Percutaneous transluminal procedure for removing atheromatous plaque from the coronary arteries. Both directional (for removing focal atheromas) and rotational (for removing concentric atheromatous plaque) atherectomy devices have been used.
Endovascular procedure in which atheromatous plaque is excised by a cutting or rotating catheter. It differs from balloon and laser angioplasty procedures which enlarge vessels by dilation but frequently do not remove much plaque. If the plaque is removed by surgical excision under general anesthesia rather than by an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ENDARTERECTOMY.
The veins and arteries of the HEART.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.
Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.
The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.
Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.
The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.
A technique utilizing a laser coupled to a catheter which is used in the dilatation of occluded blood vessels. This includes laser thermal angioplasty where the laser energy heats up a metal tip, and direct laser angioplasty where the laser energy directly ablates the occlusion. One form of the latter approach uses an EXCIMER LASER which creates microscopically precise cuts without thermal injury. When laser angioplasty is performed in combination with balloon angioplasty it is called laser-assisted balloon angioplasty (ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, LASER-ASSISTED).
Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Techniques using laser energy in combination with a balloon catheter to perform angioplasty. These procedures can take several forms including: 1, laser fiber delivering the energy while the inflated balloon centers the fiber and occludes the blood flow; 2, balloon angioplasty immediately following laser angioplasty; or 3, laser energy transmitted through angioplasty balloons that contain an internal fiber.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
Spasm of the large- or medium-sized coronary arteries.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of CORONARY VESSELS. Most coronary aneurysms are due to CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS, and the rest are due to inflammatory diseases, such as KAWASAKI DISEASE.
Complete blockage of blood flow through one of the CORONARY ARTERIES, usually from CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g., ATHERECTOMY; ENDARTERECTOMY; THROMBECTOMY; PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL LASER ANGIOPLASTY). PTCA was the dominant form of PCI, before the widespread use of stenting.
Precordial pain at rest, which may precede a MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.
Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.
Motion pictures of the passage of contrast medium through blood vessels.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.
The hospital unit in which patients with acute cardiac disorders receive intensive care.
The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.
A condition that is caused by recurring atheroembolism in the lower extremities. It is characterized by cyanotic discoloration of the toes, usually the first, fourth, and fifth toes. Discoloration may extend to the lateral aspect of the foot. Despite the gangrene-like appearance, blue toes may respond to conservative therapy without amputation.
The vein which drains the foot and leg.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
Hospitals organized and controlled by a group of physicians who practice together and provide each other with mutual support.
Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery performed on the interior of blood vessels.
Lack of perfusion in the EXTREMITIES resulting from atherosclerosis. It is characterized by INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION, and an ANKLE BRACHIAL INDEX of 0.9 or less.
Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).
Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.
Lesions formed within the walls of ARTERIES.
Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Coronary artery bypass surgery on a beating HEART without a CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS (diverting the flow of blood from the heart and lungs through an oxygenator).
The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.
The restoration of blood supply to the myocardium. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.
The period following a surgical operation.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
Analyses for a specific enzyme activity, or of the level of a specific enzyme that is used to assess health and disease risk, for early detection of disease or disease prediction, diagnosis, and change in disease status.
An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.
Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.
Methods of creating machines and devices.
Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.
A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.
A clinically significant reduction in blood supply to the BRAIN STEM and CEREBELLUM (i.e., VERTEBROBASILAR INSUFFICIENCY) resulting from reversal of blood flow through the VERTEBRAL ARTERY from occlusion or stenosis of the proximal subclavian or brachiocephalic artery. Common symptoms include VERTIGO; SYNCOPE; and INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION of the involved upper extremity. Subclavian steal may also occur in asymptomatic individuals. (From J Cardiovasc Surg 1994;35(1):11-4; Acta Neurol Scand 1994;90(3):174-8)
The therapy of the same disease in a patient, with the same agent or procedure repeated after initial treatment, or with an additional or alternate measure or follow-up. It does not include therapy which requires more than one administration of a therapeutic agent or regimen. Retreatment is often used with reference to a different modality when the original one was inadequate, harmful, or unsuccessful.
The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
A technique for assisting the circulation by decreasing the afterload of the left ventricle and augmenting the diastolic pressure. It may be achieved by intra-aortic balloon, or by implanting a special pumping device in the chest, or externally by applying a negative pressure to the lower extremities during cardiac systole.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.
Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.
Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.
Narrowing below the PULMONARY VALVE or well below it in the infundibuluar chamber where the pulmonary artery originates, usually caused by a defective VENTRICULAR SEPTUM or presence of fibrous tissues. It is characterized by restricted blood outflow from the RIGHT VENTRICLE into the PULMONARY ARTERY, exertional fatigue, DYSPNEA, and chest discomfort.
Direct myocardial revascularization in which the internal mammary artery is anastomosed to the right coronary artery, circumflex artery, or anterior descending coronary artery. The internal mammary artery is the most frequent choice, especially for a single graft, for coronary artery bypass surgery.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.
A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Stents that are covered with materials that are embedded with chemicals that are gradually released into the surrounding milieu.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
The middle layer of blood vessel walls, composed principally of thin, cylindrical, smooth muscle cells and elastic tissue. It accounts for the bulk of the wall of most arteries. The smooth muscle cells are arranged in circular layers around the vessel, and the thickness of the coat varies with the size of the vessel.

The relationship between periprocedural myocardial infarction and subsequent target vessel revascularization following percutaneous coronary revascularization: insights from the EPIC trial. Evaluation of IIb/IIIa platelet receptor antagonist 7E3 in Preventing Ischemic Complications. (1/228)

OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine whether periprocedural myocardial infarction complicating percutaneous coronary revascularization is associated with subsequent clinical restenosis, as judged by the need for target vessel revascularization. BACKGROUND: Although myocardial enzyme elevation following angioplasty is associated with increased late mortality, its effect on subsequent clinical restenosis, as assessed by the need for late target vessel revascularization (TVR), is unknown. METHODS: Serial myocardial enzyme determinations were performed on 2,099 patients who underwent angioplasty or atherectomy in the Evaluation of IIb/IIIa platelet receptor antagonist 7E3 in Preventing Ischemic Complications (EPIC) trial. Thirty-day survivors were prospectively followed for three years for adverse clinical events including death and need for TVR. RESULTS: Within the study population, periprocedural creatine kinase (CK) elevation was a predictor of late mortality. Among patients with elevated CK, however, a paradoxical decrease in the need for late TVR was present. This relationship became progressively more profound as the magnitude of CK release increased. Late TVR occurred in 29.8% of patients with no CK elevation, 24.8% with CK elevation to >3 times normal, and 16.9% with >10 times elevation (hazard ratio 0.51, 95% CI 0.29, 0.91). CONCLUSIONS: In the EPIC study, patients with periprocedural MI were less likely to develop clinical restenosis as measured by the need for TVR. Mechanistically, although it is unlikely that CK elevation prevents vascular renarrowing per se, myocardial necrosis impairs the clinical manifestation of restenosis, thereby reducing the need for ischemia-driven TVR. This novel finding 1) highlights the potential discordance between angiographic and clinical measures of restenosis, and 2) has implications for clinical trials, as therapies that reduce periprocedural MI may be associated with a perceived excess of restenosis when measured by the need for TVR.  (+info)

Influence of a platelet GPIIb/IIIa receptor antagonist on myocardial hypoperfusion during rotational atherectomy as assessed by myocardial Tc-99m sestamibi scintigraphy. (2/228)

OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effect of the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) antagonist abciximab on myocardial hypoperfusion during percutaneous transluminal rotational atherectomy (PTRA). BACKGROUND: PTRA may cause transient ischemia and periprocedural myocardial injury. A platelet-dependent risk of non-Q-wave infarctions after directional atherectomy has been described. The role of platelets for the incidence and severity of myocardial hypoperfusion during PTRA is unknown. METHODS: Seventy-five consecutive patients with complex lesions were studied using resting Tc-99m sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography prior to PTRA, during, and 2 days after the procedure. The last 30 patients received periprocedural abciximab (group A) and their results were compared to the remaining 45 patients (group B). For semiquantitative analysis, myocardial perfusion in 24 left ventricular regions was expressed as percentage of maximal sestamibi uptake. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between the groups. Transient perfusion defects were observed in 39/45 (87%) patients of group B, but only in 10/30 (33%) patients of group A (p < 0.001). Perfusion was significantly reduced during PTRA in 3.3 +/- 2.5 regions in group B compared to 1.4 +/- 2.5 regions in group A (p < 0.01). Perfusion in the region with maximal reduction during PTRA in groups B and A was 76 +/- 15% and 76 +/- 15% at baseline, decreased to 56 +/- 16% (p < 0.001) and 67 +/- 14%, respectively, during PTRA (p < 0.01 A vs. B), and returned to 76 +/- 15% and 80 +/- 13%, respectively, after PTRA. Nine patients in group B (20%) and two patients in group A (7%) had mild creatine kinase and/or troponin t elevations (p = 0.18). Patients with elevated enzymes had larger perfusion defects than did patients without myocardial injury (4.2 +/- 2.7 vs. 2.3 +/- 2.5 regions, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that GPIIb/IIIa blockade reduces incidence, extent and severity of transient hypoperfusion during PTRA. Thus, platelet aggregation may play an important role for PTRA-induced hypoperfusion.  (+info)

Mechanisms of acute lumen gain and recurrent restenosis after rotational atherectomy of diffuse in-stent restenosis: a quantitative angiographic and intravascular ultrasound study. (3/228)

OBJECTIVES: This quantitative angiographic and intravascular ultrasound study determined the mechanisms of acute lumen enlargement and recurrent restenosis after rotational atherectomy (RA) with adjunct percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in the treatment of diffuse in-stent restenosis (ISR). BACKGROUND: In-stent restenosis remains a significant clinical problem for which optimal treatment is under debate. Rotational atherectomy has become an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of diffuse ISR based on the concept of "tissue-debulking." METHODS: Rotational atherectomy with adjunct angioplasty of ISR was used in 45 patients with diffuse lesions. Quantitative coronary angiographic (QCA) analysis and sequential intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measurements were performed in all patients. Forty patients (89%) underwent angiographic six-month follow-up. RESULTS: Rotational atherectomy lead to a decrease in maximal area of stenosis from 80+/-32% before intervention to 54+/-21% after RA (p < 0.0001) as a result of a significant decrease in intimal hyperplasia cross-sectional area (CSA). The minimal lumen diameter after RA remained 15+/-4% smaller than the burr diameter used, indicating acute neointimal recoil. Additional angioplasty led to a further decrease in area of stenosis to 38+/-12% due to a significant increase in stent CSA. At six-month angiographic follow-up, recurrent restenosis rate was 45%. Lesion and stent length, preinterventional diameter stenosis and amount of acute neointimal recoil were associated with a higher rate of recurrent restenosis. CONCLUSIONS: Rotational atherectomy of ISR leads to acute lumen gain by effective plaque removal. Adjunct angioplasty results in additional lumen gain by further stent expansion and tissue extrusion. Stent and lesion length, severity of ISR and acute neointimal recoil are predictors of recurrent restenosis.  (+info)

Heparin after percutaneous intervention (HAPI): a prospective multicenter randomized trial of three heparin regimens after successful coronary intervention. (4/228)

