A potent natriuretic and vasodilatory peptide or mixture of different-sized low molecular weight PEPTIDES derived from a common precursor and secreted mainly by the HEART ATRIUM. All these peptides share a sequence of about 20 AMINO ACIDS.
Cell surface proteins that bind ATRIAL NATRIURETIC FACTOR with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. They contain intrinsic guanylyl cyclase activity.
Endogenous or exogenous chemicals that regulate the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in the body. They consist of peptides and non-peptide compounds.
A PEPTIDE that is secreted by the BRAIN and the HEART ATRIA, stored mainly in cardiac ventricular MYOCARDIUM. It can cause NATRIURESIS; DIURESIS; VASODILATION; and inhibits secretion of RENIN and ALDOSTERONE. It improves heart function. It contains 32 AMINO ACIDS.
Sodium excretion by URINATION.
A PEPTIDE of 22 amino acids, derived mainly from cells of VASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM. It is also found in the BRAIN, major endocrine glands, and other tissues. It shares structural homology with ATRIAL NATRIURETIC FACTOR. It has vasorelaxant activity thus is important in the regulation of vascular tone and blood flow. Several high molecular weight forms containing the 22 amino acids have been identified.
Guanosine cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogen phosphate). A guanine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to the sugar moiety in both the 3'- and 5'-positions. It is a cellular regulatory agent and has been described as a second messenger. Its levels increase in response to a variety of hormones, including acetylcholine, insulin, and oxytocin and it has been found to activate specific protein kinases. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of GTP to 3',5'-cyclic GMP and pyrophosphate. It also acts on ITP and dGTP. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 4.6.1.2.
Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.
The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.
Peptides that regulate the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in the body, also known as natriuretic peptide hormones. Several have been sequenced (ATRIAL NATRIURETIC FACTOR; BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE; C-TYPE NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE).
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
An increase in the excretion of URINE. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
A hormone secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX that regulates electrolyte and water balance by increasing the renal retention of sodium and the excretion of potassium.
Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
A highly specific (Leu-Leu) endopeptidase that generates ANGIOTENSIN I from its precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, leading to a cascade of reactions which elevate BLOOD PRESSURE and increase sodium retention by the kidney in the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.99.19.
An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.
Enzyme that is a major constituent of kidney brush-border membranes and is also present to a lesser degree in the brain and other tissues. It preferentially catalyzes cleavage at the amino group of hydrophobic residues of the B-chain of insulin as well as opioid peptides and other biologically active peptides. The enzyme is inhibited primarily by EDTA, phosphoramidon, and thiorphan and is reactivated by zinc. Neprilysin is identical to common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA Antigen), an important marker in the diagnosis of human acute lymphocytic leukemia. There is no relationship with CALLA PLANT.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART ATRIA.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
Classic quantitative assay for detection of antigen-antibody reactions using a radioactively labeled substance (radioligand) either directly or indirectly to measure the binding of the unlabeled substance to a specific antibody or other receptor system. Non-immunogenic substances (e.g., haptens) can be measured if coupled to larger carrier proteins (e.g., bovine gamma-globulin or human serum albumin) capable of inducing antibody formation.
The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.
Substances that dissociate into two or more ions, to some extent, in water. Solutions of electrolytes thus conduct an electric current and can be decomposed by it (ELECTROLYSIS). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.
A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.
A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).
A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
'Purines' is a term used in medical biochemistry to refer to naturally occurring heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds, which include adenine and guanine (components of nucleotides and nucleic acids), and are formed in the body from purine bases through various metabolic processes.
A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
A BLOOD PRESSURE regulating system of interacting components that include RENIN; ANGIOTENSINOGEN; ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME; ANGIOTENSIN I; ANGIOTENSIN II; and angiotensinase. Renin, an enzyme produced in the kidney, acts on angiotensinogen, an alpha-2 globulin produced by the liver, forming ANGIOTENSIN I. Angiotensin-converting enzyme, contained in the lung, acts on angiotensin I in the plasma converting it to ANGIOTENSIN II, an extremely powerful vasoconstrictor. Angiotensin II causes contraction of the arteriolar and renal VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE, leading to retention of salt and water in the KIDNEY and increased arterial blood pressure. In addition, angiotensin II stimulates the release of ALDOSTERONE from the ADRENAL CORTEX, which in turn also increases salt and water retention in the kidney. Angiotensin-converting enzyme also breaks down BRADYKININ, a powerful vasodilator and component of the KALLIKREIN-KININ SYSTEM.
Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.
The predominant form of mammalian antidiuretic hormone. It is a nonapeptide containing an ARGININE at residue 8 and two disulfide-linked cysteines at residues of 1 and 6. Arg-vasopressin is used to treat DIABETES INSIPIDUS or to improve vasomotor tone and BLOOD PRESSURE.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Protein precursors, also known as proproteins or prohormones, are inactive forms of proteins that undergo post-translational modification, such as cleavage, to produce the active functional protein or peptide hormone.
Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.
Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).
The circulation of the BLOOD through the vessels of the KIDNEY.
Chemical substances having a specific regulatory effect on the activity of a certain organ or organs. The term was originally applied to substances secreted by various ENDOCRINE GLANDS and transported in the bloodstream to the target organs. It is sometimes extended to include those substances that are not produced by the endocrine glands but that have similar effects.
A GATA transcription factor that is expressed in the MYOCARDIUM of developing heart and has been implicated in the differentiation of CARDIAC MYOCYTES. GATA4 is activated by PHOSPHORYLATION and regulates transcription of cardiac-specific genes.
The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.
21-Amino-acid peptides produced by vascular endothelial cells and functioning as potent vasoconstrictors. The endothelin family consists of three members, ENDOTHELIN-1; ENDOTHELIN-2; and ENDOTHELIN-3. All three peptides contain 21 amino acids, but vary in amino acid composition. The three peptides produce vasoconstrictor and pressor responses in various parts of the body. However, the quantitative profiles of the pharmacological activities are considerably different among the three isopeptides.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.
The outer layer of the adrenal gland. It is derived from MESODERM and comprised of three zones (outer ZONA GLOMERULOSA, middle ZONA FASCICULATA, and inner ZONA RETICULARIS) with each producing various steroids preferentially, such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and ANDROSTENEDIONE. Adrenal cortex function is regulated by pituitary ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN.
The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.
The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.
General increase in bulk of a part or organ due to CELL ENLARGEMENT and accumulation of FLUIDS AND SECRETIONS, not due to tumor formation, nor to an increase in the number of cells (HYPERPLASIA).
The volume of water filtered out of plasma through glomerular capillary walls into Bowman's capsules per unit of time. It is considered to be equivalent to INULIN clearance.
Agents that promote the excretion of urine through their effects on kidney function.
Sodium or sodium compounds used in foods or as a food. The most frequently used compounds are sodium chloride or sodium glutamate.
Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
The main trunk of the systemic arteries.
The larger subunits of MYOSINS. The heavy chains have a molecular weight of about 230 kDa and each heavy chain is usually associated with a dissimilar pair of MYOSIN LIGHT CHAINS. The heavy chains possess actin-binding and ATPase activity.
Enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of cyclic GMP to yield guanosine-5'-phosphate.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Antidiuretic hormones released by the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS of all vertebrates (structure varies with species) to regulate water balance and OSMOLARITY. In general, vasopressin is a nonapeptide consisting of a six-amino-acid ring with a cysteine 1 to cysteine 6 disulfide bridge or an octapeptide containing a CYSTINE. All mammals have arginine vasopressin except the pig with a lysine at position 8. Vasopressin, a vasoconstrictor, acts on the KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCTS to increase water reabsorption, increase blood volume and blood pressure.
A 21-amino acid peptide produced in a variety of tissues including endothelial and vascular smooth-muscle cells, neurons and astrocytes in the central nervous system, and endometrial cells. It acts as a modulator of vasomotor tone, cell proliferation, and hormone production. (N Eng J Med 1995;333(6):356-63)
Deficiency of sodium in the blood; salt depletion. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Hypertension due to RENAL ARTERY OBSTRUCTION or compression.
Colloids with liquid continuous phase and solid dispersed phase; the term is used loosely also for solid-in-gas (AEROSOLS) and other colloidal systems; water-insoluble drugs may be given as suspensions.
The process by which fetal Rh+ erythrocytes enter the circulation of an Rh- mother, causing her to produce IMMUNOGLOBULIN G antibodies, which can cross the placenta and destroy the erythrocytes of Rh+ fetuses. Rh isoimmunization can also be caused by BLOOD TRANSFUSION with mismatched blood.
A steroid metabolite that is the 11-deoxy derivative of CORTICOSTERONE and the 21-hydroxy derivative of PROGESTERONE.
A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.
A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease in which the ventricular walls are excessively rigid, impeding ventricular filling. It is marked by reduced diastolic volume of either or both ventricles but normal or nearly normal systolic function. It may be idiopathic or associated with other diseases (ENDOMYOCARDIAL FIBROSIS or AMYLOIDOSIS) causing interstitial fibrosis.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
Sympathectomy using chemicals (e.g., 6-hydroxydopamine or guanethidine) which selectively and reversibly destroy adrenergic nerve endings while leaving cholinergic nerve endings intact.
The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).
The active metabolite of ENALAPRIL and a potent intravenously administered angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. It is an effective agent for the treatment of essential hypertension and has beneficial hemodynamic effects in heart failure. The drug produces renal vasodilation with an increase in sodium excretion.
A bony prominence situated on the upper surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. It houses the PITUITARY GLAND.
The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.
The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.
Repetitive withdrawal of small amounts of blood and replacement with donor blood until a large proportion of the blood volume has been exchanged. Used in treatment of fetal erythroblastosis, hepatic coma, sickle cell anemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, septicemia, burns, thrombotic thrombopenic purpura, and fulminant malaria.
The quantity of volume or surface area of CELLS.
Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.
Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.
The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.
An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.
Systems in which an intracellular signal is generated in response to an intercellular primary messenger such as a hormone or neurotransmitter. They are intermediate signals in cellular processes such as metabolism, secretion, contraction, phototransduction, and cell growth. Examples of second messenger systems are the adenyl cyclase-cyclic AMP system, the phosphatidylinositol diphosphate-inositol triphosphate system, and the cyclic GMP system.
Discharge of URINE, liquid waste processed by the KIDNEY, from the body.
The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.
The functional units of the kidney, consisting of the glomerulus and the attached tubule.
The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.
Tapping fluid from the subarachnoid space in the lumbar region, usually between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.
Analogs of those substrates or compounds which bind naturally at the active sites of proteins, enzymes, antibodies, steroids, or physiological receptors. These analogs form a stable covalent bond at the binding site, thereby acting as inhibitors of the proteins or steroids.
The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
A potent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor; due to this action, the compound increases cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in tissue and thereby activates CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDE-REGULATED PROTEIN KINASES
Abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in two or more fetal compartments, such as SKIN; PLEURA; PERICARDIUM; PLACENTA; PERITONEUM; AMNIOTIC FLUID. General fetal EDEMA may be of non-immunologic origin, or of immunologic origin as in the case of ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FETALIS.
Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.
The blood pressure as recorded after wedging a CATHETER in a small PULMONARY ARTERY; believed to reflect the PRESSURE in the pulmonary CAPILLARIES.
Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.
Isopropyl analog of EPINEPHRINE; beta-sympathomimetic that acts on the heart, bronchi, skeletal muscle, alimentary tract, etc. It is used mainly as bronchodilator and heart stimulant.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
A pair of glands located at the cranial pole of each of the two KIDNEYS. Each adrenal gland is composed of two distinct endocrine tissues with separate embryonic origins, the ADRENAL CORTEX producing STEROIDS and the ADRENAL MEDULLA producing NEUROTRANSMITTERS.

A low-affinity serum response element allows other transcription factors to activate inducible gene expression in cardiac myocytes. (1/2854)

Hypertrophic growth of cardiac muscle cells is induced by a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli and is associated with a number of changes, including activation of genes such as atrial natriuretic factor. We found that two serum response element (SRE)-like DNA elements, one of which does not meet the consensus sequence and binds serum response factor (SRF) with low affinity, regulate the activity of this promoter. Surprisingly, the ability to induce the promoter by two different physiologic stimuli, as well as various activated transcription factors, including SRF-VP16, was primarily dependent upon the nonconsensus rather than the consensus SRE. This SRE controls the induction of gene expression via an unusual mechanism in that it is required to allow some, but not all, active transcription factors at unrelated sites on the promoter to stimulate gene expression. Thus, in addition to regulation of SRF activity by growth stimuli, regulation of a low-affinity SRE element controls inducible gene expression by modulating the ability of other transcription factors to stimulate the transcription machinery.  (+info)

Low calorie diet enhances renal, hemodynamic, and humoral effects of exogenous atrial natriuretic peptide in obese hypertensives. (2/2854)

The expression of the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor is abundant in human and rat adipose tissue, where it is specifically inhibited by fasting. In obese hypertensives, plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels were found to be lower than in obese normotensives. Therefore, the increased adipose mass might influence ANP levels and/or its biological activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the humoral, hemodynamic, and renal effects of exogenous ANP in obese hypertensives might be enhanced by a very low calorie diet. Eight obese hypertensives received a bolus injection of ANP (0.6 mg/kg) after 2 weeks of a normal calorie/normal sodium diet, and blood pressure (BP), heart rate, ANP, cGMP, plasma renin activity, and aldosterone were evaluated for 2 hours before and after the injection. Diuresis and natriuresis were measured every 30 minutes. The patients then started a low calorie/normal sodium diet (510 kcal/150 mmol/d) for 4 days, and then the ANP injection protocol was repeated. The low calorie diet induced a slight weight loss (from 90.6+/-1.1 to 87. 7+/-1.2 kg; P<0.01), which was accompanied by increase of cGMP excretion (from 146.0+/-10.1 to 154.5+/-9.5 nmol/24 h; P<0.05) together with a reduction of BP (P<0.01 versus basal levels). ANP injection after diet was followed by an increase of ANP levels similar to that observed before diet, but plasma cGMP, diuresis, and natriuresis increased significantly only after diet. Similarly, the decrease of BP after ANP administration was significantly higher after diet (change in mean arterial pressure, -6.4+/-0.7 versus -4. 0+/-0.6 mm Hg; P<0.05) as well as that of aldosterone (P<0.01). These data show that a low calorie diet enhances the humoral, renal, and hemodynamic effects of ANP in obese hypertensives and confirm the importance of caloric intake in modulating the biological activity of ANP, suggesting that the natriuretic peptide system can play a role in the acute changes of natriuresis and diuresis associated with caloric restriction.  (+info)

Peri-operative changes in echocardiographic measurements and plasma atrial and brain natriuretic peptide concentrations in 3 dogs with patent ductus arteriosus. (3/2854)

Peri-operative changes in echocardiographic measurements and plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were investigated for 1 month in 3 dogs with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Post-operative left ventricular end-diastolic dimention and fractional shortening decreased in all cases. Pre-operatively increased plasma ANP concentrations reduced dramatically after the operation. Peri-operative changes in plasma BNP levels had slightly S-shaped curves in all cases. These observations suggest that post-operative responsiveness of ANP and cardiac function are rapid in comparison with cardiac morphological changes, and BNP has a different pathophysiological significance from ANP in dogs with PDA.  (+info)

Sperm chemotaxis. (4/2854)

