The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the LEFT ATRIUM.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART ATRIA.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the RIGHT ATRIUM.
The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.
Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.
Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.
Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with velocity detection combined with range discrimination. Short bursts of ultrasound are transmitted at regular intervals and the echoes are demodulated as they return.
Surgical excision (total or partial) of a portion of the pericardium. Pericardiotomy refers to incision of the pericardium.
An electrical current applied to the HEART to terminate a disturbance of its rhythm, ARRHYTHMIAS, CARDIAC. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.
Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART VENTRICLES.
The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).
The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Qatar" is a country in the Middle East and does not have a medical definition. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I would be happy to help!
Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.
Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.
"The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.
The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.

A comparison of an A1 adenosine receptor agonist (CVT-510) with diltiazem for slowing of AV nodal conduction in guinea-pig. (1/734)

1. The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacological properties (i.e. the AV nodal depressant, vasodilator, and inotropic effects) of two AV nodal blocking agents belonging to different drug classes; a novel A1 adenosine receptor (A1 receptor) agonist, N-(3(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl)-6-aminopurine riboside (CVT-510), and the prototypical calcium channel blocker diltiazem. 2. In the atrial-paced isolated heart, CVT-510 was approximately 5 fold more potent to prolong the stimulus-to-His bundle (S-H interval), a measure of slowing AV nodal conduction (EC50 = 41 nM) than to increase coronary conductance (EC50 = 200 nM). At concentrations of CVT-510 (40 nM) and diltiazem (1 microM) that caused equal prolongation of S-H interval (approximately 10 ms), diltiazem, but not CVT-510, significantly reduced left ventricular developed pressure (LVP) and markedly increased coronary conductance. CVT-510 shortened atrial (EC50 = 73 nM) but not the ventricular monophasic action potentials (MAP). 3. In atrial-paced anaesthetized guinea-pigs, intravenous infusions of CVT-510 and diltiazem caused nearly equal prolongations of P-R interval. However, diltiazem, but not CVT-510, significantly reduced mean arterial blood pressure. 4. Both CVT-510 and diltiazem prolonged S-H interval, i.e., slowed AV nodal conduction. However, the A1 receptor-selective agonist CVT-510 did so without causing the negative inotropic, vasodilator, and hypotensive effects associated with diltiazem. Because CVT-510 did not affect the ventricular action potential, it is unlikely that this agonist will have a proarrythmic action in ventricular myocardium.  (+info)

Identification and characterization of multiple subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and their physiological functions in canine hearts. (2/734)

M2 receptors have long been believed to be the only functional subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) in the heart, although recent studies have provided evidence for the presence of other subtypes. We performed a detailed study to clarify this issue. In the presence of tetramethylammonium (1 microM to 10 mM), a novel K+ current with both delayed rectifying and inward rectifying properties (IKTMA) was activated in single canine atrial myocytes. 4-Aminopyridine (0.05-2 mM) also induced a K+ current (IK4AP) with characteristics similar to but distinct from those of IKTMA. Both IKTMA and IK4AP were abolished by 1 microM atropine. IK4AP, but not IKTMA, was minimized by treatment with pertussis toxin. IKTMA was markedly decreased by 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide (a selective antagonist for M3 subtype) but was not altered by pirenzepine (for M1), methoctramine (for M2), and tropicamide (for M4). Tropicamide substantially reduced IK4AP, but the antagonists for other mAChR subtypes had no effects on IK4AP. By comparison, IKACh (ACh-induced K+ current) was significantly depressed by methoctramine but was unaltered by other antagonists. Results from displacement binding of [methyl-3H]N-scopolamine methyl chloride with pirenzepine, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide, or tropicamide revealed the coexistence of multiple mAChR subtypes in canine atrium. Cloning of cDNA fragments and detection of mRNAs coding for M2, M3, and M4 provided further supporting evidence. Our results suggest that 1) multiple subtypes of mAChRs (M2/M3/M4) coexist in the dog heart and 2) different subtypes of mAChRs are coupled to different K+ channels. Our findings represent the first functional evidence for the physiological role of cardiac M3 and M4 receptors.  (+info)

Regional differences in the recovery course of tachycardia-induced changes of atrial electrophysiological properties. (3/734)

BACKGROUND: Regional differences in recovery of tachycardia-induced changes of atrial electrophysiological properties have not been well studied. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the control group (5 dogs), atrial effective refractory period (AERP) and inducibility of atrial fibrillation (AF) were assessed before and every 4 hours for 48 hours after complete atrioventricular junction (AVJ) ablation with 8-week VVI pacing. In experimental group 1 (15 dogs), AERP and inducibility of AF were assessed before and after complete AVJ ablation with 8-week rapid right atrial (RA) pacing (780 bpm) and VVI pacing. In experimental group 2 (7 dogs), AERP and inducibility of AF were assessed before and after 8-week rapid left atrial (LA) pacing and VVI pacing. AERP and inducibility and duration of AF were obtained from 7 epicardial sites. In the control group, atrial electrophysiological properties obtained immediately and during 48-hour measurements after pacing did not show any change. In the 2 experimental groups, recovery of atrial electrophysiological properties included a progressive recovery of AERP shortening, recovery of AERP maladaptation, and decrease of duration and episodes of reinduced AF. However, recovery of shortening and maladaptation of AERP and inducibility of AF was slower at the LA than at the RA and Bachmann's bundle. CONCLUSIONS: The LA had a slower recovery of tachycardia-induced changes of atrial electrophysiological properties, and this might play a critical role in initiation of AF.  (+info)

Rate-dependent blockade of a potassium current in human atrium by the antihistamine loratadine. (4/734)

The antihistamine loratadine is widely prescribed for the treatment of symptoms associated with allergies. Although generally believed to be free of adverse cardiac effects, there are a number of recent reports suggesting that loratadine use may be associated with arrhythmias, in particular atrial arrhythmias. Nothing is known regarding the potassium channel blocking properties of loratadine in human cardiac cells. Using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, the effects of loratadine on the transient outward K current (Ito), sustained current (Isus), and current measured at -100 mV (IK1 and Ins), the major inward and outward potassium currents present in human atrial myocytes, were examined in order to provide a possible molecular mechanism for the observed atrial arrhythmias reported with loratadine use. Loratadine rate-dependently inhibited Ito at therapeutic concentrations with 10 nM loratadine reducing Ito amplitude at a pacing rate of 2 Hz by 34.9+/-6.0%. In contrast, loratadine had no effect on either Isus or current measured at -100 mV. These results may provide a possible mechanism for the incidences of supraventricular arrhythmias reported with the use of loratadine.  (+info)

Inhibitory effects of aprindine on the delayed rectifier K+ current and the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-operated K+ current in guinea-pig atrial cells. (5/734)

In order to clarify the mechanisms by which the class Ib antiarrhythmic drug aprindine shows efficacy against atrial fibrillation (AF), we examined the effects of the drug on the repolarizing K+ currents in guinea-pig atrial cells by use of patch-clamp techniques. We also evaluated the effects of aprindine on experimental AF in isolated guinea-pig hearts. Aprindine (3 microM) inhibited the delayed rectifier K+ current (IK) with little influence on the inward rectifier K+ current (IK1) or the Ca2+ current. Electrophysiological analyses including the envelope of tails test revealed that aprindine preferentially inhibits IKr (rapidly activating component) but not IKs (slowly activating component). The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-operated K+ current (IK.ACh) was activated by the extracellular application of carbachol (1 microM) or by the intracellular loading of GTPgammaS. Aprindine inhibited the carbachol- and GTPgammaS-induced IK.ACh with the IC50 values of 0.4 and 2.5 microM, respectively. In atrial cells stimulated at 0.2 Hz, aprindine (3 microM) per se prolonged the action potential duration (APD) by 50+/-4%. The drug also reversed the carbachol-induced action potential shortening in a concentration-dependent manner. In isolated hearts, perfusion of carbachol (1 microM) shortened monophasic action potential (MAP) and effective refractory period (ERP), and lowered atrial fibrillation threshold. Addition of aprindine (3 microM) inhibited the induction of AF by prolonging MAP and ERP. We conclude the efficacy of aprindine against AF may be at least in part explained by its inhibitory effects on IKr and IK.ACh.  (+info)

Aryl propanolamines: comparison of activity at human beta3 receptors, rat beta3 receptors and rat atrial receptors mediating tachycardia. (6/734)