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of bleeding, vascular, and ischemic complications using three different heparin regimens after successful intervention. BACKGROUND: The ideal dose and duration of heparin infusion after successful coronary intervention is unknown. METHODS: Patients were randomized to one of three heparin strategies after coronary intervention: Group 1 (n = 157 patients) received prolonged (12 to 24 h) heparin infusion followed by sheath removal; Group 2 (n = 120 patients) underwent early removal of sheaths, followed by reinstitution of heparin infusion for 12 to 18 h; Group 3 (n = 137 patients) did not receive any further heparin after intervention with early sheath removal. The primary end point of the study was the combined incidence of in-hospital bleeding and vascular events. Secondary end points included in-hospital ischemic events, length of stay, cost and one-month outcome. RESULTS: After successful coronary intervention, 414 patients were randomized. Unstable angina or postinfarction angina was present in 83% of patients before intervention. The combined incidence of bleeding and vascular events was 21% in Group 1, 14% in Group 2 and 8% in Group 3 (p = 0.01). The overall incidence of in-hospital ischemic complications was 2.2%; there were no differences between groups. Length of hospital stay was shorter (p = 0.033) and adjusted hospital cost was lower (p < 0.001) for Group 3. At 30 days, the incidence of delayed cardiac and vascular events was similar for all three groups. CONCLUSIONS: Heparin infusion after successful coronary intervention is associated with more minor bleeding and vascular injury, prolonged length of stay and increased cost. In-hospital and one-month ischemic events rarely occur after successful intervention, irrespective of heparin use. Routine postprocedure heparin is not recommended, even in patients who present with unstable ischemic syndromes.  (+info)

Low prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in atherectomy specimens from patients with coronary heart disease. (5/228)

Coronary atherectomy specimens from 50 patients with coronary heart disease were examined for the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae by two different methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by in situ hybridization. C. pneumoniae DNA was detected by PCR in atherosclerotic plaques of four patients (8%). Two patients' coronary atheromas were positive, both by a single-step 16S rRNA-based PCR and by an omp1-based nested PCR. The other two patients' specimens were positive only by the nested PCR. In contrast, C. pneumoniae was not detected by in situ hybridization in any of the cardiovascular tissues tested. Of three patients with evidence of C. pneumoniae in coronary atheromas, two had an antibody titer of 1:32 and the third had no specific antibodies detectable. Results of this study demonstrate a low prevalence of C. pneumoniae DNA in coronary atheromas. These findings do not support the hypothesis that the organism plays a major role in atherogenesis.  (+info)

In vitro examination of the safety of rotational atherectomy of side branches jailed by stents. (6/228)

In vitro experimental models of branch orifices jailed by various stents were created to estimate the safety and the efficacy of rotational atherectomy when rotational burrs were advanced through the struts of stents. The scaffolding structures of the stents were destroyed due to loss and deflection of the struts, and the size of ablated stent-particles differed: the maximal size was 1.7 mm in slotted stents, and 17.6 mm in coiled stents. Thus, there is a definite potential for ablating stents when rotational atherectomy of restenotic lesions of side-branch orifices jailed by stents is performed.  (+info)

Expression of cytokine and adhesion molecule mRNA in atherectomy specimens from patients with coronary artery disease. (7/228)

Coronary arteriosclerosis is an underlying condition in acute myocardial infarction (AMI), unstable angina pectoris (UAP) and stable angina pectoris (SAP), and is also related to restenosis (RS) following coronary intervention. To investigate the pathogenesis of this condition, a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to determine relative levels of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 using directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) specimens. Eleven patients with AMI, 7 with UAP, 10 with SAP and 6 with RS following a previous coronary intervention underwent DCA. The mRNA intensity for each molecule was expressed by comparing it with that of beta-actin mRNA. The AMI and UAP patients showed high frequencies of mRNA for IL-1beta, IL-8, TGF-beta, and ICAM-1 together with strong intensities of expression, whereas SAP patients showed decreased mRNA expression for these molecules. Increased IL-6 mRNA expression was observed only in AMI samples. Specimens from RS patients revealed an accumulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines, except for IL-6, as well as of TGF-beta. The study suggests that variation in mRNA expression may reflect the pathophysiology of specific types of coronary artery disease, and remodeling following vascular injury.  (+info)

Creatine kinase-MB elevation after coronary intervention correlates with diffuse atherosclerosis, and low-to-medium level elevation has a benign clinical course: implications for early discharge after coronary intervention. (8/228)

OBJECTIVES: The study evaluated the incidence and predictors of creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) elevation after successful coronary intervention using current devices, and assessed the influence on in-hospital course and midterm survival. BACKGROUND: The CK-MB elevation after coronary intervention predominantly using balloon angioplasty correlates with late cardiac events of myocardial infarction (MI) and death. Whether CK-MB elevation after nonballoon devices is associated with an adverse short and midterm prognosis is unknown. METHODS: The incidence and predictors of CK-MB elevation after coronary intervention were prospectively studied in 1,675 consecutive patients and were followed for in-hospital events and survival. RESULTS: CK-MB elevation was detected in 313 patients (18.7%), with 1-3x in 12.8%, 3-5x in 3.5% and >5x normal in 2.4% of patients. Procedural complications or electrocardiogram changes occurred in only 49% of the CK-MB-elevation cases; CK-MB elevation was more common after nonballoon devices (19.5% vs. 11.5% after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty; p < 0.01). Predictors of CK-MB elevation on multivariate analysis were diffuse coronary disease (p = 0.02), systemic atherosclerosis (p = 0.002), stent use (p = 0.04) and absence of beta-blocker therapy (p = 0.001). Adverse in-hospital cardiac events were more frequent in patients with >5x CK-MB elevation, with no significant difference between 1-5x CK-MB elevation versus normal CK-MB group. During a mean follow-up of 13 +/- 3 months, the incidence of death in the CK-MB-elevation group was 1.6% versus 1.3% in the normal CK-MB group (p = NS). CONCLUSIONS: The CK-MB elevation after coronary intervention was observed even in the absence of discernible procedural complications and was more common in patients with diffuse atherosclerosis. In-hospital clinical events requiring prolonged monitoring were higher in >5x CK-MB-elevation patients only. Midterm survival of CK-MB-elevation patients was similar to those with normal CK-MB. Our prospective analysis shows a lack of adverse in-hospital cardiac events and suggests that early discharge of stable 1-5x normal CK-MB-elevation patients after successful coronary intervention is safe.  (+info)