Communication between spermatozoa and egg before contact by chemotaxis appears to be prevalent throughout the animal kingdom. In non-mammalian species, sperm chemotaxis to factors secreted from the egg is well documented. In mammals, sperm chemotaxis to follicular factors in vitro has been established in humans and mice. The attractants of female origin in non-mammalian species are heat-stable peptides or proteins of various sizes, or other small molecules, depending on the species. Species specificity of the attractants in non-mammalian species may vary from high species specificity, through specificity to families with no specificity within a family, to absence of specificity. The mammalian sperm attractants have not been identified but they appear to be heat-stable peptides. The claim that progesterone is the attractant for human spermatozoa has failed to be substantiated, neither have claims for other mammalian sperm attractants been verified. The molecular mechanism of sperm chemotaxis is not known. Models involving modulation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration have been proposed for both mammalian and non-mammalian sperm chemotaxis. The physiological role of sperm chemotaxis in non-mammalian species appears to differ from that in mammals. In non-mammalian species, sperm chemotaxis strives to bring as many spermatozoa as possible to the egg. However, in mammals, the role appears to be recruitment of a selective population of capacitated ('ripe') spermatozoa to fertilize the egg.  (+info)

Physiological variability of fluid-regulation hormones in young women. (5/2854)

We tested the physiological reliability of plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin (P[AVP]), aldosterone (P[ALD]), and atrial natriuretic peptide (P[ANP]) in the early follicular phase and midluteal phases over the course of two menstrual cycles (n = 9 women, ages 25 +/- 1 yr). The reliability (Cronbach's alpha >/=0.80) of these hormones within a given phase of the cycle was tested 1) at rest, 2) after 2.5 h of dehydrating exercise, and 3) during a rehydration period. The mean hormone concentrations were similar within both the early follicular and midluteal phase tests; and the mean concentrations of P[ALD] and PRA for the three test conditions were significantly greater during the midluteal compared with the early follicular phase. Although Cronbach's alpha for resting and recovery P[ANP] were high (0.80 and 0.87, respectively), the resting and rehydration values for P[AVP], P[ALD], and PRA were variable between trials for the follicular (alpha from 0.49 to 0.55) and the luteal phase (alpha from 0.25 to 0. 66). Physiological reliability was better after dehydration for P[AVP] and PRA but remained low for P[ALD]. Although resting and recovery P[AVP], P[ALD], and PRA were not consistent within a given menstrual phase, the differences in the concentrations of these hormones between the different menstrual phases far exceeded the variability within the phases, indicating that the low within-phase reliability does not prevent the detection of menstrual phase-related differences in these hormonal variables.  (+info)

Cardiovascular, endocrine, and renal effects of urodilatin in normal humans. (6/2854)

Effects of urodilatin (5, 10, 20, and 40 ng. kg-1. min-1) infused over 2 h on separate study days were studied in eight normal subjects with use of a randomized, double-blind protocol. All doses decreased renal plasma flow (hippurate clearance, 13-37%) and increased fractional Li+ clearance (7-22%) and urinary Na+ excretion (by 30, 76, 136, and 99% at 5, 10, 20, and 40 ng. kg-1. min-1, respectively). Glomerular filtration rate did not increase significantly with any dose. The two lowest doses decreased cardiac output (7 and 16%) and stroke volume (10 and 20%) without changing mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate. The two highest doses elicited larger decreases in stroke volume (17 and 21%) but also decreased blood pressure (6 and 14%) and increased heart rate (15 and 38%), such that cardiac output remained unchanged. Hematocrit and plasma protein concentration increased with the three highest doses. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system was inhibited by the three lowest doses but activated by the hypotensive dose of 40 ng. kg-1. min-1. Plasma vasopressin increased by factors of up to 5 during infusion of the three highest doses. Atrial natriuretic peptide immunoreactivity (including urodilatin) and plasma cGMP increased dose dependently. The urinary excretion rate of albumin was elevated up to 15-fold (37 +/- 17 micrograms/min). Use of a newly developed assay revealed that baseline urinary urodilatin excretion rate was low (<10 pg/min) and that fractional excretion of urodilatin remained below 0.1%. The results indicate that even moderately natriuretic doses of urodilatin exert protracted effects on systemic hemodynamic, endocrine, and renal functions, including decreases in cardiac output and renal blood flow, without changes in arterial pressure or glomerular filtration rate, and that filtered urodilatin is almost completely removed by the renal tubules.  (+info)

Second messenger production in avian medullary nephron segments in response to peptide hormones. (7/2854)

We examined the sites of peptide hormone activation within medullary nephron segments of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) kidney by measuring rates of hormone-induced generation of cyclic nucleotide second messenger. Thin descending limbs, thick ascending limbs, and collecting ducts had baseline activity of adenylyl cyclase that resulted in cAMP accumulation of 207 +/- 56, 147 +/- 31, and 151 +/- 41 fmol. mm-1. 30 min-1, respectively. In all segments, this activity increased 10- to 20-fold in response to forskolin. Activity of adenylyl cyclase in the thin descending limb was stimulated approximately twofold by parathyroid hormone (PTH) but not by any of the other hormones tested [arginine vasotocin (AVT), glucagon, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), or isoproterenol, each at 10(-6) M]. Thick ascending limb was stimulated two- to threefold by both AVT and PTH; however, glucagon and isoproterenol had no effect, and ANP stimulated neither cAMP nor cGMP accumulation. Adenylyl cyclase activity in the collecting duct was stimulated fourfold by AVT but not by the other hormones; likewise, ANP did not stimulate cGMP accumulation in this segment. These data support a tubular action of AVT and PTH in the avian renal medulla.  (+info)

cGMP-dependent and -independent inhibition of a K+ conductance by natriuretic peptides: molecular and functional studies in human proximal tubule cells. (8/2854)

In immortalized human kidney epithelial (IHKE-1) cells derived from proximal tubules, two natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR) were identified. In addition to NPR-A, which is bound by atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and urodilatin (URO), a novel form of NPR-B that might be bound by C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) was identified using PCR. This novel splice variant of NPR-B (NPR-Bi) was also found in human kidney. Whereas ANP, BNP, and URO increased intracellular cGMP levels in IHKE-1 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, CNP had no effect on cGMP levels. To determine the physiologic responses to these agonists in IHKE-1 cells, the membrane voltage (Vm) was monitored using the slow whole-cell patch-clamp technique. ANP (10 nM), BNP (10 nM), and URO (16 nM) depolarized these cells by 3 to 4 mV (n = 47, 7, and 16, respectively), an effect that could be mimicked by 0.1 mM 8-Br-cGMP (n = 15). The effects of ANP and 8-Br-cGMP were not additive (n = 4). CNP (10 nM) also depolarized these cells, by 3+/-1 mV (n = 28), despite the absence of an increase in cellular cGMP levels, indicating a cGMP-independent mechanism. In the presence of CNP, 8-Br-cGMP further depolarized Vm significantly, by 1.6+/-0.3 mV (n = 5). The depolarizations by ANP were completely abolished in the presence of Ba2+ (1 mM, n = 4) and thus can be related to inhibition of a K+ conductance in the luminal membrane of IHKE-1 cells. The depolarizations attributable to CNP were completely blocked when genistein (10 microM, n = 6), an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, was present. These findings indicate that natriuretic peptides regulate electrogenic transport processes via cGMP-dependent and -independent pathways that influence the Vm of IHKE-1 cells.  (+info)

Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), also known as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is a hormone that is primarily produced and secreted by the atria of the heart in response to stretching of the cardiac muscle cells due to increased blood volume. ANF plays a crucial role in regulating body fluid homeostasis, blood pressure, and cardiovascular function.

The main physiological action of ANF is to promote sodium and water excretion by the kidneys, which helps lower blood volume and reduce blood pressure. ANF also relaxes vascular smooth muscle, dilates blood vessels, and inhibits the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), further contributing to its blood pressure-lowering effects.

Defects in ANF production or action have been implicated in several cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure, hypertension, and kidney disease. Therefore, ANF and its analogs are being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of these conditions.

Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of certain cells in the body, primarily in the kidneys, heart, and blood vessels. They play a crucial role in regulating blood pressure, volume, and electrolyte balance.

There are two main types of ANF receptors: type A and type B. Type A receptors, also known as guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptors, are found in the kidneys, heart, and blood vessels. When ANF binds to these receptors, it triggers a series of reactions that lead to an increase in the production of a molecule called cyclic GMP (cGMP). This, in turn, causes vasodilation (relaxation of blood vessels), increased urine production, and reduced sodium reabsorption in the kidneys, all of which help lower blood pressure.

Type B receptors, on the other hand, are found mainly in the brain and have been shown to modulate the release of ANF from the heart. When ANF binds to type B receptors, it inhibits the release of vasopressin, a hormone that helps regulate water balance in the body. This further contributes to the overall effects of ANF on blood pressure and fluid balance.

Overall, ANF receptors are essential components of the complex system that helps maintain homeostasis in the cardiovascular and renal systems.

Natriuretic agents are substances that increase the secretion of sodium in the urine (natriuresis), which subsequently leads to a decrease in extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. These agents can be endogenous, such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), which are produced by the heart in response to increased stretching of cardiac muscle cells due to volume or pressure overload. Excessive production of these endogenous natriuretic peptides can contribute to the pathophysiology of heart failure.

Exogenous natriuretic agents, such as loop diuretics (e.g., furosemide), thiazide diuretics, and potassium-sparing diuretics, are used in clinical practice to treat conditions associated with fluid overload, like heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and kidney diseases. These medications act on different parts of the nephron to inhibit sodium reabsorption, thereby promoting natriuresis and diuresis.

Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) is a type of natriuretic peptide that is primarily produced in the heart, particularly in the ventricles. Although it was initially identified in the brain, hence its name, it is now known that the cardiac ventricles are the main source of BNP in the body.

BNP is released into the bloodstream in response to increased stretching or distension of the heart muscle cells due to conditions such as heart failure, hypertension, and myocardial infarction (heart attack). Once released, BNP binds to specific receptors in the kidneys, causing an increase in urine production and excretion of sodium, which helps reduce fluid volume and decrease the workload on the heart.

BNP also acts as a hormone that regulates various physiological functions, including blood pressure, cardiac remodeling, and inflammation. Measuring BNP levels in the blood is a useful diagnostic tool for detecting and monitoring heart failure, as higher levels of BNP are associated with more severe heart dysfunction.

Natriuresis is the process or condition of excreting an excessive amount of sodium (salt) through urine. It is a physiological response to high sodium levels in the body, which can be caused by various factors such as certain medical conditions (e.g., kidney disease, heart failure), medications, or dietary habits. The increased excretion of sodium helps regulate the body's water balance and maintain normal blood pressure. However, persistent natriuresis may indicate underlying health issues that require medical attention.

C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP) is a member of the natriuretic peptide family, which are hormones that play crucial roles in cardiovascular homeostasis and renal function. The natriuretic peptides include atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP).

C-type Natriuretic Peptide is primarily produced and secreted by the endothelial cells, and to a lesser extent by the central nervous system, chondrocytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells. CNP has a relatively short half-life of approximately 2 minutes due to its rapid clearance by the natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) and neutral endopeptidase (NEP).

The primary physiological function of C-type Natriuretic Peptide is to regulate vascular tone, endothelial cell growth, differentiation, and survival. It also plays a role in bone development and maintenance by promoting chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. In the kidney, CNP influences renal function through its effects on natriuresis (sodium excretion), diuresis (water excretion), and vasodilation of the afferent arteriole.

CNP binds to the NPR-B receptor, which is widely expressed in various tissues, including vascular endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and neurons. The activation of NPR-B leads to increased intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, which in turn activates protein kinase G (PKG), resulting in vasodilation, anti-proliferative, and natriuretic effects.

Dysregulation of C-type Natriuretic Peptide has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, bone disorders, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the role of CNP in these processes may provide novel therapeutic targets for treating these diseases.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a important second messenger molecule that plays a crucial role in various biological processes within the human body. It is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by the enzyme guanylyl cyclase.

Cyclic GMP is involved in regulating diverse physiological functions, such as smooth muscle relaxation, cardiovascular function, and neurotransmission. It also plays a role in modulating immune responses and cellular growth and differentiation.

In the medical field, changes in cGMP levels or dysregulation of cGMP-dependent pathways have been implicated in various disease states, including pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, erectile dysfunction, and glaucoma. Therefore, pharmacological agents that target cGMP signaling are being developed as potential therapeutic options for these conditions.

Guanylate cyclase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which acts as a second messenger in various cellular signaling pathways. There are two main types of guanylate cyclases: soluble and membrane-bound. Soluble guanylate cyclase is activated by nitric oxide, while membrane-bound guanylate cyclase can be activated by natriuretic peptides. The increased levels of cGMP produced by guanylate cyclase can lead to a variety of cellular responses, including smooth muscle relaxation, neurotransmitter release, and regulation of ion channels. Dysregulation of guanylate cyclase activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, and cancer.

Cardiomegaly is a medical term that refers to an enlarged heart. It can be caused by various conditions such as high blood pressure, heart valve problems, cardiomyopathy, or fluid accumulation around the heart (pericardial effusion). Cardiomegaly can be detected through imaging tests like chest X-rays or echocardiograms. Depending on the underlying cause, treatment options may include medications, lifestyle changes, or in some cases, surgery. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

The heart atria are the upper chambers of the heart that receive blood from the veins and deliver it to the lower chambers, or ventricles. There are two atria in the heart: the right atrium receives oxygen-poor blood from the body and pumps it into the right ventricle, which then sends it to the lungs to be oxygenated; and the left atrium receives oxygen-rich blood from the lungs and pumps it into the left ventricle, which then sends it out to the rest of the body. The atria contract before the ventricles during each heartbeat, helping to fill the ventricles with blood and prepare them for contraction.

Natriuretic peptides are a group of hormones that help regulate the balance of sodium and water in the body, as well as blood volume and blood pressure. They are produced by the heart and other tissues in response to stretching or distension of the cells due to increased fluid volume.

There are several types of natriuretic peptides, including:

1. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP): This hormone is produced by the atria of the heart in response to stretching of the atrial walls caused by increased blood volume. ANP promotes sodium and water excretion by the kidneys, which helps lower blood pressure and reduce fluid volume.
2. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP): This hormone is produced by the ventricles of the heart in response to stretching of the ventricular walls caused by increased blood volume or pressure. BNP also promotes sodium and water excretion by the kidneys, as well as dilating blood vessels and reducing the force of heart contractions.
3. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP): This hormone is produced by endothelial cells lining the blood vessels and has similar effects to ANP and BNP, but its main role is to regulate bone growth and development.

Natriuretic peptides have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications in various medical conditions, such as heart failure, hypertension, and kidney disease. Elevated levels of natriuretic peptides may indicate the presence of cardiac dysfunction or damage, while administering synthetic forms of these hormones has been shown to have beneficial effects on blood pressure, fluid balance, and cardiovascular function.

The myocardium is the middle layer of the heart wall, composed of specialized cardiac muscle cells that are responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It forms the thickest part of the heart wall and is divided into two sections: the left ventricle, which pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body, and the right ventricle, which pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs.

The myocardium contains several types of cells, including cardiac muscle fibers, connective tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. The muscle fibers are arranged in a highly organized pattern that allows them to contract in a coordinated manner, generating the force necessary to pump blood through the heart and circulatory system.

Damage to the myocardium can occur due to various factors such as ischemia (reduced blood flow), infection, inflammation, or genetic disorders. This damage can lead to several cardiac conditions, including heart failure, arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy.

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures:

1. Systolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart pushes blood out into the arteries.
2. Diastolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart rests between beats, allowing it to fill with blood.

Normal blood pressure for adults is typically around 120/80 mmHg, although this can vary slightly depending on age, sex, and other factors. High blood pressure (hypertension) is generally considered to be a reading of 130/80 mmHg or higher, while low blood pressure (hypotension) is usually defined as a reading below 90/60 mmHg. It's important to note that blood pressure can fluctuate throughout the day and may be affected by factors such as stress, physical activity, and medication use.

