis or if the cleavage defect results indirectly from the failure to segregate DNA. One intriguing hypothesis is that AIR-2 acts to localize the mitotic kinesin-like protein ZEN-4 (also known as CeMKLP1), which later functions in cytokinesis. RESULTS: Using conditional alleles, we established that AIR-2 is required at metaphase or early anaphase for normal segregation of chromosomes, localization of ZEN-4, and cytokinesis. ZEN-4 is first required late in cytokinesis, and also functions to maintain cell separation through much of the subsequent interphase. DNA segregation defects alone were not sufficient to disrupt cytokinesis in other mutants, suggesting that AIR-2 acts specifically during cytokinesis through ZEN-4. AIR-2 and ZEN-4 shared similar genetic interactions with the formin homology (FH) protein CYK-1, suggesting that AIR-2 and ZEN-4 function in a single pathway, in parallel to a contractile ring pathway that includes CYK-1. Using in vitro co-immunoprecipitation experiments, we found that AIR-2 and ZEN-4 interact directly. CONCLUSIONS: AIR-2 has two functions during mitosis: one in chromosome segregation, and a second, independent function in cytokinesis through ZEN-4. AIR-2 and ZEN-4 may act in parallel to a second pathway that includes CYK-1.  (+info)

Incenp and an aurora-like kinase form a complex essential for chromosome segregation and efficient completion of cytokinesis. (4/454)

BACKGROUND: In animal cells, cytokinesis begins shortly after the sister chromatids move to the spindle poles. The inner centromere protein (Incenp)has been implicated in both chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, but it is not known exactly how it mediates these two distinct processes. RESULTS: We identified two Caenorhabditis elegans proteins, ICP-1 and ICP-2, with significant homology in their carboxyl termini to the corresponding region of vertebrate Incenp. Embryos depleted of ICP-1 by RNA-mediated interference had defects in both chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Depletion of the Aurora-like kinase AIR-2 resulted in a similar phenotype. The carboxy-terminal region of Incenp is also homologous to that in Sli15p, a budding yeast protein that functions with the yeast Aurora kinase Ipl1p. ICP-1 bound C. elegans AIR-2 in vitro, and the corresponding mammalian orthologs Incenp and AIRK2 could be co-immunoprecipitated from cell extracts. A significant fraction of embryos depleted of ICP-1 and AIR-2 completed one cell division over the course of several cell cycles. ICP-1 promoted the stable localization of ZEN-4 (also known as CeMKLP1), a kinesin-like protein required for central spindle assembly. CONCLUSIONS: ICP-1 and AIR-2 are part of a complex that is essential for chromosome segregation and for efficient completion of cytokinesis. We propose that this complex acts by promoting dissolution of sister chromatid cohesion and the assembly of the central spindle.  (+info)

Essential roles of Drosophila inner centromere protein (INCENP) and aurora B in histone H3 phosphorylation, metaphase chromosome alignment, kinetochore disjunction, and chromosome segregation. (5/454)

We have performed a biochemical and double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) analysis of the role of two chromosomal passenger proteins, inner centromere protein (INCENP) and aurora B kinase, in cultured cells of Drosophila melanogaster. INCENP and aurora B function is tightly interlinked. The two proteins bind to each other in vitro, and DmINCENP is required for DmAurora B to localize properly in mitosis and function as a histone H3 kinase. DmAurora B is required for DmINCENP accumulation at centromeres and transfer to the spindle at anaphase. RNAi for either protein dramatically inhibited the ability of cells to achieve a normal metaphase chromosome alignment. Cells were not blocked in mitosis, however, and entered an aberrant anaphase characterized by defects in sister kinetochore disjunction and the presence of large amounts of amorphous lagging chromatin. Anaphase A chromosome movement appeared to be normal, however cytokinesis often failed. DmINCENP and DmAurora B are not required for the correct localization of the kinesin-like protein Pavarotti (ZEN-4/CHO1/MKLP1) to the midbody at telophase. These experiments reveal that INCENP is required for aurora B kinase function and confirm that the chromosomal passengers have essential roles in mitosis.  (+info)

INCENP is required for proper targeting of Survivin to the centromeres and the anaphase spindle during mitosis. (6/454)

Three lines of investigation have suggested that interactions between Survivin and the chromosomal passenger proteins INCENP and Aurora-B kinase may be important for mitotic progression. First, interference with the function of Survivin/BIR1, INCENP, or Aurora-B kinase leads to similar defects in mitosis and cytokinesis [1-7] (see [8] for review). Second, INCENP and Aurora-B exist in a complex in Xenopus eggs [9] and in mammalian cultured cells [7]. Third, interference with Survivin or INCENP function causes Aurora-B kinase to be mislocalized in mitosis in both C. elegans and vertebrates [5, 7, 9]. Here, we provide evidence that Survivin, Aurora-B, and INCENP interact physically and functionally. Direct visualization of Survivin-GFP in mitotic cells reveals that it localizes identically to INCENP and Aurora-B. Survivin binds directly to both Aurora-B and INCENP in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pull-down assays. The in vitro interaction between Survivin and Aurora-B is extraordinarily stable in that it resists 3 M NaCl. Finally, Survivin and INCENP interact functionally in vivo; in cells in which INCENP localization is disrupted, Survivin adheres to the chromosomes and no longer concentrates at the centromeres or transfers to the anaphase spindle midzone. Our data provide the first biochemical evidence that Survivin can interact directly with members of the chromosomal passenger complex.  (+info)

CENP-A is phosphorylated by Aurora B kinase and plays an unexpected role in completion of cytokinesis. (7/454)

Aurora B is a mitotic protein kinase that phosphorylates histone H3, behaves as a chromosomal passenger protein, and functions in cytokinesis. We investigated a role for Aurora B with respect to human centromere protein A (CENP-A), a centromeric histone H3 homologue. Aurora B concentrates at centromeres in early G2, associates with histone H3 and centromeres at the times when histone H3 and CENP-A are phosphorylated, and phosphorylates histone H3 and CENP-A in vitro at a similar target serine residue. Dominant negative phosphorylation site mutants of CENP-A result in a delay at the terminal stage of cytokinesis (cell separation). The only molecular defects detected in analysis of 22 chromosomal, spindle, and regulatory proteins were disruptions in localization of inner centromere protein (INCENP), Aurora B, and a putative partner phosphatase, PP1gamma1. Our data support a model where CENP-A phosphorylation is involved in regulating Aurora B, INCENP, and PP1gamma1 targeting within the cell. These experiments identify an unexpected role for the kinetochore in regulation of cytokinesis.  (+info)

Mitotic phosphorylation of histone H3: spatio-temporal regulation by mammalian Aurora kinases. (8/454)

Phosphorylation at a highly conserved serine residue (Ser-10) in the histone H3 tail is considered to be a crucial event for the onset of mitosis. This modification appears early in the G(2) phase within pericentromeric heterochromatin and spreads in an ordered fashion coincident with mitotic chromosome condensation. Mutation of Ser-10 is essential in Tetrahymena, since it results in abnormal chromosome segregation and extensive chromosome loss during mitosis and meiosis, establishing a strong link between signaling and chromosome dynamics. Although mitotic H3 phosphorylation has been long recognized, the transduction routes and the identity of the protein kinases involved have been elusive. Here we show that the expression of Aurora-A and Aurora-B, two kinases of the Aurora/AIK family, is tightly coordinated with H3 phosphorylation during the G(2)/M transition. During the G(2) phase, the Aurora-A kinase is coexpressed while the Aurora-B kinase colocalizes with phosphorylated histone H3. At prophase and metaphase, Aurora-A is highly localized in the centrosomic region and in the spindle poles while Aurora-B is present in the centromeric region concurrent with H3 phosphorylation, to then translocate by cytokinesis to the midbody region. Both Aurora-A and Aurora-B proteins physically interact with the H3 tail and efficiently phosphorylate Ser10 both in vitro and in vivo, even if Aurora-A appears to be a better H3 kinase than Aurora-B. Since Aurora-A and Aurora-B are known to be overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, our findings provide an attractive link between cell transformation, chromatin modifications and a specific kinase system.  (+info)

Aurora Kinase B is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of cell division and mitosis. It is a member of the Aurora kinase family, which includes three different isoforms (Aurora A, B, and C). Among these, Aurora Kinase B is specifically involved in the proper alignment and separation of chromosomes during cell division.

During mitosis, Aurora Kinase B forms a complex with other proteins to form the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), which plays a critical role in ensuring accurate chromosome segregation. The CPC is responsible for regulating various events during mitosis, including the attachment of microtubules to kinetochores (protein structures that connect chromosomes to spindle fibers), the correction of erroneous kinetochore-microtubule attachments, and the regulation of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), which targets specific proteins for degradation during mitosis.

Dysregulation of Aurora Kinase B has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer. Overexpression or amplification of this kinase can lead to chromosomal instability and aneuploidy, contributing to tumorigenesis and cancer progression. As a result, Aurora Kinase B is considered a promising target for the development of anti-cancer therapies, with several inhibitors currently being investigated in preclinical and clinical studies.

Aurora kinases are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in the regulation of cell division. There are three members of the Aurora kinase family, designated as Aurora A, Aurora B, and Aurora C. These kinases are involved in the proper separation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis, and their dysregulation has been implicated in various types of cancer.

Aurora A is primarily located at the centrosomes and spindle poles during cell division, where it regulates centrosome maturation, bipolar spindle formation, and chromosome segregation. Aurora B, on the other hand, is a component of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) that localizes to the centromeres during prophase and moves to the spindle midzone during anaphase. It plays essential roles in kinetochore-microtubule attachment, chromosome alignment, and cytokinesis. Aurora C is most similar to Aurora B and appears to have overlapping functions with it, although its specific roles are less well understood.

Dysregulation of Aurora kinases has been associated with various types of cancer, including breast, ovarian, colon, and lung cancers. Overexpression or amplification of Aurora A is observed in many cancers, leading to chromosomal instability and aneuploidy. Inhibition of Aurora kinases has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment, with several small molecule inhibitors currently under investigation in clinical trials.

Aurora Kinase A is a type of serine/threonine kinase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of cell division and mitosis. It is encoded by the AURKA gene in humans. This enzyme is responsible for proper chromosome alignment and segregation during mitosis, and its dysregulation has been implicated in various types of cancer. Aurora Kinase A is often overexpressed in cancer cells, leading to chromosomal instability and aneuploidy, which contribute to tumor growth and progression. Inhibitors of Aurora Kinase A are being investigated as potential cancer therapeutics.

Aurora Kinase C is a type of serine/threonine protein kinase that is involved in the regulation of cell division and mitosis. It plays a crucial role in the proper separation of chromosomes during cell division, ensuring the genetic stability of cells. Mutations in the gene that encodes Aurora Kinase C have been associated with various types of cancer, including colon, breast, and ovarian cancers. Inhibitors of Aurora Kinase C are being studied as potential cancer therapeutics.

Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases (PSTKs) are a type of protein kinase that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the hydroxyl side chains of serine or threonine residues on target proteins. This phosphorylation process plays a crucial role in various cellular signaling pathways, including regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. PSTKs are involved in many physiological and pathological processes, and their dysregulation has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) are a class of drugs that work by interfering with the function of protein kinases. Protein kinases are enzymes that play a crucial role in many cellular processes by adding a phosphate group to specific proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules. This process of adding a phosphate group is known as phosphorylation and is a key mechanism for regulating various cellular functions, including signal transduction, metabolism, and cell division.

In some diseases, such as cancer, protein kinases can become overactive or mutated, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Protein kinase inhibitors are designed to block the activity of these dysregulated kinases, thereby preventing or slowing down the progression of the disease. These drugs can be highly specific, targeting individual protein kinases or families of kinases, making them valuable tools for targeted therapy in cancer and other diseases.