TY - JOUR. T1 - Coronary angioplasty versus excisional atherectomy trial. T2 - CAVEAT. AU - Holmes, David. AU - Garratt, Kirk N.. AU - Topol, Eric J.. PY - 1992/1/1. Y1 - 1992/1/1. KW - Coronary angioplasty. KW - Exasional atherectomy. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026575986&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026575986&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1016/0167-5273(92)90170-8. DO - 10.1016/0167-5273(92)90170-8. M3 - Editorial. C2 - 1572733. AN - SCOPUS:0026575986. VL - 35. SP - 143. EP - 146. JO - International Journal of Cardiology. JF - International Journal of Cardiology. SN - 0167-5273. IS - 2. ER - ...
Atherectomy led to better postprocedural luminal dimensions but was similar to angioplasty for 6-month outcomes in left anterior descending coronary arteries. Coronary atherectomy, endoluminal stenting, and laser angioplasty are alternative interventions to balloon angioplasty (PTCA) for the percutaneous revascularization of obstructive CAD. They were developed because of the persistent unacceptably high restenosis rate (30% to 50%) associated with PTCA. The Coronary Angioplasty versus Excisional Atherectomy Trial (CAVEAT) by Topol and colleagues and the Canadian Coronary Atherectomy Trial (CCAT) by Adelman and colleagues are important because they are the first randomized trials to compare PTCA with an alternative intervention device. In fact, only 2 other randomized trials with PTCA have been reported: the Angioplasty Compared to Medicine (ACME) trial in patients with single-vessel disease and the Randomized Intervention Treatment of Angina (RITA) trial comparing PTCA with bypass graft ...
Directional atherectomy was associated with a trend toward lower rates of restenosis at 6 months, and increased mortality and ischemic events at one year. DCA resulted in higher rates of early complications at a higher cost and with no clinical benefit. Paradoxically, initial dissemination of these study results produced a transient increase in use of directional atherectomy at CAVEAT-I sites. Among investigators in the trial, there may have been a lack of influence of trial data on clinical practice patterns 1 year after publication of the results.. ...
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TY - JOUR. T1 - Comparative early and nine-month results of rotational atherectomy, stents, and the combination of both for calcified lesions in large coronary arteries. AU - Hoffmann, Rainer. AU - Mintz, Gary S.. AU - Kent, Kenneth M.. AU - Pichard, Augusto D.. AU - Satler, Lowell F.. AU - Popma, Jeffrey J.. AU - Hong, Mun K.. AU - Laird, John R.. AU - Leon, Martin B.. PY - 1998/3/1. Y1 - 1998/3/1. N2 - The aim of this study was to determine the preferred treatment modality for calcified lesions in large (≤3 mm) coronary arteries, resulting in the largest lumen dimensions and the most favorable late clinical responses. Three hundred six lesions in 306 patients (223 men, mean age 66 ± 11 years) were treated with either rotational atherectomy plus adjunct balloon angioplasty (n = 147), Palmaz-Schartz stents (n = 103), or a combination of rotational atherectomy plus adjunct Palmaz-Schartz stents (n = 56). The procedural success rate was 98.0% to 98.6% for each treatment modality. Minimal lumen ...
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Balloon postdilation can safely improve the results of successful (but suboptimal) directional coronary atherectomy. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
In addition to compressing and reshaping atheroma, atherectomy excises tissue and debulks plaques; it was anticipated that this mechanism would result in a lower rate of restenosis than that occurring after angioplasty. These expectations were not fulfilled in this trial. Although the procedural success rate was somewhat higher and the postprocedure lumen larger in patients treated with atherectomy, lumen dimensions, restenosis rates and clinical outcomes were similar in the two groups at six months. Clinical outcomes for the two groups were similar at up to 18 months after the procedure.. ...
Atherectomy is a minimally invasive endovascular surgery technique for removing atherosclerosis from blood vessels within the body. It is an alternative to angioplasty for the treatment of peripheral artery disease, but the studies that exist are not adequate to determine if it is superior to angioplasty. It has also been used to treat coronary artery disease, albeit ineffectively. Atherectomy is used to treat narrowing in arteries caused by peripheral artery disease. Unlike angioplasty and stents, which push plaque into the vessel wall, atherectomy cuts plaque from the wall of the artery. While atherectomy is usually employed to treat arteries it can be used in veins and vascular bypass grafts as well. Atherectomy falls under the general category of percutaneous revascularization, which implies re-canalizing blocked vasculature via a needle puncture in the skin. The most common access point is near the groin through the common femoral artery (CFA). Other common places are the brachial artery, ...
Rotational atherectomy by rotablator. The rotablator pulverize the calcified plaque of atheroma. Here, example of a coronary artery. - Stock Image C002/7142
BACKGROUND: There is paucity of data regarding the clinical outcome of second generation drug- eluting stents (DES) post rotational atherectomy (RA) for heavily calcified coronary lesions (HCCL). METHODOLOGY: The study cohort comprised 99 (116 lesions) consecutive patients who underwent RA for HCCL at our institution and received either a first generation DES (40 patients, 53 lesions) or a second generation DES (59 patients, 63 lesions). The analyzed clinical parameters were the 12-month rates of death (all cause and cardiac), Q-wave MI, target lesion revascularization (TLR), definite stent thrombosis (ST) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) defined as the composite of death, Q-wave MI, or TLR. RESULTS: The two groups were well matched for their baseline characteristics except for a lower left ventricular ejection fraction in the second generation DES group (46.0±23.0% vs. 55.0±9.0%; p=0.02). The group receiving second generation DES had more type C lesions (81.0% vs. 58.8%; p=0.01), ...
Background: C reactive protein (CRP), an important serum marker of atherosclerotic vascular disease, has recently been reported to be active inside human atherosclerotic plaques.. Aims: To investigate the simultaneous presence of macrophages, CRP, membrane attack complex C5b-9 (MAC), and oxidised low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in atherectomy specimens from patients with different coronary syndromes.. Methods: In total, 54 patients with stable angina (SA; n = 21), unstable angina (UA; n = 15), and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 18) underwent directional coronary atherectomy for coronary lesions. Cryostat sections of atherosclerotic plaques were immunohistochemically stained with monoclonal antibodies: anti-CD68 (macrophages), anti-5G4 (CRP), aE11 (MAC), and 12E7 (oxLDL). Immunopositive areas were evaluated in relation to fibrous and neointima tissues, atheroma, and media. Quantitative analysis was performed using image cytometry with systematic random sampling (percentage immunopositive/total ...
Clinical Cases in Coronary Rotational Atherectomy: Complex Cases and Complications This concise practical guide is designed to facilitate the clinical
左主幹部をplatformとするpercutaneous transluminal coronary rotational atherectomyの検討 Procedural Results and 3-Month Outcome of Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Rotational Atherectomy Requiring the Activation of the Burr in the Left Main Coronary Artery ...
Objectives. The purpose of this study was to examine the proliferative capacity and extracellular matrix synthesis of human coronary plaque cells in vitro.. Background. Common to both primary atherosclerosis and restenosis are vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and production of extracellular matrix proteins. The applicability to humans of experimental animal models of these processes has been questioned.. Methods. Primary atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions were excised by percutaneous directional coronary atherectomy in 93 patients. Smooth muscle cells were cultivated by an explant technique and identified by their morphology in culture, ultrastructural features under electron microscopy and immunostaining using monoclonal antibodies to smooth muscle cell alpha-actin. Proliferation in secondary culture was assessed with growth curves and the synthesis of collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycans by the incorporation of 3H-proline and 35S-sulfate, respectively. These studies were also ...
TY - GEN. T1 - Assessment of possible thermal damage of tissue due to atherectomy by means of a mechanical debulking device. AU - Lovik, Ryan D.. AU - Abraham, John P.. AU - Sparrow, Ephraim M. PY - 2009/12/1. Y1 - 2009/12/1. N2 - In vitro and cadaver experiments, coupled with numerical simulations, were performed to assess the possibility mat orbital atherectomy might cause thermal damage of tissue. The experiments involved debulking operations on a surrogate artery and on the plaque-lined posterior tibial artery of a cadaver. Temperatures and coolant flow rates measured during these experiments enabled a numerical simulation of the debulking of a plaque-lined artery in a living human. The temperature variations from the numerical simulations were used to evaluate a thermal injury index. The resulting values of the index were found to be several orders of magnitude below the threshold value for thermal injury. It is concluded that it is extremely unlikely that the use of an orbital debulking ...
Arteriogram and Atherectomy Baltimore, MD - Minimally Invasive Vascular Center offers Arteriogram and Atherectomy services. Our practice serves Baltimore, MD, Laurel, MD, Silver Spring, MD and the surrounding areas.
Leading interventional cardiologists at The Mount Sinai Hospital are the first in the world to use a newly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approveddevicefor the treatment of severely calcified coronary arteries before the placement of a cardiac stent to open a blocked artery.. The new device being used in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at The Mount Sinai Hospital is called the Diamondback 360® Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System. Its spinning electrically powered 1.25 mm diamond-coated crown is located on a thin cardiac catheterization guide wire and works within seconds to reduce the amount of hard calcium buildup in a coronary artery. The small calcium particles sanded from the arterys wall are then naturally discarded from the heart and the body.. The atherectomy system made by Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. was just FDA approved on Oct. 21. It is the first new coronary atherectomy system in more than two decades.. We are excited that we are the first in the world to offer ...
An elongate tubular body extends between a rotatable cutter and a control. The cutter is connected to the control with a rotatable element and has a serrated surface. A vacuum is applied through an annular passage defined between the tubular body and the rotatable element. The control has an indicator that reveals resistance to rotation and/or reduction in flow. Material that has been processed by the cutter is aspirated through the tubular body for disposal. The control enables rotation of the rotatable element only following application of a predetermined level of vacuum.
Boston Scientifics Jetstream atherectomy system has received CE mark for a new in-stent restenosis indication. This indication gives EU physicians another safe and effective treatment option for in-stent restenosis, a disease state that has historically been challenging to treat with traditional therapies, says a Boston Scientific press release.. The indication is supported by data from the Jetstream-ISR feasibility study, in which the device demonstrated a strong safety profile, with zero device-stent interactions. The study included long, complex lesions (62% were TASC C&D). Six-month freedom from target lesion revascularisation was 86.2% with patency at 72%.. ...
cleared coronary balloon on the market-is critical for physicians treating highly complex coronary lesions. As the market leader in coronary atherectomy, the 1.0mm balloon complements our orbital atherectomy system as we continue providing advanced solutions for treating the complex and high-risk indicated patient. At launch, CSI will offer both the 1.0-4.0mm Sapphire II PRO and the 2.0-4.0mm Sapphire® NC Plus non-compliant coronary balloons on a limited basis. The company anticipates that OrbusNeichs full balloon product portfolio will become available in the U.S. throughout 2018 and 2019. About OrbusNeich OrbusNeich is a global pioneer in the provision of life-changing vascular solutions and offers an extensive portfolio of products that set industry benchmarks in vascular intervention. Current products include the worlds first dual therapy stents, the COMBO Plus and COMBO Dual Therapy Stents, together with stents and balloons marketed under the names of Azule®, Scoreflex®, Sapphire® ...
Endovascular Today sat down with a multidisciplinary panel of esteemed interventionists to discuss their current practice paradigms for atherectomy, including the hot topic of Vessel Prep prior to drug-coated balloons and other adjunctive therapies.
Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., based in St. Paul, Minn., is a medical device company focused on developing and commercializing innovative solutions for treating vascular and coronary disease. The companys Orbital Atherectomy Systems treat calcified and fibrotic plaque in arterial vessels throughout the leg and heart in a few minutes of treatment time, and address many of the limitations associated with existing surgical, catheter and pharmacological treatment alternatives. The U.S. FDA granted the first 510(k) clearance for the use of the Orbital Atherectomy System in peripheral arteries in August 2007. In October 2013, the company received FDA approval for the Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System. To date, over 356,000 of CSIs devices have been sold to leading institutions across the United States.
Is there a difference in the mechanisms of lumen enlargement with direct stenting as compared to stenting with predilatation? A 3D intravascular ultrasound ...