Diuresis is a medical term that refers to an increased production of urine by the kidneys. It can occur as a result of various factors, including certain medications, medical conditions, or as a response to a physiological need, such as in the case of dehydration. Diuretics are a class of drugs that promote diuresis and are often used to treat conditions such as high blood pressure, heart failure, and edema.

Diuresis can be classified into several types based on its underlying cause or mechanism, including:

1. Osmotic diuresis: This occurs when the kidneys excrete large amounts of urine in response to a high concentration of solutes (such as glucose) in the tubular fluid. The high osmolarity of the tubular fluid causes water to be drawn out of the bloodstream and into the urine, leading to an increase in urine output.
2. Forced diuresis: This is a medical procedure in which large amounts of intravenous fluids are administered to promote diuresis. It is used in certain clinical situations, such as to enhance the excretion of toxic substances or to prevent kidney damage.
3. Natriuretic diuresis: This occurs when the kidneys excrete large amounts of sodium and water in response to the release of natriuretic peptides, which are hormones that regulate sodium balance and blood pressure.
4. Aquaresis: This is a type of diuresis that occurs in response to the ingestion of large amounts of water, leading to dilute urine production.
5. Pathological diuresis: This refers to increased urine production due to underlying medical conditions such as diabetes insipidus or pyelonephritis.

It is important to note that excessive diuresis can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalances, so it should be monitored carefully in clinical settings.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

Aldosterone is a hormone produced by the adrenal gland. It plays a key role in regulating sodium and potassium balance and maintaining blood pressure through its effects on the kidneys. Aldosterone promotes the reabsorption of sodium ions and the excretion of potassium ions in the distal tubules and collecting ducts of the nephrons in the kidneys. This increases the osmotic pressure in the blood, which in turn leads to water retention and an increase in blood volume and blood pressure.

Aldosterone is released from the adrenal gland in response to a variety of stimuli, including angiotensin II (a peptide hormone produced as part of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), potassium ions, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary gland. The production of aldosterone is regulated by a negative feedback mechanism involving sodium levels in the blood. High sodium levels inhibit the release of aldosterone, while low sodium levels stimulate its release.

In addition to its role in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance and blood pressure, aldosterone has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, and primary hyperaldosteronism (a condition characterized by excessive production of aldosterone).

A kidney, in medical terms, is one of two bean-shaped organs located in the lower back region of the body. They are essential for maintaining homeostasis within the body by performing several crucial functions such as:

1. Regulation of water and electrolyte balance: Kidneys help regulate the amount of water and various electrolytes like sodium, potassium, and calcium in the bloodstream to maintain a stable internal environment.

2. Excretion of waste products: They filter waste products from the blood, including urea (a byproduct of protein metabolism), creatinine (a breakdown product of muscle tissue), and other harmful substances that result from normal cellular functions or external sources like medications and toxins.

3. Endocrine function: Kidneys produce several hormones with important roles in the body, such as erythropoietin (stimulates red blood cell production), renin (regulates blood pressure), and calcitriol (activated form of vitamin D that helps regulate calcium homeostasis).

4. pH balance regulation: Kidneys maintain the proper acid-base balance in the body by excreting either hydrogen ions or bicarbonate ions, depending on whether the blood is too acidic or too alkaline.

5. Blood pressure control: The kidneys play a significant role in regulating blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which constricts blood vessels and promotes sodium and water retention to increase blood volume and, consequently, blood pressure.

Anatomically, each kidney is approximately 10-12 cm long, 5-7 cm wide, and 3 cm thick, with a weight of about 120-170 grams. They are surrounded by a protective layer of fat and connected to the urinary system through the renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

Hemodynamics is the study of how blood flows through the cardiovascular system, including the heart and the vascular network. It examines various factors that affect blood flow, such as blood volume, viscosity, vessel length and diameter, and pressure differences between different parts of the circulatory system. Hemodynamics also considers the impact of various physiological and pathological conditions on these variables, and how they in turn influence the function of vital organs and systems in the body. It is a critical area of study in fields such as cardiology, anesthesiology, and critical care medicine.

Renin is a medically recognized term and it is defined as:

"A protein (enzyme) that is produced and released by specialized cells (juxtaglomerular cells) in the kidney. Renin is a key component of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which helps regulate blood pressure and fluid balance in the body.

When the kidney detects a decrease in blood pressure or a reduction in sodium levels, it releases renin into the bloodstream. Renin then acts on a protein called angiotensinogen, converting it to angiotensin I. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) subsequently converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II, which is a potent vasoconstrictor that narrows blood vessels and increases blood pressure.

Additionally, angiotensin II stimulates the adrenal glands to release aldosterone, a hormone that promotes sodium reabsorption in the kidneys and increases water retention, further raising blood pressure.

Therefore, renin plays a critical role in maintaining proper blood pressure and electrolyte balance in the body."

Phenylephrine is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as sympathomimetic amines. It primarily acts as an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonist, which means it stimulates these receptors, leading to vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels). This effect can be useful in various medical situations, such as:

1. Nasal decongestion: When applied topically in the nose, phenylephrine causes constriction of the blood vessels in the nasal passages, which helps to relieve congestion and swelling. It is often found in over-the-counter (OTC) cold and allergy products.
2. Ocular circulation: In ophthalmology, phenylephrine is used to dilate the pupils before eye examinations. The increased pressure from vasoconstriction helps to open up the pupil, allowing for a better view of the internal structures of the eye.
3. Hypotension management: In some cases, phenylephrine may be given intravenously to treat low blood pressure (hypotension) during medical procedures like spinal anesthesia or septic shock. The vasoconstriction helps to increase blood pressure and improve perfusion of vital organs.

It is essential to use phenylephrine as directed, as improper usage can lead to adverse effects such as increased heart rate, hypertension, arrhythmias, and rebound congestion (when used as a nasal decongestant). Always consult with a healthcare professional for appropriate guidance on using this medication.

Neprilysin (NEP), also known as membrane metallo-endopeptidase or CD10, is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein that functions as a zinc-dependent metalloprotease. It is widely expressed in various tissues, including the kidney, brain, heart, and vasculature. Neprilysin plays a crucial role in the breakdown and regulation of several endogenous bioactive peptides, such as natriuretic peptides, bradykinin, substance P, and angiotensin II. By degrading these peptides, neprilysin helps maintain cardiovascular homeostasis, modulate inflammation, and regulate neurotransmission. In the context of heart failure, neprilysin inhibitors have been developed to increase natriuretic peptide levels, promoting diuresis and vasodilation, ultimately improving cardiac function.

Atrial function in a medical context refers to the role and performance of the two upper chambers of the heart, known as the atria. The main functions of the atria are to receive blood from the veins and help pump it into the ventricles, which are the lower pumping chambers of the heart.

The atria contract in response to electrical signals generated by the sinoatrial node, which is the heart's natural pacemaker. This contraction helps to fill the ventricles with blood before they contract and pump blood out to the rest of the body. Atrial function can be assessed through various diagnostic tests, such as echocardiograms or electrocardiograms (ECGs), which can help identify any abnormalities in atrial structure or electrical activity that may affect heart function.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is a highly sensitive analytical technique used in clinical and research laboratories to measure concentrations of various substances, such as hormones, vitamins, drugs, or tumor markers, in biological samples like blood, urine, or tissues. The method relies on the specific interaction between an antibody and its corresponding antigen, combined with the use of radioisotopes to quantify the amount of bound antigen.

In a typical RIA procedure, a known quantity of a radiolabeled antigen (also called tracer) is added to a sample containing an unknown concentration of the same unlabeled antigen. The mixture is then incubated with a specific antibody that binds to the antigen. During the incubation period, the antibody forms complexes with both the radiolabeled and unlabeled antigens.

After the incubation, the unbound (free) radiolabeled antigen is separated from the antibody-antigen complexes, usually through a precipitation or separation step involving centrifugation, filtration, or chromatography. The amount of radioactivity in the pellet (containing the antibody-antigen complexes) is then measured using a gamma counter or other suitable radiation detection device.

The concentration of the unlabeled antigen in the sample can be determined by comparing the ratio of bound to free radiolabeled antigen in the sample to a standard curve generated from known concentrations of unlabeled antigen and their corresponding bound/free ratios. The higher the concentration of unlabeled antigen in the sample, the lower the amount of radiolabeled antigen that will bind to the antibody, resulting in a lower bound/free ratio.

Radioimmunoassays offer high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, making them valuable tools for detecting and quantifying low levels of various substances in biological samples. However, due to concerns about radiation safety and waste disposal, alternative non-isotopic immunoassay techniques like enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have become more popular in recent years.

The heart ventricles are the two lower chambers of the heart that receive blood from the atria and pump it to the lungs or the rest of the body. The right ventricle pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs, while the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. Both ventricles have thick, muscular walls to generate the pressure necessary to pump blood through the circulatory system.

Electrolytes are substances that, when dissolved in water, break down into ions that can conduct electricity. In the body, electrolytes are responsible for regulating various important physiological functions, including nerve and muscle function, maintaining proper hydration and acid-base balance, and helping to repair tissue damage.

The major electrolytes found in the human body include sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate. These electrolytes are tightly regulated by various mechanisms, including the kidneys, which help to maintain their proper balance in the body.

When there is an imbalance of electrolytes in the body, it can lead to a range of symptoms and health problems. For example, low levels of sodium (hyponatremia) can cause confusion, seizures, and even coma, while high levels of potassium (hyperkalemia) can lead to heart arrhythmias and muscle weakness.

Electrolytes are also lost through sweat during exercise or illness, so it's important to replace them through a healthy diet or by drinking fluids that contain electrolytes, such as sports drinks or coconut water. In some cases, electrolyte imbalances may require medical treatment, such as intravenous (IV) fluids or medication.

Cell surface receptors, also known as membrane receptors, are proteins located on the cell membrane that bind to specific molecules outside the cell, known as ligands. These receptors play a crucial role in signal transduction, which is the process of converting an extracellular signal into an intracellular response.

Cell surface receptors can be classified into several categories based on their structure and mechanism of action, including:

1. Ion channel receptors: These receptors contain a pore that opens to allow ions to flow across the cell membrane when they bind to their ligands. This ion flux can directly activate or inhibit various cellular processes.
2. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): These receptors consist of seven transmembrane domains and are associated with heterotrimeric G proteins that modulate intracellular signaling pathways upon ligand binding.
3. Enzyme-linked receptors: These receptors possess an intrinsic enzymatic activity or are linked to an enzyme, which becomes activated when the receptor binds to its ligand. This activation can lead to the initiation of various signaling cascades within the cell.
4. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs): These receptors contain intracellular tyrosine kinase domains that become activated upon ligand binding, leading to the phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling molecules.
5. Integrins: These receptors are transmembrane proteins that mediate cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions by binding to extracellular matrix proteins or counter-receptors on adjacent cells. They play essential roles in cell adhesion, migration, and survival.

Cell surface receptors are involved in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, hormone signaling, immune response, and cell growth and differentiation. Dysregulation of these receptors can contribute to the development of numerous diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Heart failure is a pathophysiological state in which the heart is unable to pump sufficient blood to meet the metabolic demands of the body or do so only at the expense of elevated filling pressures. It can be caused by various cardiac disorders, including coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular heart disease, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. Symptoms may include shortness of breath, fatigue, and fluid retention. Heart failure is often classified based on the ejection fraction (EF), which is the percentage of blood that is pumped out of the left ventricle during each contraction. A reduced EF (less than 40%) is indicative of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), while a preserved EF (greater than or equal to 50%) is indicative of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). There is also a category of heart failure with mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF) for those with an EF between 40-49%.

Angiotensin II is a potent vasoactive peptide hormone that plays a critical role in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which is a crucial regulator of blood pressure and fluid balance in the body. It is formed from angiotensin I through the action of an enzyme called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE).

Angiotensin II has several physiological effects on various organs, including:

1. Vasoconstriction: Angiotensin II causes contraction of vascular smooth muscle, leading to an increase in peripheral vascular resistance and blood pressure.
2. Aldosterone release: Angiotensin II stimulates the adrenal glands to release aldosterone, a hormone that promotes sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion in the kidneys, thereby increasing water retention and blood volume.
3. Sympathetic nervous system activation: Angiotensin II activates the sympathetic nervous system, leading to increased heart rate and contractility, further contributing to an increase in blood pressure.
4. Thirst regulation: Angiotensin II stimulates the hypothalamus to increase thirst, promoting water intake and helping to maintain intravascular volume.
5. Cell growth and fibrosis: Angiotensin II has been implicated in various pathological processes, such as cell growth, proliferation, and fibrosis, which can contribute to the development of cardiovascular and renal diseases.

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are two classes of medications commonly used in clinical practice to target the RAAS by blocking the formation or action of angiotensin II, respectively. These drugs have been shown to be effective in managing hypertension, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease.

WKY (Wistar Kyoto) is not a term that refers to "rats, inbred" in a medical definition. Instead, it is a strain of laboratory rat that is widely used in biomedical research. WKY rats are an inbred strain, which means they are the result of many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a genetically uniform population.

WKY rats originated from the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia and were established as a normotensive control strain to contrast with other rat strains that exhibit hypertension. They have since been used in various research areas, including cardiovascular, neurological, and behavioral studies. Compared to other commonly used rat strains like the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), WKY rats are known for their lower blood pressure, reduced stress response, and greater emotionality.

In summary, "WKY" is a designation for an inbred strain of laboratory rat that is often used as a control group in biomedical research due to its normotensive characteristics.

Sodium Chloride is defined as the inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions. It is commonly known as table salt or halite, and it is used extensively in food seasoning and preservation due to its ability to enhance flavor and inhibit bacterial growth. In medicine, sodium chloride is used as a balanced electrolyte solution for rehydration and as a topical wound irrigant and antiseptic. It is also an essential component of the human body's fluid balance and nerve impulse transmission.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

Sodium is an essential mineral and electrolyte that is necessary for human health. In a medical context, sodium is often discussed in terms of its concentration in the blood, as measured by serum sodium levels. The normal range for serum sodium is typically between 135 and 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L).

Sodium plays a number of important roles in the body, including:

* Regulating fluid balance: Sodium helps to regulate the amount of water in and around your cells, which is important for maintaining normal blood pressure and preventing dehydration.
* Facilitating nerve impulse transmission: Sodium is involved in the generation and transmission of electrical signals in the nervous system, which is necessary for proper muscle function and coordination.
* Assisting with muscle contraction: Sodium helps to regulate muscle contractions by interacting with other minerals such as calcium and potassium.

Low sodium levels (hyponatremia) can cause symptoms such as confusion, seizures, and coma, while high sodium levels (hypernatremia) can lead to symptoms such as weakness, muscle cramps, and seizures. Both conditions require medical treatment to correct.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Purinones" is not a recognized term in medical terminology. It seems there might be a spelling mistake or a misunderstanding of the term. If you meant "purines," I can provide a definition for that. Purines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that form the basis of several important biomolecules, such as nucleotides and their derivatives found in DNA and RNA. If you had something different in mind, please provide clarification so I can give you an accurate and helpful response.

SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) are an inbred strain of rats that were originally developed through selective breeding for high blood pressure. They are widely used as a model to study hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases, as well as neurological disorders such as stroke and dementia.

Inbred strains of animals are created by mating genetically identical individuals (siblings or offspring) for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at all genetic loci. This means that the animals within an inbred strain are essentially genetically identical to one another, which makes them useful for studying the effects of specific genes or environmental factors on disease processes.