Protein kinase inhibitors can work in various ways to block the activity of protein kinases. Some bind directly to the active site of the enzyme, preventing it from interacting with its substrates. Others bind to allosteric sites, changing the conformation of the enzyme and making it inactive. Still, others target upstream regulators of protein kinases or interfere with their ability to form functional complexes.

Examples of protein kinase inhibitors include imatinib (Gleevec), which targets the BCR-ABL kinase in chronic myeloid leukemia, and gefitinib (Iressa), which inhibits the EGFR kinase in non-small cell lung cancer. These drugs have shown significant clinical benefits in treating these diseases and have become important components of modern cancer therapy.

Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases (PI3Ks) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction. They phosphorylate the 3-hydroxyl group of the inositol ring in phosphatidylinositol and its derivatives, which results in the production of second messengers that regulate various cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival.

PI3Ks are divided into three classes based on their structure and substrate specificity. Class I PI3Ks are further subdivided into two categories: class IA and class IB. Class IA PI3Ks are heterodimers consisting of a catalytic subunit (p110α, p110β, or p110δ) and a regulatory subunit (p85α, p85β, p55γ, or p50γ). They are primarily activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. Class IB PI3Ks consist of a catalytic subunit (p110γ) and a regulatory subunit (p101 or p84/87). They are mainly activated by G protein-coupled receptors.

Dysregulation of PI3K signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, PI3Ks have emerged as important targets for drug development in these areas.

Protein kinases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in many cellular processes by adding phosphate groups to other proteins, a process known as phosphorylation. This modification can activate or deactivate the target protein's function, thereby regulating various signaling pathways within the cell. Protein kinases are essential for numerous biological functions, including metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Abnormal regulation of protein kinases has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Mitosis is a type of cell division in which the genetic material of a single cell, called the mother cell, is equally distributed into two identical daughter cells. It's a fundamental process that occurs in multicellular organisms for growth, maintenance, and repair, as well as in unicellular organisms for reproduction.

The process of mitosis can be broken down into several stages: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. During prophase, the chromosomes condense and become visible, and the nuclear envelope breaks down. In prometaphase, the nuclear membrane is completely disassembled, and the mitotic spindle fibers attach to the chromosomes at their centromeres.

During metaphase, the chromosomes align at the metaphase plate, an imaginary line equidistant from the two spindle poles. In anaphase, sister chromatids are pulled apart by the spindle fibers and move toward opposite poles of the cell. Finally, in telophase, new nuclear envelopes form around each set of chromosomes, and the chromosomes decondense and become less visible.

Mitosis is followed by cytokinesis, a process that divides the cytoplasm of the mother cell into two separate daughter cells. The result of mitosis and cytokinesis is two genetically identical cells, each with the same number and kind of chromosomes as the original parent cell.

Protein-kinase B, also known as AKT, is a group of intracellular proteins that play a crucial role in various cellular processes such as glucose metabolism, apoptosis, cell proliferation, transcription, and cell migration. The AKT family includes three isoforms: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3, which are encoded by the genes PKBalpha, PKBbeta, and PKBgamma, respectively.

Proto-oncogene proteins c-AKT refer to the normal, non-mutated forms of these proteins that are involved in the regulation of cell growth and survival under physiological conditions. However, when these genes are mutated or overexpressed, they can become oncogenes, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer development.

Activation of c-AKT occurs through a signaling cascade that begins with the binding of extracellular ligands such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) to their respective receptors on the cell surface. This triggers a series of phosphorylation events that ultimately lead to the activation of c-AKT, which then phosphorylates downstream targets involved in various cellular processes.

In summary, proto-oncogene proteins c-AKT are normal intracellular proteins that play essential roles in regulating cell growth and survival under physiological conditions. However, their dysregulation can contribute to cancer development and progression.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system is a crucial pathway for the transmission and regulation of various cellular responses in eukaryotic cells. It plays a significant role in several biological processes, including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, and stress response. The MAPK cascade consists of three main components: MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K or MEKK), MAP kinase kinase (MAP2K or MEK), and MAP kinase (MAPK).

The signaling system is activated by various extracellular stimuli, such as growth factors, cytokines, hormones, and stress signals. These stimuli initiate a phosphorylation cascade that ultimately leads to the activation of MAPKs. The activated MAPKs then translocate into the nucleus and regulate gene expression by phosphorylating various transcription factors and other regulatory proteins.

There are four major MAPK families: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3), p38 MAPKs (p38α/β/γ/δ), and ERK5. Each family has distinct functions, substrates, and upstream activators. Dysregulation of the MAPK signaling system can lead to various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathway is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies.

The spindle apparatus is a microtubule-based structure that plays a crucial role in the process of cell division, specifically during mitosis and meiosis. It consists of three main components:

1. The spindle poles: These are organized structures composed of microtubules and associated proteins that serve as the anchoring points for the spindle fibers. In animal cells, these poles are typically formed by centrosomes, while in plant cells, they form around nucleation sites called microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs).
2. The spindle fibers: These are dynamic arrays of microtubules that extend between the two spindle poles. They can be categorized into three types: kinetochore fibers, which connect to the kinetochores on chromosomes; astral fibers, which radiate from the spindle poles and help position the spindle within the cell; and interpolar fibers, which lie between the two spindle poles and contribute to their separation during anaphase.
3. Regulatory proteins: Various motor proteins, such as dynein and kinesin, as well as non-motor proteins like tubulin and septins, are involved in the assembly, maintenance, and dynamics of the spindle apparatus. These proteins help to generate forces that move chromosomes, position the spindle, and ultimately segregate genetic material between two daughter cells during cell division.

The spindle apparatus is essential for ensuring accurate chromosome separation and maintaining genomic stability during cell division. Dysfunction of the spindle apparatus can lead to various abnormalities, including aneuploidy (abnormal number of chromosomes) and chromosomal instability, which have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and developmental disorders.

Chromosome segregation is the process that occurs during cell division (mitosis or meiosis) where replicated chromosomes are separated and distributed equally into two daughter cells. Each chromosome consists of two sister chromatids, which are identical copies of genetic material. During chromosome segregation, these sister chromatids are pulled apart by a structure called the mitotic spindle and moved to opposite poles of the cell. This ensures that each new cell receives one copy of each chromosome, preserving the correct number and composition of chromosomes in the organism.

Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CAMKs) are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways. They are activated by the binding of calcium ions and calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, to their regulatory domain.

Once activated, CAMKs phosphorylate specific serine or threonine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their activity, localization, or stability. This post-translational modification is essential for various cellular processes, including synaptic plasticity, gene expression, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation.

There are several subfamilies of CAMKs, including CaMKI, CaMKII, CaMKIII (also known as CaMKIV), and CaMK kinase (CaMKK). Each subfamily has distinct structural features, substrate specificity, and regulatory mechanisms. Dysregulation of CAMK signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disorders.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

Piperazines are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a seven-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 4. They have the molecular formula N-NRR' where R and R' can be alkyl or aryl groups. Piperazines have a wide range of uses in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and as building blocks in organic synthesis.

In a medical context, piperazines are used in the manufacture of various drugs, including some antipsychotics, antidepressants, antihistamines, and anti-worm medications. For example, the antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine and the antidepressant drug nefazodone both contain a piperazine ring in their chemical structure.

However, it's important to note that some piperazines are also used as recreational drugs due to their stimulant and euphoric effects. These include compounds such as BZP (benzylpiperazine) and TFMPP (trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine), which have been linked to serious health risks, including addiction, seizures, and death. Therefore, the use of these substances should be avoided.

Proto-oncogene proteins are normal cellular proteins that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and survival under physiological conditions.

When proto-oncogene proteins undergo mutations or aberrations in their expression levels, they can transform into oncogenic forms, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. These altered proteins are then referred to as oncogene products or oncoproteins. Oncogenic mutations can occur due to various factors, including genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and aging.

Examples of proto-oncogene proteins include:

1. Ras proteins: Involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Activating mutations in Ras genes are found in various human cancers.
2. Myc proteins: Regulate gene expression related to cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and metabolism. Overexpression of Myc proteins is associated with several types of cancer.
3. EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor): A transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Mutations or overexpression of EGFR are linked to various malignancies, such as lung cancer and glioblastoma.
4. Src family kinases: Intracellular tyrosine kinases that regulate signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Dysregulation of Src family kinases is implicated in several types of cancer.
5. Abl kinases: Cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases that regulate various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and stress responses. Aberrant activation of Abl kinases, as seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Understanding the roles of proto-oncogene proteins and their dysregulation in cancer development is essential for developing targeted cancer therapies that aim to inhibit or modulate these aberrant signaling pathways.

Kinetochores are specialized protein structures that form on the centromere region of a chromosome. They play a crucial role in the process of cell division, specifically during mitosis and meiosis. The primary function of kinetochores is to connect the chromosomes to the microtubules of the spindle apparatus, which is responsible for separating the sister chromatids during cell division. Through this connection, kinetochores facilitate the movement of chromosomes towards opposite poles of the cell during anaphase, ensuring equal distribution of genetic material to each resulting daughter cell.

SRC-family kinases (SFKs) are a group of non-receptor tyrosine kinases that play important roles in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration. They are named after the founding member, SRC, which was first identified as an oncogene in Rous sarcoma virus.

SFKs share a common structure, consisting of an N-terminal unique domain, a SH3 domain, a SH2 domain, a catalytic kinase domain, and a C-terminal regulatory tail with a negative regulatory tyrosine residue (Y527 in human SRC). In their inactive state, SFKs are maintained in a closed conformation through intramolecular interactions between the SH3 domain, SH2 domain, and the phosphorylated C-terminal tyrosine.

Upon activation by various signals, such as growth factors, cytokines, or integrin engagement, SFKs are activated through a series of events that involve dephosphorylation of the regulatory tyrosine residue, recruitment to membrane receptors via their SH2 and SH3 domains, and trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop in the kinase domain.

Once activated, SFKs can phosphorylate a wide range of downstream substrates, including other protein kinases, adaptor proteins, and cytoskeletal components, thereby regulating various signaling pathways that control cell behavior. Dysregulation of SFK activity has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

Azepines are heterocyclic chemical compounds that contain a seven-membered ring with one nitrogen atom and six carbon atoms. The term "azepine" refers to the basic structure, and various substituted azepines exist with different functional groups attached to the carbon and nitrogen atoms.

Azepines are not typically used in medical contexts as a therapeutic agent or a target for drug design. However, some azepine derivatives have been investigated for their potential biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anticancer properties. These compounds may be the subject of ongoing research, but they are not yet established as medical treatments.

It's worth noting that while azepines themselves are not a medical term, some of their derivatives or analogs may have medical relevance. Therefore, it is essential to consult medical literature and databases for accurate and up-to-date information on the medical use of specific azepine compounds.

Organophosphates are a group of chemicals that include insecticides, herbicides, and nerve gases. They work by inhibiting an enzyme called acetylcholinesterase, which normally breaks down the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the synapse between nerves. This leads to an overaccumulation of acetylcholine, causing overstimulation of the nervous system and resulting in a wide range of symptoms such as muscle twitching, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, sweating, confusion, and potentially death due to respiratory failure. Organophosphates are highly toxic and their use is regulated due to the risks they pose to human health and the environment.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Cell cycle proteins are a group of regulatory proteins that control the progression of the cell cycle, which is the series of events that take place in a eukaryotic cell leading to its division and duplication. These proteins can be classified into several categories based on their functions during different stages of the cell cycle.