Ease of use has dictated the destiny of all new techniques and devices in interventional cardiology. The popularity of stents began when they became as easy to use and more predictable than balloons. Conversely, directional and rotational atherectomy fell into oblivion or became confined to a small niche application. Some of these devices have been underused, even when proved beneficial, such as filters in saphenous vein graft treatment or thrombectomy in acute myocardial infarction. For chronic total occlusions (CTOs), the only route to success passes through the use of multiple dedicated wires, guided by contralateral injection, and of over-the-wire (OTW) balloons or microcatheters, sometimes inserted retrogradely via collateral vessels with the use of devices with exotic names like Tornus and Corsair (Asahi Intecc, Nagoya, Japan).. No wonder few interventionalists have ventured into this uncharted territory. The problem is, however, that CTOs are very frequent and are present in ,30% of ...
Introduction Rotational atherectomy (RA) during primary PCI (PPCI) for STEMI is relatively contraindicated because of the perceived increased risk of no-reflow. However, RA PPCI may sometimes be required to restore flow in heavily calcified coronary arteries. Previously only very limited observational data has described the use of RA in PPCI. Aim We report the clinical and procedural characteristics, and in hospital outcomes, of 21 patients who underwent RA PPCI at our centre between 2006 and 2016,. Methods A retrospective review of the PCI database and medical records.. Results 21 patients (age 78(10) years (mean (SD)), 12 men) underwent RA during PPCI (0.4% of all PPCI). 3 patients had cardiogenic shock at presentation and 2 had out of hospital cardiac arrest. Hypertension (n=19), smoking history (n=18), hypercholesterolemia (n=16), diabetes (n=6) and chronic kidney disease (n=6 with eGFR ,60) were frequently present. Aspirin was given to 20/21 patients and clopidogrel, ticagrelor and ...
Coronary lesions with severe (or heavy) calcification are classified as complex lesions and are known to carry lower success rates and higher complication rates following percutaneous coronary intervention. The Diamondback 360(®) Coronary Orbital At
Stents have emerged as one of the major therapeutic tools for percutaneous intracoronary revascularization procedures. In fact, a stent is implanted in at least 30% of lesions attempted. Their clinical impact is huge because stenting has produced a decrease int the need for emergency surgery to 0.5%, with an incidence of acute myocardial infarction related to angioplasty of 2% and a death rate of , 1% despite unfavourable clinical and anatomical conditions treated. The initial price of stenting was a high frequency of subacute stent thrombosis and peripheral vascular complications, which has been solved ...
TemREN is used to prepare the lesion area for balloon angioplasty and to relieve heavy plaque burden from atherosclerotic lesions. TemREN is usually made up of art...
Insights from the authors on removing severe superficial calcium to achieve significant luminal gain in femoropopliteal arteries.
EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa). In July 2018, Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (CSI®) announced that OrbusNeich Medical Co. Ltd. signed an exclusive distribution agreement to sell its coronary and peripheral Orbital Atherectomy Systems outside the United States and Japan.. Medikit Co., Ltd:. →Japan. In November 2016, Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (CSI®) announced that Medikit, Co., Ltd. signed an exclusive distribution agreement to sell its coronary and peripheral Orbital Atherectomy Systems in Japan.. ...
EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa). In July 2018, Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (CSI®) announced that OrbusNeich Medical Co. Ltd. signed an exclusive distribution agreement to sell its coronary and peripheral Orbital Atherectomy Systems outside the United States and Japan.. Medikit Co., Ltd:. →Japan. In November 2016, Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (CSI®) announced that Medikit, Co., Ltd. signed an exclusive distribution agreement to sell its coronary and peripheral Orbital Atherectomy Systems in Japan.. ...
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Fumedica AG, Atherectomy, Ballon, Bergebeutel, Chirurgische Messer, Clips, Fixationen für Katheter, Hämorrhoidalleiden, Herniennetze, Herzunterstützung, Lungenunterstützung, Inkontinenz, Kardiotechnik, WarmAir, Blanketrol III, Nahtmaterial, Occluder, Patientenüberwachung, Ports, Sternumverschluss, Teflon Pledgets, Stent, Patienten Lagerung Proneview, Zangen, Instrumente
The industry’s most complete portfolio of PCI products. Learn more about coronary stents, guidewires, atherectomy and more.
Looking for online definition of coronary atherectomy in the Medical Dictionary? coronary atherectomy explanation free. What is coronary atherectomy? Meaning of coronary atherectomy medical term. What does coronary atherectomy mean?
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Coronary hemodynamics before and after rotational atherectomy with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
Medtronic has been granted CE mark approval for the HawkOne directional atherectomy system in a lower profile size for treating patients with peripheral artery disease. The new HawkOne 6 Fr provides an effective and easy-to-use treatment option for patients with peripheral artery disease both above and below the knee with a single device. The HawkOne system is designed to remove plaque from the vessel wall and restore blood flow.. Directional atherectomy is an established treatment modality for patients with complex peripheral artery disease to restore patency, maximise luminal gain and preserve future treatment options, says Thomas Zeller, head, Department of Angiology, Universitäts-Herzzentrum Freiburg, Bad Krozingen, Germany. The new smaller HawkOne 6Fr size is an advanced option to treat patients with multi-level peripheral artery disease, addressing lesions of various length, morphology, and location, particularly those below the knee.. The HawkOne system is also designed to enable ...
However, being able to visualize the vessel with the lumivascular technology is clearly appealing and suggestive of safe passage. Distal embolization remains a major concern (especially atherectomy for ISR), and questions the need for embolic protection every time (filter was used only in 22% of patients in the DEFINITVE LE trial).7 Unprecedented complications can arise, which require expertise and catheter skills and may lead to the possibility of open vascular surgery in these high-risk patients.. DA in ISR lesions have been contraindicated due to the potential risk of cutter entrapment on stent struts during atherectomy. However, with the advent of concurrent imaging during DA, this risk can potentially be avoided. Nevertheless, as seen in this case, despite adequate visualization with OCT imaging, there can be significantly malapposed stent struts in overlapped segments that may still pose a risk for trapping the DA catheter. In such scenarios, the use of adjunctive balloon angioplasty ...
A rotational atherectomy device for removing a stenotic tissue from a vessel of a patient is disclosed. The device comprises a rotatable, flexible, hollow drive shaft having a fluid impermeable wall defining a fluid impermeable lumen of the drive shaft and, an abrasive element mounted to a distal end portion of the drive shaft proximal to and spaced away from a distal support element formed at a distal end of the drive shaft, the distal support element being inflatable by pressurized fluid which flows in an antegrade direction through said lumen of the drive shaft and is at least partially re-directed into the distal fluid inflatable support element. The distal fluid inflatable support element has an outer wall comprising an outflow opening located such that said outflow opening faces an inner surface of a treated vessel during rotation of the drive shaft so that a flow of fluid through said outflow opening forms a layer of fluid between the outer wall of the rotating fluid inflated distal support
An atherectomy device is used for removing a restriction in a blood vessel. The atherectomy device includes a cutting portion having a lumen therein, the lumen being sized to track over a guidewire, wherein an outer surface of the cutting portion comprises a cutting surface. An elongate shaping member is cooperable with the cutting portion and is disposed generally longitudinally relative to the cutting portion. The shaping member has an insertion conformation and an expanded conformation. The expanded conformation is radially expanded relative to the insertion conformation. The shaping member is configured to deform the cutting portion from an insertion shape into a cutting shape as the shaping member moves from the insertion conformation to the expanded conformation. A drive shaft is coupled to a proximal end of the cutting portion and is configured to be rotationally driven.
The global Orbital Atherectomy Device Market report provides an accurate investigation of the different patterns and parameters affecting the industrial growth of the Orbital Atherectomy Device market at a global level. An assessment of the effect of the current situation and trends in the market is additionally included to provide an overview of the markets future position. The report provides the detailed information related to the global Orbital Atherectomy Device market dynamics and demonstrates superior forecast for the development of the market and its key competitors Medtronic (Ireland), Philips (Netherlands), Boston Scientific (US), Cardiovascular Systems (US), Straub Medical (Switzerland), BIOTRONIK (Netherlands), C.R. Bard (US), Avinger (US) based on consistent information.. Apply here for the sample copy of the report @: www.99strategy.biz/request-for-sample.html?repid=46491. Furthermore, The report presents a detailed segmentation Peripheral Vascular, Cardiovascular, ...
The incidence of coronary artery disease requiring coronary intervention in patients with Kawasaki disease is high. Because coronary artery lesions in Kawasaki disease commonly involve severe calcification and aneurysmal changes which can progress with time, in contrast with adult atherosclerotic coronary artery lesions, the indication or technique of catheter intervention for adult patients cannot be directly applied. However, the experience of coronary intervention in Kawasaki disease is extremely limited compared to that with intervention in adults, which provides satisfactory therapeutic results. There are several kinds of percutaneous coronary intervention techniques in Kawasaki disease including balloon angioplasty, stent implantation, rotational ablation, and directional coronary atherectomy. Satisfactory acute results for coronary balloon angioplasty can be obtained in patients in a relatively short interval from the onset of disease, especially within 6 years. However, the incidence of ...
This medical exhibit illustrates the Atherectomy Procedure. The atherectomy instrument is visualized within the coronary artery shaving away the atherosclerotic plaque .
An atherectomy apparatus and method is disclosed for the purpose of surgical excision of atheromas which typically consist of plaque deposits that cause narrowing (stenosis) of an artery. The apparatus, called a pullback atherectomy catheter, cuts and collects obstructive material into a collection chamber as the catheter is pulled back through obstructive material within a human vessel such as an artery.
The Global Atherectomy Devices Market is expected to reach USD 894.69 million by 2025, based on a new report by Hexa Reports. The demand for atherectomy de
Data are mean value ± SD, unless otherwise indicated. ANOVA = analysis of variance; CSA = cross-sectional area; EEM = external elastic membrane; P+M = plaque plus media; Δ = change in.. ...
Figure 1 Coronary Angiogram and Intravascular Ultrasound Images of the Left Coronary System. (A) Pre-procedural angiogram demonstrating a restenosed 3.5 × 15-mm Palmaz-Schatz stent (Cordis, Johnson & Johnson Company, Warren, New Jersey) (dotted line) implanted 20 years ago on the proximal LAD and a long segment of calcified disease extending from the LMS to the distal LAD, with involvement of the LAD/diagonal bifurcation (arrows). (B) Angiogram after rotational atherectomy with 1.5-mm burr and aggressive pre-dilation with 3.0- to 3.5-mm noncompliant balloons on LAD. A 2.25 × 12-mm EES in the diagonal ostium with crushed protruding EES struts (dotted line). (C) Intravascular ultrasound showing lumen area of 3.2 mm2 with a vessel diameter of 4.8 mm at the distal LMS. (D) Palmaz-Schatz stent struts (arrowheads) with evident dissection in the restenosed segment (arrows). (E) Cracked napkin-ring calcification after rotational atherectomy and pre-dilation (arrows). (F) Crushed EES struts on to the ...
ECCENTRIC ABRADING HEAD FOR HIGH-SPEED ROTATIONAL ATHERECTOMY DEVICES - The invention provides a rotational atherectomy device having, in various embodiments, a flexible, elongated, rotatable drive shaft with at least one flexible eccentric enlarged abrading head attached thereto. In other embodiments, the eccentric abrading head is not flexible or partially flexible. At least part of the eccentric enlarged cutting head has a tissue removing surface-typically an abrasive surface. In certain embodiments, the abrading head will be at least partially hollow. When placed within an artery against stenotic tissue and rotated at sufficiently high speeds the eccentric nature of the enlarged cutting head causes the cutting head and drive shaft to rotate in such a fashion as to open the stenotic lesion to a diameter substantially larger than the outer diameter of the enlarged cutting head. Preferably the eccentric enlarged cutting head has a center of mass spaced radially from the rotational axis of the ...
A vascular catheter includes a flexible catheter body having proximal and distal ends and an elongate housing secured to the distal end of the catheter body. An interactional device is disposed on one side of the housing, and at least two spaced-apart inflatable chambers are located on the other side of the housing generally at its proximal and distal ends, respectively. The inflatable chambers may be expanded simultaneously or separately, and the spaced-apart positioning of the chambers provides for stable positioning of the housing during atherectomy procedures, imaging procedures, and the like. The balloon is conveniently connected to the housing by an integral flange structure which is secured through an inflation aperture on the housing side. The balloon may be inflated through an annular inflation which is defined by a separate isolation tube disposed in the central lumen of the catheter body.