SHR rats develop high blood pressure spontaneously, without any experimental manipulation, and show many features of human hypertension, such as increased vascular resistance, left ventricular hypertrophy, and renal dysfunction. They also exhibit a number of behavioral abnormalities, including hyperactivity, impulsivity, and cognitive deficits, which make them useful for studying the neurological consequences of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

Overall, inbred SHR rats are an important tool in biomedical research, providing a valuable model for understanding the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to hypertension and related disorders.

A peptide fragment is a short chain of amino acids that is derived from a larger peptide or protein through various biological or chemical processes. These fragments can result from the natural breakdown of proteins in the body during regular physiological processes, such as digestion, or they can be produced experimentally in a laboratory setting for research or therapeutic purposes.

Peptide fragments are often used in research to map the structure and function of larger peptides and proteins, as well as to study their interactions with other molecules. In some cases, peptide fragments may also have biological activity of their own and can be developed into drugs or diagnostic tools. For example, certain peptide fragments derived from hormones or neurotransmitters may bind to receptors in the body and mimic or block the effects of the full-length molecule.

The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) is a complex hormonal system that regulates blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte balance, and vascular resistance. It plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of hypertension, heart failure, and kidney diseases.

Here's a brief overview of how it works:

1. Renin is an enzyme that is released by the juxtaglomerular cells in the kidneys in response to decreased blood pressure or reduced salt delivery to the distal tubules.
2. Renin acts on a protein called angiotensinogen, which is produced by the liver, converting it into angiotensin I.
3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), found in the lungs and other tissues, then converts angiotensin I into angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor that narrows blood vessels and increases blood pressure.
4. Angiotensin II also stimulates the release of aldosterone from the adrenal glands, which promotes sodium and water reabsorption in the kidneys, further increasing blood volume and blood pressure.
5. Additionally, angiotensin II has direct effects on the heart, promoting hypertrophy and remodeling, which can contribute to heart failure.
6. The RAS can be modulated by various medications, such as ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and aldosterone antagonists, which are commonly used to treat hypertension, heart failure, and kidney diseases.

Blood volume refers to the total amount of blood present in an individual's circulatory system at any given time. It is the combined volume of both the plasma (the liquid component of blood) and the formed elements (such as red and white blood cells and platelets) in the blood. In a healthy adult human, the average blood volume is approximately 5 liters (or about 1 gallon). However, blood volume can vary depending on several factors, including age, sex, body weight, and overall health status.

Blood volume plays a critical role in maintaining proper cardiovascular function, as it affects blood pressure, heart rate, and the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues throughout the body. Changes in blood volume can have significant impacts on an individual's health and may be associated with various medical conditions, such as dehydration, hemorrhage, heart failure, and liver disease. Accurate measurement of blood volume is essential for diagnosing and managing these conditions, as well as for guiding treatment decisions in clinical settings.

Arginine vasopressin (AVP), also known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH), is a hormone produced in the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior pituitary gland. It plays a crucial role in regulating water balance and blood pressure in the body.

AVP acts on the kidneys to promote water reabsorption, which helps maintain adequate fluid volume and osmotic balance in the body. It also constricts blood vessels, increasing peripheral vascular resistance and thereby helping to maintain blood pressure. Additionally, AVP has been shown to have effects on cognitive function, mood regulation, and pain perception.

Deficiencies or excesses of AVP can lead to a range of medical conditions, including diabetes insipidus (characterized by excessive thirst and urination), hyponatremia (low sodium levels in the blood), and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH).

Hypertension is a medical term used to describe abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries, often defined as consistently having systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) over 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) over 80 mmHg. It is also commonly referred to as high blood pressure.

Hypertension can be classified into two types: primary or essential hypertension, which has no identifiable cause and accounts for about 95% of cases, and secondary hypertension, which is caused by underlying medical conditions such as kidney disease, hormonal disorders, or use of certain medications.

If left untreated, hypertension can lead to serious health complications such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, it is important for individuals with hypertension to manage their condition through lifestyle modifications (such as healthy diet, regular exercise, stress management) and medication if necessary, under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Protein precursors, also known as proproteins or prohormones, are inactive forms of proteins that undergo post-translational modification to become active. These modifications typically include cleavage of the precursor protein by specific enzymes, resulting in the release of the active protein. This process allows for the regulation and control of protein activity within the body. Protein precursors can be found in various biological processes, including the endocrine system where they serve as inactive hormones that can be converted into their active forms when needed.

Norepinephrine, also known as noradrenaline, is a neurotransmitter and a hormone that is primarily produced in the adrenal glands and is released into the bloodstream in response to stress or physical activity. It plays a crucial role in the "fight-or-flight" response by preparing the body for action through increasing heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and glucose availability.

As a neurotransmitter, norepinephrine is involved in regulating various functions of the nervous system, including attention, perception, motivation, and arousal. It also plays a role in modulating pain perception and responding to stressful or emotional situations.

In medical settings, norepinephrine is used as a vasopressor medication to treat hypotension (low blood pressure) that can occur during septic shock, anesthesia, or other critical illnesses. It works by constricting blood vessels and increasing heart rate, which helps to improve blood pressure and perfusion of vital organs.

Cardiac myocytes are the muscle cells that make up the heart muscle, also known as the myocardium. These specialized cells are responsible for contracting and relaxing in a coordinated manner to pump blood throughout the body. They differ from skeletal muscle cells in several ways, including their ability to generate their own electrical impulses, which allows the heart to function as an independent rhythmical pump. Cardiac myocytes contain sarcomeres, the contractile units of the muscle, and are connected to each other by intercalated discs that help coordinate contraction and ensure the synchronous beating of the heart.

Renal circulation refers to the blood flow specifically dedicated to the kidneys. The main function of the kidneys is to filter waste and excess fluids from the blood, which then get excreted as urine. To perform this function efficiently, the kidneys receive a substantial amount of the body's total blood supply - about 20-25% in a resting state.

The renal circulation process begins when deoxygenated blood from the rest of the body returns to the right side of the heart and is pumped into the lungs for oxygenation. Oxygen-rich blood then leaves the left side of the heart through the aorta, the largest artery in the body.

A portion of this oxygen-rich blood moves into the renal arteries, which branch directly from the aorta and supply each kidney with blood. Within the kidneys, these arteries divide further into smaller vessels called afferent arterioles, which feed into a network of tiny capillaries called the glomerulus within each nephron (the functional unit of the kidney).

The filtration process occurs in the glomeruli, where waste materials and excess fluids are separated from the blood. The resulting filtrate then moves through another set of capillaries, the peritubular capillaries, which surround the renal tubules (the part of the nephron that reabsorbs necessary substances back into the bloodstream).

The now-deoxygenated blood from the kidneys' capillary network coalesces into venules and then merges into the renal veins, which ultimately drain into the inferior vena cava and return the blood to the right side of the heart. This highly specialized circulation system allows the kidneys to efficiently filter waste while maintaining appropriate blood volume and composition.

Hormones are defined as chemical messengers that are produced by endocrine glands or specialized cells and are transported through the bloodstream to tissues and organs, where they elicit specific responses. They play crucial roles in regulating various physiological processes such as growth, development, metabolism, reproduction, and mood. Examples of hormones include insulin, estrogen, testosterone, adrenaline, and thyroxine.

GATA4 is a transcription factor that belongs to the GATA family of zinc finger proteins, which are characterized by their ability to bind to DNA sequences containing the core motif (A/T)GATA(A/G). GATA4 specifically recognizes and binds to GATA motifs in the promoter and enhancer regions of target genes, where it can modulate their transcription.

GATA4 is widely expressed in various tissues, including the heart, gut, lungs, and gonads. In the heart, GATA4 plays critical roles during cardiac development, such as promoting cardiomyocyte differentiation and regulating heart tube formation. It also continues to be expressed in adult hearts, where it helps maintain cardiac function and can contribute to heart repair after injury.

Mutations in the GATA4 gene have been associated with congenital heart defects, suggesting its essential role in heart development. Additionally, GATA4 has been implicated in cancer progression, particularly in gastrointestinal and lung cancers, where it can act as an oncogene by promoting cell proliferation and survival.

Hematocrit is a medical term that refers to the percentage of total blood volume that is made up of red blood cells. It is typically measured as part of a complete blood count (CBC) test. A high hematocrit may indicate conditions such as dehydration, polycythemia, or living at high altitudes, while a low hematocrit may be a sign of anemia, bleeding, or overhydration. It is important to note that hematocrit values can vary depending on factors such as age, gender, and pregnancy status.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Hypotension is a medical term that refers to abnormally low blood pressure, usually defined as a systolic blood pressure less than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or a diastolic blood pressure less than 60 mm Hg. Blood pressure is the force exerted by the blood against the walls of the blood vessels as the heart pumps blood.

Hypotension can cause symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, weakness, and fainting, especially when standing up suddenly. In severe cases, hypotension can lead to shock, which is a life-threatening condition characterized by multiple organ failure due to inadequate blood flow.

Hypotension can be caused by various factors, including certain medications, medical conditions such as heart disease, endocrine disorders, and dehydration. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience symptoms of hypotension, as it can indicate an underlying health issue that requires treatment.

Endothelin is a type of peptide (small protein) that is produced by the endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels. Endothelins are known to be potent vasoconstrictors, meaning they cause the narrowing of blood vessels, and thus increase blood pressure. There are three major types of endothelin molecules, known as Endothelin-1, Endothelin-2, and Endothelin-3. These endothelins bind to specific receptors (ETA, ETB) on the surface of smooth muscle cells in the blood vessel walls, leading to contraction and subsequent vasoconstriction. Additionally, endothelins have been implicated in various physiological and pathophysiological processes such as regulation of cell growth, inflammation, and fibrosis.

Heart rate is the number of heartbeats per unit of time, often expressed as beats per minute (bpm). It can vary significantly depending on factors such as age, physical fitness, emotions, and overall health status. A resting heart rate between 60-100 bpm is generally considered normal for adults, but athletes and individuals with high levels of physical fitness may have a resting heart rate below 60 bpm due to their enhanced cardiovascular efficiency. Monitoring heart rate can provide valuable insights into an individual's health status, exercise intensity, and response to various treatments or interventions.

Consciousness is a complex and multifaceted concept that is difficult to define succinctly, but in a medical or neurological context, it generally refers to an individual's state of awareness and responsiveness to their surroundings. Consciousness involves a range of cognitive processes, including perception, thinking, memory, and attention, and it requires the integration of sensory information, language, and higher-order cognitive functions.

In medical terms, consciousness is often assessed using measures such as the Glasgow Coma Scale, which evaluates an individual's ability to open their eyes, speak, and move in response to stimuli. A coma is a state of deep unconsciousness where an individual is unable to respond to stimuli or communicate, while a vegetative state is a condition where an individual may have sleep-wake cycles and some automatic responses but lacks any meaningful awareness or cognitive function.

Disorders of consciousness can result from brain injury, trauma, infection, or other medical conditions that affect the functioning of the brainstem or cerebral cortex. The study of consciousness is a rapidly evolving field that involves researchers from various disciplines, including neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and artificial intelligence.

The adrenal cortex is the outer portion of the adrenal gland, which is located on top of the kidneys. It plays a crucial role in producing hormones that are essential for various bodily functions. The adrenal cortex is divided into three zones:

1. Zona glomerulosa: This outermost zone produces mineralocorticoids, primarily aldosterone. Aldosterone helps regulate sodium and potassium balance and thus influences blood pressure by controlling the amount of fluid in the body.
2. Zona fasciculata: The middle layer is responsible for producing glucocorticoids, with cortisol being the most important one. Cortisol regulates metabolism, helps manage stress responses, and has anti-inflammatory properties. It also plays a role in blood sugar regulation and maintaining the body's response to injury and illness.
3. Zona reticularis: The innermost zone produces androgens, primarily dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate form (DHEAS). These androgens are weak compared to those produced by the gonads (ovaries or testes), but they can be converted into more potent androgens or estrogens in peripheral tissues.

Disorders related to the adrenal cortex can lead to hormonal imbalances, affecting various bodily functions. Examples include Addison's disease (insufficient adrenal cortical hormone production) and Cushing's syndrome (excessive glucocorticoid levels).

Vascular resistance is a measure of the opposition to blood flow within a vessel or a group of vessels, typically expressed in units of mmHg/(mL/min) or sometimes as dynes*sec/cm^5. It is determined by the diameter and length of the vessels, as well as the viscosity of the blood flowing through them. In general, a decrease in vessel diameter, an increase in vessel length, or an increase in blood viscosity will result in an increase in vascular resistance, while an increase in vessel diameter, a decrease in vessel length, or a decrease in blood viscosity will result in a decrease in vascular resistance. Vascular resistance is an important concept in the study of circulation and cardiovascular physiology because it plays a key role in determining blood pressure and blood flow within the body.

Muscle proteins are a type of protein that are found in muscle tissue and are responsible for providing structure, strength, and functionality to muscles. The two major types of muscle proteins are:

1. Contractile proteins: These include actin and myosin, which are responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscles. They work together to cause muscle movement by sliding along each other and shortening the muscle fibers.
2. Structural proteins: These include titin, nebulin, and desmin, which provide structural support and stability to muscle fibers. Titin is the largest protein in the human body and acts as a molecular spring that helps maintain the integrity of the sarcomere (the basic unit of muscle contraction). Nebulin helps regulate the length of the sarcomere, while desmin forms a network of filaments that connects adjacent muscle fibers together.

Overall, muscle proteins play a critical role in maintaining muscle health and function, and their dysregulation can lead to various muscle-related disorders such as muscular dystrophy, myopathies, and sarcopenia.

Hypertrophy, in the context of physiology and pathology, refers to an increase in the size of an organ or tissue due to an enlargement of its constituent cells. It is often used to describe the growth of muscle cells (myocytes) in response to increased workload or hormonal stimulation, resulting in an increase in muscle mass. However, hypertrophy can also occur in other organs such as the heart (cardiac hypertrophy) in response to high blood pressure or valvular heart disease.

It is important to note that while hypertrophy involves an increase in cell size, hyperplasia refers to an increase in cell number. In some cases, both hypertrophy and hyperplasia can occur together, leading to a significant increase in the overall size and function of the organ or tissue.

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. The glomeruli are the tiny fibers in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood. A lower GFR number means that the kidneys aren't working properly and may indicate kidney disease.

The GFR is typically calculated using a formula that takes into account the patient's serum creatinine level, age, sex, and race. The most commonly used formula is the CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) equation. A normal GFR is usually above 90 mL/min/1.73m2, but this can vary depending on the individual's age and other factors.

Diuretics are a type of medication that increase the production of urine and help the body eliminate excess fluid and salt. They work by interfering with the reabsorption of sodium in the kidney tubules, which in turn causes more water to be excreted from the body. Diuretics are commonly used to treat conditions such as high blood pressure, heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and kidney disease. There are several types of diuretics, including loop diuretics, thiazide diuretics, potassium-sparing diuretics, and osmotic diuretics, each with its own mechanism of action and potential side effects. It is important to use diuretics under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can interact with other medications and have an impact on electrolyte balance in the body.

Dietary sodium is a mineral that is primarily found in table salt (sodium chloride) and many processed foods. It is an essential nutrient for human health, playing a crucial role in maintaining fluid balance, transmitting nerve impulses, and regulating muscle contractions. However, consuming too much dietary sodium can increase blood pressure and contribute to the development of hypertension, heart disease, stroke, and kidney problems.

The recommended daily intake of dietary sodium is less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) per day for most adults, but the American Heart Association recommends no more than 1,500 mg per day for optimal heart health. It's important to note that many processed and restaurant foods contain high levels of sodium, so it's essential to read food labels and choose fresh, whole foods whenever possible to help limit dietary sodium intake.

"Newborn animals" refers to the very young offspring of animals that have recently been born. In medical terminology, newborns are often referred to as "neonates," and they are classified as such from birth until about 28 days of age. During this time period, newborn animals are particularly vulnerable and require close monitoring and care to ensure their survival and healthy development.