The major groups of cell cycle proteins include:

1. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs): CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate key transitions in the cell cycle. They require binding to a regulatory subunit called cyclin to become active. Different CDK-cyclin complexes are activated at different stages of the cell cycle.
2. Cyclins: Cyclins are a family of regulatory proteins that bind and activate CDKs. Their levels fluctuate throughout the cell cycle, with specific cyclins expressed during particular phases. For example, cyclin D is important for the G1 to S phase transition, while cyclin B is required for the G2 to M phase transition.
3. CDK inhibitors (CKIs): CKIs are regulatory proteins that bind to and inhibit CDKs, thereby preventing their activation. CKIs can be divided into two main families: the INK4 family and the Cip/Kip family. INK4 family members specifically inhibit CDK4 and CDK6, while Cip/Kip family members inhibit a broader range of CDKs.
4. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C): APC/C is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets specific proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. During the cell cycle, APC/C regulates the metaphase to anaphase transition and the exit from mitosis by targeting securin and cyclin B for degradation.
5. Other regulatory proteins: Several other proteins play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, such as p53, a transcription factor that responds to DNA damage and arrests the cell cycle, and the polo-like kinases (PLKs), which are involved in various aspects of mitosis.

Overall, cell cycle proteins work together to ensure the proper progression of the cell cycle, maintain genomic stability, and prevent uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to cancer.

Benzamides are a class of organic compounds that consist of a benzene ring (a aromatic hydrocarbon) attached to an amide functional group. The amide group can be bound to various substituents, leading to a variety of benzamide derivatives with different biological activities.

In a medical context, some benzamides have been developed as drugs for the treatment of various conditions. For example, danzol (a benzamide derivative) is used as a hormonal therapy for endometriosis and breast cancer. Additionally, other benzamides such as sulpiride and amisulpride are used as antipsychotic medications for the treatment of schizophrenia and related disorders.

It's important to note that while some benzamides have therapeutic uses, others may be toxic or have adverse effects, so they should only be used under the supervision of a medical professional.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine-threonine kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are activated by second messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium ions (Ca2+), which result from the activation of cell surface receptors like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs).

Once activated, PKC proteins phosphorylate downstream target proteins, thereby modulating their activities. This regulation is involved in numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and membrane trafficking. There are at least 10 isoforms of PKC, classified into three subfamilies based on their second messenger requirements and structural features: conventional (cPKC; α, βI, βII, and γ), novel (nPKC; δ, ε, η, and θ), and atypical (aPKC; ζ and ι/λ). Dysregulation of PKC signaling has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

M Phase cell cycle checkpoints are control mechanisms that ensure the proper completion of the M phase (mitosis or meiosis) of the cell cycle. These checkpoints verify that certain conditions are met before the cell proceeds to the next phase of the cell cycle, thus helping to maintain genomic stability and prevent errors such as chromosomal mutations or aneuploidy.

There are two main M Phase cell cycle checkpoints:

1. The G2/M Checkpoint: This checkpoint is activated at the end of the G2 phase and verifies that all DNA has been replicated accurately, and that there are no DNA damages or other issues that could interfere with mitosis. If any problems are detected, the cell cycle is halted until they can be resolved.
2. The Mitotic Spindle Checkpoint: This checkpoint ensures that all chromosomes have attached properly to the spindle apparatus and that they will be equally distributed to the two resulting daughter cells during mitosis. If any chromosomes are not properly attached or if there is an issue with the spindle apparatus, the cell cycle is paused until these problems are corrected.

These checkpoints play a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability and preventing the development of cancer and other diseases.

Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinases, also known as protein kinase A (PKA), are a family of enzymes that play a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways. These enzymes are responsible for the regulation of various cellular processes, including metabolism, gene expression, and cell growth and differentiation.

PKA is composed of two regulatory subunits and two catalytic subunits. When cAMP binds to the regulatory subunits, it causes a conformational change that leads to the dissociation of the catalytic subunits. The freed catalytic subunits then phosphorylate specific serine and threonine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their activity.

The cAMP-dependent protein kinases are activated in response to a variety of extracellular signals, such as hormones and neurotransmitters, that bind to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) or receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). These signals lead to the activation of adenylyl cyclase, which catalyzes the conversion of ATP to cAMP. The resulting increase in intracellular cAMP levels triggers the activation of PKA and the downstream phosphorylation of target proteins.

Overall, cAMP-dependent protein kinases are essential regulators of many fundamental cellular processes and play a critical role in maintaining normal physiology and homeostasis. Dysregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (p38 MAPKs) are a family of conserved serine-threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including inflammation, immune response, differentiation, apoptosis, and stress responses. They are activated by diverse stimuli such as cytokines, ultraviolet radiation, heat shock, osmotic stress, and lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

Once activated, p38 MAPKs phosphorylate and regulate several downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases. This regulation leads to the expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of p38 MAPK signaling has been implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, p38 MAPKs are considered promising targets for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1 (MAPK1), also known as Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2), is a protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. It is a member of the MAPK family, which regulates various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and stress response.

MAPK1 is activated by a cascade of phosphorylation events initiated by upstream activators like MAPKK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase) in response to various extracellular signals such as growth factors, hormones, and mitogens. Once activated, MAPK1 phosphorylates downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases, thereby modulating their activities and ultimately influencing gene expression and cellular responses.

MAPK1 is widely expressed in various tissues and cells, and its dysregulation has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of MAPK1 signaling pathways has important implications for developing therapeutic strategies to treat these disorders.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

A centrosome is a microtubule-organizing center found in animal cells. It consists of two barrel-shaped structures called centrioles, which are surrounded by a protein matrix called the pericentriolar material. The centrosome plays a crucial role in organizing the microtubules that form the cell's cytoskeleton and help to shape the cell, as well as in separating the chromosomes during cell division.

During mitosis, the two centrioles of the centrosome separate and move to opposite poles of the cell, where they nucleate the formation of the spindle fibers that pull the chromosomes apart. The centrosome also helps to ensure that the genetic material is equally distributed between the two resulting daughter cells.

It's worth noting that while centrioles are present in many animal cells, they are not always present in all types of cells. For example, plant cells do not have centrioles or centrosomes, and instead rely on other mechanisms to organize their microtubules.

Cytokinesis is the part of the cell division process (mitosis or meiosis) in which the cytoplasm of a single eukaryotic cell divides into two daughter cells. It usually begins after telophase, and it involves the constriction of a contractile ring composed of actin filaments and myosin motor proteins that forms at the equatorial plane of the cell. This results in the formation of a cleavage furrow, which deepens and eventually leads to the physical separation of the two daughter cells. Cytokinesis is essential for cell reproduction and growth in multicellular organisms, and its failure can lead to various developmental abnormalities or diseases.

Polyploidy is a condition in which a cell or an organism has more than two sets of chromosomes, unlike the typical diploid state where there are only two sets (one from each parent). Polyploidy can occur through various mechanisms such as errors during cell division, fusion of egg and sperm cells that have an abnormal number of chromosomes, or through the reproduction process in plants.

Polyploidy is common in the plant kingdom, where it often leads to larger size, increased biomass, and sometimes hybrid vigor. However, in animals, polyploidy is less common and usually occurs in only certain types of cells or tissues, as most animals require a specific number of chromosomes for normal development and reproduction. In humans, polyploidy is typically not compatible with life and can lead to developmental abnormalities and miscarriage.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

The cell cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication. It consists of four main phases: G1 phase, S phase, G2 phase, and M phase.

During the G1 phase, the cell grows in size and synthesizes mRNA and proteins in preparation for DNA replication. In the S phase, the cell's DNA is copied, resulting in two complete sets of chromosomes. During the G2 phase, the cell continues to grow and produces more proteins and organelles necessary for cell division.

The M phase is the final stage of the cell cycle and consists of mitosis (nuclear division) and cytokinesis (cytoplasmic division). Mitosis results in two genetically identical daughter nuclei, while cytokinesis divides the cytoplasm and creates two separate daughter cells.

The cell cycle is regulated by various checkpoints that ensure the proper completion of each phase before progressing to the next. These checkpoints help prevent errors in DNA replication and division, which can lead to mutations and cancer.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

HeLa cells are a type of immortalized cell line used in scientific research. They are derived from a cancer that developed in the cervical tissue of Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman, in 1951. After her death, cells taken from her tumor were found to be capable of continuous division and growth in a laboratory setting, making them an invaluable resource for medical research.

HeLa cells have been used in a wide range of scientific studies, including research on cancer, viruses, genetics, and drug development. They were the first human cell line to be successfully cloned and are able to grow rapidly in culture, doubling their population every 20-24 hours. This has made them an essential tool for many areas of biomedical research.

It is important to note that while HeLa cells have been instrumental in numerous scientific breakthroughs, the story of their origin raises ethical questions about informed consent and the use of human tissue in research.

Medical Definition:
Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are a diverse group of proteins that bind to microtubules, which are key components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. MAPs play crucial roles in regulating microtubule dynamics and stability, as well as in mediating interactions between microtubules and other cellular structures. They can be classified into several categories based on their functions, including:

1. Microtubule stabilizers: These MAPs promote the assembly of microtubules and protect them from disassembly by enhancing their stability. Examples include tau proteins and MAP2.
2. Microtubule dynamics regulators: These MAPs modulate the rate of microtubule polymerization and depolymerization, allowing for dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton during cell division and other processes. Examples include stathmin and XMAP215.
3. Microtubule motor proteins: These MAPs use energy from ATP hydrolysis to move along microtubules, transporting various cargoes within the cell. Examples include kinesin and dynein.
4. Adapter proteins: These MAPs facilitate interactions between microtubules and other cellular structures, such as membranes, organelles, or signaling molecules. Examples include MAP4 and CLASPs.

Dysregulation of MAPs has been implicated in several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (where tau proteins form abnormal aggregates called neurofibrillary tangles) and cancer (where altered microtubule dynamics can contribute to uncontrolled cell division).

Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases (RSKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play a crucial role in the regulation of cell growth, proliferation, and survival. They are so named because they phosphorylate and regulate the function of the ribosomal protein S6, which is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit involved in protein synthesis.

RSKs are activated by various signals, including growth factors, hormones, and mitogens, through a cascade of phosphorylation events involving several upstream kinases such as MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Once activated, RSKs phosphorylate a wide range of downstream targets, including transcription factors, regulators of translation, and cytoskeletal proteins, thereby modulating their activities and functions.

There are four isoforms of RSKs in humans, namely RSK1, RSK2, RSK3, and RSK4, which share a common structural organization and functional domains, including an N-terminal kinase domain, a C-terminal kinase domain, and a linker region that contains several regulatory motifs. Dysregulation of RSKs has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and diabetes, making them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention.

Pyrimidines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds similar to benzene and pyridine, containing two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 3 of the six-member ring. They are one of the two types of nucleobases found in nucleic acids, the other being purines. The pyrimidine bases include cytosine (C) and thymine (T) in DNA, and uracil (U) in RNA, which pair with guanine (G) and adenine (A), respectively, through hydrogen bonding to form the double helix structure of nucleic acids. Pyrimidines are also found in many other biomolecules and have various roles in cellular metabolism and genetic regulation.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3 (MAPK3), also known as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1), is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. It is involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and survival, in response to extracellular stimuli such as growth factors, hormones, and stress.

MAPK3 is activated through a phosphorylation cascade that involves the activation of upstream MAPK kinases (MKK or MEK). Once activated, MAPK3 can phosphorylate and activate various downstream targets, including transcription factors, to regulate gene expression. Dysregulation of MAPK3 signaling has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

A chondroma is a benign, slow-growing tumor that develops in the cartilage. Cartilage is a type of connective tissue found in various parts of the body, including the joints, ribcage, and nose. Chondromas are most commonly found in the hands and feet.

Chondromas are typically small, measuring less than 2 centimeters in diameter, and they usually do not cause any symptoms. However, if a chondroma grows large enough to press on nearby nerves or blood vessels, it may cause pain, numbness, or weakness in the affected area.