1. The in vitro activity of four aryl propanolamines was compared to two prototypic beta3 receptor agonists, CGP 12177 and CL316243 at the human beta3 receptor, the rat beta3 receptor in the stomach fundus and receptors mediating atrial tachycardia. 2. L-739,574 was the most potent (EC50 = 9 nM) and selective agonist at the human beta3 receptor with high maximal response (74% of the maximal response to isoproterenol). 3. A phenol-biaryl ether analogue possessed modest affinity for the human beta3 receptor (EC50 = 246 nM), but was highly efficacious with a maximal response 82% of the maximal response to isoproterenol. The other derivatives were intermediate in potency with low maximal responses. 4. These agonists at the human beta3 receptor did not activate the rat beta3 receptor in the rat stomach fundus. In fact, the aryl propanolamines (10(-6) M) inhibited CL316243-induced activation of the rat beta3 receptor. Thus, agonist activity at the human beta3 receptor translated into antagonist activity at the rat beta3 receptor. 5. L739,574 and the phenol biaryl ether increased heart rate via beta1 receptors. 6. Although CGP12177 produced atrial tachycardia, neither the indole sulphonamide nor biphenyl biaryl ether did, although both had high affinity for the human beta3 receptor. Thus, the atrial tachycardic receptor was not identical to the human beta3 receptor. 7. These studies (a) characterized four aryl propanolamines with high affinity at the human beta3 receptor, (b) found that they were antagonists at the rat beta3 receptor, an observation with profound implications for in vivo rat data, and (c) established that the rodent atrial non-beta1, beta2 or beta3 tachycardic receptor was also unrelated to the human beta3 receptor.  (+info)

Altered kinetics of contraction of mouse atrial myocytes expressing ventricular myosin regulatory light chain. (7/734)

To investigate the role of myosin regulatory light chain isoforms as a determinant of the kinetics of cardiac contraction, unloaded shortening velocity was determined by the slack-test method in skinned wild-type murine atrial cells and transgenic cells expressing ventricular regulatory light chain (MLC2v). Transgenic mice were generated using a 4.5-kb fragment of the murine alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter to drive high levels of MLC2v expression in the atrium. Velocity of unloaded shortening was determined at 15 degrees C in maximally activating Ca2+ solution (pCa 4.5) containing (in mmol/l) 7 EGTA, 1 free Mg2+, 4 MgATP, 14.5 creatine phosphate, and 20 imidazole (ionic strength 180 mmol/l, pH 7.0). Compared with the wild type (n = 10), the unloaded shortening velocity of MLC2v-expressing transgenic murine atrial cells (n = 10) was significantly greater (3.88 +/- 1.19 vs. 2.51 +/- 1.08 muscle lengths/s, P < 0.05). These results provide evidence that myosin light chain 2 regulates cross-bridge cycling rate. The faster rate of cycling in the presence of MLC2v suggests that the MLC2v isoform may contribute to the greater power-generating capabilities of the ventricle compared with the atrium.  (+info)

Mapping of atrial activation with a noncontact, multielectrode catheter in dogs. (8/734)

BACKGROUND: Endocardial mapping of sustained arrhythmias has traditionally been performed with a roving diagnostic catheter. Although this approach is adequate for many tachyarrhythmias, it has limitations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel noncontact mapping system for assessing atrial tachyarrhythmias. METHODS AND RESULTS: The mapping system consists of a 9F multielectrode-array balloon catheter that has 64 active electrodes and ring electrodes for emitting a locator signal. The locator signal was used to construct a 3-dimensional right atrial map; it was independently validated and was highly accurate. Virtual electrograms were calculated at 3360 endocardial sites in the right atrium. We evaluated right atrial activation by positioning the balloon catheter in the mid right atrium via a femoral venous approach. Experiments were performed on 12 normal mongrel dogs. The mean correlation coefficient between contact and virtual electrograms was 0.80+/-0.12 during sinus rhythm. Fifty episodes of atrial flutter induced in 11 animals were evaluated. In the majority of experiments, complete or almost complete reentrant circuits could be identified within the right atrium. Mean correlation coefficient between virtual and contact electrograms was 0.85+/-0.17 in atrial flutter. One hundred fifty-six episodes of pacing-induced atrial fibrillation were evaluated in 11 animals. Several distinct patterns of right atrial activation were seen, including single-activation wave fronts and multiple simultaneous-activation wave fronts. Mean correlation coefficient between virtual and contact electrograms during atrial fibrillation was 0.81+/-0.18. The accuracy of electrogram reconstruction was lower at sites >4.0 cm from the balloon center and at sites with a high spatial complexity of electrical activation. CONCLUSIONS: This novel noncontact mapping system can evaluate conduction patterns during sinus rhythm, demonstrate reentry during atrial flutter, and describe right atrial activation during atrial fibrillation. The accuracy of electrogram reconstruction was good at sites <4.0 cm from the balloon center, and thus the system has the ability to perform high-resolution multisite mapping of atrial tachyarrhythmias in vivo.  (+info)

Left atrial function refers to the role and performance of the left atrium in the heart. The left atrium is the upper chamber on the left side of the heart that receives oxygenated blood from the lungs via the pulmonary veins and then contracts to help pump it into the left ventricle, which is the lower chamber that pumps blood out to the rest of the body.

The main functions of the left atrium include:

1. Receiving oxygen-rich blood from the lungs: The left atrium receives oxygenated blood from the pulmonary veins and acts as a reservoir for this blood before it is pumped into the left ventricle.
2. Contracting to help pump blood into the left ventricle: During atrial contraction, also known as atrial kick, the left atrium contracts and helps push blood into the left ventricle, increasing the amount of blood that can be ejected with each heartbeat.
3. Relaxing to receive more blood: Between heartbeats, the left atrium relaxes and fills up with more oxygenated blood from the lungs.
4. Contributing to heart rate regulation: The left atrium contains specialized cells called pacemaker cells that can help regulate the heart rate by initiating electrical impulses that trigger heart contractions.

Left atrial function is crucial for maintaining efficient cardiac output and overall cardiovascular health. Various conditions, such as heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and hypertension, can negatively impact left atrial function and contribute to the development of complications like stroke and reduced exercise tolerance.

Atrial function in a medical context refers to the role and performance of the two upper chambers of the heart, known as the atria. The main functions of the atria are to receive blood from the veins and help pump it into the ventricles, which are the lower pumping chambers of the heart.

The atria contract in response to electrical signals generated by the sinoatrial node, which is the heart's natural pacemaker. This contraction helps to fill the ventricles with blood before they contract and pump blood out to the rest of the body. Atrial function can be assessed through various diagnostic tests, such as echocardiograms or electrocardiograms (ECGs), which can help identify any abnormalities in atrial structure or electrical activity that may affect heart function.

Right atrial function refers to the role and performance of the right atrium in the heart. The right atrium is one of the four chambers of the heart and is responsible for receiving deoxygenated blood from the body via the superior and inferior vena cava. It then contracts to help pump the blood into the right ventricle, which subsequently sends it to the lungs for oxygenation.

Right atrial function can be assessed through various methods, including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormalities in right atrial function may indicate underlying heart conditions such as right-sided heart failure, atrial fibrillation, or other cardiovascular diseases. Proper evaluation and monitoring of right atrial function are essential for effective diagnosis, treatment, and management of these conditions.

The heart atria are the upper chambers of the heart that receive blood from the veins and deliver it to the lower chambers, or ventricles. There are two atria in the heart: the right atrium receives oxygen-poor blood from the body and pumps it into the right ventricle, which then sends it to the lungs to be oxygenated; and the left atrium receives oxygen-rich blood from the lungs and pumps it into the left ventricle, which then sends it out to the rest of the body. The atria contract before the ventricles during each heartbeat, helping to fill the ventricles with blood and prepare them for contraction.

Doppler echocardiography is a type of ultrasound test that uses high-frequency sound waves to produce detailed images of the heart and its blood vessels. It measures the direction and speed of blood flow in the heart and major blood vessels leading to and from the heart. This helps to evaluate various conditions such as valve problems, congenital heart defects, and heart muscle diseases.

In Doppler echocardiography, a small handheld device called a transducer is placed on the chest, which emits sound waves that bounce off the heart and blood vessels. The transducer then picks up the returning echoes, which are processed by a computer to create moving images of the heart.

The Doppler effect is used to measure the speed and direction of blood flow. This occurs when the frequency of the sound waves changes as they bounce off moving objects, such as red blood cells. By analyzing these changes, the ultrasound machine can calculate the velocity and direction of blood flow in different parts of the heart.

Doppler echocardiography is a non-invasive test that does not require any needles or dyes. It is generally safe and painless, although patients may experience some discomfort from the pressure applied by the transducer on the chest. The test usually takes about 30 to 60 minutes to complete.

Atrial fibrillation (A-tre-al fi-bru-la'shun) is a type of abnormal heart rhythm characterized by rapid and irregular beating of the atria, the upper chambers of the heart. In this condition, the electrical signals that coordinate heartbeats don't function properly, causing the atria to quiver instead of contracting effectively. As a result, blood may not be pumped efficiently into the ventricles, which can lead to blood clots, stroke, and other complications. Atrial fibrillation is a common type of arrhythmia and can cause symptoms such as palpitations, shortness of breath, fatigue, and dizziness. It can be caused by various factors, including heart disease, high blood pressure, age, and genetics. Treatment options include medications, electrical cardioversion, and surgical procedures to restore normal heart rhythm.

Echocardiography, Doppler, pulsed is a type of diagnostic medical test that uses ultrasound to create detailed images of the heart's structures and assess their function. In this technique, high-frequency sound waves are directed at the heart using a handheld device called a transducer, which is placed on the chest wall. The sound waves bounce off the heart structures and return to the transducer, which then sends the information to a computer that converts it into images.