The specific needs of newborn animals can vary widely depending on the species, but generally, they require warmth, nutrition, hydration, and protection from harm. In many cases, newborns are unable to regulate their own body temperature or feed themselves, so they rely heavily on their mothers for care and support.

In medical settings, newborn animals may be examined and treated by veterinarians to ensure that they are healthy and receiving the care they need. This can include providing medical interventions such as feeding tubes, antibiotics, or other treatments as needed to address any health issues that arise. Overall, the care and support of newborn animals is an important aspect of animal medicine and conservation efforts.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

The aorta is the largest artery in the human body, which originates from the left ventricle of the heart and carries oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. It can be divided into several parts, including the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. The ascending aorta gives rise to the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. The aortic arch gives rise to the brachiocephalic, left common carotid, and left subclavian arteries, which supply blood to the head, neck, and upper extremities. The descending aorta travels through the thorax and abdomen, giving rise to various intercostal, visceral, and renal arteries that supply blood to the chest wall, organs, and kidneys.

Myosin Heavy Chains are the large, essential components of myosin molecules, which are responsible for the molecular motility in muscle cells. These heavy chains have a molecular weight of approximately 200 kDa and form the motor domain of myosin, which binds to actin filaments and hydrolyzes ATP to generate force and movement during muscle contraction. There are several different types of myosin heavy chains, each with specific roles in various tissues and cellular functions. In skeletal and cardiac muscles, for example, myosin heavy chains have distinct isoforms that contribute to the contractile properties of these tissues.

3',5'-Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterases are a group of enzymes that play a role in regulating the levels of cGMP, an important intracellular signaling molecule involved in various biological processes. These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of cGMP to 5'-GMP, thereby terminating cGMP-mediated signals within cells.

There are several isoforms of cGMP phosphodiesterases, which differ in their regulatory properties, substrate specificity, and cellular distribution. These enzymes can be activated or inhibited by various factors, including drugs, hormones, and neurotransmitters, and play a crucial role in modulating the activity of cGMP-dependent signaling pathways in different tissues and organs.

Dysregulation of cGMP phosphodiesterase activity has been implicated in various diseases, including cardiovascular disorders, pulmonary hypertension, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Therefore, these enzymes are considered important targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of these conditions.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Vasopressin, also known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH), is a hormone that helps regulate water balance in the body. It is produced by the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior pituitary gland. When the body is dehydrated or experiencing low blood pressure, vasopressin is released into the bloodstream, where it causes the kidneys to decrease the amount of urine they produce and helps to constrict blood vessels, thereby increasing blood pressure. This helps to maintain adequate fluid volume in the body and ensure that vital organs receive an adequate supply of oxygen-rich blood. In addition to its role in water balance and blood pressure regulation, vasopressin also plays a role in social behaviors such as pair bonding and trust.

Endothelin-1 is a small peptide (21 amino acids) and a potent vasoconstrictor, which means it narrows blood vessels. It is primarily produced by the endothelial cells that line the interior surface of blood vessels. Endothelin-1 plays a crucial role in regulating vascular tone, cell growth, and inflammation. Its dysregulation has been implicated in various cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and heart failure. It exerts its effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors (ETA and ETB) on the surface of target cells.

Hyponatremia is a condition characterized by abnormally low sodium levels in the blood, specifically levels less than 135 mEq/L. Sodium is an essential electrolyte that helps regulate water balance in and around your cells and plays a crucial role in nerve and muscle function. Hyponatremia can occur due to various reasons, including certain medical conditions, medications, or excessive water intake leading to dilution of sodium in the body. Symptoms may range from mild, such as nausea, confusion, and headache, to severe, like seizures, coma, or even death in extreme cases. It's essential to seek medical attention if you suspect hyponatremia, as prompt diagnosis and treatment are vital for a favorable outcome.

Renovascular hypertension is a type of secondary hypertension (high blood pressure) that is caused by renal artery stenosis or narrowing. This condition reduces blood flow to the kidneys, leading to the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which causes an increase in peripheral vascular resistance and blood volume, resulting in hypertension.

Renovascular hypertension is often seen in people with atherosclerosis or fibromuscular dysplasia, which are the most common causes of renal artery stenosis. Other conditions that can lead to renovascular hypertension include vasculitis, blood clots, and compression of the renal artery by nearby structures.

Diagnosis of renovascular hypertension typically involves imaging studies such as duplex ultrasound, CT angiography, or magnetic resonance angiography to visualize the renal arteries and assess for stenosis. Treatment may involve medications to control blood pressure, lifestyle modifications, and procedures such as angioplasty and stenting to open up the narrowed renal artery. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to restore blood flow to the kidney.

In the context of medical definitions, "suspensions" typically refers to a preparation in which solid particles are suspended in a liquid medium. This is commonly used for medications that are administered orally, where the solid particles disperse upon shaking and settle back down when left undisturbed. The solid particles can be made up of various substances such as drugs, nutrients, or other active ingredients, while the liquid medium is often water, oil, or alcohol-based.

It's important to note that "suspensions" in a medical context should not be confused with the term as it relates to pharmacology or physiology, where it may refer to the temporary stopping of a bodily function or the removal of something from a solution through settling or filtration.

Rh isoimmunization is a condition that occurs when an Rh-negative individual (usually a woman) develops an immune response to the Rh-positive blood of another individual (usually a fetus during pregnancy or a transfused blood). The Rh-negative person's immune system recognizes the Rh-positive blood as foreign and produces antibodies against it. This sensitization can lead to hemolytic disease of the newborn if the mother becomes pregnant with another Rh-positive fetus, as the maternal antibodies can cross the placenta and attack the fetal red blood cells, potentially causing anemia, jaundice, or more severe complications.

The first exposure to Rh-positive blood typically does not cause a significant reaction because the mother's immune system has not yet produced enough antibodies. However, subsequent exposures can lead to increasingly severe reactions due to the presence of pre-existing antibodies. Preventive measures such as administering Rh immunoglobulin (RhIg) to Rh-negative women during pregnancy and after delivery help prevent sensitization and reduce the risk of hemolytic disease of the newborn.

Desoxycorticosterone (also known as desoxycorticosterone or DCZ) is a natural steroid hormone produced by the adrenal gland. It is a weak glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid, which means it has some effects on blood sugar metabolism and regulates electrolyte and fluid balance in the body.

Desoxycorticosterone is used as a medication in the form of its synthetic acetate ester, desoxycorticosterone acetate (DCA), to treat Addison's disease, a condition in which the adrenal glands do not produce enough steroid hormones. DCA helps to replace the missing mineralocorticoid activity and prevent the symptoms of low blood pressure, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalances associated with Addison's disease.

It is important to note that desoxycorticosterone should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as it can have significant side effects if not properly monitored.

nitroprusside (ni-troe-rus-ide)

A rapid-acting vasodilator used in the management of severe hypertension, acute heart failure, and to reduce afterload in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. It is a potent arterial and venous dilator that decreases preload and afterload, thereby reducing myocardial oxygen demand. Nitroprusside is metabolized to cyanide, which must be monitored closely during therapy to prevent toxicity.

Pharmacologic class: Peripheral vasodilators

Therapeutic class: Antihypertensives, Vasodilators

Medical Categories: Cardiovascular Drugs, Hypertension Agents

Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a type of heart muscle disorder characterized by impaired relaxation and filling of the lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles), leading to reduced pump function. This is caused by stiffening or rigidity of the heart muscle, often due to fibrosis or scarring. The stiffness prevents the ventricles from filling properly with blood during the diastolic phase, which can result in symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and fluid retention.

RCM is a less common form of cardiomyopathy compared to dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. It can be idiopathic (no known cause) or secondary to other conditions like amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, or storage diseases. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, echocardiography, and sometimes cardiac MRI or biopsy. Treatment is focused on managing symptoms and addressing underlying causes when possible.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

A smooth muscle within the vascular system refers to the involuntary, innervated muscle that is found in the walls of blood vessels. These muscles are responsible for controlling the diameter of the blood vessels, which in turn regulates blood flow and blood pressure. They are called "smooth" muscles because their individual muscle cells do not have the striations, or cross-striped patterns, that are observed in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. Smooth muscle in the vascular system is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and by hormones, and can contract or relax slowly over a period of time.

A chemical sympathectomy is a medical procedure that involves the use of chemicals to interrupt the function of the sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system is a part of the autonomic nervous system that regulates various involuntary physiological responses, such as heart rate, blood pressure, and sweating.

In a chemical sympathectomy, an anesthetic or neurolytic agent is injected into or around the sympathetic nerve trunks to block the transmission of nerve impulses. This procedure can be performed to treat various medical conditions, such as hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating), Raynaud's phenomenon, and certain types of pain.

The effects of a chemical sympathectomy are usually temporary, lasting several months to a year or more, depending on the type of agent used and the specific technique employed. Potential complications of this procedure include nerve damage, bleeding, infection, and puncture of surrounding organs.

Cardiac output is a measure of the amount of blood that is pumped by the heart in one minute. It is defined as the product of stroke volume (the amount of blood pumped by the left ventricle during each contraction) and heart rate (the number of contractions per minute). Normal cardiac output at rest for an average-sized adult is about 5 to 6 liters per minute. Cardiac output can be increased during exercise or other conditions that require more blood flow, such as during illness or injury. It can be measured noninvasively using techniques such as echocardiography or invasively through a catheter placed in the heart.

Enalaprilat is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors. It is the active metabolite of Enalapril. Enalaprilat works by blocking the action of angiotensin-converting enzyme, which helps to relax and widen blood vessels, thereby reducing blood pressure and increasing blood flow.

Enalaprilat is primarily used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), heart failure, and to improve survival after a heart attack. It is administered intravenously in a hospital setting, and its effects are usually seen within 15 minutes of administration. Common side effects of Enalaprilat include hypotension (low blood pressure), dizziness, headache, and nausea.

The Sella Turcica, also known as the Turkish saddle, is a depression or fossa in the sphenoid bone located at the base of the skull. It forms a housing for the pituitary gland, which is a small endocrine gland often referred to as the "master gland" because it controls other glands and makes several essential hormones. The Sella Turcica has a saddle-like shape, with its anterior and posterior clinoids forming the front and back of the saddle, respectively. This region is of significant interest in neuroimaging and clinical settings, as various conditions such as pituitary tumors or other abnormalities may affect the size, shape, and integrity of the Sella Turcica.

Intravenous (IV) infusion is a medical procedure in which liquids, such as medications, nutrients, or fluids, are delivered directly into a patient's vein through a needle or a catheter. This route of administration allows for rapid absorption and distribution of the infused substance throughout the body. IV infusions can be used for various purposes, including resuscitation, hydration, nutrition support, medication delivery, and blood product transfusion. The rate and volume of the infusion are carefully controlled to ensure patient safety and efficacy of treatment.

"Competitive binding" is a term used in pharmacology and biochemistry to describe the behavior of two or more molecules (ligands) competing for the same binding site on a target protein or receptor. In this context, "binding" refers to the physical interaction between a ligand and its target.

When a ligand binds to a receptor, it can alter the receptor's function, either activating or inhibiting it. If multiple ligands compete for the same binding site, they will compete to bind to the receptor. The ability of each ligand to bind to the receptor is influenced by its affinity for the receptor, which is a measure of how strongly and specifically the ligand binds to the receptor.

In competitive binding, if one ligand is present in high concentrations, it can prevent other ligands with lower affinity from binding to the receptor. This is because the higher-affinity ligand will have a greater probability of occupying the binding site and blocking access to the other ligands. The competition between ligands can be described mathematically using equations such as the Langmuir isotherm, which describes the relationship between the concentration of ligand and the fraction of receptors that are occupied by the ligand.

Competitive binding is an important concept in drug development, as it can be used to predict how different drugs will interact with their targets and how they may affect each other's activity. By understanding the competitive binding properties of a drug, researchers can optimize its dosage and delivery to maximize its therapeutic effect while minimizing unwanted side effects.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a type of cardiomyopathy characterized by the enlargement and weakened contraction of the heart's main pumping chamber (the left ventricle). This enlargement and weakness can lead to symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and fluid retention. DCM can be caused by various factors including genetics, viral infections, alcohol and drug abuse, and other medical conditions like high blood pressure and diabetes. It is important to note that this condition can lead to heart failure if left untreated.

An exchange transfusion of whole blood is a medical procedure in which a patient's blood is gradually replaced with donor whole blood. This procedure is typically performed in newborns or infants who have severe jaundice caused by excessive levels of bilirubin, a yellowish pigment that forms when hemoglobin from red blood cells breaks down.

During an exchange transfusion, the baby's blood is removed through a vein or artery and replaced with donor whole blood through another vein or artery. The process is repeated several times until a significant portion of the baby's blood has been exchanged with donor blood. This helps to reduce the levels of bilirubin in the baby's blood, which can help prevent or treat brain damage caused by excessive bilirubin.

Exchange transfusions are typically performed in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and require close monitoring by a team of healthcare professionals. The procedure carries some risks, including infection, bleeding, and changes in blood pressure or heart rate. However, it can be a lifesaving treatment for newborns with severe jaundice who are at risk of developing serious complications.

Cell size refers to the volume or spatial dimensions of a cell, which can vary widely depending on the type and function of the cell. In general, eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus) tend to be larger than prokaryotic cells (cells without a true nucleus). The size of a cell is determined by various factors such as genetic makeup, the cell's role in the organism, and its environment.

The study of cell size and its relationship to cell function is an active area of research in biology, with implications for our understanding of cellular processes, evolution, and disease. For example, changes in cell size have been linked to various pathological conditions, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, measuring and analyzing cell size can provide valuable insights into the health and function of cells and tissues.

Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a medical condition in which the left ventricle of the heart undergoes an enlargement or thickening of its muscle wall. The left ventricle is the main pumping chamber of the heart that supplies oxygenated blood to the rest of the body.

In response to increased workload, such as hypertension (high blood pressure), aortic valve stenosis, or athletic training, the left ventricular muscle may thicken and enlarge. This process is called "hypertrophy." While some degree of hypertrophy can be adaptive in athletes, significant or excessive hypertrophy can lead to impaired relaxation and filling of the left ventricle during diastole, reduced pumping capacity, and decreased compliance of the chamber.

Left ventricular hypertrophy is often asymptomatic initially but can increase the risk of various cardiovascular complications such as heart failure, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction (heart attack), and sudden cardiac death over time. It is typically diagnosed through imaging techniques like echocardiography or cardiac MRI and confirmed by measuring the thickness of the left ventricular wall.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

Pressoreceptors are specialized sensory nerve endings found in the walls of blood vessels, particularly in the carotid sinus and aortic arch. They respond to changes in blood pressure by converting the mechanical stimulus into electrical signals that are transmitted to the brain. This information helps regulate cardiovascular function and maintain blood pressure homeostasis.

Myocardial contraction refers to the rhythmic and forceful shortening of heart muscle cells (myocytes) in the myocardium, which is the muscular wall of the heart. This process is initiated by electrical signals generated by the sinoatrial node, causing a wave of depolarization that spreads throughout the heart.

During myocardial contraction, calcium ions flow into the myocytes, triggering the interaction between actin and myosin filaments, which are the contractile proteins in the muscle cells. This interaction causes the myofilaments to slide past each other, resulting in the shortening of the sarcomeres (the functional units of muscle contraction) and ultimately leading to the contraction of the heart muscle.

Myocardial contraction is essential for pumping blood throughout the body and maintaining adequate circulation to vital organs. Any impairment in myocardial contractility can lead to various cardiac disorders, such as heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias.