Chondromas are usually diagnosed through imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans. If a chondroma is suspected based on these tests, a biopsy may be performed to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other types of tumors.

Treatment for chondromas typically involves surgical removal of the tumor. In most cases, this can be done using minimally invasive techniques that allow for quicker recovery times. After surgery, patients will need to follow up with their healthcare provider to ensure that the tumor has been completely removed and to monitor for any signs of recurrence.

Aneugens are chemical or physical agents that can cause aneuploidy, which is a condition characterized by an abnormal number of chromosomes in the cells of an organism. Aneuploidy can result from errors in cell division, such as nondisjunction, during which chromosome pairs fail to separate properly during mitosis or meiosis.

Exposure to aneugens can increase the risk of aneuploidy by interfering with the normal functioning of the mitotic spindle, the cellular structure responsible for separating chromosomes during cell division. Aneugens can cause errors in chromosome segregation by disrupting the attachment of chromosomes to the spindle or by affecting the dynamics of spindle microtubules.

Examples of aneugens include certain chemotherapeutic drugs, such as colchicine and vincristine, which are used in cancer treatment but can also cause fetal abnormalities if taken during pregnancy. Other aneugens include environmental toxins, such as pesticides and industrial chemicals, which have been linked to increased risks of birth defects and reproductive problems.

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases (MAP2K or MEK) are a group of protein kinases that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways. They are so named because they are activated by mitogens, which are substances that stimulate cell division, and other extracellular signals.

MAP2Ks are positioned upstream of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPK) in a three-tiered kinase cascade. Once activated, MAP2Ks phosphorylate and activate MAPKs, which then go on to regulate various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis.

There are several subfamilies of MAP2Ks, including MEK1/2, MEK3/6 (also known as MKK3/6), MEK4/7 (also known as MKK4/7), and MEK5. Each MAP2K is specific to activating a particular MAPK, and they are activated by different MAP3Ks (MAP kinase kinase kinases) in response to various extracellular signals.

Dysregulation of the MAPK/MAP2K signaling pathways has been implicated in numerous diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Therefore, targeting these pathways with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for treating various diseases.

JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases are a subgroup of the Ser/Thr protein kinases that are activated by stress stimuli and play important roles in various cellular processes, including inflammation, apoptosis, and differentiation. They are involved in the regulation of gene expression through phosphorylation of transcription factors such as c-Jun. JNKs are activated by a variety of upstream kinases, including MAP2Ks (MKK4/SEK1 and MKK7), which are in turn activated by MAP3Ks (such as ASK1, MEKK1, MLKs, and TAK1). JNK signaling pathways have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory diseases.

Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) are a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in various cellular functions, including signal transduction, cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. They catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the tyrosine residues of proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules.

PTKs can be divided into two main categories: receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). RTKs are transmembrane proteins that become activated upon binding to specific ligands, such as growth factors or hormones. NRTKs, on the other hand, are intracellular enzymes that can be activated by various signals, including receptor-mediated signaling and intracellular messengers.

Dysregulation of PTK activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, PTKs are important targets for drug development and therapy.

Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of several cellular processes, including glycogen metabolism, cell signaling, gene transcription, and apoptosis. It was initially discovered as a key enzyme involved in glycogen metabolism due to its ability to phosphorylate and inhibit glycogen synthase, an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of glycogen from glucose.

GSK-3 exists in two isoforms, GSK-3α and GSK-3β, which share a high degree of sequence similarity and are widely expressed in various tissues. Both isoforms are constitutively active under normal conditions and are regulated through inhibitory phosphorylation by several upstream signaling pathways, such as insulin, Wnt, and Hedgehog signaling.

Dysregulation of GSK-3 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. In recent years, GSK-3 has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for the development of novel drugs to treat these conditions.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in the chromatin of eukaryotic cells. They are rich in basic amino acid residues, such as arginine and lysine, which give them their positive charge. Histones play a crucial role in packaging DNA into a more compact structure within the nucleus by forming a complex with it called a nucleosome. Each nucleosome contains about 146 base pairs of DNA wrapped around an octamer of eight histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4). The N-terminal tails of these histones are subject to various post-translational modifications, such as methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation, which can influence chromatin structure and gene expression. Histone variants also exist, which can contribute to the regulation of specific genes and other nuclear processes.

P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, cell motility, and gene transcription. They are activated by binding to small GTPases of the Rho family, such as Cdc42 and Rac, which become active upon stimulation of various extracellular signals. Once activated, PAKs phosphorylate a range of downstream targets, leading to changes in cell behavior and function. Aberrant regulation of PAKs has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Antineoplastic agents are a class of drugs used to treat malignant neoplasms or cancer. These agents work by inhibiting the growth and proliferation of cancer cells, either by killing them or preventing their division and replication. Antineoplastic agents can be classified based on their mechanism of action, such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, topoisomerase inhibitors, mitotic inhibitors, and targeted therapy agents.

Alkylating agents work by adding alkyl groups to DNA, which can cause cross-linking of DNA strands and ultimately lead to cell death. Antimetabolites interfere with the metabolic processes necessary for DNA synthesis and replication, while topoisomerase inhibitors prevent the relaxation of supercoiled DNA during replication. Mitotic inhibitors disrupt the normal functioning of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for cell division. Targeted therapy agents are designed to target specific molecular abnormalities in cancer cells, such as mutated oncogenes or dysregulated signaling pathways.

It's important to note that antineoplastic agents can also affect normal cells and tissues, leading to various side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and myelosuppression (suppression of bone marrow function). Therefore, the use of these drugs requires careful monitoring and management of their potential adverse effects.

CDC2 protein kinase, also known as cell division cycle 2 or CDK1, is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow, replicate their DNA, and divide into two daughter cells.

CDC2 protein kinase is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that are activated by binding to regulatory subunits called cyclins. CDC2 protein kinase is primarily associated with the regulation of the G2 phase and the entry into mitosis, the stage of the cell cycle where nuclear and cytoplasmic division occur.

CDC2 protein kinase functions by phosphorylating various target proteins, which alters their activity and contributes to the coordination of the different events that occur during the cell cycle. The activity of CDC2 protein kinase is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, as well as the binding and destruction of cyclin subunits.

Dysregulation of CDC2 protein kinase has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, where uncontrolled cell division can lead to the formation of tumors. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of CDC2 protein kinase is an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Pyrazoles are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that contain a six-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 2. The chemical structure of pyrazoles consists of a pair of nitrogen atoms adjacent to each other in the ring, which makes them unique from other azole heterocycles such as imidazoles or triazoles.

Pyrazoles have significant biological activities and are found in various pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and natural products. Some pyrazole derivatives exhibit anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, antimicrobial, antiviral, antifungal, and anticancer properties.

In the medical field, pyrazoles are used in various drugs to treat different conditions. For example, celecoxib (Celebrex) is a selective COX-2 inhibitor used for pain relief and inflammation reduction in arthritis patients. It contains a pyrazole ring as its core structure. Similarly, febuxostat (Uloric) is a medication used to treat gout, which also has a pyrazole moiety.

Overall, pyrazoles are essential compounds with significant medical applications and potential for further development in drug discovery and design.

3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Protein Kinases (PDPKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in regulating various cellular processes, including cell survival, proliferation, and metabolism. They are named after their ability to phosphorylate and activate downstream targets in response to the binding of 3-phosphoinositides, which are lipid second messengers generated by the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks).

PDPKs consist of two main isoforms: PDPK1 and PDK2. PDPK1 is also known as the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) associated protein, mSin1 kinase, or Rictor-binding protein. It primarily phosphorylates and activates AGC kinases, such as Akt/PKB, p70 S6 kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC). PDK2, on the other hand, is also known as ILK-associated kinase (ILKAP) or PDPK2. It primarily phosphorylates and activates PKC isoforms.

PDPKs are often deregulated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders. Therefore, they represent potential therapeutic targets for the development of novel drugs to treat these conditions.

Creatine kinase (CK) is a muscle enzyme that is normally present in small amounts in the blood. It is primarily found in tissues that require a lot of energy, such as the heart, brain, and skeletal muscles. When these tissues are damaged or injured, CK is released into the bloodstream, causing the levels to rise.

Creatine kinase exists in several forms, known as isoenzymes, which can be measured in the blood to help identify the location of tissue damage. The three main isoenzymes are:

1. CK-MM: Found primarily in skeletal muscle
2. CK-MB: Found primarily in heart muscle
3. CK-BB: Found primarily in the brain

Elevated levels of creatine kinase, particularly CK-MB, can indicate damage to the heart muscle, such as occurs with a heart attack. Similarly, elevated levels of CK-BB may suggest brain injury or disease. Overall, measuring creatine kinase levels is a useful diagnostic tool for assessing tissue damage and determining the severity of injuries or illnesses.

Chromones are a type of chemical compound that contain a benzopyran ring, which is a structural component made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyran ring. They can be found in various plants and have been used in medicine for their anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antitussive (cough suppressant) properties. Some chromones are also known to have estrogenic activity and have been studied for their potential use in hormone replacement therapy. Additionally, some synthetic chromones have been developed as drugs for the treatment of asthma and other respiratory disorders.

Cell cycle checkpoints are control mechanisms that regulate the cell cycle and ensure the accurate and timely progression through different phases of the cell cycle. These checkpoints monitor specific cellular events, such as DNA replication and damage, chromosome separation, and proper attachment of the mitotic spindle to the chromosomes. If any of these events fail to occur properly or are delayed, the cell cycle checkpoints trigger a response that can halt the cell cycle until the problem is resolved. This helps to prevent cells with damaged or incomplete genomes from dividing and potentially becoming cancerous.

There are three main types of cell cycle checkpoints:

1. G1 Checkpoint: Also known as the restriction point, this checkpoint controls the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. It monitors the availability of nutrients, growth factors, and the integrity of the genome before allowing the cell to proceed into DNA replication.
2. G2 Checkpoint: This checkpoint regulates the transition from the G2 phase to the M phase of the cell cycle. It checks for completion of DNA replication and absence of DNA damage before allowing the cell to enter mitosis.
3. Mitotic (M) Checkpoint: Also known as the spindle assembly checkpoint, this checkpoint ensures that all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle before anaphase begins. It prevents the separation of sister chromatids until all kinetochores are correctly attached and tension is established between them.

Cell cycle checkpoints play a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability, preventing tumorigenesis, and ensuring proper cell division. Dysregulation of these checkpoints can lead to various diseases, including cancer.

Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a type of short, double-stranded RNA molecule that plays a role in the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The RNAi pathway is a natural cellular process that regulates gene expression by targeting and destroying specific messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, thereby preventing the translation of those mRNAs into proteins.

SiRNAs are typically 20-25 base pairs in length and are generated from longer double-stranded RNA precursors called hairpin RNAs or dsRNAs by an enzyme called Dicer. Once generated, siRNAs associate with a protein complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which uses one strand of the siRNA (the guide strand) to recognize and bind to complementary sequences in the target mRNA. The RISC then cleaves the target mRNA, leading to its degradation and the inhibition of protein synthesis.

SiRNAs have emerged as a powerful tool for studying gene function and have shown promise as therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases, including viral infections, cancer, and genetic disorders. However, their use as therapeutics is still in the early stages of development, and there are challenges associated with delivering siRNAs to specific cells and tissues in the body.

Anaphase is a stage in the cell division process called mitosis, where sister chromatids (the two copies of each chromosome formed during DNA replication) separate at the centromeres and move toward opposite poles of the cell. This separation is facilitated by the attachment of microtubules from the spindle apparatus to the kinetochores, protein structures located on the centromeres of each sister chromatid. Anaphase is followed by telophase, during which the nuclear membrane reforms around each set of separated chromosomes, and cytokinesis, the division of the cytoplasm to form two separate daughter cells.