Pulsed Doppler echocardiography is a specific type of Doppler ultrasound that allows for the measurement of blood flow velocities in the heart and great vessels. In this technique, the transducer emits short bursts or "pulses" of sound waves and then measures the time it takes for the echoes to return. By analyzing the frequency shifts of the returning echoes, the velocity and direction of blood flow can be determined. This information is particularly useful in evaluating valvular function, assessing the severity of valvular lesions, and identifying areas of turbulent or abnormal blood flow.

Overall, echocardiography, Doppler, pulsed is a valuable tool for diagnosing and managing a wide range of cardiovascular conditions, including heart valve disorders, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathies, and pericardial diseases.

Pericardiectomy is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of all or part of the pericardium, which is the sac-like membrane surrounding the heart. This surgery is typically performed to treat chronic or recurrent pericarditis, constrictive pericarditis, or pericardial effusions that do not respond to other treatments. Pericardiectomy can help reduce symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and fluid buildup around the heart, improving the patient's quality of life and overall prognosis.

Electric countershock, also known as defibrillation, is a medical procedure that uses an electric current to restore normal heart rhythm in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. The procedure involves delivering a therapeutic dose of electrical energy to the heart through electrodes placed on the chest wall or directly on the heart. This electric current helps to depolarize a large number of cardiac cells simultaneously, which can help to interrupt the abnormal electrical activity in the heart and allow the normal conduction system to regain control and restore a normal rhythm. Electric countershock is typically delivered using an automated external defibrillator (AED) or a manual defibrillator, and it is a critical component of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS).

Myocardial contraction refers to the rhythmic and forceful shortening of heart muscle cells (myocytes) in the myocardium, which is the muscular wall of the heart. This process is initiated by electrical signals generated by the sinoatrial node, causing a wave of depolarization that spreads throughout the heart.

During myocardial contraction, calcium ions flow into the myocytes, triggering the interaction between actin and myosin filaments, which are the contractile proteins in the muscle cells. This interaction causes the myofilaments to slide past each other, resulting in the shortening of the sarcomeres (the functional units of muscle contraction) and ultimately leading to the contraction of the heart muscle.

Myocardial contraction is essential for pumping blood throughout the body and maintaining adequate circulation to vital organs. Any impairment in myocardial contractility can lead to various cardiac disorders, such as heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias.

Heart function tests are a group of diagnostic exams that are used to evaluate the structure and functioning of the heart. These tests help doctors assess the pumping efficiency of the heart, the flow of blood through the heart, the presence of any heart damage, and the overall effectiveness of the heart in delivering oxygenated blood to the rest of the body.

Some common heart function tests include:

1. Echocardiogram (Echo): This test uses sound waves to create detailed images of the heart's structure and functioning. It can help detect any damage to the heart muscle, valves, or sac surrounding the heart.
2. Nuclear Stress Test: This test involves injecting a small amount of radioactive substance into the patient's bloodstream and taking images of the heart while it is at rest and during exercise. The test helps evaluate blood flow to the heart and detect any areas of reduced blood flow, which could indicate coronary artery disease.
3. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): This test uses magnetic fields and radio waves to create detailed images of the heart's structure and function. It can help detect any damage to the heart muscle, valves, or other structures of the heart.
4. Electrocardiogram (ECG): This test measures the electrical activity of the heart and helps detect any abnormalities in the heart's rhythm or conduction system.
5. Exercise Stress Test: This test involves walking on a treadmill or riding a stationary bike while being monitored for changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and ECG readings. It helps evaluate exercise capacity and detect any signs of coronary artery disease.
6. Cardiac Catheterization: This is an invasive procedure that involves inserting a catheter into the heart to measure pressures and take samples of blood from different parts of the heart. It can help diagnose various heart conditions, including heart valve problems, congenital heart defects, and coronary artery disease.

Overall, heart function tests play an essential role in diagnosing and managing various heart conditions, helping doctors provide appropriate treatment and improve patient outcomes.

Echocardiography is a medical procedure that uses sound waves to produce detailed images of the heart's structure, function, and motion. It is a non-invasive test that can help diagnose various heart conditions, such as valve problems, heart muscle damage, blood clots, and congenital heart defects.

During an echocardiogram, a transducer (a device that sends and receives sound waves) is placed on the chest or passed through the esophagus to obtain images of the heart. The sound waves produced by the transducer bounce off the heart structures and return to the transducer, which then converts them into electrical signals that are processed to create images of the heart.

There are several types of echocardiograms, including:

* Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE): This is the most common type of echocardiogram and involves placing the transducer on the chest.
* Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE): This type of echocardiogram involves passing a specialized transducer through the esophagus to obtain images of the heart from a closer proximity.
* Stress echocardiography: This type of echocardiogram is performed during exercise or medication-induced stress to assess how the heart functions under stress.
* Doppler echocardiography: This type of echocardiogram uses sound waves to measure blood flow and velocity in the heart and blood vessels.

Echocardiography is a valuable tool for diagnosing and managing various heart conditions, as it provides detailed information about the structure and function of the heart. It is generally safe, non-invasive, and painless, making it a popular choice for doctors and patients alike.

Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a type of echocardiogram, which is a medical test that uses sound waves to create detailed images of the heart. In TEE, a special probe containing a transducer is passed down the esophagus (the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach) to obtain views of the heart from behind. This allows for more detailed images of the heart structures and function compared to a standard echocardiogram, which uses a probe placed on the chest. TEE is often used in patients with poor image quality from a standard echocardiogram or when more detailed images are needed to diagnose or monitor certain heart conditions. It is typically performed by a trained cardiologist or sonographer under the direction of a cardiologist.

Left ventricular function refers to the ability of the left ventricle (the heart's lower-left chamber) to contract and relax, thereby filling with and ejecting blood. The left ventricle is responsible for pumping oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. Its function is evaluated by measuring several parameters, including:

1. Ejection fraction (EF): This is the percentage of blood that is pumped out of the left ventricle with each heartbeat. A normal ejection fraction ranges from 55% to 70%.
2. Stroke volume (SV): The amount of blood pumped by the left ventricle in one contraction. A typical SV is about 70 mL/beat.
3. Cardiac output (CO): The total volume of blood that the left ventricle pumps per minute, calculated as the product of stroke volume and heart rate. Normal CO ranges from 4 to 8 L/minute.

Assessment of left ventricular function is crucial in diagnosing and monitoring various cardiovascular conditions such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, valvular heart diseases, and cardiomyopathies.

Ventricular function, in the context of cardiac medicine, refers to the ability of the heart's ventricles (the lower chambers) to fill with blood during the diastole phase and eject blood during the systole phase. The ventricles are primarily responsible for pumping oxygenated blood out to the body (left ventricle) and deoxygenated blood to the lungs (right ventricle).

There are several ways to assess ventricular function, including:

1. Ejection Fraction (EF): This is the most commonly used measure of ventricular function. It represents the percentage of blood that is ejected from the ventricle during each heartbeat. A normal left ventricular ejection fraction is typically between 55% and 70%.
2. Fractional Shortening (FS): This is another measure of ventricular function, which calculates the change in size of the ventricle during contraction as a percentage of the original size. A normal FS for the left ventricle is typically between 25% and 45%.
3. Stroke Volume (SV): This refers to the amount of blood that is pumped out of the ventricle with each heartbeat. SV is calculated by multiplying the ejection fraction by the end-diastolic volume (the amount of blood in the ventricle at the end of diastole).
4. Cardiac Output (CO): This is the total amount of blood that the heart pumps in one minute. It is calculated by multiplying the stroke volume by the heart rate.

Impaired ventricular function can lead to various cardiovascular conditions, such as heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and valvular heart disease. Assessing ventricular function is crucial for diagnosing these conditions, monitoring treatment response, and guiding clinical decision-making.

Observer variation, also known as inter-observer variability or measurement agreement, refers to the difference in observations or measurements made by different observers or raters when evaluating the same subject or phenomenon. It is a common issue in various fields such as medicine, research, and quality control, where subjective assessments are involved.

In medical terms, observer variation can occur in various contexts, including:

1. Diagnostic tests: Different radiologists may interpret the same X-ray or MRI scan differently, leading to variations in diagnosis.
2. Clinical trials: Different researchers may have different interpretations of clinical outcomes or adverse events, affecting the consistency and reliability of trial results.
3. Medical records: Different healthcare providers may document medical histories, physical examinations, or treatment plans differently, leading to inconsistencies in patient care.
4. Pathology: Different pathologists may have varying interpretations of tissue samples or laboratory tests, affecting diagnostic accuracy.

Observer variation can be minimized through various methods, such as standardized assessment tools, training and calibration of observers, and statistical analysis of inter-rater reliability.

Stroke volume is a term used in cardiovascular physiology and medicine. It refers to the amount of blood that is pumped out of the left ventricle of the heart during each contraction (systole). Specifically, it is the difference between the volume of blood in the left ventricle at the end of diastole (when the ventricle is filled with blood) and the volume at the end of systole (when the ventricle has contracted and ejected its contents into the aorta).