Ventricular remodeling is a structural adaptation process of the heart in response to stress or injury, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack) or pressure overload. This process involves changes in size, shape, and function of the ventricles (the lower chambers of the heart).

In ventricular remodeling, the heart muscle may thicken, enlarge, or become more stiff, leading to alterations in the pumping ability of the heart. These changes can ultimately result in cardiac dysfunction, heart failure, and an increased risk of arrhythmias (irregular heart rhythms).

Ventricular remodeling is often classified into two types:

1. Concentric remodeling: This occurs when the ventricular wall thickens (hypertrophy) without a significant increase in chamber size, leading to a decrease in the cavity volume and an increase in the thickness of the ventricular wall.
2. Eccentric remodeling: This involves an increase in both the ventricular chamber size and wall thickness due to the addition of new muscle cells (hyperplasia) or enlargement of existing muscle cells (hypertrophy). As a result, the overall shape of the ventricle becomes more spherical and less elliptical.

Both types of remodeling can negatively impact heart function and contribute to the development of heart failure. Close monitoring and appropriate treatment are essential for managing ventricular remodeling and preventing further complications.

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a key secondary messenger in many biological processes, including the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cellular excitability. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase and is degraded by the enzyme phosphodiesterase.

In the body, cAMP plays a crucial role in mediating the effects of hormones and neurotransmitters on target cells. For example, when a hormone binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, it can activate a G protein, which in turn activates adenylyl cyclase to produce cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then activate various effector proteins, such as protein kinases, which go on to regulate various cellular processes.

Overall, the regulation of cAMP levels is critical for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and abnormalities in cAMP signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Second messenger systems are a type of intracellular signaling pathway that allows cells to respond to external signals, such as hormones and neurotransmitters. When an extracellular signal binds to a specific receptor on the cell membrane, it activates a G-protein or an enzyme associated with the receptor. This activation leads to the production of a second messenger molecule inside the cell, which then propagates the signal and triggers various intracellular responses.

Examples of second messengers include cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), inositol trisphosphate (IP3), diacylglycerol (DAG), and calcium ions (Ca2+). These second messengers activate or inhibit various downstream effectors, such as protein kinases, ion channels, and gene transcription factors, leading to changes in cellular functions, such as metabolism, gene expression, cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis.

Second messenger systems play crucial roles in many physiological processes, including sensory perception, neurotransmission, hormonal regulation, immune response, and development. Dysregulation of these systems can contribute to various diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders.

Urination, also known as micturition, is the physiological process of excreting urine from the urinary bladder through the urethra. It is a complex process that involves several systems in the body, including the urinary system, nervous system, and muscular system.

In medical terms, urination is defined as the voluntary or involuntary discharge of urine from the urethra, which is the final pathway for the elimination of waste products from the body. The process is regulated by a complex interplay between the detrusor muscle of the bladder, the internal and external sphincters of the urethra, and the nervous system.

During urination, the detrusor muscle contracts, causing the bladder to empty, while the sphincters relax to allow the urine to flow through the urethra and out of the body. The nervous system plays a crucial role in coordinating these actions, with sensory receptors in the bladder sending signals to the brain when it is time to urinate.

Urination is essential for maintaining the balance of fluids and electrolytes in the body, as well as eliminating waste products such as urea, creatinine, and other metabolic byproducts. Abnormalities in urination can indicate underlying medical conditions, such as urinary tract infections, bladder dysfunction, or neurological disorders.

Organ size refers to the volume or physical measurement of an organ in the body of an individual. It can be described in terms of length, width, and height or by using specialized techniques such as imaging studies (like CT scans or MRIs) to determine the volume. The size of an organ can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, body size, and overall health status. Changes in organ size may indicate various medical conditions, including growths, inflammation, or atrophy.

A nephron is the basic structural and functional unit of the kidney. It is responsible for filtering blood, reabsorbing necessary substances, and excreting waste products into the urine. Each human kidney contains approximately one million nephrons.

The structure of a nephron includes a glomerulus, which is a tuft of capillaries surrounded by Bowman's capsule. The glomerulus filters blood, allowing small molecules like water and solutes to pass through while keeping larger molecules like proteins and blood cells within the capillaries.

The filtrate then passes through the tubular portion of the nephron, which includes the proximal convoluted tubule, loop of Henle, distal convoluted tubule, and collecting duct. The tubular portion reabsorbs necessary substances like water, glucose, amino acids, and electrolytes back into the bloodstream while excreting waste products like urea and creatinine into the urine.

Overall, nephrons play a critical role in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance, regulating blood pressure, and removing waste products from the body.

The thoracic aorta is the segment of the largest artery in the human body (the aorta) that runs through the chest region (thorax). The thoracic aorta begins at the aortic arch, where it branches off from the ascending aorta, and extends down to the diaphragm, where it becomes the abdominal aorta.

The thoracic aorta is divided into three parts: the ascending aorta, the aortic arch, and the descending aorta. The ascending aorta rises from the left ventricle of the heart and is about 2 inches (5 centimeters) long. The aortic arch curves backward and to the left, giving rise to the brachiocephalic trunk, the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery. The descending thoracic aorta runs downward through the chest, passing through the diaphragm to become the abdominal aorta.

The thoracic aorta supplies oxygenated blood to the upper body, including the head, neck, arms, and chest. It plays a critical role in maintaining blood flow and pressure throughout the body.

A spinal puncture, also known as a lumbar puncture or a spinal tap, is a medical procedure in which a thin, hollow needle is inserted between two vertebrae in the lower back to extract cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the subarachnoid space. This procedure is typically performed to diagnose conditions affecting the central nervous system, such as meningitis, encephalitis, or subarachnoid hemorrhage, by analyzing the CSF for cells, chemicals, bacteria, or viruses. Additionally, spinal punctures can be used to administer medications or anesthetics directly into the CSF space, such as in the case of epidural anesthesia during childbirth.

The medical definition of a spinal puncture is: "A diagnostic and therapeutic procedure that involves introducing a thin needle into the subarachnoid space, typically at the lumbar level, to collect cerebrospinal fluid or administer medications."

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Water-electrolyte balance refers to the regulation of water and electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate) in the body to maintain homeostasis. This is crucial for various bodily functions such as nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, fluid balance, and pH regulation. The body maintains this balance through mechanisms that control water intake, excretion, and electrolyte concentration in various body fluids like blood and extracellular fluid. Disruptions in water-electrolyte balance can lead to dehydration or overhydration, and imbalances in electrolytes can cause conditions such as hyponatremia (low sodium levels) or hyperkalemia (high potassium levels).

Affinity labels are chemical probes or reagents that can selectively and covalently bind to a specific protein or biomolecule based on its biological function or activity. These labels contain a functional group that interacts with the target molecule, often through non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, van der Waals forces, or ionic bonds. Once bound, the label then forms a covalent bond with the target molecule, allowing for its isolation and further study.

Affinity labels are commonly used in biochemistry and molecular biology research to identify and characterize specific proteins, enzymes, or receptors. They can be designed to bind to specific active sites, binding pockets, or other functional regions of a protein, allowing researchers to study the structure-function relationships of these molecules.

One example of an affinity label is a substrate analogue that contains a chemically reactive group. This type of affinity label can be used to identify and characterize enzymes by binding to their active sites and forming a covalent bond with the enzyme. The labeled enzyme can then be purified and analyzed to determine its structure, function, and mechanism of action.

Overall, affinity labels are valuable tools for studying the properties and functions of biological molecules in vitro and in vivo.

Vasodilation is the widening or increase in diameter of blood vessels, particularly the involuntary relaxation of the smooth muscle in the tunica media (middle layer) of the arteriole walls. This results in an increase in blood flow and a decrease in vascular resistance. Vasodilation can occur due to various physiological and pathophysiological stimuli, such as local metabolic demands, neural signals, or pharmacological agents. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure, tissue perfusion, and thermoregulation.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Osmolar concentration is a measure of the total number of solute particles (such as ions or molecules) dissolved in a solution per liter of solvent (usually water), which affects the osmotic pressure. It is expressed in units of osmoles per liter (osmol/L). Osmolarity and osmolality are related concepts, with osmolarity referring to the number of osmoles per unit volume of solution, typically measured in liters, while osmolality refers to the number of osmoles per kilogram of solvent. In clinical contexts, osmolar concentration is often used to describe the solute concentration of bodily fluids such as blood or urine.

Echocardiography is a medical procedure that uses sound waves to produce detailed images of the heart's structure, function, and motion. It is a non-invasive test that can help diagnose various heart conditions, such as valve problems, heart muscle damage, blood clots, and congenital heart defects.

During an echocardiogram, a transducer (a device that sends and receives sound waves) is placed on the chest or passed through the esophagus to obtain images of the heart. The sound waves produced by the transducer bounce off the heart structures and return to the transducer, which then converts them into electrical signals that are processed to create images of the heart.

There are several types of echocardiograms, including:

* Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE): This is the most common type of echocardiogram and involves placing the transducer on the chest.
* Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE): This type of echocardiogram involves passing a specialized transducer through the esophagus to obtain images of the heart from a closer proximity.
* Stress echocardiography: This type of echocardiogram is performed during exercise or medication-induced stress to assess how the heart functions under stress.
* Doppler echocardiography: This type of echocardiogram uses sound waves to measure blood flow and velocity in the heart and blood vessels.

Echocardiography is a valuable tool for diagnosing and managing various heart conditions, as it provides detailed information about the structure and function of the heart. It is generally safe, non-invasive, and painless, making it a popular choice for doctors and patients alike.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine is a chemical compound that belongs to the class of xanthines. It is a methylated derivative of xanthine and is commonly found in some types of tea, coffee, and chocolate. This compound acts as a non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, which means it can increase the levels of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) by preventing its breakdown.

In medical terms, 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine is often used as a bronchodilator and a stimulant of central nervous system. It is also known to have diuretic properties. This compound is sometimes used in the treatment of asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and other respiratory disorders.

It's important to note that 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine can have side effects, including increased heart rate, blood pressure, and anxiety. It should be used under the supervision of a medical professional and its use should be carefully monitored to avoid potential adverse reactions.

Hydrops Fetalis is a serious condition characterized by the accumulation of excessive fluid in two or more fetal compartments, including the abdomen (ascites), around the heart (pericardial effusion), and/or within the lungs (pleural effusion). This accumulation can also affect the skin, causing it to become edematous. Hydrops Fetalis is often associated with various underlying causes, such as chromosomal abnormalities, congenital infections, genetic disorders, and structural defects that impair the fetus's ability to maintain fluid balance. In some cases, the cause may remain unknown. The prognosis for Hydrops Fetalis is generally poor, with a high mortality rate, although early detection and appropriate management can improve outcomes in certain situations.

A subarachnoid hemorrhage is a type of stroke that results from bleeding into the space surrounding the brain, specifically within the subarachnoid space which contains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This space is located between the arachnoid membrane and the pia mater, two of the three layers that make up the meninges, the protective covering of the brain and spinal cord.

The bleeding typically originates from a ruptured aneurysm, a weakened area in the wall of a cerebral artery, or less commonly from arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) or head trauma. The sudden influx of blood into the CSF-filled space can cause increased intracranial pressure, irritation to the brain, and vasospasms, leading to further ischemia and potential additional neurological damage.

Symptoms of a subarachnoid hemorrhage may include sudden onset of severe headache (often described as "the worst headache of my life"), neck stiffness, altered mental status, nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and focal neurological deficits. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent further complications and improve the chances of recovery.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Potassium is a essential mineral and an important electrolyte that is widely distributed in the human body. The majority of potassium in the body (approximately 98%) is found within cells, with the remaining 2% present in blood serum and other bodily fluids. Potassium plays a crucial role in various physiological processes, including:

1. Regulation of fluid balance and maintenance of normal blood pressure through its effects on vascular tone and sodium excretion.
2. Facilitation of nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction by participating in the generation and propagation of action potentials.
3. Protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and glycogen metabolism.
4. Regulation of acid-base balance through its role in buffering systems.

The normal serum potassium concentration ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 mEq/L (milliequivalents per liter) or mmol/L (millimoles per liter). Potassium levels outside this range can have significant clinical consequences, with both hypokalemia (low potassium levels) and hyperkalemia (high potassium levels) potentially leading to serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias, muscle weakness, and respiratory failure.

Potassium is primarily obtained through the diet, with rich sources including fruits (e.g., bananas, oranges, and apricots), vegetables (e.g., leafy greens, potatoes, and tomatoes), legumes, nuts, dairy products, and meat. In cases of deficiency or increased needs, potassium supplements may be recommended under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Pulmonary wedge pressure, also known as pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) or left heart filling pressure, is a measurement obtained during right heart catheterization. It reflects the pressure in the left atrium, which is an estimate of the diastolic pressure in the left ventricle. Normal PCWP ranges from 4 to 12 mmHg. Increased pulmonary wedge pressure can indicate heart failure or other cardiac disorders that affect the left side of the heart.

Antihypertensive agents are a class of medications used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). They work by reducing the force and rate of heart contractions, dilating blood vessels, or altering neurohormonal activation to lower blood pressure. Examples include diuretics, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, ARBs, calcium channel blockers, and direct vasodilators. These medications may be used alone or in combination to achieve optimal blood pressure control.

Isoproterenol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called beta-adrenergic agonists. Medically, it is defined as a synthetic catecholamine with both alpha and beta adrenergic receptor stimulating properties. It is primarily used as a bronchodilator to treat conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by relaxing the smooth muscles in the airways, thereby improving breathing.

Isoproterenol can also be used in the treatment of bradycardia (abnormally slow heart rate), cardiac arrest, and heart blocks by increasing the heart rate and contractility. However, due to its non-selective beta-agonist activity, it may cause various side effects such as tremors, palpitations, and increased blood pressure. Its use is now limited due to the availability of more selective and safer medications.

Transgenic mice are genetically modified rodents that have incorporated foreign DNA (exogenous DNA) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA technology, where a specific gene or genetic sequence of interest is isolated and then introduced into the mouse embryo. The resulting transgenic mice can then express the protein encoded by the foreign gene, allowing researchers to study its function in a living organism.

The process of creating transgenic mice usually involves microinjecting the exogenous DNA into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg, which is then implanted into a surrogate mother. The offspring that result from this procedure are screened for the presence of the foreign DNA, and those that carry the desired genetic modification are used to establish a transgenic mouse line.

Transgenic mice have been widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function, and test new therapies. They provide a valuable tool for understanding complex biological processes and developing new treatments for a variety of medical conditions.

The adrenal glands are a pair of endocrine glands that are located on top of the kidneys. Each gland has two parts: the outer cortex and the inner medulla. The adrenal cortex produces hormones such as cortisol, aldosterone, and androgens, which regulate metabolism, blood pressure, and other vital functions. The adrenal medulla produces catecholamines, including epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline), which help the body respond to stress by increasing heart rate, blood pressure, and alertness.