CPT Code 0264T, Category III Codes, Atherectomy (Open or Percutaneous) for Supra-Inguinal Arteries and Other Undefined Category Codes - Codify by AAPC
An atherectomy system for cutting, ingesting and removing an obstruction from within a patients artery, comprising a flexible guide-wire insertable into the artery, a flexible rotary-catheter rotatably disposed and slidable over the flexible guide-wire, a blade forming a distal end of the flexible rotary-catheter having teeth on its periphery which are bent inward, a continuous passage for ingesting the cut obstruction material between the flexible rotary-catheter and the flexible guide-wire, means at the proximal end of the flexible rotary-catheter for rotating it and positive displacement pump means connected to the continuous passage to pull the cut obstruction material proximally.
Press release - Market Expertz - Atherectomy Devices Market Size, Share Growth, Trends, Devices, Applications, Competitive Analysis, Industry Expansion Strategies, By 2027 - published on openPR.com
Disclosed is a device for delivering tissue adhesives and/or sealant patches to a surface which covers or surrounds a lumen, cavity or organ, or potential lumen or cavity, within a human or other animal. Also disclosed is a method of delivering tissue adhesives and/or sealant patches to a surface which covers or surrounds a lumen, cavity or organ, or potential lumen or cavity. The method is particularly suited to sealing perforations in vascular walls, such as after arterial access for Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA), Percutaneous Coronary Angiography and Percutaneous Coronary Atherectomy and similar diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.
Alpesh R. Shah, MD is a Associate Professor of Clinical Cardiology, Academic Institute at Houston Methodist and Weill Cornell Medical College - specializing in Peripheral arterial disease, Valvular heart disease, Angioplasty, Coronary stenting, Carotid artery stenting, Cardiac catherization, Coronary atherectomy, Coronary brachytherapy, Complex coronary interventions, Renal artery stenting. Dr. Shah has been a primary investigator of more than 20 clinical trials at Houston Methodist Hospital. Over the last decade, he has been involved with several clinical trials advancing new stent design and its wider clinical applications. Currently he is involved in clinical research for the Bioabsorbable stent in Coronary arteries. Such devices have the potential of promoting vascular healing by preventing long term neoatheresclerosis and restoring vasomotion. Dr. Shah is an integral part of the Heart Team at Houston Methodist Hospital which continues to look at optimizing outcomes of stenting vs. bypass surgery.
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Despite advances in experience and equipment, CTO recanalization with the use of contemporary guidewires and techniques may still be unsuccessful in ≥25% of cases. Numerous devices have been developed to approach such refractory and complex cases. Many of these devices never progressed beyond the investigational phase because their use in small numbers of patients demonstrated either excessively high rates of complications (typically either dissection and/or perforation) or success rates not clearly greater than those achieved by standard equipment. Examples of failed CTO devices include the Magnum/Magnarail system,38,39 the Kensey Catheter,40 the ROTACS Low Speed Rotational Atherectomy Catheter,41 and the Excimer Laser Wire.42. Two devices specifically designed for refractory CTO recanalization have demonstrated sufficient safety and efficacy to have received approval by the Food and Drug Administration for sale in the United States: the Safe Cross-RF guidewire and the Frontrunner catheter. ...
Yet another embodiment is a rotational atherectomy system, comprising: an elongated, flexible drive shaft having a distal end for insertion into a vasculature of a patient and having a proximal end opposite the distal end remaining outside the vasculature of the patient; an eccentric solid crown attached to the drive shaft proximate the distal end of the drive shaft; an electric motor rotatably coupled to the proximal end of the drive shaft, the electric motor being capable of rotating the drive shaft in a first direction and in a second direction opposite the first direction; and control electronics for monitoring and controlling the rotation of the electric motor. The drive shaft and eccentric solid crown, when rotating, have a torque limited by a current supplied to the electric motor. The control electronics include an algorithm that detects and controls when the drive shaft and eccentric solid crown encounter a blockage in the vasculature that rapidly slows their rotation. The control ...
Cardiovascular Systems (CSI), a provider of orthopedic solutions, is set to exhibit 12-month data from its Compliance 360° study. The prospective, randomized trial, which enrolled 50 patients, was designed to compare the treatment of above-the-knee calcified lesions using the companys Diamondback orbital atherectomy system, followed by low-pressure balloon angioplasty, to balloon angioplasty alone.. The study examines whether Diamondback orbital atherectomy system can achieve satisfactory acute and long-term results without the need for stent placement.. The Diamondback system is used as a minimally invasive therapy to treat patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), blockages in leg arteries.. The company said it will present data at the american college of cardiologys (ACCs) 61st annual scientific session & expo McCormick place south in Chicago from 24-27 March 2012.. ...
48 hours postoperatively. One case remained after hospital discharge with monoplegia and dyslalia. One patient had peripheral vascular complications at the site of arterial cannulation with thrombosis, which required embolectomy and raffia with a bovine pericardial patch at the second day after surgery. These complications occurred only in cases of aortic valve replacement in patients with severe stenosis and calcification of annulus and leaflets.. One patient underwent reoperation for mitral stenosis, pulmonary hemorrhage on the fourth postoperative day, after discharge from the ICU and was managed, again in the ICU, with mechanical ventilation. Another patient had pulmonary hemorrhage on discharge from the operating room, probably secondary to complications of selective cannulation, which occurred at 3rd postoperative day. Five (4.8%) patients underwent reoperation for bleeding, all through smaller incisions, only with the help of videoendoscopy.. Five patients, all of the group GcCPB, died ...
A technique for ablation and removal of plaque deposits from the arterial, venous, vascular graft or other tissue wall of a patient. Ablation is accomplished by directing a high pressure jet of sterile saline solution at the plaque deposit. The high pressure jet is located at the distal end of a catheter which is advanced through the vascular system to the site of the plaque deposit. Removal of the debris is via an evacuation lumen within the catheter. The arterial wall is protected from damage by the catheter design which directs the high pressure jet towards a portion of the distal end of the catheter which serves as a target. The distal end of the catheter is placed such that the plaque or other deposit to be ablated is positioned between the high pressure jet and the target. An optional ultrasonic transducer array located adjacent the high pressure jet and the evacuation lumen permits the attending physician to monitor the procedure. A balloon may be used to hold the catheter against the deposit
An arterial catheter system for removing plaque from the aorta and other arteries is disclosed. The system typically includes an elongate catheter member, a filtration apparatus disposed within the di
In the hands of experienced cardiologists, and with availability of modern day technology, it is estimated that the risk of death is during a stent procedure is usually less than 1%, while the chance of requiring emergency bypass surgery is around 2% or less. It is a relatively safe procedure and is carried out all over the world. An out patient or an inpatient uncomplicated stent case usually require 23 hours or less of hospitalization after the procedure.. The risk of a other serious complication is estimated to be less than 4 and probably around 1 to 2 per thousand, and similar to that described for cardiac cath. The risk of a heart attack and bleeding that requires a blood transfusion is increased when compared to cardiac cath. However, the risks are relatively low and acceptable in most cases when one balances the potential benefit against the expected risk (risk-benefit ratio).. The aggravation of kidney function (particularly in diabetics and those with prior kidney disease) is higher ...
Rex Medical of Conshohocken, Pennsylvania won regulatory approval from the FDA to sell its Cleaner Rotational Thrombectomy System. The atherectomy system
It looks like a miniature football and spins faster than one of Randall Cunninghams tosses -- up to 190,000 revolutions per minute.But then the device, a new surgical tool called a Rotablator, must
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nice guy, but seems to have an unstable disposition to the point that I would not do business with him or recommend that others do so. I dont think hes dishonest, and this rating is not set in stone. If I (passively) observe positive changes in his behavior, this rating will improve. For now, caveat creditor ...
Sharma, Samin K.; Kini, Annapoorna S. (1999). "Coronary Atherectomy". Contemporary Concepts in Cardiology. Developments in ... Coronary artherectomy: Contemporary concepts in cardiology and (with Dr. Valentín Fuster) of Definitions of acute coronary ... Kini co-established, with Samin K. Sharma, the Live Symposium of Complex Coronary and Vascular Cases in 1998 and has served as ... She is co-author of Atlas of Coronary Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography, ISBN 3-319-62664-7, Practical Manual of ...
Atherectomy Cardiopulmonary bypass Coronary stenting Revascularization India portal Medicine portal "Doctor Profile". My Doc ... Rotational and Directional Atherectomy, Coronary stenting and Percutaneous Laser Myocardial Revascularization. He graduated in ... "Paclitaxel-Eluting versus Everolimus-Eluting Coronary Stents in Diabetes". N Engl J Med. 373 (18): 1709-1719. doi:10.1056/ ...
"Aminophylline for Preventing Bradyarrhythmias During Orbital or Rotational Atherectomy of the Right Coronary Artery". ... Atherectomy of the right coronary artery]. It is also used in the treatment of heart block due to acute inferior myocardial ... It acts through cellular surface receptors which effect intracellular signalling pathways to increase coronary artery blood ...
Placement of a coronary stent (a cylinder of wire mesh that is placed in a previously blocked artery to ensure that it stays ... An atherectomy is an invasive procedure performed for removing atherosclerosis from blood vessels within the body. The narrowed ... Balloon angioplasty is an invasive test that helps to treat any blockage present in the coronary arteries. A catheter with a ...
coronary-artery bypass grafting in multivessel coronary disease". N. Engl. J. Med. 358 (4): 331-41. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa071804. ... including balloon angioplasty and atherectomy. Drug-eluting stents (DES) have also been extensively studied, and are generally ... A drug-eluting stent (DES) is a peripheral or coronary stent (a scaffold) placed into narrowed, diseased peripheral or coronary ... The first procedure to treat blocked coronary arteries was coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), wherein a section of ...
Coronary Interventions ANGIOPLASTY, STENTS AND ATHERECTOMY (Cleveland Clinic) v t e. ... used in percutaneous coronary interventions. It has a special balloon tip with small blades, that are activated when the ... This procedure is different from Rotoblation (Percutaneous Transluminal Rotational Atherectomy or PCRA) whereby a diamond ... PMID 25955577.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link) Overview Coronary Artery Disease Treatment - ...
Coronary artery disease (CAD)- Coronary artery disease is a general term for any reduction in coronary circulation. One such ... It is a form of PCI and generally what is implied when referring to "PCI." Atherectomy - Enlarging the lumen of an artery by ... Coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG): Grafting an artery or vein from elsewhere to bypass a stenotic coronary artery. ... Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) - Procedures to treat stenotic coronary arteries by accessing through a blood vessel. ...
... atherectomy MeSH E02.148.050.120.125 - atherectomy, coronary MeSH E02.148.102.060 - angioplasty, balloon MeSH E02.148.102.060. ... percutaneous coronary MeSH E02.148.050.075 - angioplasty, laser MeSH E02.148.050.075.080 - angioplasty, balloon, laser-assisted ... 080 - angioplasty, balloon, laser-assisted MeSH E02.148.102.060.100 - angioplasty, transluminal, percutaneous coronary MeSH ...
... atherectomy, coronary MeSH E04.100.376.719.332 - coronary artery bypass MeSH E04.100.376.719.332.199 - coronary artery bypass, ... atherectomy, coronary MeSH E04.928.220.520.220 - coronary artery bypass MeSH E04.928.220.520.220.189 - coronary artery bypass, ... atherectomy MeSH E04.100.814.050.120.125 - atherectomy, coronary MeSH E04.100.814.055 - angioscopy MeSH E04.100.814.143 - ... percutaneous coronary MeSH E04.100.814.050.075 - angioplasty, laser MeSH E04.100.814.050.075.080 - angioplasty, balloon, laser- ...
Implantation of stents Rotational or laser atherectomy Brachytherapy (use of radioactive source to inhibit restenosis) The ... "Mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting versus percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting for coronary artery ... Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a procedure used to treat narrowing of the coronary arteries of the heart found in ... Coronary angioplasty, also known as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), because it is done through the skin ...