Stroke volume is an important measure of heart function, as it reflects the ability of the heart to pump blood effectively to the rest of the body. A low stroke volume may indicate that the heart is not pumping efficiently, while a high stroke volume may suggest that the heart is working too hard. Stroke volume can be affected by various factors, including heart disease, high blood pressure, and physical fitness level.

The formula for calculating stroke volume is:

Stroke Volume = End-Diastolic Volume - End-Systolic Volume

Where end-diastolic volume (EDV) is the volume of blood in the left ventricle at the end of diastole, and end-systolic volume (ESV) is the volume of blood in the left ventricle at the end of systole.

Blood flow velocity is the speed at which blood travels through a specific part of the vascular system. It is typically measured in units of distance per time, such as centimeters per second (cm/s) or meters per second (m/s). Blood flow velocity can be affected by various factors, including cardiac output, vessel diameter, and viscosity of the blood. Measuring blood flow velocity is important in diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease.

Hemodynamics is the study of how blood flows through the cardiovascular system, including the heart and the vascular network. It examines various factors that affect blood flow, such as blood volume, viscosity, vessel length and diameter, and pressure differences between different parts of the circulatory system. Hemodynamics also considers the impact of various physiological and pathological conditions on these variables, and how they in turn influence the function of vital organs and systems in the body. It is a critical area of study in fields such as cardiology, anesthesiology, and critical care medicine.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Qatar" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in the Middle East, on the Arabian Peninsula. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them!

"Access to information," in a medical context, refers to the ability of individuals, patients, healthcare providers, and researchers to obtain, request, and disseminate health-related data, records, research findings, and other important information. This includes access to personal medical records, clinical trial results, evidence-based practices, and public health statistics.

Promoting access to information is crucial for informed decision-making, ensuring transparency, advancing medical research, improving patient care, and enhancing overall healthcare system performance. Various laws, regulations, and policies at the local, national, and international levels aim to protect and facilitate access to information while balancing privacy concerns, data security, and intellectual property rights.

Electronic mail, often abbreviated as email or e-mail, is a method of exchanging digital messages between people using computer networks. The term "electronic mail" is a direct comparison to traditional paper-based mail systems and has been in use since the creation of the first email system in 1971.

In medical terms, email is commonly used as a means of communication between healthcare professionals, patients, and other stakeholders in the healthcare industry. For example, physicians may use email to communicate with colleagues or staff members, while hospitals and clinics may use email to send appointment reminders or test results to patients.

Email messages can include text, images, videos, and attachments, making them a versatile tool for communication. However, it is important to note that email is not considered a secure means of transmitting sensitive medical information due to the risk of interception or unauthorized access. As such, healthcare professionals must follow established guidelines and regulations when using email to communicate protected health information (PHI) in order to maintain patient privacy and confidentiality.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "publishing" is not a term that has a medical definition. Publishing typically refers to the process of preparing and disseminating information, such as books, journals, or articles, to the public or a specific audience. It could involve both print and digital media. If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Peer review in the context of research refers to the evaluation of scientific, academic, or professional work by others working in the same field. The purpose of peer review is to ensure that the research is rigorous, valid, and relevant to the field. In a peer-review process, experts in the relevant field assess the research article, report, or other type of scholarly work for its accuracy, quality, and significance before it is published or presented at a conference.

The peer-review process typically involves several stages:

1. Submission: The author(s) submit their manuscript to a journal, conference, or other publication venue.
2. Assignment: The editor of the publication assigns the manuscript to one or more reviewers who are experts in the field.
3. Review: The reviewers evaluate the manuscript based on criteria such as originality, methodology, data analysis, interpretation of results, and contribution to the field. They provide feedback and recommendations to the editor.
4. Decision: Based on the feedback from the reviewers, the editor makes a decision about whether to accept, reject, or request revisions to the manuscript.
5. Revision: If the manuscript is rejected or requires revisions, the author(s) may have an opportunity to revise and resubmit the manuscript for further consideration.

Peer review is a critical component of the scientific process, as it helps ensure that research is held to high standards of quality and integrity. It also provides a mechanism for identifying and correcting errors or weaknesses in research before it is published or disseminated widely.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Internet" is a term that pertains to the global network of interconnected computers and servers that enable the transmission and reception of data via the internet protocol (IP). It is not a medical term and does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer them for you!

A "periodical" in the context of medicine typically refers to a type of publication that is issued regularly, such as on a monthly or quarterly basis. These publications include peer-reviewed journals, magazines, and newsletters that focus on medical research, education, and practice. They may contain original research articles, review articles, case reports, editorials, letters to the editor, and other types of content related to medical science and clinical practice.

As a "Topic," periodicals in medicine encompass various aspects such as their role in disseminating new knowledge, their impact on clinical decision-making, their quality control measures, and their ethical considerations. Medical periodicals serve as a crucial resource for healthcare professionals, researchers, students, and other stakeholders to stay updated on the latest developments in their field and to share their findings with others.