Microtubules are hollow, cylindrical structures composed of tubulin proteins in the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells. They play crucial roles in various cellular processes such as maintaining cell shape, intracellular transport, and cell division (mitosis and meiosis). Microtubules are dynamic, undergoing continuous assembly and disassembly, which allows them to rapidly reorganize in response to cellular needs. They also form part of important cellular structures like centrioles, basal bodies, and cilia/flagella.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Quinazolines are not a medical term per se, but they are a class of organic compounds that have been widely used in the development of various pharmaceutical drugs. Therefore, I will provide you with a chemical definition of quinazolines:

Quinazolines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds consisting of a benzene ring fused to a pyrazine ring. The structure can be represented as follows:

Quinazoline

They are often used as building blocks in the synthesis of various drugs, including those used for treating cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and microbial infections. Some examples of FDA-approved drugs containing a quinazoline core include the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa) and erlotinib (Tarceva), which are used to treat non-small cell lung cancer, and the calcium channel blocker verapamil (Calan, Isoptin), which is used to treat hypertension and angina.

Collagen type XI is a fibrillar collagen that is found in the extracellular matrix of various tissues, including cartilage and the eye. It is a homotrimer made up of three identical alpha 1(XI) chains or a heterotrimer composed of two alpha 1(XI) chains and one alpha 2(XI) chain. Collagen type XI is closely associated with collagen type II fibrils and plays a role in regulating the diameter and organization of these fibrils. Mutations in the genes encoding collagen type XI can lead to skeletal disorders such as stiff skin syndrome and fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

Chromosomal proteins, non-histone, are a diverse group of proteins that are associated with chromatin, the complex of DNA and histone proteins, but do not have the characteristic structure of histones. These proteins play important roles in various nuclear processes such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, recombination, and chromosome condensation and segregation during cell division. They can be broadly classified into several categories based on their functions, including architectural proteins, enzymes, transcription factors, and structural proteins. Examples of non-histone chromosomal proteins include high mobility group (HMG) proteins, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), and condensins.

Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, transcription, and other cellular processes. They are activated by binding to cyclin proteins, which accumulate and degrade at specific stages of the cell cycle. The activation of CDKs leads to phosphorylation of various downstream target proteins, resulting in the promotion or inhibition of different cell cycle events. Dysregulation of CDKs has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, and they are considered important targets for drug development.

MAP (Mitogen-Activated Protein) Kinase Kinase Kinases (MAP3K or MAPKKK) are a group of protein kinases that play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction pathways, which regulate various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. They are called "kinases" because they catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to specific serine or threonine residues on their target proteins.

MAP3Ks function upstream of MAP Kinase Kinases (MKKs or MAP2K) and MAP Kinases (MPKs or MAPK) in the MAP kinase cascade. Upon activation by various extracellular signals, such as growth factors, cytokines, stress, and hormones, MAP3Ks phosphorylate and activate MKKs, which subsequently phosphorylate and activate MPKs. Activated MPKs then regulate the activity of downstream transcription factors and other target proteins to elicit appropriate cellular responses.

There are several subfamilies of MAP3Ks, including ASK, DLK, TAK, MEKK, MLK, and ZAK, among others. Each subfamily has distinct structural features and functions in different signaling pathways. Dysregulation of MAP kinase cascades, including MAP3Ks, has been implicated in various human diseases, such as cancer, inflammation, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Androstadienes are a class of steroid hormones that are derived from androstenedione, which is a weak male sex hormone. Androstadienes include various compounds such as androstadiene-3,17-dione and androstanedione, which are intermediate products in the biosynthesis of more potent androgens like testosterone and dihydrotestosterone.

Androstadienes are present in both males and females but are found in higher concentrations in men. They can be detected in various bodily fluids, including blood, urine, sweat, and semen. In addition to their role in steroid hormone synthesis, androstadienes have been studied for their potential use as biomarkers of physiological processes and disease states.

It's worth noting that androstadienes are sometimes referred to as "androstenes" in the literature, although this term can also refer to other related compounds.

Extracellular signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERKs or Extracellular signal-regulated kinases) are a subfamily of the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival in response to extracellular signals.

ERKs are activated by a cascade of phosphorylation events initiated by the binding of growth factors, hormones, or other extracellular molecules to their respective receptors. This activation results in the formation of a complex signaling pathway that involves the sequential activation of several protein kinases, including Ras, Raf, MEK (MAPK/ERK kinase), and ERK.

Once activated, ERKs translocate to the nucleus where they phosphorylate and activate various transcription factors, leading to changes in gene expression that ultimately result in the appropriate cellular response. Dysregulation of the ERK signaling pathway has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

A blastodisc is a term used in embryology, specifically in describing the development of birds and reptiles. It refers to a flattened disc of cells that forms on the upper surface of the yolk during early embryonic development. This disc contains the cells that will give rise to the embryo itself, as well as the extra-embryonic membranes that support its development.

The blastodisc is formed when the sperm fertilizes the egg, triggering a series of cell divisions and rearrangements. The cells in the blastodisc are initially equivalent, but they soon become organized into distinct regions with different fates. The outermost layer of the blastodisc will give rise to the extra-embryonic membranes, while the inner cells will form the embryo proper.

It's worth noting that the term "blastodisc" is not used in mammalian development, where a similar structure is called the "blastocyst."

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Morpholines" is not a medical term. It is a chemical term that refers to a class of heterocyclic organic compounds containing one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom in the ring. They are widely used as intermediates in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and dyes. If you have any questions about a medical issue or term, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, transformation, and apoptosis, in response to diverse stimuli such as mitogens, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and environmental stresses. They are highly conserved across eukaryotes and consist of a three-tiered kinase module composed of MAPK kinase kinases (MAP3Ks), MAPK kinases (MKKs or MAP2Ks), and MAPKs.

Activation of MAPKs occurs through a sequential phosphorylation and activation cascade, where MAP3Ks phosphorylate and activate MKKs, which in turn phosphorylate and activate MAPKs at specific residues (Thr-X-Tyr or Ser-Pro motifs). Once activated, MAPKs can further phosphorylate and regulate various downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases.

There are four major groups of MAPKs in mammals: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3), p38 MAPKs (p38α/β/γ/δ), and ERK5/BMK1. Each group of MAPKs has distinct upstream activators, downstream targets, and cellular functions, allowing for a high degree of specificity in signal transduction and cellular responses. Dysregulation of MAPK signaling pathways has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory diseases.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