... (ANP) or atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a natriuretic peptide hormone secreted from the cardiac ... ANP is also called atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), atrial natriuretic hormone (ANH), cardionatrine, cardiodilatin (CDD), and ... Atrial+Natriuretic+Factor at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Human NPPA genome location ... Later, the substance was purified from heart tissue by several groups and named atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) or ANP. ANP is ...
... this work led to his discovery and isolation of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) alternately known as atrial natriuretic factor ... "Tissue fractionation studies on the relationship between an atrial natriuretic factor and specific atrial granules". Canadian ... de Bold, A. J. (1982). "Atrial natriuretic factor of the rat heart. Studies on isolation and properties". Proceedings of the ... de Bold, AJ (1985). "Atrial natriuretic factor: a hormone produced by the heart". Science. 230 (4727): 767-70. Bibcode:1985Sci ...
Hynynen, M.; Ilmarinen, R., Tikkanen, I., Fyhrquist, F. (1993). "Plasma atrial natriuretic factor during cold-induced diuresis ...
Ferri C, Piccoli A, Laurenti O, Bellini C, De Mattia G, Santucci A, Balsano F (March 1994). "Atrial natriuretic factor in ... there are no changes in perfusion or in atrial natriuretic peptide levels up until the very late stages of the disease, when ... Abordo EA, Thornalley PJ (August 1997). "Synthesis and secretion of tumour necrosis factor-alpha by human monocytic THP-1 cells ... several factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. Etiologically, four main causes are responsible for ...
Wyss, DF; Lahm, HW; Manneberg, M; Labhardt, AM (February 1991). "Anantin--a peptide antagonist of the atrial natriuretic factor ... a peptide antagonist of the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). II. Determination of the primary sequence by NMR on the basis of ...
There are three distinct atrial natriuretic factor receptors identified so far in mammals: natriuretic peptide receptors 1, 2, ... An atrial natriuretic peptide receptor is a receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide. NPRA and NPRB are linked to guanylyl ... Atrial+Natriuretic+Factor+Receptors at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) (Articles with ... where vascular smooth muscle will bind ANP released as a result of increasing right atrial pressure and will cause the walls of ...
The atrioventricular canal signaling cascade involves the atrial natriuretic factor gene (ANF). This gene is one of the first ... T-box transcription factor 2 Tbx2 is a transcription factor that is encoded by the Tbx2 gene on chromosome 17q21-22 in humans. ... T-box factor and NK2-homeobox factor binding element are involved in the repression of the atrioventricular canal without ... The molecule Tbx-2 is a transcription factor in the T box transcription factor family. Tbx2 helps form the outflow tract and ...
It is associated with accumulation of the protein atrial natriuretic factor. It may cause abnormal heart rhythms. Eric J. Topol ... Isolated atrial amyloidosis is a form of amyloidosis affecting the atria of the heart.[citation needed] ...
Kim TG, Chen J, Sadoshima J, Lee Y (2005). "Jumonji represses atrial natriuretic factor gene expression by inhibiting ... "Nitric oxide induces gene expression of jumonji and retinoblastoma 2 protein while reducing expression of atrial natriuretic ... Jarid2 (jumonji, AT rich interactive domain 2) is a protein coding gene that functions as a putative transcription factor. ... and atrial enlargement. Homozygous mutants of Jarid2 are found to die soon after birth. Overexpression of the mouse Jarid2 gene ...
Böhlen LM, de Courten M, Hafezi F, Shaw S, Riesen W, Weidmann P (June 1994). "Insulin sensitivity and atrial natriuretic factor ... c-Fos and Fra1 are both components of the transcription factor AP-1, and in the year 2000, Hafezi and his colleagues presented ...
2004). "ZAK re-programs atrial natriuretic factor expression and induces hypertrophic growth in H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells". ... 2004). "Transforming growth factor-beta induces the expression of ANF and hypertrophic growth in cultured cardiomyoblast cells ...
"Left atrial function and atrial natriuretic factor/cyclic guanosine monophosphate changes in DDD and VVI pacing modes". Am. J. ... "Total sympathetic activity and atrial natriuretic factor levels in VVI and DDD pacing with different atrioventricular delays ... and decreased left atrial total emptying fraction associated with ventricular pacing. The loss of physiologic timing of atrial ... Atrial contraction against a closed tricuspid valve can cause pulsation in the neck and abdomen, headache, cough, and jaw pain ...
Rosenzweig, Anthony; Seidman, Christine E. (1991). "Atrial Natriuretic Factor and Related Peptide Hormones". Annual Review of ... Anaritide (also known as human atrial natriuretic peptide [102-126]) is a synthetic analogue of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP ... human atrial natriuretic factor [102-126]) infusion in the anesthetized guinea pig". Pulmonary Pharmacology. 1 (3): 119-123. ... Zietse, Robert; Schalekamp, Maarten A. (November 1988). "Effect of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (102-126) in ...
"Time course of human atrial natriuretic factor release during cardiopulmonary bypass in mitral valve and coronary artery ... "Effects of prolonged infusions of atrial natriuretic peptide and isoproterenol on the mechanical and endocrine function of ... "Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Receptor 1 Is a Major Predictor of Mortality and New-Onset Heart Failure in Patients With Acute ... "Bradycardia and atrial fibrillation in patients with stable coronary artery disease treated with ivabradine: an analysis from ...
... which encodes the precursor of cardiodilatin-related peptide and atrial natriuretic factor. NPPA-AS1 is alternatively spliced. ... Long noncoding RNA Annilo T, Kepp K, Laan M (2009). "Natural antisense transcript of natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA): ...
... for natriuretic factors such as atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). GC-C (GUCY2C): for guanylin and uroguanylin. GC-D (GUCY2D) GC- ...
Csx/Nkx2.5 physically associates with the zinc finger protein GATA4 and cooperatively activates atrial natriuretic factor gene ... to a decrease in the expression of genes regulated by the GATA4 transcription factor and linked to the development of atrial ... Assisted by several other initiation factors (eIF1 and eIF1A, eIF5, eIF3, polyA binding protein) it is recruited to the 5′ end ... "A mutation in the Kozak sequence of GATA4 hampers translation in a family with atrial septal defects". American Journal of ...
Peptide hormones such as the atrial natriuretic factor activate membrane-bound GC, while soluble GC (sGC) is typically ...
A stimulant, atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) increases cGMP production in the kidneys, which increases function of the ... and also suggests that additional research be conducted to identify the upstream and downstream factors in CNGC-mediated signal ...
Examples are Aβ, IAPP, Atrial natriuretic factor (in isolated atrial amyloidosis), and Calcitonin (in medullary carcinoma of ... These proteins can become irregular due to genetic effects, as well as through acquired environmental factors. The four most ... In people who have inflammation caused by AA amyloidosis, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibitors such as infliximab and ... Historical classification systems were based on clinical factors. Until the early 1970s, the idea of a single amyloid substance ...
They also contain neurons with receptors for angiotensin, atrial natriuretic factor, endothelin and relaxin, each of which ... Estrogen receptor (ER) has been shown to transactivate other transcription factors in this manner, despite the absence of an ... Releasing hormones (also called releasing factors) are produced in hypothalamic nuclei then transported along axons to either ... and from low-pressure atrial volume receptors, is mediated by others. In the rat, stimulation of the vagina also causes ...
R J Winquist, E P Faison, S A Waldman, K Schwartz, F Murad, and R M Rapoport (1984) Atrial natriuretic factor elicits an ... He is known for his work in atrial natriuretic factor intracellular signaling through guanylate cyclase (GC), and the relation ... His most cited articles are: SA Waldman, RM Rapoport, F Murad (1984) Atrial natriuretic factor selectively activates ... Experimental Therapeutics His early career was devoted to characterize the receptor-mediated responses to atrial natriuretic ...
Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, brain and atrial natriuretic peptide, and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 have ...
... agonist taurine atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) GABA. While neurotransmission is ... The definition of a gliotransmitter is not only defined by its presence in glial cells, but is determined by other factors, ... Rivera, EJ; Goldin, A; Fulmer, N; Tavares, R; Wands, JR; de la Monte, SM (2005). "Insulin and insulin-like growth factor ...
... atrial natriuretic factor - atrial natriuretic factor receptor - Avogadro constant - axon B cell - bacteria - bacterial ... transforming growth factor - transforming growth factor alpha - transforming growth factor beta - transforming growth factor ... peptide elongation factor - peptide elongation factor tu - peptide fragment - peptide initiation factor - peptide receptor - ... nerve growth factor - nerve growth factor receptor - nerve tissue protein - nerve tissue protein S 100 - nervous system - ...
... a component of the EarthScope USArray project Atrial natriuretic peptide, or atrial natriuretic factor, a hormone α- ... or anti-nuclear factor in blood Array Network Facility, ...
Serine/threonine-specific protein kinase, as in bone morphogenetic protein Guanylate cyclase, as in atrial natriuretic factor ... Examples of the enzymatic activity include: Receptor tyrosine kinase, as in fibroblast growth factor receptor. Most enzyme- ... Alexander SP, Mathie A, Peters JA (February 2007). "Catalytic receptors: Natriuretic peptide family". Br. J. Pharmacol. 150 ...
... such as atrial natriuretic factor eventually leading to left ventricular hypertrophy which often progresses to heart failure. ... Krüppel-like factor 15 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the KLF15 gene in the Krüppel-like factor family. Its former ... "The Kruppel-like factor KLF15 inhibits connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression in cardiac fibroblasts". J. Mol. Cell ... Zhou J, Tan T, Tian Y, Zheng B, Ou JH, Huang EJ, Yen TS (July 2011). "Krüppel-like factor 15 activates hepatitis B virus gene ...
... natriuretic peptides MeSH D06.472.699.584.500 - atrial natriuretic factor MeSH D06.472.699.584.625 - natriuretic peptide, brain ... epidermal growth factor MeSH D06.472.317.400 - gastric inhibitory polypeptide MeSH D06.472.317.410 - gastrin-releasing peptide ... thymic factor, circulating MeSH D06.472.910.800 - thymopoietins MeSH D06.472.910.800.850 - thymopentin MeSH D06.472.910.850 - ... MeSH D06.472.699.584.750 - natriuretic peptide, c-type MeSH D06.472.699.587 - pancreatic polypeptide MeSH D06.472.699.590 - ...
... atrial natriuretic factor MeSH D08.811.520.650.800 - phosphatidylinositol diacylglycerol-lyase MeSH D08.811.600.075 - ... factor viia MeSH D08.811.277.656.300.760.310 - factor ixa MeSH D08.811.277.656.300.760.315 - factor xa MeSH D08.811.277.656. ... complement factor b MeSH D08.811.277.656.300.760.200 - complement factor d MeSH D08.811.277.656.300.760.210 - complement factor ... 300.760.320 - factor xia MeSH D08.811.277.656.300.760.324 - factor xiia MeSH D08.811.277.656.300.760.353 - furin MeSH D08.811. ...
Gerbes, Alexander L. and Vollmar, Angelika M. (1990): Degradation and clearance of atrial natriuretic factors. In: Life ...
atrial natriuretic factor answers are found in the Tabers Medical Dictionary powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone ... factor. Accessed October 3, 2023.. Atrial natriuretic factor. (2021). In Venes, D. (Ed.), Tabers Medical Dictionary (24th ed ... factor. Atrial Natriuretic Factor [Internet]. In: Venes DD, editors. Tabers Medical Dictionary. F.A. Davis Company; 2021. [ ... "Atrial Natriuretic Factor." Tabers Medical Dictionary, 24th ed., F.A. Davis Company, 2021. Tabers Online, www.tabers.com/ ...
We report here that the atrial natriuretic factor ( ANF) promoter is a target of PITX2. PITX2A, PITX2B, and PITX2C isoforms ... We report here that the atrial natriuretic factor ( ANF) promoter is a target of PITX2. PITX2A, PITX2B, and PITX2C isoforms ... We report here that the atrial natriuretic factor ( ANF) promoter is a target of PITX2. PITX2A, PITX2B, and PITX2C isoforms ... PITX2 isoform-specific regulation of atrial natriuretic factor expression - Synergism and repression with Nkx2.5. *Mark ...
Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a polypeptide able to affect cardiovascular home-ostasis exhibiting diuretic, natriuretic, ... Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a polypeptide able to affect cardiovascular home-ostasis exhibiting diuretic, natriuretic, ... Atrial natriuretic factor inhibits mitogen-induced growth in aortic smooth muscle cells. Baldini, PM;De Vito, P;FRAZIANO, ... atrial natriuretic factor; animal cell; aorta media; article; astrocyte; cell growth; cell proliferation; cell type; ...
"Atrial Natriuretic Factor" by people in this website by year, and whether "Atrial Natriuretic Factor" was a major or minor ... "Atrial Natriuretic Factor" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... Atrial Natriuretic Factor Precursors*Atrial Natriuretic Factor Precursors. *Prepro-Cardiodilatin-Atrial Natriuretic Factor ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Atrial Natriuretic Factor" by people in Profiles. ...
... plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), angiotensin II (Ang II), aldosterone (Aldo), arginine vasopressin (AVP) and ... Atrial Natriuretic Factor / blood* * Blood Volume* * Dinoprostone / urine * Female * Glomerular Filtration Rate / drug effects ... Atrial natriuretic peptide and exaggerated natriuresis during acute hypertonic volume expansion in essential hypertension J ... In patients with essential hypertension and healthy controls, plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), angiotensin II ...
Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) or atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a natriuretic peptide hormone secreted from the cardiac ... ANP is also called atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), atrial natriuretic hormone (ANH), cardionatrine, cardiodilatin (CDD), and ... Atrial+Natriuretic+Factor at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Human NPPA genome location ... Later, the substance was purified from heart tissue by several groups and named atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) or ANP. ANP is ...
Atrial natriuretic factor inhibits Na-K-Cl cotransport in teleost intestine. Am J Physiol 249:C531-C534. Google Scholar ... Biological actions of atrial natriuretic factor in flatfish. Fish Physiol Biochem 9:271-277. Google Scholar ... Effects of homologous atrial natriuretic peptide on drinking and plasma ANG II level in eels. Am J Physiol 275:R1605-R1610. ... Effects of eel atrial natriuretic peptide on NaCl and water transport across the intestine of the seawater eel. J Comp Physiol ...
N2 - Low-pressure atrial baroreceptors are important in the regulation of plasma volume. Plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF ... AB - Low-pressure atrial baroreceptors are important in the regulation of plasma volume. Plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF ... Low-pressure atrial baroreceptors are important in the regulation of plasma volume. Plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) ... Atrial natriuretic factor in normal man: effects of tilt, posture, exercise and haemorrhage. / Hodsman, G. P.; Phillips, P. A. ...
Dive into the research topics of Restoration of renal response to atrial natriuretic factor in experimental low-output heart ... Restoration of renal response to atrial natriuretic factor in experimental low-output heart failure. ...
title = "Atrial natriuretic factor and pulmonary status in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome: Preliminary ... We studied the correlation of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) with lung compliance in a series of 16 premature infants with ... Atrial natriuretic factor and pulmonary status in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome: Preliminary ... N2 - We studied the correlation of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) with lung compliance in a series of 16 premature infants ...
The precursor protein is atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), a hormone controlling salt and water homeostasis that is synthesized ... 37] Imaging and some biomarkers like N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), ... Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is also thought to be involved in amyloid deposition. [30] Aggressive use of newer ... Isolated atrial amyloidosis and the importance of molecular classification. Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). 2013 Oct. 26(4):387-9. [ ...
The role of atrial natriuretic factor: The role of atrial natriuretic factor. Clinical and Investigative Medicine, 11(6), 392- ... The role of atrial natriuretic factor: The role of atrial natriuretic factor, Clinical and Investigative Medicine, vol. 11, no ... The role of atrial natriuretic factor: The role of atrial natriuretic factor. / Campbell, P. J.; Leung, W. M.; Logan, A. G. et ... The role of atrial natriuretic factor: The role of atrial natriuretic factor. Clinical and Investigative Medicine. 1988 Dec 1; ...
The secretion of atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126) by cultured cardiac myocytes is regulated by glucocorticoids. ... Dive into the research topics of The secretion of atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126) by cultured cardiac myocytes is regulated ...
Receptors, Atrial Natriuretic Factor / antagonists & inhibitors* * Serotonin Receptor Agonists / toxicity* Substances * ... 3 receptor agonist in its anxiogenic activity in rats and is an antagonist at mammalian atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) ...