"Atrial Size and Function in Athletes". International Journal of Sports Medicine. 36 (14): 1170-1176. doi:10.1055/s-0035-1555780 ... Atrial fibrillation may also be noted on the ECG in individuals with chronic mitral regurgitation. The ECG may not show any of ... For instance, the electrocardiogram (ECG) in long-standing MR may show evidence of left atrial enlargement and left ventricular ... Also, there may be development of an irregular heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation. Findings on clinical examination ...
"Atrial Size and Function in Athletes". International Journal of Sports Medicine. 36 (14): 1170-1176. doi:10.1055/s-0035-1555780 ... ISBN 978-0-323-24126-7. Haddad, F; Doyle, R; Murphy, D. J; Hunt, S. A (2008). "Right Ventricular Function in Cardiovascular ... this is thought to be partly driven by the increased prevalence of atrial fibrillation and heart failure with preserved ... "Tricuspid regurgitation and right ventricular function after mitral valve surgery with or without concomitant tricuspid valve ...
"Atrial Size and Function in Athletes". International Journal of Sports Medicine. 36 (14): 1170-1176. doi:10.1055/s-0035-1555780 ... Tricuspid regurgitation: the backflow of blood from the right ventricle into the right atrium, owing to imperfect functioning ( ... Regurgitation in or near the heart is often caused by valvular insufficiency (insufficient function, with incomplete closure, ...
"Thyroid function abnormalities during amiodarone therapy for persistent atrial fibrillation". The American Journal of Medicine ... Its primary function is to increase the production of T3 and T4 by the thyroid gland. The most useful marker of thyroid gland ... Thyroid disease is a medical condition that affects the function of the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland is located at the ... There are several hormones that can be measured in the blood to determine how the thyroid gland is functioning. These include ...
Kochie, S. L. (January 2021). "Effects of pimobendan on left atrial transport function in cats". Journal of Veterinary Internal ... also increases blood flow in the left atrium and heart ear to a small extent and additionally improves atrial function. On the ... Atrial fibrillation detectable by ECG is an additional risk factor. Aortic thrombus can often be visualized directly by ... If only one limb is affected and there is residual motor function, there is a better chance that the cat will recover and ...
"Thyroid function abnormalities during amiodarone therapy for persistent atrial fibrillation". The American Journal of Medicine ... Thyroid function should be checked at least every six months. Hypothyroidism (slowing of the thyroid) occurs frequently; in the ... Individuals who have undergone open heart surgery are at an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation (or AF) in the ... In the ARCH trial, intravenous amiodarone (2 g administered over 2 d) has been shown to reduce the incidence of atrial ...
"Atrial endocrine function in humans with artificial hearts." ; Schwab T.R., Edwards B.S., DeVries W.C., Zimmerman R.S., Burnett ... February 1987 ; "Artificial Organs" ; PMID 3566584 "A clinical estimation model for noninvasive determination of atrial ...
Normal atrial function is essential for embryogenesis, as inactivation of the MYL7 gene was embryonic lethal at ED10.5-11.5. ... Huang C, Sheikh F, Hollander M, Cai C, Becker D, Chu PH, Evans S, Chen J (December 2003). "Embryonic atrial function is ... Atrial Light Chain-1 (ALC-1), also known as Essential Light Chain, Atrial is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MYL4 ... Shift in atrial myosin heavy chains and in ventricular myosin light chains" (PDF). European Heart Journal. 5 Suppl F: 85-93. ...
"Kv1.5 channelopathy due to KCNA5 loss-of-function mutation causes human atrial fibrillation". Human Molecular Genetics. 15 (14 ... Mutations in this gene have been related to both atrial fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. KCNA5 are also key players in ... It belongs to the delayed rectifier class, the function of which could restore the resting membrane potential of beta cells ... Potassium channel subunits capable of functioning as Src homology 3-dependent adaptors". Proceedings of the National Academy of ...
"Gain of function in IKs secondary to a mutation in KCNE5 associated with atrial fibrillation". Heart Rhythm. 5 (3): 427-35. doi ... Inherited sequence variants in human KCNE5 are associated with atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. Atrial fibrillation is ... "Gain of function in IKs secondary to a mutation in KCNE5 associated with atrial fibrillation". Heart Rhythm. 5 (3): 427-35. doi ... "Identification of a KCNE2 gain-of-function mutation in patients with familial atrial fibrillation". American Journal of Human ...
Long-term expression of isomyosins and myoendocrine functions in ectopic grafts of atrial tissue. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. ...
"Identification of a KCNE2 gain-of-function mutation in patients with familial atrial fibrillation". American Journal of Human ... "Gain-of-function mutations in potassium channel subunit KCNE2 associated with early-onset lone atrial fibrillation". Biomarkers ... As observed for hERG mutations, KCNE2 loss-of-function mutations are associated with inherited long QT syndrome, and hERG-KCNE2 ... KCNE2 is also expressed in atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes, the pancreas, pituitary gland, and lung epithelium. In situ ...
Atrial fibrillation Abnormalities in the function of MS channels can cause: Neuronal disease Muscular degeneration. Cardiac ... MSCs function as mechanotransducers capable of generating both electrical and ion flux signals as a response to external or ... In Bacteria and Archaea the function of these channels is conserved and it has been demonstrated that they play a role in ... Although MS vary in many aspects, structures and functions, all the MS studied to date share an important feature: in a process ...
... has exactly the opposite function of the atrial natriuretic hormone secreted by the heart. Aldosterone is part of ... The amount of plasma renin secreted is an indirect function of the serum potassium as probably determined by sensors in the ... Aldosterone levels vary as an inverse function of sodium intake as sensed via osmotic pressure. The slope of the response of ... they share 11β-hydroxylation and 18-hydroxylation functions), but aldosterone synthase is also able to perform an 18-oxidation ...
Theodorakis GN, Panou F, Markianos M, Fragakis N, Livanis EG, Kremastinos DT (February 1997). "Left atrial function and atrial ... and decreased left atrial total emptying fraction associated with ventricular pacing. The loss of physiologic timing of atrial ... Atrial contraction against a closed tricuspid valve can cause pulsation in the neck and abdomen, headache, cough, and jaw pain ... Complications include atrial fibrillation, thrombo-embolic events, and heart failure. The cause is poorly understood. However ...
He is best known for his discovery of the mechanical function of atrial chambers of the heart. With experimental evidence on ... Rai, Dinker B. (2022). Mechanical Function of the Atrial Diastole: A New Discovery: The Motion of Blood in the Venous System- ... February 1986 Rai, Dinker B. (March 2013). "The dynamic function of the atrial diastole of the heart and motion of venous ... Dinker B. Rai". Newspaper News India 15 September 1985 page 25 Rai, Dinker B. (March 2013). "The Dynamic Function of the Atrial ...
"Assessment of sino-atrial and atrio-ventricular nodal function in the conscious horse by intra-atrial electrostimulation". ... was Assessment of sino-atrial and atrio-ventricular nodal function in the conscious horse by intra-atrial electrostimulation. ...
Li VW, So EK, Li W, Chow PC, Cheung YF (October 2021). "Interplay between right atrial function and liver stiffness in adults ... Arrhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia, atrial fibrillation/flutter, and intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardia can occur ... Atrial septal defects (ASDs) are a kind of congenital heart abnormality in which a tiny opening exists between the two atria of ... Differences in right atrial and ventricular mechanics and liver stiffness was also observed in adults with repaired TOF, as ...
Tuomi JM, Chidiac P, Jones DL (February 2010). "Evidence for enhanced M3 muscarinic receptor function and sensitivity to atrial ... RGS2 functions as a GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) which acts to increase the natural GTPase activity of the Gα subunit. By ... There has also been some evidence of a role of RGS2 in atrial arrhythmias where RGS2 deficient mice exhibited prolonged and ... 1998). "RGS2/G0S8 is a selective inhibitor of Gqalpha function". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 94 (26): 14389-93. doi:10.1073/ ...
"A gain-of-function TBX20 mutation causes congenital atrial septal defects, patent foramen ovale and cardiac valve defects". ... Proper function of Tbx20 is essential because it controls other genes that regulate cardiomyocyte proliferation, such as Tbx2 ... Studies in mouse, human and fruitfly have shown that this gene is essential for early heart development, adult heart function ... function and adaptation". Development. 132 (10): 2451-62. doi:10.1242/dev.01799. PMID 15843414. Takeuchi JK, Mileikovskaia M, ...
"Effects of human atrial natriuretic peptide on cardiac function and hemodynamics in patients with high plasma BNP levels". Int ... This gene encodes a caveolin family member, which functions as a component of the caveolae plasma membranes found in most cell ... Mutations resulting in loss-of-function of caveolin-3 cause cardiac myocyte hypertrophy, dilation of the heart, and depression ... Disruption of caveolin-3 disturbs the structure of cardiac caveolae and blocks atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression, a ...
The project was expanded by inviting all HUNT4 participants with atrial fibrillation to measure cardiac function and cardiac ...
"Effects of prolonged infusions of atrial natriuretic peptide and isoproterenol on the mechanical and endocrine function of ... ISBN 978-1-4684-4865-8. Ferrari, R.; Di Mauro, S.; Sherwood, G. (1992). L-carnitine and Its Role in Medicine: From Function to ... Studies of body water and sodium, renal function, hemodynamic indexes, and plasma hormones in untreated congestive cardiac ... Studies of body water and sodium, renal function, hemodynamics, and plasma hormones during edema and after recovery". ...
... is a function of atrial contraction. The ratio between e' and a' is also a measure of diastolic function, in addition to the ... Before the advent of tissue Doppler, systolic function was usually assessed with ejection fraction (EF), and diastolic function ... this pressure difference is both a function of the pressure drop during early relaxation and the initial atrial pressure. In ... In the right ventricle this is not an important principle, as the right atrial pressure is the same as central venous pressure ...
... of the bHLH transcription factor Hrt2 in repression of atrial gene expression and maintenance of postnatal cardiac function". ... all notch proteins fail to function properly. As yet, the manner by which the glycosylation of notch affects function is not ... Studies have revealed that both loss- and gain-of-function of the Notch pathway results in defects in AV canal development. In ... The addition of O-fucose by POFUT1 is absolutely necessary for notch function, and, without the enzyme to add O-fucose, ...
Nocturnal atrial fibrillation caused by gain of function mutation in KCND2, encoding pore-forming alpha subunit of the cardiac ... PCCA2 - Progressive Cerebello-Cerebral Atrophy type 2: due to VPS53 mutation, abrogating function of the gARP complex. 1:37 ... "Nocturnal Atrial Fibrillation Caused by Mutation in KCND2, Encoding Pore-Forming (α) Subunit of the Cardiac Kv4.2 Potassium ...