... there are three classes of aurora kinases in multicellular organisms, including humans: Aurora A (a.k.a. Aurora 2) functions ... Aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases that are essential for cell proliferation. They are phosphotransferase enzymes that ... Aurora inhibitor Bolanos-Garcia V M. Aurora kinases. The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 37 (2005) 1572- ... Giet R, Prigent C. Aurora/Ipl1p-related kinases, a new oncogenic family of mitotic serine-threonine kinases. Journal of Cell ...
Aurora kinase Aurora A kinase Aurora C kinase INCENP Spindle assembly checkpoint GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000178999 - ... Phosphorylation of CENP-A at serine 7 by Aurora A kinase recruits Aurora B to the centromere. Aurora B, itself, can also ... The Aurora kinases associate with microtubules during chromosome movement and segregation. Aurora kinase B localizes to ... Aurora B kinase has been shown to interact with: BARD1, BIRC5, and CDCA8 TACC1. FBXL2. Abnormally elevated levels of Aurora B ...
Although yeast contain only one Aurora kinase and C. elegans and Drosophila contain only two, mammals have three Aurora kinases ... "Aurora-C kinase is a novel chromosomal passenger protein that can complement Aurora-B kinase function in mitotic cells". Cell ... "Aurora-C kinase is a novel chromosomal passenger protein that can complement Aurora-B kinase function in mitotic cells". Cell ... Aurora kinase C, also Serine/threonine-protein kinase 13 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the AURKC gene. This gene ...
The human genome contains three members of the aurora kinase family: Aurora kinase A, Aurora kinase B and Aurora C kinase. The ... Aurora A and Aurora B kinases play important roles in mitosis. The Aurora kinase A is associated with centrosome maturation and ... Aurora A phosphorylation directs the cytoplasmic polyadenylation translation of mRNA's, like the MAP kinase kinase kinase ... contain orthologues only to Aurora A and Aurora B. In all studied species, the three Aurora mitotic kinases localize to the ...
Aurora kinase inhibitors are a putative drug class for treating cancer. The Aurora kinase enzymes could be potential targets ... There are three mammalian aurora kinase genes, encoding aurora A, B and C. Intense investigation has focused on aurora A and B ... Aurora-B (Serine/threonine-protein kinase 12, AIK2, AIM1, ARK2, STK12) Aurora-C (Serine/threonine-protein kinase 13, AIE2, AIK3 ... Aurora kinases, so named because the scattered mitotic spindles generated by mutant forms resemble the Aurora Borealis, have ...
... works as an inhibitor, attaching to the active sites of Aurora A and Aurora B kinases. Hauf, Silke; Cole, Richard W ... Hesperadin is an aurora kinase inhibitor. The small molecule inhibits chromosome alignment and segregation by limiting the ... function of mitotic kinases Aurora B and Aurora A. Hesperadin causes cells to enter anaphase much faster, sometimes before the ... Hesperadin inhibits Aurora kinase-1 and blocks mitotic progression in bloodstream forms". Molecular Microbiology. 72 (2): 442- ...
This process is associated with Aurora B Protein Kinase. When Aurora B's function is disrupted, MCAK ability to locate ... Andrews PD, Ovechkina Y, Morrice N, Wagenbach M, Duncan K, Wordeman L, Swedlow JR (February 2004). "Aurora B regulates MCAK at ... There are other environments in which MCAK's function is impaired, absent impact on its associated kinase. For example, alpha- ...
"Cyclin Dependent Kinase (CDK) and Aurora Kinase (AK) inhibitors , Cyclacel R&D for anticancer drugs acting on cell cycle". www. ...
... strong interest has shifted towards the aurora kinase proteins. The kinase gene Aurora A when amplified acts as an oncogene ... The localization of MAD2 and BubR1 to the kinetochore may also be dependent on the Aurora B kinase. Cells lacking Aurora B fail ... Aurora-B/Ipl1 kinase of the chromosomal passenger complex functions as the tensions sensor in improper kinetochore attachments ... The Aurora-B/Ipl1 kinase is also critical in correcting merotelic attachments, where one kinetochore is simultaneously attached ...
MKLP1 TEX14 CEP55 Aurora Kinase B Paweletz N (January 2001). "Walther Flemming: pioneer of mitosis research". Nature Reviews. ...
"NEDD9 depletion destabilizes Aurora A kinase and heightens the efficacy of Aurora A inhibitors: implications for treatment of ... Interaction of NEDD9 with Aurora A kinase may also play a role in tumor invasion. NEDD9 binds to and regulates acetylation of ... NEDD9 binds directly to the Aurora-A mitotic kinase at the centrosome, and promotes its activity, allowing cells to enter ... Other phosphorylation events in this region are imposed by the kinase Aurora-A, which phosphorylates residue S296, for ...
Other kinases that have interested Sebti include Rho-associated kinase and Aurora kinase. STAT3. In 2003 the Sebti lab ... May 30, 2014). "Dual Aurora A and JAK2 kinase blockade effectively suppresses malignant transformation". Oncotarget. 5 (10): ... Kinases. Sebti's work on the kinase Akt led to his interest in Triciribine. ... October 1, 2012). "RKI-1447 is a potent inhibitor of the Rho-associated ROCK kinases with anti-invasive and antitumor ...
Aurora kinase has two forms which are designated Aurora kinase A and Aurora kinase B. These proteins play a key role in mitosis ... In some human cancers, the expression and kinase activity of Aurora kinases have been up-regulated and has been looked into as ... A possible causes of multipolar spindle formation involve regulation of protein kinase family known as Aurora kinase. ... Jingyan Fu, Fu (26 January 2007). "Roles of Aurora Kinases in Mitosis and Tumorigenesis". Molecular Cancer Research. 5 (1): 1- ...
The CAS family member NEDD9 has also been shown to interact directly with AURKA (encoding Aurora-A kinase) to regulate cell ... it is possible that CASS4 may similarly interact with aurora-A kinase. CASS4 signaling may contribute to platelet activation ... "The focal adhesion scaffolding protein HEF1 regulates activation of the Aurora-A and Nek2 kinases at the centrosome". Nature ... These include association with FAK and Src family kinases at focal adhesions to transmit integrin-initiated signals to ...
"Drugging MYCN through an Allosteric Transition in Aurora Kinase A." Cancer Cell. 26 (3): 414-27. doi:10.1016/j.ccr.2014.07.015 ... N-Myc is also stabilized by aurora A which protects it from degradation. Drugs that target this interaction are under ... development, and are designed to change the conformation of aurora A. Conformational change in Aurora A leads to release of N- ... "Stabilization of N-Myc is a critical function of Aurora A in human neuroblastoma". Cancer Cell. 15 (1): 67-78. doi:10.1016/j. ...
Aurora B is a kinase active in late metaphase, and has been shown to function as a checkpoint for the proper attachments of ... Cimini, Daniela; Wan, Xiaohu; Hirel, Christophe B.; Salmon, E.D. (2006-09-05). "Aurora Kinase Promotes Turnover of Kinetochore ... When Aurora B was partially inhibited by a small molecule drug, Cimini et al. observed lagging chromatids at increasing ... "The Ska complex promotes Aurora B activity to ensure chromosome biorientation". The Journal of Cell Biology. 215 (1): 77-93. ...
"Expression of Aurora-B kinase and phosphorylated histone H3 in hepatocellular carcinoma". Anticancer Research. 26 (5A): 3585-93 ...
... is also important in activating and recruiting Aurora A kinase, a kinase responsible for phosphorylating TPX2 and ... In the presence of nuclear import factor importin α, TPX2 is bound and prevented from binding Aurora A kinase, though it is ... TPX2 recruits and activates Aurora A kinase by utilizing its short 43 amino acid long amino-terminal sequence to bind the ... Notably, this recognition between TPX2 and Aurora A is analogous to that between the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK) ...
"Survivin enhances Aurora-B kinase activity and localizes Aurora-B in human cells". J. Biol. Chem. 278 (1): 486-90. doi:10.1074/ ... Survivin has been shown to interact with: Aurora B kinase, CDCA8, Caspase 3, Caspase 7, Diablo homolog and INCENP. GRCh38: ...
Stabilization of DGL7 in cell occurs due to phosphorylation by Aurora A kinase. Expression of DGL7 is found in cancer and stem ... 2005). "Phosphorylation and stabilization of HURP by Aurora-A: implication of HURP as a transforming target of Aurora-A". Mol. ... Yu CT, Hsu JM, Lee YC, Tsou AP, Chou CK, Huang CY (July 2005). "Phosphorylation and stabilization of HURP by Aurora-A: ... implication of HURP as a transforming target of Aurora-A". Mol. Cell. Biol. 25 (14): 5789-800. doi:10.1128/MCB.25.14.5789- ...
2005). "The centrosomal protein Lats2 is a phosphorylation target of Aurora-A kinase". Genes Cells. 9 (5): 383-97. doi:10.1111/ ... 2005). "The Ste20-like kinase Mst2 activates the human large tumor suppressor kinase Lats1". Oncogene. 24 (12): 2076-86. doi: ... Large tumor suppressor kinase 2 (LATS2) is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the LATS2 gene. This gene encodes a serine/ ... It interacts with the centrosomal proteins aurora-A and ajuba and is required for accumulation of gamma-tubulin and spindle ...
... has been shown to interact with INCENP, Survivin and Aurora B kinase. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000134690 - ... "Phosphorylation and activation of cell division cycle associated 8 by aurora kinase B plays a significant role in human lung ...
Aurora kinases are required for proper spindle assembly and separation. Aurora A associates with centrosomes and is believed to ... Spindle assembly is largely regulated by phosphorylation events catalyzed by mitotic kinases. Cyclin dependent kinase complexes ... with many of these proteins serving as Aurora and Polo-like kinase substrates. In a properly formed mitotic spindle, bi- ... Polo-like kinase, also known as PLK, especially PLK1 has important roles in the spindle maintenance by regulating microtubule ...
"Phosphorylation of HsMis13 by Aurora B kinase is essential for assembly of functional kinetochore". J. Biol. Chem. 283 (39): ...
... has been shown to interact with: Aurora A kinase, CD29 NME3, Protein SET, RAR-related orphan receptor alpha, RAR-related ... Du J, Hannon GJ (December 2002). "The centrosomal kinase Aurora-A/STK15 interacts with a putative tumor suppressor NM23-H1". ... Nucleoside diphosphate kinase A is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the NME1 gene. It is thought to be a metastasis ... Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK) exists as a hexamer composed of 'A' (encoded by this gene) and 'B' (encoded by NME2) ...
He S, Yang S, Deng G, Liu M, Zhu H, Zhang W, Yan S, Quan L, Bai J, Xu N (2010). "Aurora kinase A induces miR-17-92 cluster ... "miR-17-5p Promotes migration of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-heat ...
... (MLN8237) is an orally available selective aurora A kinase inhibitor developed by Takeda. It was investigated as a ... a selective Aurora A kinase inhibitor, in relapsed and refractory aggressive B- and T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas". Journal of ... Protein kinase inhibitors, Benzoic acids, Fluoroarenes, Abandoned drugs, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company brands, Chloroarenes, ...
2011-11-01). "Arabidopsis α Aurora Kinases Function in Formative Cell Division Plane Orientation". The Plant Cell. 23 (11): ... Another midline-localized protein, "two-in-on" (TIO), is a putative kinase and is also required for cytokinesis as shown by ... October 1998). "A cell cycle regulated MAP kinase with a possible role in cytokinesis in tobacco cells". Journal of Cell ... 2011-10-25). "Phosphorylation of a mitotic kinesin-like protein and a MAPKKK by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) is involved in ...
"Bora and the Kinase Aurora A Cooperatively Activate the Kinase Plk1 and Control Mitotic Entry". Science. 320 (5883): 1655-1658 ... This loop is further amplified indirectly through the coordinated interaction of the Aurora A kinase and the Bora cofactor. ... pathways which activate the Chk2 and Chk1 kinases, respectively. These kinases act upstream of Cdc25 and Wee1, the direct ... The main rad3 effector is the kinase Chk1, which is required for the G2-M arrest in response to DNA-damaging agents. Chk1 is an ...
Seki A, Coppinger JA, Jang CY, Yates JR, Fang G (June 2008). "Bora and the kinase Aurora a cooperatively activate the kinase ... These kinases phosphorylate and activate the effector kinases Chk2 and Chk1, respectively, which in turn phosphorylate the ... The G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinase works together with S phase cyclin-dependent kinase targeting p27 for degradation. In turn ... The cell is once more examined for sites of DNA damage or incomplete replication, and the kinases ATR and ATM are recruited to ...
... there are three classes of aurora kinases in multicellular organisms, including humans: Aurora A (a.k.a. Aurora 2) functions ... Aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases that are essential for cell proliferation. They are phosphotransferase enzymes that ... Aurora inhibitor Bolanos-Garcia V M. Aurora kinases. The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 37 (2005) 1572- ... Giet R, Prigent C. Aurora/Ipl1p-related kinases, a new oncogenic family of mitotic serine-threonine kinases. Journal of Cell ...
Here we report that a circumscribed exposure to the aurora kin … ... Our findings cast light on how inhibitors of aurora-B kinase may kill tumor cells, implicate Myc in the induction of a lethal ... Therapeutic potential of a synthetic lethal interaction between the MYC proto-oncogene and inhibition of aurora-B kinase Proc ... Here we report that a circumscribed exposure to the aurora kinase inhibitor, VX-680, selectively kills cells that overexpress ...
Several of the currently available Aurora kinase inhibitors target both Aurora-A and Aurora-B. Comparing the pan Aurora kinase ... The Aurora kinases A and B (Aurora-A and Aurora-B) are highly conserved serine/threonine kinases that play essential and ... R763 is a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor that inhibits Aurora-A and Aurora-B [28]. To further analyze whether Aurora-A, a ... We identify the Aurora kinases as potential targets in this disease. Aurora kinases are upregulated in multiple human cancers, ...