Testing for coronary artery disease or carotid artery disease is of unclear benefit. While PAD is a risk factor for abdominal ... Atherectomy, in which the plaque is scraped off of the inside of the vessel wall (albeit with no better results than ... PAD carries a greater than "20% risk of a coronary event in 10 years". The risk is low that an individual with claudication ... When narrowing occurs in the heart, it is called coronary artery disease, and in the brain, it is called cerebrovascular ...
Coronary Angioplasty is indicated for coronary artery disease such as unstable angina, NSTEMI, STEMI and spontaneous coronary ... Often, peripheral angioplasty is used in conjunction with guide wire, peripheral stenting and an atherectomy. Angioplasty can ... coronary arteries of the heart found in coronary heart disease. These stenotic segments of the coronary arteries arise due to ... A percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or coronary angioplasty with stenting, is a non-surgical procedure used to improve ...
Coronary stents: bare-metal stent (BMS) and drug-eluting stent (DES) Angioplasty balloons Atherectomy lasers and rotational ... Coronary angiography is a diagnostic procedure that allows visualization of the coronary vessels. Fluoroscopy is used to ... A common example of cardiac catheterization is coronary catheterization that involves catheterization of the coronary arteries ... Acute coronary syndromes: ST elevation MI (STEMI), non-ST Elevation MI (NSTEMI), and unstable angina Evaluation of coronary ...
He is the first cardiologist in the region to perform an angioscopy and directional atherectomy. He is reported to be the first ... Chandra P, Cribier A, Seth A (1995). "Utility of Pilot wire in angioplasty of tortuous and highly angulated coronary arteries ... Chandra P, Cribier A, Seth A (1995). "Utility of Pilot wire in angioplasty of tortuous and highly angulated coronary arteries ... Atherectomy Drug Eluting Stents Ventricular assist device Angioscopy Embolectomy Transmyocardial revascularization India portal ...
A coronary angiogram (an X-ray with radio-opaque contrast in the coronary arteries) that shows the left coronary circulation. ... Often, peripheral angioplasty is used in conjunction with guide wire, peripheral stenting and an atherectomy. ... A coronary angioplasty is a therapeutic procedure to treat the stenotic (narrowed) coronary arteries of the heart found in ... A percutaneous coronary intervention is first performed. A PCI used with stable coronary artery disease reduces chest pain but ...
Removal of coronary artery obstruction and insertion of stent(s) (36.1) Bypass anastomosis for heart revascularization (36.2) ... Percutaneous angioplasty or atherectomy of precerebral (extracranial) vessel(s) (01) Incision and excision of skull, brain, and ...
Coronary artery angioscopy, which first was used to reveal the presence of a blood clot in the coronary arteries of patients ... Forrester JS, Litvack F, Grundfest W, Hickey A (1987). "A perspective of coronary disease seen through the arteries of living ...
Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent. Drug-eluting stent. *Bentall ... This is done to avoid the reduced diastolic blood flow in the coronary circulation associated with the Blalock-Taussig shunt. ...
Desai, Chintan S.; Blumenthal, Roger S.; Greenland, Philip (2014). "Screening low-risk individuals for coronary artery disease ... It thus has potential for screening for coronary artery disease,[17] although no evidence-based recommendations can be made ...
Bypass/Coronary artery bypass MIDCAB. Off-pump CAB. TECAB. Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent. Drug-eluting stent. *Bentall ...
Coronary *Calcium scan. *CT angiography. *Abdominal and pelvic CT *Virtual colonoscopy. *CT angiography *Coronary CT ...
Atherectomy, stenting, and angioplasty to remove or push aside the arterial blockages are the most common procedures for ... Coronary artery aneurysm. *head / neck *Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection ...
... or directional coronary atherectomy is a minimally invasive procedure to remove blockage from coronary arteries to improve ... DCA, or directional coronary atherectomy is a minimally invasive procedure to remove blockage from coronary arteries to improve ... With the catheter at the opening of one of the coronary arteries, the doctor injects dye and takes an X-ray. If it shows a ... This is a latticed metal scaffold put inside the coronary artery to keep the vessel open. ...
Learn more about ELCA Coronary laser atherectomy catheter. View specifications, download support documents and discover related ... Coronary laser atherectomy catheter Find similar products ELCA coronary laser atherectomy catheters are designed to cross, ... coronary spasm, coronary embolism, coronary perforation, laser/stent damage, balloon/stent damage, and other serious. ... prepare and treat the most complex coronary lesions. This non-mechanical atherectomy catheter can be delivered over any .014" ...
... prepare and treat the most complex coronary lesions. ... ELCA coronary laser atherectomy catheters are designed to cross ... coronary spasm, coronary embolism, coronary perforation, laser/stent damage, balloon/stent damage, and other serious. ... Coronary laser atherectomy catheter IGTDELCALASR Bekijk soortgelijke producten ... prepare and treat the most complex coronary lesions. This non-mechanical atherectomy catheter can be delivered over any .014" ...
Percutaneous transluminal coronary rotational atherectomy (PTCRA) debulks atherosclerotic plaque from coronary arteries using ... Percutaneous transluminal rotational atherectomy for coronary artery disease. Atherosclerosis is the build-up of fat and other ... This is an update of the review on Percutaneous transluminal rotational atherectomy for coronary artery disease first ... Wasiak J, Law J, Watson P, Spinks A. Percutaneous transluminal rotational atherectomy for coronary artery disease. Cochrane ...
Meer informatie over ELCA Coronary laser atherectomy catheter. Bekijk specificaties, download ondersteuningsdocumenten en ... Coronary laser atherectomy catheter Bekijk soortgelijke producten ELCA coronary laser atherectomy catheters are designed to ... coronary spasm, coronary embolism, coronary perforation, laser/stent damage, balloon/stent damage, and other serious. ... This non-mechanical atherectomy catheter can be delivered over any .014" wire and can de-bulk and modify plaque of multiple ...
Coronary Artery Disease Procedure: Immediate rotational atherectomy (RA) Procedure: Delayed rotational atherectomy (RA) Phase 1 ... Coronary artery dissection is a contraindication for the use of rotational atherectomy, since rotational atherectomy may ... Safety and Efficacy of Rotational Atherectomy (RA) in Coronary Dissection. The safety and scientific validity of this study is ... Immediate rotational atherectomy (RA) in the treatment with nondilatable calcified lesion complicated by coronary dissection ...
Coronary, Death, Sudden, Coronary Disease, Constriction, Pathologic, Coronary Vessels, Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary ... Stenosis of ≥ 60% in the proximal third of the left anterior descending coronary artery Lesion suitable for either atherectomy ... Left main coronary stenosis exceeding 25 percent. Acute myocardial infarction within 1 week. Severe left ventricular ... Fifty-eight percent of all atherectomy procedures performed at the study centers were included in the trial.. Angiographic ...
About Global Coronary Atherectomy Devices A coronary atherectomy device is used in a non-surgical procedure - Market research ... Global Coronary Atherectomy Devices Market 2017-2021 Global Coronary Atherectomy Devices Market 2017-2021 ... Global Coronary Atherectomy Devices Market 2017-2021. About Global Coronary Atherectomy Devices. A coronary atherectomy device ... Table Coronary atherectomy devices market in EMEA 2016-2021 ($ millions). *Table Coronary atherectomy devices market overview ...
Mechanical rotational atherectomy with the Rotablator is widely used for percutaneous coronary revascularization, but the ideal ... Coronary angioplasty and Rotablator atherectomy trial (CARAT): immediate and late results of a prospective multicenter ... 12.7%, P , 0.05) immediately after atherectomy. This study suggests that a routine lesion modification strategy employing small ...
DESIGN: Nonrandomized, sequential patients with coronary arterial lesions that were ostial, eccentric, bulky, recurrent or ... To evaluate preliminary experience of directional coronary atherectomy for complex coronary artery lesions. ... OBJECTIVE: To evaluate preliminary experience of directional coronary atherectomy for complex coronary artery lesions. DESIGN: ... Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary. Coronary Angiography. Coronary Artery Disease / radiography, surgery*, ...
Keywords: Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Angiography, Atherectomy, Constriction, Pathologic, Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary , ... Coronary Angioplasty Versus Excisional Atherectomy Trial I - CAVEAT I. Feb 04, 2002 Share via: ... Directional atherectomy was associated with a trend toward lower rates of restenosis at 6 months, and increased mortality and ... Directional atherectomy (DCA), balloon angioplasty (PTCA). Concomitant Medications: Aspirin, calcium channel blockade, heparin ...
What is coronary atherectomy? Meaning of coronary atherectomy medical term. What does coronary atherectomy mean? ... Looking for online definition of coronary atherectomy in the Medical Dictionary? coronary atherectomy explanation free. ... 55, transluminal coronary atherectomy, directional atherectomy, excimer laser atherectomy, rotational atherectomy, that by ... coronary atherectomy. A technique of removing obstructions from the coronary artery with a cutting instrument inserted through ...
Coronary heart disease , Evaluation of Treatment Strategies for Severe CaLcIfic Coronary Arteries: Orbital Atherectomy vs. ... Evaluation of Treatment Strategies for Severe CaLcIfic Coronary Arteries: Orbital Atherectomy vs. Conventional Angioplasty ... This trial will evaluate Orbital Atherectomy compared to conventional balloon angioplasty technique for the treatment of ...
Coronary lesions with severe (or heavy) calcification are classified as complex lesions and are known to carry lower success ... rates and higher complication rates following percutaneous coronary intervention. The Diamondback 360(®) Coronary Orbital At ... The Diamondback 360(®) Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System is the first and only device approved for use in the USA as a ... Coronary lesions with severe (or heavy) calcification are classified as complex lesions and are known to carry lower success ...
Directional Coronary Atherectomy (DCA) is a minimally invasive procedure to remove the blockage from the coronary arteries and ... Once the catheter is placed in the opening or ostium of one of the coronary arteries, the doctor injects dye and takes an x-ray ... A device called a stent may be placed within the coronary artery to keep the vessel open. After the intervention is completed ...
What is Coronary Angioplasty and Rotablator Atherectomy Trial? Meaning of Coronary Angioplasty and Rotablator Atherectomy Trial ... What does Coronary Angioplasty and Rotablator Atherectomy Trial mean in law? ... Definition of Coronary Angioplasty and Rotablator Atherectomy Trial in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary ... redirected from Coronary Angioplasty and Rotablator Atherectomy Trial). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, ...
Coronary Atherectomy Devices and Lower Extremity Peripheral Atherectomy Devices ... France Atherectomy Devices is segmented as follows -*Coronary Atherectomy Devices. *Lower Extremity Peripheral Atherectomy ... Table 3: Coronary Atherectomy Devices Market, France, Revenue ($m), USD Constant, 2015-2020. Table 4: Coronary Atherectomy ... France Atherectomy Devices Market Outlook to 2025 - Coronary Atherectomy Devices and Lower Extremity Peripheral Atherectomy ...
CRT-100.65 In-Hospital Outcomes Following Coronary Atherectomy During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention ... CRT-100.65 In-Hospital Outcomes Following Coronary Atherectomy During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention ... CRT-100.65 In-Hospital Outcomes Following Coronary Atherectomy During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention ...
Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) is a device which allows for vessel preparation and treatment of severely calcified coronary ... CRT-200.71 Initial Commercial Experience With Orbital Atherectomy in Calcified Coronary Artery Disease ... CRT-200.71 Initial Commercial Experience With Orbital Atherectomy in Calcified Coronary Artery Disease ... CRT-200.71 Initial Commercial Experience With Orbital Atherectomy in Calcified Coronary Artery Disease ...
Histologic analysis of directional coronary atherectomy samples. A review of findings and their clinical relevance. Am J ... Histologic analysis of directional coronary atherectomy samples. A review of findings and their clinical relevance. ... Histologic analysis of directional coronary atherectomy samples. A review of findings and their clinical relevance. ...
Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS). Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS). The only atherectomy device indicated to ... Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System. INDICATION & IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION. Indication: The DIAMONDBACK 360® Coronary ... Home » Coronary » Diamondback 360® Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System. Diamondback 360® ... Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Often referred to as blocked arteries, CAD is the most common ...
Use of rotational atherectomy (RA) is contraindicated in the presence of a coronary dissection. ... It is commonly seen at the time of PCI to a right coronary artery (RCA) and is associated with potentially fatal consequences. ... undilatable lesion can result in coronary dissection. Retrograde propagation of a dissection flap into the sinus of Valsalva is ... Rotational Atherectomy in a Dissected Coronary Artery That Propagated Into the Sinus of Valsalva: Is This the Last Hope? By: ...