Al-Saady, N. M.; O. A. Abel; A. J. Camm (1999). "Left atrial appendage: structure, function, and role in thromboembolism". ... This form of atrial fibrillation occurs in people of all ages but is most common in the elderly, in those with other atrial ... In atrial fibrillation, the lack of an organized atrial contraction can result in some stagnant blood in the left atrium (LA) ... Diener, HC; Hart, RG; Koudstaal, PJ; Lane, DA; Lip, GYH (February 2019). "Atrial Fibrillation and Cognitive Function: JACC ...
5p fails as a biomarker for systemic ventricular function in adults after atrial repair for transposition of the great arteries ... MicroRNAs function to regulate the expression levels of other genes by several mechanisms. MicroRNA Smith RA, Jedlinski DJ, ...
... gain-of-function KCNE1 mutations are associated with early-onset atrial fibrillation. A common KCNE1 polymorphism, S38G, is ... Atrial KCNE1 expression was downregulated in a porcine model of post-operative atrial fibrillation following lung lobectomy. ... Han HG, Wang HS, Yin Z, Jiang H, Fang M, Han J (20 October 2014). "KCNE1 112G>a polymorphism and atrial fibrillation risk: a ... KCNQ1 is also essential for the normal function of many different epithelial tissues, but in these non-excitable cells it is ...
Occasionally pacing of the atrium at a rate higher than the JET may allow improved cardiac function by allowing atrial and ... as they do during atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter), the AV node will limit the electrical activity that conducts to the ... This function of the AV node is important, because if the signals generated in the atria of the heart were to increase in rate ... There may be atrio-ventricular disassociation with more ventricular signals than atrial signals. The cause of JET is felt to be ...
... Eur Heart J. 2022 Jun 6;43(22):2127-2135. doi: ... Aims: We aimed to investigate the association of clinically overt and silent brain lesions with cognitive function in atrial ... Keywords: Atrial fibrillation; Brain infarction; Cognitive function; Magnetic resonance imaging; Oral anticoagulation. ...
A study by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center has strengthened the link between thyroid function and atrial ... Normal variations in thyroid function may be linked to atrial fibrillation risk. ... A study by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center has strengthened the link between thyroid function and atrial ... found that genetically determined variations in thyroid function, even those which fall within a physiologically accepted " ...
Atrial function was evaluated in M-mode and 2D projections and by cross-sectional Doppler echocardiography. The results ... The aim of our study was to evaluate left atrial function in patients after renal transplantation and compare them with ... total left atrial fraction (FClp), or IElp ratio.Conclusion: Abnormal function of the left atrium in the course of uremia ... In both investigated groups there were no differences in minimal left atrial dimensions (LAmin), PEPlp/Etlp ratio, P wave time ...
Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are first-line agents for ... DOACs for patients with renal dysfunction and/or extremes in body weight.To evaluate the impact body weight and renal function ... The Impact of Body Weight and Renal Function on the Risk of Bleeding With Direct Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation.. ... This retrospective cohort study included adults with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) or atrial flutter (AFL) receiving a ...
The main function of the ventricle to deliver enough blood to the body for their regular and normal functioning. And the blood ... Types of Atrial Fibrillation. On the basis of different research and studies, atrial fibrillation are classified into different ... Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation. Person who is atrial fibrillation shows various different symptoms. Some of the common ... Reason behind Atrial Fibrillation. Major factors which work behind atrial fibrillation is abnormal heart beat. As during ...
A substantial proportion of atrial fibrillation (AF) cases cannot be explained by acquired AF risk factors. Limited guidelines ... A Gain-of-Function TBX5 mutation is associated with atypical Holt-Oram syndrome and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Circ Res. ... Kv1.5 Channelopathy Due to KCNA5 loss-of-function mutation causes human atrial fibrillation. Hum Mol Genet. 2006;15:2185-91. ... KCNQ1 Gain-of-function mutation in familial atrial fibrillation. Science 2003;299:251-4. ...
... size is often used as a surrogate marker of LA function in clinical practice, with larger atria thought to represent a ... Boyd AC, Richards DA, Marwick T, Thomas L: Atrial strain rate is a sensitive measure of alterations in atrial phasic function ... Left atrial function to identify patients with atrial fibrillation at high risk of stroke: new insights from a large registry. ... Left atrial strain measured by two-dimensional speckle tracking represents a new tool to evaluate left atrial function. J Am ...
Influence of diastolic mechanics on cardiac electrophysiology: effects on sino-atrial node function ... Influence of diastolic mechanics on cardiac electrophysiology: effects on sino-atrial node function ...
Relation of atrial natriuretic pepitdes to left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in heart failure. In: European ... Relation of atrial natriuretic pepitdes to left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in heart failure. European Journal ... Relation of atrial natriuretic pepitdes to left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in heart failure. / Wijbenga, JAM ( ... title = "Relation of atrial natriuretic pepitdes to left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in heart failure", ...
In this study our aim was to determine the changes in left atrial functions in patients with CSX. ... OBJECTIVE: Cardiac syndrome X (CSX) affects left ventricular functions due to myocardial ischaemia. ...
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is treated with rate control medications, antiarrhythmic ... Association of Kidney Function With Risk of Adverse Effects of Therapies for Atrial Fibrillation. ... Atrial fibrillation (AF) is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is treated with rate control medications, antiarrhythmic ...
Atrial septal defect is characterized by a defect in the interatrial septum allowing pulmonary venous return from the left ... Atrial septal defect (ASD) is one of the more commonly recognized congenital cardiac anomalies presenting in adulthood. ... Atrial function after surgical and percutaneous closure of atrial septal defect: a strain rate imaging study. J Am Soc ... left atrial pressure may exceed right atrial pressure by several millimeters of mercury, whereas with large ASD, mean atrial ...
Evaluation of the local atrial function by regional speckle tracking imaging using intracardiac echocardiography. ... Effects of the MitraClip on right heart function and tricuspid valve regurgitation ...
Left atrial function assessed by left atrial strain in patients with left circumflex branch culprit acute myocardial infarction ... Echocardiography was performed to evaluate left ventricular diastolic function, LA volume, and LA function. Systolic (LAS ) and ... We hypothesized that LA function would be further decreased in AMI patients with a culprit lesion in the left circumflex branch ... The lower global LAS strain might suggest decreased LA function resulting from ischemic insult by AMI with culprit lesions in ...
"Atrial Size and Function in Athletes". International Journal of Sports Medicine. 36 (14): 1170-1176. doi:10.1055/s-0035-1555780 ... Atrial fibrillation may also be noted on the ECG in individuals with chronic mitral regurgitation. The ECG may not show any of ... For instance, the electrocardiogram (ECG) in long-standing MR may show evidence of left atrial enlargement and left ventricular ... Also, there may be development of an irregular heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation. Findings on clinical examination ...
Dive into the research topics of Impact of left atrial appendage occlusion on left atrial function-The LAFIT Watchman study. ... Impact of left atrial appendage occlusion on left atrial function-The LAFIT Watchman study. ...
Atrial function was decreased in the PAF group, particularly the peak atrial longitudinal strain (L-ɛ-Max) of LA (29.3 ± 7.9% ... Atrial function analysed by strain in echocardiography is strongly associated with PAF and might enable to identify male ... The description of atrial remodelling occurring at this early stage might enable to depict predictive factors of AF in veteran ... to evaluate the left and right atrial (LA, RA) anatomical and functional (assessed by 2D strain) remodelling. No difference was ...
keywords = "Catheter ablation, Endothelial function, Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, Persistent atrial fibrillation, Renal ... Improvement in renal and endothelial function after catheter ablation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. Journal ... Improvement in renal and endothelial function after catheter ablation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. In: ... Improvement in renal and endothelial function after catheter ablation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. / Okawa ...
... are characterized by changes in the left atrial (LA) function and activation of the apoptotic process. The purpose of the ... improves left atrial contractile function and depresses inflammatory and apoptotic process. ... Echocardiographically, LA volumes were measured at mitral valve opening (Vmax), at the onset of left atrial systole (P wave of ... present study was the evaluation of the effect of mitral valve replacement on the LA function, on inflammatory process and ...
... DAscenzi, ... 2019). Reference values of left atrial size and function according to age: should we redefine the normal upper limits?. THE ... 2019). Reference values of left atrial size and function according to age: should we redefine the normal upper limits?. THE ... Furthermore, also LA function measured by strain was not affected by age. The current reference values of LAVi should be used ...
History The arrhythmic function from the still left atrial appendage (LAA). History The arrhythmic function from the still left ... Upcoming studies are had a need to determine whether LAA ligation impacts atrial fibrillation burden. was thought as the ... atrial appendage (LAA) continues to be implicated within the maintenance of persistent atrial fibrillation. voltage ...
Dive into the research topics of Characterization of the dynamic function of the pulmonary veins before and after atrial ... T1 - Characterization of the dynamic function of the pulmonary veins before and after atrial fibrillation ablation using multi- ... Characterization of the dynamic function of the pulmonary veins before and after atrial fibrillation ablation using multi- ... Characterization of the dynamic function of the pulmonary veins before and after atrial fibrillation ablation using multi- ...
Structure and Function of the Left Atrium and Left Atrial Appendage: AF and Stroke Implications. Journal of the American ... Structure and Function of the Left Atrium and Left Atrial Appendage : AF and Stroke Implications. In: Journal of the American ... Structure and Function of the Left Atrium and Left Atrial Appendage: AF and Stroke Implications. / Delgado, Victoria; Di Biase ... title = "Structure and Function of the Left Atrium and Left Atrial Appendage: AF and Stroke Implications", ...
Predict the Development of Atrial Fibrillation Post-Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Operation ... Pre-Operative Estimation of Endothelial Function and Plasma sCD40L as Well as Vascular Redox State, Predict the Development of ... Pre-Operative Estimation of Endothelial Function and Plasma sCD40L as Well as Vascular Redox State, ...
3D modelling of atrial and ventricular shape and function in a patient following the new modified Mustard operation, Page 1 of ... 3D modelling of atrial and ventricular shape and function in a patient following the new modified Mustard operation ... oa 3D modelling of atrial and ventricular shape and function in a patient following the new modified Mustard operation ... Comparison of long-term outcomes of atrial repair of simple transposition with implications for a late arterial switch strategy ...