More specifically, Aurora kinases play a crucial role in cellular division by controlling chromatid segregation. Defects in ... Aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases that are essential for cell proliferation. They are phosphotransferase enzymes that ... Aurora inhibitor 1 is a potent Aurora inhibitor (IC50: ≤ 4 nM and ≤13 nM for Aurora A and Aurora B kinase). ... Aurora inhibitor 1 is a potent Aurora inhibitor (IC50: ≤ 4 nM and ≤13 nM for Aurora A and Aurora B kinase). ...
We propose that human TPX2 is required for targeting Aurora-A kinase to the spindle apparatus. In turn, Aurora-A might regulate ... Aurora-A is a serine-threonine kinase implicated in the assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. Here we show that ... Human TPX2 is required for targeting Aurora-A kinase to the spindle. The Journal of cell biology, Vol. 158, H. 4. pp. 617-623. ... Human TPX2 is required for targeting Aurora-A kinase to the spindle ...
Aurora Kinase CAurora KinasesAurora Kinase AAurora Kinase BProtein Kinase CProtein-Serine-Threonine KinasesMedlinePlusHealth ... Aurora Kinase CAurora KinasesAurora Kinase AAurora Kinase BProtein Kinase CProtein-Serine-Threonine Kinases ... aurora kinase B; aurora kinase B-Sv1; aurora kinase B-Sv2; aurora- and Ipl1-like midbody-associated protein 1; aurora-1; aurora ... Aurora kinase B and Aurora C kinase. The ... Aurora A and Aurora B kinases play important roles in mitosis. The Aurora kinase A ...
Human aurora kinase A. with MLN-8054 GtoP Target: aurora kinase A ...
Aurora kinase B. Aurora kinase B was identified in humans by a polymerase chain reaction screen for kinases that are ... In both cases, per site pair, trials were Thymidine kinase discarded until the mean SNR was essentially identical (and the SNR ...
One of the key regulatory kinases involved in multiple stages of mitosis is Aurora kinase B. We hypothesized that ... Keywords: Aurora kinase, medulloblastoma, tumor biology, molecular therapy,cell-cycle. Received: June 29, 2014 Accepted: ... Our results suggest the potential for therapeutic application of Aurora kinase B inhibitors in the treatment of Group 3 ... The specific inhibition of Aurora kinase B was achieved in MYC- overexpressing medulloblastoma cells with AZD1152-HQPA. MYC ...
Aurora kinase A (AURKA), which is a member of serine/threonine kinase family, plays a critical role in regulating mitosis. ... Hochegger, H.; Hégarat, N.; Pereira-Leal, J. Aurora at the pole and equator: Overlapping functions of Aurora kinases in the ... Quantitative conformational profiling of kinase inhibitors reveals origins of selectivity for Aurora kinase activation states. ... Eyers, P.A.; Erikson, E.; Chen, L.G.; Maller, J.L. A novel mechanism for activation of the protein kinase Aurora A. Curr. Biol ...
2023 - The Role of Aurora Kinase Inhibitors in hematologic disorders , All rights reserved ...
2023 - The Role of Aurora Kinase Inhibitors in hematologic disorders , All rights reserved ...
0.05, **, < 0.01 versus the control group and LV-control group. Discussion B-ALL, the most frequent kind of ALL, is normally seen as a clonal extension of developmentally arrested malignant B-cell precursors 2. to detect the mRNA expression of USP1 in BM-MNCs from diagnosed B-ALL sufferers and healthy handles newly. As a total result, the appearance of USP1 was higher in B-ALL sufferers in comparison to that in healthful donors (Amount ?(Amount1A,1A, < 0.01). Traditional western blot evaluation also revealed which the protein degree of USP1 was higher in B-ALL sufferers compared to that in healthful controls (Amount ?(Figure1B).1B). These results indicated a potential function of USP1 in the pathogenesis of B-ALL. Open up in another window Amount 1 Expression degree of USP1 in B-ALL sufferers. (A) Recognition of mRNA appearance degree of USP1 in BM-MNCs from B-ALL sufferers and healthful donors using real-time PCR. **, < 0.01 weighed against healthy handles. (B) The protein degrees of USP1 in ...
... and that are driven by the oncoprotein NRAS become addicted to MYC stabilization via a mechanism mediated by aurora kinase A ( ... Aurora A Kinase Inhibitor AKI603 Induces Cellular Senescence in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells Harboring T315I Mutation. Wang. ... Aurora A Kinase Inhibitor AKI603 Induces Cellular Senescence in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells Harboring T315I Mutation. Wang. ... A MYC-aurora kinase A protein complex represents an actionable drug target in p53-altered liver cancer. ...
As a molecular mechanism, we demonstrate that PTPRD interacts with aurora kinase A (AURKA), an oncogenic protein that is over- ... Moreover, we identify aurora kinase A, a serine/threonine kinase oncogene that is up-regulated in many forms of cancer, ... One of the top scoring proteins on the PTPRD interaction arrays was aurora kinase A (AURKA), a serine/threonine kinase that is ... Lens SM, Voest EE, Medema RH: Shared and separate functions of polo-like kinases and aurora kinases in cancer. Nat Rev Cancer. ...
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases PubMed MeSh Term narrower concept * Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases - Aurora Kinase A PubMed ... Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases - Aurora Kinases PubMed MeSh Term *Overview. Overview. subject area of * Identification of ... novel phosphorylation sites on Xenopus laevis aurora A and analysis of phosphopeptide enrichment by immobilized metal-affinity ...
... kinase (a non-receptor kinase) and following phosphorylation of Paxillin (PXN) and actin redecorating, a system that may be ... IM is normally a Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) medication originally created as an inhibitor for the BCR-ABL kinase, a fusion ... Activation of proteins kinase C (PKC) continues to be implicated in. * Post author By technumber ... The N-terminal kinase area is certainly tethered via an autoinhibitory helix and a calmodulin binding site to a C-terminal ...
NDEL1 phosphorylation by Aurora-A kinase is essential for centrosomal maturation, separation, and TACC3 recruitment. Molecular ... NDEL1 phosphorylation by Aurora-A kinase is essential for centrosomal maturation, separation, and TACC3 recruitment. In: ... NDEL1 phosphorylation by Aurora-A kinase is essential for centrosomal maturation, separation, and TACC3 recruitment. / Mori, ... NDEL1 phosphorylation by Aurora-A kinase is essential for centrosomal maturation, separation, and TACC3 recruitment. ...
The AURKC gene provides instructions for making a protein called aurora kinase C. Learn about this gene and related health ... The Aurora Kinase C c.144delC mutation causes meiosis I arrest in men and is frequent in the North African population. Hum Mol ... Aurora kinase C helps the two dividing cells separate from each other and ensures that these cells each contain a complete set ... A lack of aurora kinase C blocks cell division in sperm cells. As a result, sperm cells have extra chromosomes, usually four ...
ALW-II-41-27 (Synonyms: Eph receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Price: 200mg, $1750;500mg, $2890; 1g, $3950;. ...
... ... we identified a synthetic lethality interaction between CHEK1 and mitotic aurora kinase A (AURKA) inhibitors. Gene expression ... TTK kinase, and CHEK1. AURKA and CHEK1 were amplified in 8.7% and 3.9% of ovarian cancers, respectively. AURKA and CHEK1 ... like the checkpoint kinase 1 (CHEK1) to induce G2 arrest. In our study, by using an in silico approach, ...
Compare Aurora A ELISA Kits and find the right product on antibodies-online.com. ... Order Aurora A ELISA Kits for many Reactivities. ... Aurora Kinase A ELISA Kits. (Aurora Kinase A (AURKA)). The ... Aliase für Aurora Kinase A ELISA Kits. aurora kinase A (AURKA) ELISA Kits. aurora kinase A (Aurka) ELISA Kits. aurora A (aurA) ... Hier sind Aurora Kinase A ELISA Kits für eine Vielzahl von Species wie anti-Human Aurora Kinase A, anti-Mouse Aurora Kinase A, ...
Aurora kinase A. MDRSKENCISGPVKATAPVGGPKRVLVTQQFPCQNPLPVNSGQAQRVLCP.... unknown. Drug Info/Drug Targets: DrugBank 3.0: a ...
MK-0457, an Aurora kinase and BCR-ABL inhibitor, is active in patients with BCR-ABL T315I leukemia. In: Leukemia. 2013 ; Vol. ... MK-0457, an Aurora kinase and BCR-ABL inhibitor, is active in patients with BCR-ABL T315I leukemia. / Giles, F. J.; Swords, R. ... MK-0457, an Aurora kinase and BCR-ABL inhibitor, is active in patients with BCR-ABL T315I leukemia. Leukemia. 2013 Jan;27(1): ... MK-0457, an Aurora kinase and BCR-ABL inhibitor, was studied on a Phase I/II study in 77 patients with refractory hematologic ...
In yeast, the ortholog of the Aurora B-INCENP protein kinase complex (Ipl1-Sli15) may have a role in this crucial process, ... Evidence that the Ipl1-Sli15 (Aurora kinase-INCENP) complex promotes chromosome bi-orientation by altering kinetochore-spindle ...
The phosphatydilinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian focus on of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a. The phosphatydilinositol-3-kinase ... of the PI3K pathway and simultaneous increase of the signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPK) ... rationale for combining several ongoing phase I clinical trials combining mTOR PI3K or AKT inhibitors with MAP/ERK kinase (MEK ... inhibit both mTOR complexes and the new dual inhibitors that are also adding activity against the phosphatydilinositol-3-kinase ...
Structure-based characterization of novel Aurora Kinase inhibitors. Aurora Kinase inhibitor. *Sample Page ... Kinomic profiling of principal mesangial cells treated with PDGF uncovered activation of many protein-tyrosine kinases, ...
SCLC-N to aurora kinase inhibitors. *SCLC-P to PARP inhibitors (independent of SLFN11) ...
Myeloperoxidase (MPO) takes on important assignments in disease by increasing oxidative and nitrosative tension and oxidizing lipoproteins. towards the energetic site of MPO and reacts with substances I and II. Docking studies also show the Tyr of KYC rests right above the heme of MPO. Oddly enough, KYC boosts MPO-dependent H2O2 intake. These data suggest KYC is certainly a book and particular inhibitor of MPO activity thats non-toxic to 1353859-00-3 supplier endothelial cell civilizations. Accordingly, KYC could be useful for dealing with MPO-mediated vascular disease. 0.001, em 1353859-00-3 supplier t /em -check) in Trp intrinsic fluorescence in LDL (Fig. 8A), confirming that Trp in LDL was oxidized. Adding KYC towards the response system safeguarded Trp residues in LDL from becoming oxidized. Number 8B demonstrates KYC dose-dependently decreased NO2Tyr development in LDL induced from the MPO/H2O2/NaNO2 response system. Weighed against KYC at 0 M, KYC at 6.25 M inhibited NO2Tyr formation by ...
  • Our results suggest the potential for therapeutic application of Aurora kinase B inhibitors in the treatment of Group 3 medulloblastoma. (oncotarget.com)
  • Finally the last section will be devoted to a new class of compounds that are able to inhibit both mTOR complexes and the new dual inhibitors that are also adding activity against the phosphatydilinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) a key component of the main opinions loop involved in this pathway. (biomasswars.com)
  • This observation has provided rationale for combining several ongoing phase I clinical trials combining mTOR PI3K or AKT inhibitors with MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. (biomasswars.com)
  • In addition, Vertex could earn additional milestone payments for the development of Aurora kinase inhibitors outside the area of oncology. (vrtx.com)
  • Aurora kinases are implicated in the onset and progression of many different human cancers, and novel Aurora kinase inhibitors such as VX-680 have the potential to play an important future role in the treatment and management of a wide range of tumor types. (vrtx.com)
  • We are pleased to enter this collaboration with Merck, which shares our vision of Aurora kinase inhibitors as a class of drugs that may have the potential to transform the future of cancer treatment," said Joshua Boger, Ph.D., Chairman and CEO of Vertex. (vrtx.com)
  • Aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases that are essential for cell proliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Giet R, Prigent C. Aurora/Ipl1p-related kinases, a new oncogenic family of mitotic serine-threonine kinases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aurora-A is a serine-threonine kinase implicated in the assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. (unibas.ch)
  • A family of highly conserved serine-threonine kinases that are involved in the regulation of MITOSIS. (lookformedical.com)
  • An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. (lookformedical.com)
  • Mammalian aurora-A belongs to a multigenic family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases comprising two other members: aurora-B and aurora-C. In this review we will focus on aurora-A that starts to localize to centrosomes only in S phase as soon as centrioles have been duplicated, the protein is then degraded in early G1. (lookformedical.com)
  • A family of serine/threonine kinase Aurora constitutes a key regulator in the orchestration of mitotic events. (lookformedical.com)
  • Aurora kinase A (AURKA), which is a member of serine/threonine kinase family, plays a critical role in regulating mitosis. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • The mammalian Aurora kinase family contains three serine/threonine kinase members that participate in cell division. (rndsystems.com)
  • AURK significantly promotes activation of IκBα at serine 32, but not serine 36 residues, unlike IκB kinase (IKK) family proteins activate both IκBα serine residues. (researchsquare.com)
  • Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) are serine-threonine protein kinases that initiate protein kinase signaling cascades. (bvsalud.org)
  • Aurora 2) functions during prophase of mitosis and is required for correct duplication and separation of the centrosomes (the microtubule organising centres in eukaryotic cells). (wikipedia.org)
  • Roles of Aurora Kinases in Mitosis and Tumorigenesis" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Aurora kinase C is a chromosomal passenger protein that interacts with aurora kinase B in the regulation of MITOSIS. (lookformedical.com)
  • An aurora kinase that localizes to the CENTROSOME during MITOSIS and is involved in centrosome regulation and formation of the MITOTIC SPINDLE. (lookformedical.com)
  • An aurora kinase that is a component of the chromosomal passenger protein complex and is involved in the regulation of MITOSIS. (lookformedical.com)
  • One of the key regulatory kinases involved in multiple stages of mitosis is Aurora kinase B. We hypothesized that medulloblastoma cells that overexpress MYC would be uniquely sensitized to the apoptotic effects of Aurora B inhibition. (oncotarget.com)