Keywords: Activating transcription factor 2, Atrial natriuretic peptide, Protein kinase C, T cell factor and lymphoid enhancer ... Atrial Natriuretic Factor Radioimmunoassay Kit (North Institute of Biological Technology, Beijing, China). Intra-atrial ... Figure 1. Effects of Wnt agonist 1 on atrial atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion (A) and dynamics (B) in beating rat ... Figure 11. Schematic mechanisms by which Wnt agonist 1 (Wnta1) regulates atrial atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion and ...
ชมเดช, บังอร and สุดทรวง, ราตรี (1986) "Atrial Natriuretic Factor (ANF)," Chulalongkorn Medical Journal: Vol. 30
Atrial natriuretic factor significantly contributes to the mineralocorticoid escape phenomenon. Evidence for a guanylate ... Factors influencing outcome of surgery for primary aldosteronism. Arch Surg. 1996 Jun. 131(6):646-50. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... The most important factors that predict the pathophysiologic association of hypokalemia with primary aldosteronism are (1) ... Risk factors for cardiovascular disease in primary aldosteronism were found to include hypokalemia, unilateral primary ...
Plasma Atrial Natriuretic Factor in Uncomplicated Acute Myocardial Infarction Cardiology (November,2008) ...
Renal perfusion appears to be protected by vasodilators, including prostaglandins E2 and I2 and atrial natriuretic factor. ... Increased resistance across the sinusoidal vascular bed of the liver is caused by fixed factors and dynamic factors. Two thirds ... may become activated into collagen-forming cells by a variety of paracrine factors. Such factors may be released by hepatocytes ... Clarification of risk factors for abdominal operations in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. Ann Surg. 1984 Jun. 199(6):648-55. [ ...
Renal perfusion appears to be protected by vasodilators, including prostaglandins E2 and I2 and atrial natriuretic factor. ... Increased resistance across the sinusoidal vascular bed of the liver is caused by fixed factors and dynamic factors. Two thirds ... may become activated into collagen-forming cells by a variety of paracrine factors. Such factors may be released by hepatocytes ... Clarification of risk factors for abdominal operations in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. Ann Surg. 1984 Jun. 199(6):648-55. [ ...
It could be related to atrial natriuretic factor. I think we need to make certain that we commit to understanding more broadly ... Other possible mechanisms could involve Invokanas effects on blood pressure, uric acid, or atrial natriuretic peptide (see Dr ...
Cys18]-Atrial Natriuretic Factor (4-18) amide (rat) SKU: SKU-4462 Category: Atrial, Peptides ...
de Bold A (1985). Atrial natriuretic factor: a hormone produced by the heart. Science 230 (4727): 767-70. http://www. ... Atrial natriuretic peptide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atrial_natriuretic_peptide .. * Ishida H Hirota Y Higashijima N ... Mueller C Scholer A Laule-Kilian K Martina B Schindler C Buser P Pfisterer M Perruchoud AP Use of B-type natriuretic peptide in ... These neurohumoral substances include nitric oxide, glucagon, prostaglandins, tumor necrosis factor and other cytokines. * The ...
Atrial natriuretic factor is a peptide synthesized by atrial myocytes and released as aresponse to atrial distension. It is ... The sympathetic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the natriuretic peptide atrial and the vasopressin ... The sympathetic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the natriuretic peptide atrial and the vasopressin ... to be inhibited by factors such as age, hormonal disorders, or a chaotic lifestyle, but that does not mean that the body does ...
Atrial natriuretic factor. This hormone decreases blood pressure by causing dilation of blood vessels. ...
Characterization of atrial-natriuretic-factor-receptor-coupled membrane guanylate cyclase from rat and mouse testes. Marala, R. ... Purification of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor by using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Daniel, T.O., Tremble, P ... Estradiol stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 in ... The role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in male reproductive tract differentiation: stimulation of EGFR expression ...
Atrial natriuretic factor transcription, storage and release in the failing human heart.. Fischer TA, Haass M, Dietz R, ... Role of right and left atrial dimensions for release of atrial natriuretic peptide in left sided valvular heart disease and ... Atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA in patients with heart disease.. Haass M, Fischer TA, Hänze J, Saggau W, Lang RE, Dietz R.. Am ...
  • Natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP, and CNP) are a family of hormone/paracrine factors that are structurally related. (wikipedia.org)
  • ANP is secreted in response to: Stretching of the atrial wall, via Atrial volume receptors Increased Sympathetic stimulation of β-adrenoceptors Increased sodium concentration (hypernatremia), though sodium concentration is not the direct stimulus for increased ANP secretion Endothelin, a potent vasoconstrictor Three types of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors have been identified on which natriuretic peptides act. (wikipedia.org)
  • IDE hydrolyzes a variety of regulatory peptides, including insulin, glucagon, atrial natriuretic factor, and transforming growth factor-alpha in vitro (1). (rndsystems.com)
  • A potent natriuretic and vasodilatory peptide or mixture of different-sized low molecular weight PEPTIDES derived from a common precursor and secreted mainly by the HEART ATRIUM . (nih.gov)
  • These cells contain volume receptors which respond to increased stretching of the atrial wall due to increased atrial blood volume. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are all cell surface receptors and designated: guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) also known as natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA/ANPA) or NPR1 guanylyl cyclase-B (GC-B) also known as natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPRB/ANPB) or NPR2 natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPRC/ANPC) or NPR3 NPR-A and NPR-B have a single membrane-spanning segment with an extracellular domain that binds the ligand. (wikipedia.org)
  • CIP4 is a scaffold protein that regulates membrane deformation and tubulation, organization of the actin cytoskeleton, endocytosis of growth factor receptors, and vesicle trafficking. (biomedcentral.com)
  • NPPA variants affect plasma ANP concentrations, blood pressure levels, and cardiovascular diseases such as atrial fibrillation (AF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Sections of rat hypothalamus were examined immunocytochemically for coexistence of atrial natriuretic factor (cardiodilatin) and oxytocin. (nih.gov)
  • Here, we investigated the potential for a novel strategy for the treatment of itch that involves the inhibition of the NPPB receptor NPR1 (natriuretic peptide receptor 1). (nih.gov)
  • 7. Hypertension associated with decreased testosterone levels in natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene-knockout and gene-duplicated mutant mouse models. (nih.gov)
  • 12. Stimulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptor/guanylyl cyclase- A signaling pathway antagonizes the activation of protein kinase C-alpha in murine Leydig cells. (nih.gov)
  • 13. Atrial natriuretic factor stimulates luteal guanylate cyclase. (nih.gov)
  • The purpose is to develop understanding of the role of virus, viral proteins, immune cells, cytokine production, growth factor expression and co-infection with other pathogens in the altered function and disease manifestations of the cardiovascular system. (nih.gov)
  • Current cardiac biomarkers have been roughly divided into i) leakage markers related to myocardial integrity, such as cardiac troponin (cTn), myoglobin and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB (CK-MB) and ii) functional markers related to specific proteins of cardiac functions, such as brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and endothelin. (vin.com)
  • Cell surface proteins that bind ATRIAL NATRIURETIC FACTOR with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. (bvsalud.org)
  • The NPPA gene is expressed primarily in atrial myocytes and consists of 2 introns and three exons, with translation of this gene yielding a high molecular mass 151 amino acid polypeptide known as preproANP. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the blood, BK is generated from circulating high- and low-molecular-weight kininogens chiefly by plasma kallikein (4), and ANP is secreted primarily by atrial myocytes in response to local wall stretching (5). (scielo.br)
  • 7. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase activation is required for the anti-hypertrophic effect of atrial natriuretic factor in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. (nih.gov)
  • We now show using RNA interference that CIP4 expression in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes is required for the induction of non-mitotic, hypertrophic growth by the α-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine, the IL-6 cytokine leukemia inhibitor factor, and fetal bovine serum, as assayed using morphometry, immunocytochemistry for the hypertrophic marker atrial natriuretic factor and [ 3 H]leucine incorporation for de novo protein synthesis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) or atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a natriuretic peptide hormone secreted from the cardiac atria that in humans is encoded by the NPPA gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polypeptides of about 150 amino acids that serve as precursors to prohormone of ATRIAL NATRIURETIC FACTOR , a 126-amino acid polypeptide or ANP (1-126). (nih.gov)
  • they had natriuretic activity in rats. (portlandpress.com)
  • Using a knock-in (KI) rat model, researchers found an AF-associated human variant in NPPA caused inflammation, fibroblast activation, atrial fibrosis, and AF in KI rats. (wikipedia.org)
  • The present study was designed to examine the chronic (5 day) and acute (2 hr) hemodynamic effects of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in conscious normotensive rats. (tulane.edu)
  • The nephron sites involved in the blunted natriuretic response to frusemide during sodium depletion were investigated using micropuncture techniques in anaesthetized rats. (portlandpress.com)
  • ANP is closely related to BNP (brain natriuretic peptide) and CNP (C-type natriuretic peptide), which all share a similar amino acid ring structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • 5. Receptor-mediated stimulatory effect of atrial natriuretic factor, brain natriuretic peptide, and C-type natriuretic peptide on testosterone production in purified mouse Leydig cells: activation of cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme. (nih.gov)
  • This study aimed to assess the role of diastolic dysfunction, abnormal myocardial strain and elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the early identification of cardiac involvement in Chagas disease. (plos.org)
  • Diastolic dysfunction and elevated brain natriuretic peptide levels are present in different cardiomyopathies and in advanced phases of Chagas disease. (plos.org)
  • We conducted a study to assess the diastolic function, regional systolic abnormalities and brain natriuretic peptide levels in the different forms of Chagas disease. (plos.org)
  • Most notable of these cardiac biomarkers are: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) 1 , brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) 2 , N-terminal proANP fragments (NT-pro ANP) 3 , NT proBNP fragments 4 and cardiac troponins (cTn) 5 . (vin.com)
  • The purified enzyme hydrolyzed the Pro7-Phe8 bond of bradykinin and the Ser25-Tyr26 bond of atrial natriuretic peptide. (scielo.br)
  • The high affinity of this endopeptidase for bradykinin (Km = 10 µM) and for atrial natriuretic peptide (Km = 5 µM) suggests that it may play a physiological role in the inactivation of these circulating hypotensive peptide hormones. (scielo.br)
  • The purified enzyme hydrolyzed the Pro 7 -Phe 8 bond of bradykinin and the Ser 25 -Tyr 26 bond of atrial natriuretic peptide. (scielo.br)
  • The circulating peptide hormones bradykinin (BK) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are very powerful vasodilators that may participate in the physiological control of arterial pressure (1-5). (scielo.br)
  • 10. Atrial natriuretic peptide, oxytocin, and vasopressin increase guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate in LLC-PK1 kidney epithelial cells. (nih.gov)
  • To elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP) in a hypertensive state, ANP and VP receptor bindings in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) kidney were analyzed using the radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) technique. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Coexistence of intestinal trefoil factor (hITF) and oxytocin in magnocellular neurons in the human hypothalamus. (nih.gov)
  • To examine the relationship between the sodium-retaining actions of insulin and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), 16 healthy subjects were studied on three occasions, ~1 wk apart, using standard clearance techniques to evaluate responses during the acute administration of insulin, low-dose ANF, or both. (biu.ac.il)
  • Both energetic substances up-regulated the manifestation of vascular endothelial development factor (VEGF) as well as the researchers demonstrated that activation from the VEGF pathway was adequate to suppress the phenotype from the gridlock mutation. (icsv20.org)
  • Following stimulation of atrial cells, proANP is released and rapidly converted to the 28-amino-acid C-terminal mature ANP on the cell surface by the cardiac transmembrane serine protease corin. (wikipedia.org)
  • 9. Calcium and calmodulin regulate atrial natriuretic factor stimulation of cyclic GMP in a human renal cell line. (nih.gov)
  • 16. Stimulation of testosterone production by atrial natriuretic peptide in isolated mouse Leydig cells results from a promiscuous activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase by cyclic GMP. (nih.gov)
  • 1. The effect of partially purified rat atrial natriuretic factor on sodium efflux from sodium-loaded human erythrocytes was studied. (portlandpress.com)
  • 14. Effects of atrial natriuretic peptide and sodium nitroprusside on epidermal growth factor-stimulated wound repair in rabbit corneal epithelial cells. (nih.gov)
  • 19. Actions of C-type natriuretic peptide and sodium nitroprusside on carbachol-stimulated inositol phosphate formation and contraction in ciliary and iris sphincter smooth muscles. (nih.gov)
  • Temperature dependence was also examined with respect to the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on drinking and arterial pressure. (bioone.org)
  • The ScaI gene polymorphism of the atrial natriuretic factor and essential arterial hypertension in childhood. (cdc.gov)
  • Association of the ScaI atrial natriuretic peptide gene polymorphism with nonfatal myocardial infarction and extent of coronary artery disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Plasma concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and hemodynamic parameters were investigated in five premature infants undergoing exchange transfusion. (elsevierpure.com)
  • 1. The role of Ca2+ and calmodulin in the regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide-stimulated guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate accumulation by isolated mouse Leydig cells. (nih.gov)
  • 4. The results suggest that atrial natriuretic factor acts in the kidney by mechanisms other than through inhibition of the Na + -K + exchange pump or the Na + -K + cotransport system. (portlandpress.com)
  • The discovery of a natriuretic factor (one that promotes kidney excretion of salt and water) was first reported by Adolfo José de Bold in 1981 when rat atrial extracts were found to contain a substance that increased salt and urine output in the kidney. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2. Steroidogenic effect of atrial natriuretic factor in isolated mouse Leydig cells is mediated by cyclic GMP. (nih.gov)
  • 3. Effect of a tumour-promoting phorbol ester on atrial peptide-induced testosterone production and cyclic GMP accumulation by isolated mouse Leydig cells. (nih.gov)
  • 6. HS-142-1 inhibits testosterone production and guanosine-3':5'-cyclic monophosphate accumulation stimulated by atrial natriuretic peptide in isolated mouse Leydig cells. (nih.gov)
  • 17. Histones inhibit human chorionic gonadotrophin-stimulated but not atrial peptide-stimulated testosterone production and cyclic nucleotide formation by isolated mouse Leydig cells. (nih.gov)
  • WT1, a transcriptional factor for nephrin, was detected in nucleus in podocyte-like cells in all stages. (go.jp)
  • In H9C2 cells, GRK2 overexpression increased atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) activity and enhanced phenylephrine-induced ANF response, and this is associated with an increase of NFκB transcriptional activity. (elsevierpure.com)
  • abstract = "Circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was assayed before and after postural change and exercise in 54 patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) and 20 controls. (princeton.edu)
  • Polymorphisms in the hANP (human atrial natriuretic peptide) gene, albuminuria, and hypertension. (cdc.gov)
  • Later, the substance was purified from heart tissue by several groups and named atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) or ANP. (wikipedia.org)
  • This variability, or heterogeneity, in clinical presentation suggests complex interactions between environmental and biological factors, resulting in several underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the development and progression of AUD. (nih.gov)
  • 4. Effect of cyclic GMP-increasing agents nitric oxide and C-type natriuretic peptide on bovine chromaffin cell function: inhibitory role mediated by cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase. (nih.gov)
  • We sought to determine the degree to which B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) adds to clinical judgment in the diagnosis of congestive heart failure (CHF). (nih.gov)
  • C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF- α]), genetic markers (e.g. (vin.com)
  • The sensitivity to ANP, a physiological regulator of drinking in eels, was not altered by the temperature, suggesting an involvement of other factors in the thermogenic drinking that is demonstrated in this study. (bioone.org)
  • Neurons immunoreactive for atrial natriuretic factor were found in the supraoptic, periventricular and paraventricular nuclei. (nih.gov)