Cognitive function and adherence to anticoagulation treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation. ... De novo atrial fibrillation 5 (3.8) 45 (51.1) < .001 3 (12.5) 47 (23.9) .209 2 (6.7) 48 (25.1) .025 ... De novo atrial fibrillation 38 (28.6) 12 (13.6) .009 5 (19.2) 4 (15.4) .714 0.085 ... Atrial fibrillation and cognitive impairment: some answers but many questions. Rev Esp Cardiol. 2020;73:869-7010.1016/j.rec. ...
The role of the autonomic nervous system in the genesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been well studied; however, the ... Abnormal vasovagal reaction, autonomic function, and heart rate variability in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. ... Atrial fibrillation produced by prolonged rapid atrial pacing is associated with heterogeneous changes in atrial sympathetic ... Localization of left atrial ganglionated plexi in patients with atrial fibrillation: techniques and technology. J Cardiovasc ...
Left Atrial Function and Sudden Cardiac Death. Lee D, Parkash R. Lee D, et al. Among authors: parkash r. Can J Cardiol. 2019 ... 2021 CAEP Acute Atrial Fibrillation/Flutter Best Practices Checklist. Stiell IG, de Wit K, Scheuermeyer FX, Vadeboncoeur A, ... Randomized Ablation-Based Rhythm-Control Versus Rate-Control Trial in Patients With Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation: ... The 2020 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Comprehensive Guidelines for the Management of Atrial ...
Left atrial appendage obliteration is an option for reducing stroke risk. Two implantable devices used to occlude the appendage ... Surgical treatments for atrial fibrillation are reserved for patients who are undergoing cardiac surgery for other reasons. ... Pulse rate is sensitive, but not specific, for diagnosis, and suspected atrial fibrillation should be confirmed with 12-lead ... Because normal electrocardiographic findings do not rule out atrial fibrillation, home monitoring is recommended if there is ...
TBX5 loss-of-function mutation contributes to atrial fibrillation and atypical Holt-Oram syndrome. Mol Med Rep. 2016 May. 13(5 ... A gain-of-function TBX5 mutation is associated with atypical Holt-Oram syndrome and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Circ Res. ... Developmental structure-function insights from Tbx5(del/+) mouse model of Holt-Oram syndrome. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. ... Atrial fibrillation and other clinical manifestations of altered TBX5 dosage in typical Holt-Oram syndrome. Circ Res. 2008 Sep ...
  • The contractile function of the superior PVs was impaired in paroxysmal AF patients. (nycu.edu.tw)
  • Experimental model for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation arising at the pulmonary vein-atrial junctions. (springer.com)
  • Bettoni M, Zimmermann M. Autonomic tone variations before the onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. (springer.com)
  • Autonomic denervation added to pulmonary vein isolation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a randomized clinical trial. (springer.com)
  • Ablation therapy may be superior to antiarrhythmics in selected patients, including those with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who are symptomatic but without structural heart disease, patients who are intolerant of antiarrhythmics, and patients with inadequate pharmacologic rhythm control. (aafp.org)
  • A gain-of-function TBX5 mutation is associated with atypical Holt-Oram syndrome and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. (medscape.com)
  • Aims: Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) is frequently encountered in pacemaker patients, most commonly in sick sinus syndrome. (hku.hk)
  • this is a novel mutation, in that it is associated with a gain-of-function mechanism and is associated with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and no structural heart disease. (medscape.com)
  • Background and Objective: Growing evidence shows that certain acute exposures, especially alcohol, may trigger episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). (lu.se)
  • The left atrium (LA) plays an integral role in cardiac performance by modulating left ventricular (LV) filling with its reservoir, conduit, and contractile functions [ 1 ] . (researchsquare.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: Cardiac syndrome X (CSX) affects left ventricular functions due to myocardial ischaemia. (comu.edu.tr)
  • Atrial septal defect (ASD) is one of the more commonly recognized congenital cardiac anomalies presenting in adulthood. (medscape.com)
  • Depending on the size of the defect, size of the shunt, and associated anomalies, this can result in a spectrum of disease ranging from no significant cardiac sequelae to right-sided volume overload, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and even atrial arrhythmias. (medscape.com)
  • Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a congenital cardiac disorder caused by the spontaneous malformation of the interatrial septum. (medscape.com)
  • In addition, analysis of the pre-ablation PV function showed that the angles, which shifted during cardiac cycle of left (P = 0.035) and right (P = 0.014) inferior PV, were significantly decreased in recurrent patients. (nycu.edu.tw)
  • Yu Y, Wei C, Liu L, Lian AL, Qu XF, Yu G. Atrial fibrillation increases sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons in the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. (springer.com)
  • Atrial fibrillation is a supraventricular arrhythmia that adversely affects cardiac function and increases the risk of stroke. (aafp.org)
  • Surgical treatments for atrial fibrillation are reserved for patients who are undergoing cardiac surgery for other reasons. (aafp.org)
  • Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia characterized by irregular and rapid electrical activity in the atria. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Advanced imaging modalities, including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), offer valuable insights into atrial structure and function. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Material/Methods: Consecutive cases of NICMPs with impaired systolic function and controls were included from a computerized database of cardiac magnetic resonance exams for a 2.5-year period. (kbco.hr)
  • Background: Cardiovascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) can be lowered by catheter ablation. (elsevierpure.com)
  • We hypothesized the underlying mechanism was improvement in renal and endothelial function corresponding to AF burden, and investigated whether restoration of sinus rhythm (SR) after ablation affected these functions according to AF type. (elsevierpure.com)
  • In PeAF patients with CKD, an improved endothelial function after ablation was associated with an improved renal function. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Understanding pulmonary vein (PV) function before and after catheter ablation can validate the benefit of the treatment and provide mechanistic insight into atrial fibrillation (AF). (nycu.edu.tw)
  • Pulmonary vein region ablation in experimental vagal atrial fibrillation: role of pulmonary veins versus autonomic ganglia. (springer.com)
  • Ablation therapy is used to destroy abnormal foci responsible for atrial fibrillation. (aafp.org)
  • Atrial ventricular nodal ablation is recommended for patients refractory to medical therapy, usually older patients needing a pacemaker. (aafp.org)
  • Incorporating factors such as left atrial size, atrial substrate characteristics, and patient symptom burden can aid in identifying patients who are suitable candidates for catheter ablation. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Additionally, the integration of advanced mapping technologies, such as contact force sensing and high-resolution imaging, enables personalized ablation strategies based on individual atrial anatomy and electrical properties [ 4 ]. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Researchers see transvenous ablation of the right greater splanchnic nerve (GSN) as potentially appropriate for patients with HF, regardless of ventricular function or acuity. (medscape.com)
  • Echocardiography was performed to evaluate left ventricular diastolic function, LA volume, and LA function. (bvsalud.org)
  • Left ventricular (LV) size and function were not different among groups, except LV mass index. (unisi.it)
  • Atrial fibrillation is a supraventricular arrhythmia characterized by uncoordinated electrical activation of the atria and an irregular, often rapid, ventricular response causing hemodynamic compromise. (aafp.org)
  • Similar relationships have been demonstrated for patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular diastolic function [ 19 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Other causes of coronary embolism include atrial fibrillation, left atrial tumours, bacterial endocarditis, atrial and ventricular mural thrombus, syphilis and pulmonary vein thrombosis [7]. (who.int)
  • In atrial fibrillation, the atria do not contract, and the atrioventricular (AV) conduction system is bombarded with many electrical stimuli, causing inconsistent impulse transmission and an irregularly irregular ventricular rate, which is usually in the tachycardia rate range. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The aim of the study was to evaluate the left atrial and ventricular geometry, systolic and diastolic functions in patients with CLD. (bvsalud.org)
  • However, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, left atrial enlargement, and increased left ventricular mass index (LVMI) were more prevalent among the patients with CLD compared to controls (P (bvsalud.org)
  • abstract = "Atrial fibrillation (AF) and stroke are important major health problems that share common risk factors and frequently coexist. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Atrial fibrillation (AF) is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is treated with rate control medications, antiarrhythmic medications, as well as anticoagulation and procedures, each of which have associated risks. (kaiserpermanente.org)
  • Impact of anticoagulation in patients with dementia and atrial fibrillation. (revespcardiol.org)
  • Clinical question: In older patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib), does frailty or cognitive function affect the risk of anticoagulation use? (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Cite this: Kidney Disease Is Linked to Higher Risk for Atrial Fibrillation - Medscape - Sep 06, 2017. (medscape.com)
  • This retrospective cohort study included adults with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) or atrial flutter (AFL) receiving a DOAC ≥12 months. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • 1 , 2 As the atria fibrillate, blood pools in the atria, and a clot may form in the atrial appendage, increasing the risk of embolic stroke. (aafp.org)
  • Atrial thrombi may form, causing a significant risk of embolic stroke. (msdmanuals.com)
  • LA longitudinal phasic strain Sa (absolute peak strain during atrial contraction), Se (peak strain at early diastole) and Stot (total atrial strain =Sa+Se), representing contractile, conduit, and reservoir function respectively, were measured using off-line 2D STE software in apical 4 chamber view, and data were compared among groups at different LA size and between sub-groups in normal LA size with and without hypertension (HT). (researchsquare.com)
  • Likely some augmentation occurs during atrial contraction. (medscape.com)
  • History The arrhythmic function from the still left atrial appendage (LAA) continues to be implicated within the maintenance of persistent atrial fibrillation. (academicediting.org)
  • Left atrial appendage obliteration is an option for reducing stroke risk. (aafp.org)
  • The atrial lead was implanted in either the right atrial appendage (RAA) (n = 83) or the right low-atrial septum (LAS) (n = 94). (hku.hk)