Calcified coronary lesions, Drug-eluting stents, Rotational atherectomy, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Atherectomy, Coronary ... post rotational atherectomy (RA) for heavily calcified coronary lesions (HCCL). METHODOLOGY: The study cohort comprised 99 (116 ... and second-generation drug-eluting stents in patients undergoing rotational atherectomy for heavily calcified coronary lesions. ... and second-generation drug-eluting stents in patients undergoing rotational atherectomy for heavily calcified coronary lesions ...
Coronary atherectomy specimens from 50 patients with coronary heart disease were examined for the presence of Chlamydia ... Coronary atherectomy specimens from 50 patients with coronary heart disease were examined for the presence of Chlamydia ... Of three patients with evidence of C. pneumoniae in coronary atheromas, two had an antibody titer of 1:32 and the third had no ... Results of this study demonstrate a low prevalence of C. pneumoniae DNA in coronary atheromas. These findings do not support ...
Trial Of Orbital Atherectomy Device In Calcified Coronary Arteries Completes Enrollment. In short ... The coronary system is limited by federal law to investigational use and is currently not commercially available in the United ... The U.S. FDA granted 510(k) clearance for the use of the Diamondback Orbital Atherectomy System in August 2007. To date, nearly ... It is estimated that moderate to severe arterial calcium is present in nearly 40 percent of those treated annually for coronary ...
... coronary in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for Atherectomy, coronary. 4 words related to endarterectomy: ablation, cutting out, ... Atherectomy, coronary synonyms, Atherectomy, coronary antonyms - FreeThesaurus.com https://www.freethesaurus.com/Atherectomy%2c ... Atherectomy, coronary provided by ,a style=color:#000 href=https://www.freethesaurus.com/Atherectomy%2c+coronary, ... redirected from Atherectomy, coronary). Also found in: Dictionary, Medical. #vtZoom,.vt-link{cursor:pointer} .vt-container{ ...
... with coronary angioplasty when performed; single major coronary artery or branch ... HCPCS Code Description: Percutaneous transluminal coronary atherectomy, with drug eluting intracoronary stent, ... Percutaneous transluminal coronary atherectomy, with drug eluting intracoronary stent, with coronary angioplasty when performed ... Percutaneous transluminal coronary atherectomy, with drug eluting intracoronary stent, with coronary angioplasty when performed ...
Coronary atherectomy devices are used to relieve symptoms of coronary artery disease and improve blood flow to the heart. ... Coronary Atherectomy Devices. Atherectomy is a procedure that relieves symptoms of coronary artery disease by improving blood ... Then, a special atherectomy catheter carrying a grinding device is positioned at the narrow spot in your coronary artery. ... Learn More about Coronary Atherectomy Devices. Vidant Health can connect you to health care professionals to help you ...
N2 - Directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) was performed in 158 patients over a 2-year period at the Mayo Clinic. Primary ... AB - Directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) was performed in 158 patients over a 2-year period at the Mayo Clinic. Primary ... Directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) was performed in 158 patients over a 2-year period at the Mayo Clinic. Primary ... abstract = "Directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) was performed in 158 patients over a 2-year period at the Mayo Clinic. ...
Learn more about ELCA Coronary laser atherectomy catheter. View specifications, download support documents and discover related ... Coronary laser atherectomy catheter Find similar products ELCA coronary laser atherectomy catheters are designed to cross, ... coronary spasm, coronary embolism, coronary perforation, laser/stent damage, balloon/stent damage, and other serious. ... Lesion is beyond acute bends or is in a location within the coronary anatomy where the catheter cannot traverse. Guidewire ...
  • DCA, or directional coronary atherectomy is a minimally invasive procedure to remove blockage from coronary arteries to improve blood flow to the heart muscle and ease pain. (medlineplus.gov)
  • With the catheter at the opening of one of the coronary arteries, the doctor injects dye and takes an X-ray. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Percutaneous transluminal coronary rotational atherectomy (PTCRA) debulks atherosclerotic plaque from coronary arteries using an abrasive burr. (cochrane.org)
  • PTCRA has been used both as an alternative to and in conjunction with balloon angioplasty to open up blocked coronary arteries. (cochrane.org)
  • To assess the effects of PTCRA for coronary artery disease in patients with non-complex and complex lesions (e.g. ostial, long or diffuse lesions or those arising from in-stent re- stenosis ) of the coronary arteries. (cochrane.org)
  • A coronary atherectomy device is used in a non-surgical procedure to remove atherosclerotic plaque from coronary arteries and vein grafts. (marketresearch.com)
  • Atherectomy is performed to open the blocked arteries and regularize the flow of blood to the heart. (marketresearch.com)
  • instrumental removal, via catheter, of atheromas in coronary arteries. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • ORBIT II is evaluating the safety and effectiveness of the company's orbital atherectomy technology in treating severely calcified coronary arteries. (medlatest.com)
  • Based on promising results in treating severely calcified coronary arteries in the ORBIT I study, CSI's orbital technology may be well suited for removing calcified plaque in coronary lesions. (medlatest.com)
  • CSI has also commenced its ORBIT II Investigational Device Exemption clinical trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of its orbital technology in treating coronary arteries. (medlatest.com)
  • Atherectomy is used to treat narrowing in arteries caused by peripheral artery disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • While atherectomy is usually employed to treat arteries it can be used in veins and vascular bypass grafts as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Revolution device is indicated for atherectomy of the peripheral vasculature and to break apart and remove thrombus from the peripheral arteries. (mpo-mag.com)
  • The devices for directional atherectomy approved by the US FDA can be used only for peripheral blood vessels and not for the coronary, carotid, iliac, or renal arteries. (medindia.net)
  • It causes increased blood flow to the heart muscle by relaxing the coronary arteries and other blood vessels in the body and regulates heart rhythm. (heart.org)
  • Atherectomy is a procedure used to remove plaque and open narrowed coronary arteries to clear heart blockages and increase blood flow. (gottliebhospital.org)
  • An atherectomy is especially helpful for treating blockages in arteries that occur around branches or in vessels that are not easily treated with stents . (gottliebhospital.org)
  • Rotational atherectomy ('rotablator') is used to treat heavily calcified lesions within coronary arteries at the time of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). (edownloads.me)
  • When this process occurs in the coronary arteries it is referred to as a heart attack. (google.ca)
  • These features make laser atherectomy an efficient tool in the treatment of peripheral arteries with higher atherosclerotic burden and thrombus, as well as in the treatment of diffuse intimal hyperplasia that is seen with in-stent restenosis of previously stented peripheral arteries. (springer.com)
  • In October 2013, the company received FDA approval for the use of the Diamondback Orbital Atherectomy System in coronary arteries. (businesswire.com)
  • Coronary artery disease, a narrowing of the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the heart, is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women. (methodisthospitals.org)
  • A safe, radiographic dye is injected into the coronary arteries via a catheter, enabling the doctor to see the blood flow through the arteries. (methodisthospitals.org)
  • Coronary artery disease is a narrowing or blockage of the arteries and vessels that provide oxygen and nutrients to the heart. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Coronary artery disease occurs when the coronary arteries become partially blocked or clogged. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This blockage limits the flow of blood from the coronary arteries, which are the major arteries supplying oxygen-rich blood to the heart. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The coronary arteries expand when the heart is working harder and needs more oxygen. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Healthy coronary arteries are clean, smooth, and slick. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Atherosclerotic plaques often form blood clots that also can block the coronary arteries (coronary thrombosis). (encyclopedia.com)
  • The catheter is then placed at the opening of the coronary arteries and contrast fluid is injected to determine if blockage or plaque is present. (mercyhealthsystem.org)
  • This procedure is done to open blocked coronary arteries caused by coronary artery disease. (mercyhealthsystem.org)
  • This often preventable disease causes the dangerous thickening and narrowing of the coronary arteries-the vessels that bring blood to the heart-which disrupts the flow of oxygen and nutrients to the heart, causing serious problems. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • With this procedure, a long thin tube (catheter) is passed into the coronary arteries. (massgeneral.org)
  • A press release reports that CSI's Diamondback 360 coronary orbital atherectomy system is the first and only atherectomy device approved to specifically treat severely calcified coronary arteries. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • Cardiovascular Systems Inc (CSI) has submitted an application to Japan's Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) for approval of its Diamondback 360 Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System Micro Crown to treat severely calcified coronary arteries for the facilitation of stent placement. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • The recently published JETSTREAM Calcium Study was a prospective, single-arm, multicenter study to evaluate the effect of the JETSTREAM™ Atherectomy System (Boston Scientific Corporation) when treating severely calcified peripheral arterial lesions in the common femoral, superficial femoral, or popliteal arteries causing claudication. (evtoday.com)
  • Dissections occur post atherectomy of the infrainguinal arteries. (invasivecardiology.com)
  • A total of 15 patients undergoing atherectomy of the femoropopliteal arteries for de novo or restenotic disease (non-stent restenosis) were prospectively included in this study by one operator at one center. (invasivecardiology.com)
  • In 1977, the selective coronary catheter which was developed and introduced by Dr. Andreas Gruentzig and his colleagues in Zurich, was first proposed as a therapeutic tool for the dilatation of obstructions in the coronary arteries. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The study includes the observation of the heart's pumping function and the visualization of the coronary arteries, which supply the heart muscle with blood. (kaweahdelta.org)
  • Features the front-cutting, stable rotation of a diamond-tipped burr recognized by physicians as an optimal device to ablate calcium in coronary arteries. (bostonscientific.com)
  • Dr. Kini's study sought to assess the mechanical effects of RA and OA on heavily calcified coronary lesions and subsequent stent placement using optical coherence tomography, an established medical imaging technique that uses light to capture three-dimensional images from within arteries and other biological tissue. (finances.com)
  • Stents are small cylinders that are placed inside coronary arteries to keep them open. (readabstracts.com)
  • Eighty-nine percent of the patients who had atherectomy had a 50% or more reduction in the narrowing of their arteries, compared with 80% of those who had angioplasty. (readabstracts.com)
  • This type of coronary artery disease occurs when arteries that supply blood to the heart are blocked by a buildup of fatty deposits and plaque (atherosclerosis). (bidmc.org)
  • Complete blockage of blood flow through one of the CORONARY ARTERIES, usually from CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Dilatation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply. (bioportfolio.com)
  • What are the coronary arteries? (ahealthyme.com)
  • Coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle. (ahealthyme.com)
  • The coronary arteries run along the outside of the heart and have small branches that supply blood to the heart muscle. (ahealthyme.com)
  • The 2 main coronary arteries are the left main and right coronary arteries. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Additional smaller branches of the coronary arteries include the obtuse marginal (OM), septal perforator (SP), and diagonals. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Why are the coronary arteries important? (ahealthyme.com)
  • Since coronary arteries deliver blood to the heart muscle, any coronary artery disorder or disease can reduce the flow of oxygen and nutrients to the heart, which may lead to a heart attack and possibly death. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Coronary heart disease, or coronary artery disease (CAD), is characterized by inflammation and the buildup of and fatty deposits along the innermost layer of the coronary arteries. (ahealthyme.com)
  • With this procedure, a wire is passed into the coronary arteries of the heart and X-rays are taken after a contrast agent is injected into an artery. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Several methods are used to remove this build-up including a procedure known as percutaneous transluminalcoronary rotational atherectomy (PTCRA). (cochrane.org)
  • This is an update of the review on 'Percutaneous transluminal rotational atherectomy for coronary artery disease' first published in The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2003. (cochrane.org)