  • Mitotic kinase Aurora-B is regulated by SUMO-2/3 conjugation/deconjugation during mitosis. (nih.gov)
  • As discussed in detail below, biochemical, biophysical, structural, and cellular evidences have shown that the redox modification of the cysteine residues of AURKA affects both the phosphorylation state of Thr288 and the conformation state of structural elements critical for the kinase activity, leading to the regulation of AURKA activity. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • So far, several lines of evidence have shown that H 2 O 2 -induced regulation of the AURKA activity, possibly through direct oxidation of Cys290 present in the activation segment of the kinase domain. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • As the spindle formation is the process that is mainly governed by the kinase activity of AURKA, these observations led to the hypothesis that H 2 O 2 regulates the activity of AURKA [ 27 ] [ 28 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • By using a direct in vivo shRNA screen, we show that liver cancer cells that have mutations in the gene encoding the tumor suppressor protein p53 (Trp53 in mice and TP53 in humans) and that are driven by the oncoprotein NRAS become addicted to MYC stabilization via a mechanism mediated by aurora kinase A (AURKA). (scite.ai)
  • As a molecular mechanism, we demonstrate that PTPRD interacts with aurora kinase A (AURKA), an oncogenic protein that is over-expressed in multiple forms of cancer, including neuroblastoma. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Combined Aurora kinase and EGFR targeting using a monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody was more effective compared to single EGFR and Aurora kinase inhibition. (oncotarget.com)
  • The specific inhibition of Aurora kinase B was achieved in MYC- overexpressing medulloblastoma cells with AZD1152-HQPA. (oncotarget.com)
  • MYC overexpression sensitized medulloblastoma cells to cell death upon Aurora B inhibition. (oncotarget.com)
  • Using both flank and intracranial cerebellar xenografts we demonstrate that tumors formed from MYC-overexpressing medulloblastoma cells show a response to Aurora B inhibition including growth impairment and apoptosis induction. (oncotarget.com)
  • Pfizer) plus Everolimus are underway (35 36 Furthermore preclinical data have shown that mTORC1 inhibition results in a hyperactivation of the PI3K pathway and simultaneous increase of the signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPK) pathway (37) thus proving the presence of another opinions loop that connect the PI3K-AKT-mTOR with the MAPK pathway. (biomasswars.com)
  • Treating SCCHN cell lines with a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor resulted in defective cytokinesis, polyploidy and apoptosis, which was effective irrespective of the EGFR status. (oncotarget.com)
  • Our results demonstrate that combined targeting of EGFR and Aurora kinases represents a therapeutic means to activate cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis in SCCHN. (oncotarget.com)
  • Three Aurora kinases have been identified in mammalian cells to date. (wikipedia.org)
  • LY3295668 is a selective inhibitor of Aurora A with Kis of 0.8 nM and 1038 nM for Aurora A and B, respectively. (targetmol.com)
  • SCH-1473759 hydrochloride is an inhibitor of aurora(aurora A and B with IC50s of 4 and 13 nM, respectively). (targetmol.com)
  • TC-A 2317 hydrochloride is an inhibitor of Aurora kinase A with a Ki of 1.2 nM compared to Aurora kinase B with a Ki of 101 nM. (targetmol.com)
  • Aurora A activity is positively-regulated by the spindle protein TPX2, and has recently been shown to be a target for thiol-containing molecules, such as Coenzyme A. Aurora B (a.k.a. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aurora 1) functions in the attachment of the mitotic spindle to the centromere. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here we show that human Aurora-A binds to TPX2, a prominent component of the spindle apparatus. (unibas.ch)
  • Binding studies demonstrated that the NH2 terminus of TPX2 can directly interact with the COOH-terminal catalytic domain of Aurora-A. Although kinase activity was not required for this interaction, TPX2 was readily phosphorylated by Aurora-A. Upon siRNA-mediated elimination of TPX2 from cells, the association of Aurora-A with the spindle microtubules was abolished, although its association with spindle poles was unaffected. (unibas.ch)
  • In turn, Aurora-A might regulate the function of TPX2 during spindle assembly. (unibas.ch)
  • Works in various organisms have revealed that the kinase is involved in centrosome separation, duplication and maturation as well as in bipolar spindle assembly and stability. (lookformedical.com)
  • The protein encoded by this gene is a cell cycle-regulated kinase that appears to be involved in microtubule formation and/or stabilization at the spindle pole during chromosome segregation. (antikoerper-online.de)
  • Evidence that the Ipl1-Sli15 (Aurora kinase-INCENP) complex promotes chromosome bi-orientation by altering kinetochore-spindle pole connections. (pasteur.fr)
  • In yeast, the ortholog of the Aurora B-INCENP protein kinase complex (Ipl1-Sli15) may have a role in this crucial process, because it is necessary to prevent attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules from the same spindle pole. (pasteur.fr)
  • Aurora A influences centrosome maturation and spindle assembly, while Auroras B and C direct chromosome alignment and segregation. (rndsystems.com)
  • Kinomic profiling of principal mesangial cells treated with PDGF uncovered activation of many protein-tyrosine kinases, including AXL. (nipponkaigi-tokyo.com)
  • Alert FDA Approves Bosutinib for Children With CML The agency approved the tyrosine kinase inhibitor for pediatric patients with chronic phase Ph+ chronic myelogenous leukemia that is newly diagnosed or resistant or intolerant to prior therapy. (medscape.com)
  • Aurora C (AURKC) works in germ-line cells and little is known about its function. (wikipedia.org)
  • The AURKC gene provides instructions for making a protein called aurora kinase C. This protein regulates certain events during cell division. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Those transformed cells form tumours when implanted in immunodeficient mice, indicating that the kinase is an oncogene. (lookformedical.com)
  • Ilorasertib hydrochloride (ABT-348 hydrochloride) is an ATP-competitive multitargeted kinase inhibitor, which inhibits Aurora C, Aurora B, and Aurora A (IC50s: 1. (targetmol.com)
  • Aurora kinases are found in all organisms in which their function has been conserved throughout evolution, namely the control of chromosome segregation. (lookformedical.com)
  • Besides being implicated as mitotic regulators, these three kinases have generated significant interest in the cancer research field due to their elevated expression profiles in many human cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The phosphatydilinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian focus on of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a main concentrate of attention for cancers researchers before decade. (biomasswars.com)
  • Preclinical results for VX-680 reported by Vertex scientists in early 2004 demonstrated for the first time that a compound targeting the Aurora mechanism could induce tumor regression in human models of solid tumor cancers. (vrtx.com)
  • In Merck, we have a partner that is a global leader in the development and commercialization of innovative medicines, and one with the breadth of capabilities and resources that we expect to be required to establish the clinical benefit of an Aurora kinase inhibitor across a spectrum of solid tumors and hematologic cancers. (vrtx.com)
  • Aurora A overexpression in many malignant tumor types suggests that it may be directly involved in NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION. (lookformedical.com)
  • In human, aurora-A has focused a lot of attention, since its overexpression has been found to be correlated with the grade of various solid tumours. (lookformedical.com)
  • Ectopic kinase overexpression in any culture cell line leads to polyploidy and centrosome amplification. (lookformedical.com)
  • However, overexpression of aurora-A in particular cell lines such as NIH3T3 is sufficient to induce growth on soft agar. (lookformedical.com)
  • The expression of Aurora-A phosphorylation-mimetic mutants of NDEL1 efficiently rescued the defects of centrosomal maturation and separation which are characteristic of Aurora-A-depleted cells. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Our findings suggest that Aurora-A-mediated phosphorylation of NDEL1 is essential for centrosomal separation and centrosomal maturation and for mitotic entry. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The phosphorylation of IκBα by IκB kinase family have been so many identified, but the phosphorylation sites of IκBα by other kinases remain poorly understood. (researchsquare.com)
  • Jones D, Noble M, Wedge SR, Robson CN, Gaughan L. Aurora A regulates expression of AR-V7 in models of castrate resistant prostate cancer . (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Whitehouse Station, NJ and Cambridge, MA, June 22, 2004 -- Merck & Co., Inc. (NYSE: MRK) and Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated (Nasdaq: VRTX) announced today that they have entered into a global collaboration to develop and commercialize VX-680, Vertex's lead Aurora kinase inhibitor that is expected to enter clinical development this year for the treatment of cancer. (vrtx.com)
  • In addition, the companies will conduct a joint research program to characterize VX-680's activity across a broad range of cancer types as well as to identify follow-on drug candidates directed at Aurora kinases, using molecular profiling approaches and microarray technologies pioneered by Merck. (vrtx.com)
  • This agreement places a significant value on our innovations in the area of Aurora kinases and cancer, and highlights Vertex's progress in realizing our 2004 business development and collaborative revenue objectives," Boger added. (vrtx.com)
  • MK-0457, an Aurora kinase and BCR-ABL inhibitor, was studied on a Phase I/II study in 77 patients with refractory hematologic malignancies. (northwestern.edu)
  • AT9283 is an effective multi-targeted inhibitor of JAK2(IC50=1.2 nM) and JAK3(IC50=1.1 nM), Aurora A, Aurora B and Abl(T315I). (targetmol.com)
  • TPX2 was identified by mass spectrometry as a major protein coimmunoprecipitating specifically with Aurora-A from mitotic HeLa cell extracts. (unibas.ch)
  • A lack of aurora kinase C blocks cell division in sperm cells. (medlineplus.gov)
  • NDEL1 preferentially localizes to the centrosome and is a likely target for cell cycle-activated kinases, including CDK1. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Methods: Previously we observed that aurora kinase (AURK) binds IκBα in the cell. (researchsquare.com)
  • DMC promotes abnormal cell division by inhibiting the synthesis of the cell cycle checkpoint kinase Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), leading to increased cell vulnerability to DNA damage, disordered replication, and death. (bvsalud.org)
  • The zinc finger domain of Tzfp binds to the tbs motif located at the upstream flanking region of the Aie1 (aurora-C) kinase gene. (lookformedical.com)
  • Nuclear expression of protein kinase CK2α is reportedly elevated in human carcinomas, but mechanisms underlying its variable localization in cells are poorly understood. (bvsalud.org)
  • Identification of a new recurrent aurora kinase C mutation in both European and African men with macrozoospermia. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The Aurora Kinase C c.144delC mutation causes meiosis I arrest in men and is frequent in the North African population. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The first aurora kinases were identified in Drosophila melanogaster, where mutations led to failure of centrosome separation with the monopolar spindles reminiscent of the North Pole, suggesting the name aurora. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the role of aurora-A in centrosome function. (lookformedical.com)
  • We analyzed the clinical data and performed immunohistochemistry for Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Aurora kinase A (Aurora-A) expression in 180 SCCHN patients. (oncotarget.com)
  • The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters. (lookformedical.com)
  • Aurora inhibitor 1 is a potent Aurora inhibitor (IC50: ≤ 4 nM and ≤13 nM for Aurora A and Aurora B kinase). (targetmol.com)
  • MBM-17 is a potent inhibitor of NIMA-related kinase 2 (Nek2,IC50 of 3 nM). (targetmol.com)
  • This collaboration unites Vertex's drug discovery leadership targeting Aurora kinases with Merck's proprietary molecular profiling technologies and clinical development infrastructure in oncology. (vrtx.com)
  • Here we report that a circumscribed exposure to the aurora kinase inhibitor, VX-680, selectively kills cells that overexpress Myc. (nih.gov)
  • Aurora kinase C helps the two dividing cells separate from each other and ensures that these cells each contain a complete set of chromosomes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Finally, we evaluate a functional interaction between Fry and NDR1 kinase, providing evidence of an evolutionarily conserved complex required for morphogenesis. (nature.com)
  • Covalent Aurora A regulation by the metabolic integrator coenzyme A". Redox Biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • The human Aurora kinases present a similar domain organization, with a N-terminal domain of 39-129 residues in length, a related Ser/Thr protein kinase domain and a short C-terminal domain containing 15-20 residues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comparing pan-Aurora kinase and Aurora-A targeting hints towards a strong and clinically relevant biological effect mediated via Aurora kinase B. Taken together, our findings characterize a new poor risk group in SCCHN patients defined by elevated EGFR and Aurora-A protein expression. (oncotarget.com)
  • Hier sind Aurora Kinase A ELISA Kits für eine Vielzahl von Species wie anti-Human Aurora Kinase A, anti-Mouse Aurora Kinase A, anti-Rat Aurora Kinase A zu finden. (antikoerper-online.de)
  • As described above, there are three classes of aurora kinases in multicellular organisms, including humans: Aurora A (a.k.a. (wikipedia.org)