  • Backgrounds: Alterations in the atrial structure and function associated with aging result in electric remodeling of the left atrium (LA) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). (korea.ac.kr)
  • The magnitude of the left-to-right shunt across the atrial septal defect (ASD) depends on the defect size, the relative compliance of the ventricles, and the relative resistance in both the pulmonary and systemic circulation. (medscape.com)
  • A 2-dimensional echocardiographic picture taken from subxiphoid window showing a large secundum atrial septal defect (arrow) in a 7-year-old boy with Holt-Oram syndrome. (medscape.com)
  • 6 - 8 The prevalence of atrial fibrillation increases with age, and the associated cost of medical care is high. (aafp.org)
  • We aimed to investigate the association of clinically overt and silent brain lesions with cognitive function in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. (nih.gov)
  • To evaluate the impact body weight and renal function have on major and clinically relevant nonmajor (CRNM) bleeding events and ischemic strokes in AF patients receiving a DOAC. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • In this study our aim was to determine the changes in left atrial functions in patients with CSX. (comu.edu.tr)
  • Left atrial function assessed by left atrial strain in patients with left circumflex branch culprit acute myocardial infarction. (bvsalud.org)
  • We hypothesized that LA function would be further decreased in AMI patients with a culprit lesion in the left circumflex branch (LCX). (bvsalud.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with mitral stenosis (MS) and heart failure (HF) are characterized by changes in the left atrial (LA) function and activation of the apoptotic process. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The purpose of the present study was the evaluation of the effect of mitral valve replacement on the LA function, on inflammatory process and apoptotic markers in patients with MS and HF. (ox.ac.uk)
  • CONCLUSION: The present findings indicate that mitral valve replacement in patients with mitral valve stenosis, reduces the size of the left atrium, improves left atrial contractile function and depresses inflammatory and apoptotic process. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Localization of left atrial ganglionated plexi in patients with atrial fibrillation: techniques and technology. (springer.com)
  • Pollicization to improve function of index finger is recommended for patients with aplasia of the thumb. (medscape.com)
  • Prevalence and spectrum of TBX5 mutation in patients with lone atrial fibrillation. (medscape.com)
  • By assessing factors like left atrial size, fibrosis, and fibrotic burden, these imaging techniques aid in risk stratification and identifying patients who may benefit from specific interventions or therapies. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Methods and results: Patients with pacemaker indication and PAF received a DDDR-pacemaker, which included an automatic atrial overdrive (AO) algorithm. (hku.hk)
  • Non-vitamin K anticoagulants can be associated with lower kidney damage when compared to warfarin in atrial fibrillation patients, found a new study published in Journal of the American College journal. (medindia.net)
  • Patients with atrial fibrillation - a potent risk factor for stroke -- commonly take these medications. (medindia.net)
  • Kidney function decline in patients taking oral anticoagulant drugs is an important topic that has been overlooked in previous clinical trials," says lead author Xiaoxi Yao, Ph.D. "Even our past work at Mayo Clinic has been primarily focused on risks for stroke or bleeding. (medindia.net)
  • Our study demonstrated that renal function decline is very common among atrial fibrillation patients on blood thinners," says Dr. Yao. (medindia.net)
  • About 1 in 4 patients had significantly reduced kidney function within two years of being on any of these medications, and 1 in 7 patients had acute kidney injury. (medindia.net)
  • In general, patients with atrial fibrillation taking blood-thinning medications tend to have declining kidney function over time," says Dr. Noseworthy. (medindia.net)
  • These patients had atrial fibrillation and started taking oral anticoagulants -- apixaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban or warfarin -- sometime between Oct. 1, 2010, and April 30, 2016. (medindia.net)
  • They found that the cumulative risk of one of these four events occurring within two years of beginning the medication was 24.4 percent, 4 percent, 14.8 percent and 1.7 percent, respectively, proving that kidney function decline is common in these patients. (medindia.net)
  • Patients with atrial fibrillation already face a high risk of kidney disease, perhaps because many such patients have risk factors, such as advanced age, diabetes, and hypertension," says Dr. Yao. (medindia.net)
  • Many drugs these patients are taking rely on kidney function for drug elimination. (medindia.net)
  • Short-term fluctuations of plasma NT-proBNP levels in patients with new-onset atrial fibrillation: a way to assess time of onset? (bmj.com)
  • Atrial fibrillation tends to occur in patients with an underlying heart disorder. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Conclusion: The study demonstrated increased left atrial diameter, increased LVMI associated with diastolic dysfunction, and preserved systolic function at rest among CLD patients. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Impact of Body Weight and Renal Function on the Risk of Bleeding With Direct Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are first-line agents for prevention. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • The choice between vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) is influenced by patient characteristics such as age, renal function, and comorbidities. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Because normal electrocardiographic findings do not rule out atrial fibrillation, home monitoring is recommended if there is clinical suspicion of arrhythmia despite normal test results. (aafp.org)
  • Atrial fibrillation is associated with a fivefold increased risk of stroke, 3 - 5 and it is the most common arrhythmia. (aafp.org)
  • Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia in the general population, affecting more than 2 million adults in the United States. (medscape.com)
  • Therefore, we assessed LA phasic strain with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (2D STE) in a high CVD risk community population to explore the relationship between LA phasic function and LA size to answer two questions: (1) Does the larger LA size means worse function? (researchsquare.com)
  • All subjects underwent a resting-electrocardiogram (ECG) to assess the electric remodelling of P-waves as well as an echocardiography, to evaluate the left and right atrial (LA, RA) anatomical and functional (assessed by 2D strain) remodelling. (hal.science)
  • Conclusion - Atrial function analysed by strain in echocardiography is strongly associated with PAF and might enable to identify male endurance veteran athletes at risk to develop AF. (hal.science)
  • However, in transoesophageal echocardiography, there was a semi-mobile thrombus on the left atrial surface of the valve measuring 5 × 5 mm ( Figure 2 ). (who.int)
  • Worldwide epidemiology of atrial fibrillation: A global burden of disease 2010 study. (nature.com)
  • Genetic predisposition, clinical risk factor burden, and lifetime risk of atrial fibrillation. (nature.com)
  • Upcoming studies are had a need to determine whether LAA ligation impacts atrial fibrillation burden. (academicediting.org)
  • Atrial fibrillation (AF) burden defined as cumulative time in mode switch was not reduced during automatic AO from either the RAA or from the LAS. (hku.hk)
  • Population aging is associated with an increased prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) and dementia. (revespcardiol.org)
  • Furthermore, conflicting results have been reported about the influence of age on LA size and data on the impact of age on LA myocardial function are scanty. (unisi.it)
  • TOMTEC has supported the Myocardial Function Imaging Symposium in Leuven, that took place from February 4-6. (tomtec.de)
  • In most cases, the defect lies superior in the atrial septum near the entry of superior vena cava. (medscape.com)
  • Newswise - A study by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center has strengthened the link between thyroid function and atrial fibrillation (AF), an irregular heart rhythm that increases the risk of stroke and other heart-related complications. (newswise.com)
  • I. Some of major Complications of atrial fibrillation include: heart failure and stroke. (vedantu.com)
  • Systolic function of the left ventricle was similar in the two arms. (bvsalud.org)
  • Also, there may be development of an irregular heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation. (wikipedia.org)
  • We assessed the dynamic function of four PVs by MDCT at systolic and diastolic phases. (nycu.edu.tw)
  • In clinical practice, LA size, an essential component of echocardiographic parameters, is easily available and widely used as a surrogate marker of its function and regarded as a powerful predictor for adverse clinical outcomes of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) [ 2 - 8 ] . (researchsquare.com)
  • However, in many cases, firing of an ectopic focus within venous structures adjacent to the atria (usually the pulmonary veins) is responsible for initiation and perhaps maintenance of atrial fibrillation. (msdmanuals.com)
  • 2019). Reference values of left atrial size and function according to age: should we redefine the normal upper limits? (unisi.it)
  • Echocardiographically, LA volumes were measured at mitral valve opening (Vmax), at the onset of left atrial systole (P wave of the electrocardiogram, Vp) and at the mitral valve closure (Vmin). (ox.ac.uk)
  • Darbar D. Genetics of atrial fibrillation: Rare mutations, common polymorphisms, and clinical relevance. (nature.com)
  • Kalstø S, Siland J, Rienstra M, Christophersen I. Atrial fibrillation genetics update: Toward clinical implementation. (nature.com)
  • Left atrial (LA) size is often used as a surrogate marker of LA function in clinical practice, with larger atria thought to represent a "dysfunctioning" atrium, since there is no accepted 'gold' standard to evaluate LA function. (researchsquare.com)
  • The exact relationship between LA size and phasic function, and whether LA dysfunction occur before LA enlargement (LAE) may be of clinical interest while have not been fully studied. (researchsquare.com)
  • Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common arrhythmias, affecting between 3 and 6 million adults in the US. (msdmanuals.com)
  • 2018 focused update of the canadian cardiovascular society guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation. (nature.com)
  • The 2020 Canadian cardiovascular society/canadian heart rhythm society comprehensive guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation. (nature.com)
  • Laboratory findings revealed low leukocyte cardiovascular conditions, particularly atrial fibril- count and lymphopenia (Appendix, https://ww- lation, although both were adequately treated with wnc.cdc.gov/EID/article/26/9/20-1791-App1.pdf). (cdc.gov)
  • LA phasic function remodeling occurs before LAE and continues with LAE, with reservoir, conduit and contractile function being affected unparalleled. (researchsquare.com)
  • LA contractile function was assessed by the LA active emptying fraction (ACTEF). (ox.ac.uk)
  • In addition, alterations of the atrial cardiomyocytes, increase of noncollagen deposits in the interstitial space and fibrosis, favor the occurrence of re-entry that predisposes to AF. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Left atrial (LA) remodeling is an important underlying substrate for AF and stroke. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Eventually, AF further impairs LA function and promotes LA remodeling, closing a self-perpetuating vicious circle. (elsevierpure.com)