  • This study is aimed at examining the safety and efficacy of rotational atherectomy (RA) in nondilatable calcified lesion complicated by coronary dissection during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedure. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Coronary artery dissection is a contraindication for the use of rotational atherectomy, since rotational atherectomy may propagate coronary dissection. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In the presence of coronary dissection, conservative management is suggested for approximately 4 weeks to permit the dissection to heal prior to treatment with rotational atherectomy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Mechanical rotational atherectomy with the Rotablator is widely used for percutaneous coronary revascularization, but the ideal debulking strategy remains unknown. (nih.gov)
  • Rotational Atherectomy in a Dissected Coronary Artery That Propagated Into the Sinus of Valsalva: Is This the Last Hope? (medreviews.com)
  • Clinical outcomes of first- and second-generation drug-eluting stents in patients undergoing rotational atherectomy for heavily calcified coronary lesions. (surrey.ac.uk)
  • BACKGROUND: There is paucity of data regarding the clinical outcome of second generation drug- eluting stents (DES) post rotational atherectomy (RA) for heavily calcified coronary lesions (HCCL). (surrey.ac.uk)
  • The Rex Medical Revolution Peripheral Atherectomy System is an innovative and ergonomically designed low profile rotational atherectomy system (140,000 RPM) with continuous mechanical aspiration for below-the-knee (BTK) and above-the-knee (ATK) applications including multiple plaque morphologies ranging from thrombus and soft plaque to severely calcified lesions and chronic total occlusions (CTOs). (mpo-mag.com)
  • Rotational atherectomy The cutting tip spins at high speed and grinds the plaque into a powder that is then washed away safely in the bloodstream. (medindia.net)
  • Orbital atherectomy This is the latest technique that uses a high-speed rotational device similar to the rotational atherectomy but with a slightly modified tip. (medindia.net)
  • Rotational atherectomy by rotablator. (sciencephoto.com)
  • In extreme cases, such as in balloon failure-to-cross, rotational atherectomy (RA) might be decisive. (cbsmd.org)
  • Previous reports cite an incidence of between 0.2-0.6% 1- 6 and while some of these series were reported during the era of balloon angioplasty alone, more recent studies have referred to intervention using newer devices including stents and rotational and directional atherectomy. (bmj.com)
  • Rotational atherectomy (RA) is useful in modifying calcified plaque during PCI. (ahajournals.org)
  • This concise practical guide is designed to facilitate the clinical decision-making process in the management of rotational atherectomy procedures by reviewing a number of cases and defining the various diagnostic and management decisions open to clinicians. (edownloads.me)
  • Therefore, this book will provide interventionalists with a valuable compendium of cases which can help them in the management of patients whom they plan to treat with rotational atherectomy. (edownloads.me)
  • Additionally, the increased mass of the sanding crown allows for lower rotational speeds while maintaining the same orbit potential as the first generation orbital atherectomy system. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • Among the various kinds of percutaneous coronary intervention techniques for balloon non-crossable severe calcified coronary stenosis, rotational atherectomy (RA) is known to be a therapy of choice. (sch.ac.kr)
  • Among the many devices for PCI, rotational atherectomy (RA) has shown high procedural success rates with non-crossable calcified stenosis [ 2 ]. (sch.ac.kr)
  • IMSEAR at SEARO: Burr entrapment resulting in perforation of right coronary artery: an unreported complication of rotational atherectomy. (who.int)
  • Gambhir DS, Batra R, Singh S, Kaul UA, Arora R. Burr entrapment resulting in perforation of right coronary artery: an unreported complication of rotational atherectomy. (who.int)
  • CSII ) today announced that a new article e-published in May 2015 in The Journal of Catheterization and Cardiovascular Intervention highlights the mechanical effect of orbital atherectomy (OA) and rotational atherectomy (RA) in treating heavily calcified coronary lesions. (finances.com)
  • The article, titled "Optical Coherence Tomography Assessment of the Mechanistic Effects of Rotational and Orbital Atherectomy in Severely Calcified Coronary Lesions," details results from a study led by Dr. Annapoorna Kini, Professor of Cardiology at the Mount Sinai Hospital and Icahn School of Medicine, and Director of The Cardiac Catheterization Lab at Mount Sinai Hospital. (finances.com)
  • By product type, the global atherectomy devices market is segmented into photo-ablative (laser) atherectomy systems, directional atherectomy systems, orbital atherectomy systems, rotational atherectomy systems, and others. (medgadget.com)
  • The vein graft underwent rotational atherectomy followed by stenting, demonstrating rotational atherectomy of saphenous vein grafts is possible in appropriately selected patients. (springer.com)
  • In: Low R., Yeo K. (eds) Clinical Cases in Coronary Rotational Atherectomy. (springer.com)
  • Objectives This study sought to assess the mechanistic effect of rotational atherectomy (RA) and orbital atherectomy (OA) on heavily calcified coronary lesions and subsequent stent placement using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Background RA and OA are two main approaches to ablate coronary calcium. (fujita-hu.ac.jp)
  • ELCA coronary laser atherectomy catheters are designed to cross, prepare and treat the most complex coronary lesions. (philips.com)
  • Directional atherectomy vs. PTCA for angiographic estenosis in LAD lesions. (acc.org)
  • To assess the clinical and angiographic outcomes following atherectomy for de novo lesions in the proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD). (acc.org)
  • Preliminary experience at a Canadian centre with directional coronary atherectomy for complex lesions. (biomedsearch.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate preliminary experience of directional coronary atherectomy for complex coronary artery lesions. (biomedsearch.com)
  • MAIN RESULTS: Primary success was achieved in 29 of 33 lesions (88%) by atherectomy alone and in 31 of 33 lesions (94%) by additional use of balloon angioplasty. (biomedsearch.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Directional coronary atherectomy is safe and efficacious for ostial, bulky and eccentric lesions not optimally suited to balloon angioplasty. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Lesions which have tortuous segments immediately beyond, restricting movement of the stiff nose-cone, and which are membranous or bandlike, may not be indicated for directional coronary atherectomy. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This trial will evaluate Orbital Atherectomy compared to conventional balloon angioplasty technique for the treatment of severely calcified lesions prior to implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES). (centerwatch.com)
  • Evaluation of the Diamondback 360 Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System for treating de novo, severely calcified lesions. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Coronary lesions with severe (or heavy) calcification are classified as complex lesions and are known to carry lower success rates and higher complication rates following percutaneous coronary intervention. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The Diamondback 360(®) Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System is the first and only device approved for use in the USA as a treatment for severely calcified coronary lesions to facilitate stent delivery and optimal deployment. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Availability of this device provides a safe and effective option for physicians to improve treatment outcomes in this patient population with severely calcified coronary lesions. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) is a device which allows for vessel preparation and treatment of severely calcified coronary lesions. (onlinejacc.org)
  • The only atherectomy device indicated to treat severely calcified coronary lesions. (csi360.com)
  • The DIAMONDBACK 360® Coronary Orbital Atherectomy Systems (OAS) are percutaneous orbital atherectomy systems indicated to facilitate stent delivery in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who are acceptable candidates for PTCA or stenting due to de novo , severely calcified coronary artery lesions. (csi360.com)
  • Our coronary atherectomy device helps you cross, prepare and treat the most difficult coronary lesions with laser guided precision. (philips.com)
  • 03). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first description of TF protein expression in human coronary artery lesions in vivo. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Tissue factor was readily detected in de novo lesions in patients with unstable coronary syndromes, suggesting a role for TF in the pathogenesis of this disease process. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Conversely, TF was rarely detected in patients with restenosis lesions even if the resulting clinical presentation was an unstable coronary syndrome. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Methods and Results: TEC atherectomy was performed on 158 saphenous vein graft lesions in 146 consecutive patients with a mean age of 65±8 years (78% men). (nebraska.edu)
  • The TEC atherectomy cutter was successfully advanced through 144 lesions (91%), but technical failures occurred in 14 lesions (9%), and these were subsequently managed by successful balloon angioplasty. (nebraska.edu)
  • Angiographic complications were evident in 33 lesions (20.7%) immediately after TEC atherectomy and in 8 lesions (5%) after PTCA, including distal embolization (11.9%), no-reflow (8.8%), and abrupt closure (5.0%), but no perforations. (nebraska.edu)
  • COAST is a single-arm, multicentre, global investigational device exemption (IDE) study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CSI's next-generation orbital atherectomy system in treating patients with severely calcified coronary lesions for the facilitation of stent placement. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • These findings are similar to the data reported by Mintz et al in coronary artery lesions. (evtoday.com)
  • Longer lesions correlated with more dissections post atherectomy on IVUS ( P =.03), but not on angiogram ( P =.28). (invasivecardiology.com)
  • Said study co-investigator, Samin K. Sharma, MD, Director of Clinical and Interventional Cardiology at The Mount Sinai Medical Center, "We found that using OA versus RA to treat heavily calcified coronary lesions resulted in more significant tissue modification leading to better stent apposition and expansion. (finances.com)
  • While small case reports have described the mechanistic effect of RA in calcified coronary lesions, there has been no imaging study to assess the effect of OA on coronary artery architecture and/or compare the effects of two atherectomy devices. (finances.com)
  • A 61-year-old man with a history of five-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting was found to have symptomatic, severe, and critically obstructive calcific lesions of the vein graft to the RCA. (springer.com)
  • Ten to 20 percent of the 280,000 Japanese patients who undergo percutaneous coronary interventions, or PCIs, each year have severely calcified coronary lesions. (infomeddnews.com)
  • REACH PVI study prospectively evaluated acute clinical outcomes of orbital atherectomy via transradial access for the treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in lower extremity lesions. (infomeddnews.com)
  • Diamondback is the only atherectomy device to treat calcific coronary artery disease by both safely reducing superficial lesions and creating fractures of deep calcium, facilitating stent delivery, expansion and wall apposition for low restenosis rates. (infomeddnews.com)
  • The aim of this study was to introduce the experience in treatment of acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction(STEMI), saphenous vein graft(SVG), Chronic total occlusion(CTO),In-stent restenosis(ISR)and diffuse calcification lesions by excimer laser coronary atherectomy(ELCA). (bvsalud.org)
  • Conclution This limited evdiences showed that treatment of complex coronary lesions by excimer laser coronary atherectomy may be a Safe and effective choice.It can be further popularized in complex coronary artery disease. (bvsalud.org)
  • Involvement of C-reactive protein obtained by directional coronary atherectomy in plaque instability and developing restenosis in patients with stable or unstable angina pectoris. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Final results of the STent versus directional coronary Atherectomy Randomized Trial (START). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Histologic analysis of directional coronary atherectomy samples. (harvard.edu)
  • Directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) was performed in 158 patients over a 2-year period at the Mayo Clinic. (elsevier.com)
  • To explore the potential role that TF may play in ischemic coronary syndromes, directional coronary atherectomy specimens were tested for the presence of TF protein using immunohistochemical techniques. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • IMSEAR at SEARO: Clinical, angiographic and histopathological predictors of restenosis after directional coronary atherectomy. (who.int)
  • Out of 127 directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) procedures done in our laboratory, there were 81 patients who had completed a minimum of six months of follow-up. (who.int)
  • During a directional coronary atherectomy, a thin, flexible tube (catheter) is inserted into an artery through a small incision in the groin. (lvhn.org)
  • The studies by Topol and Adelman and their colleagues tested the hypothesis that directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) is superior to PTCA in reducing restenosis. (acpjc.org)
  • Directional coronary atherectomy may cause more complications than coronary angioplasty in patients with coronary artery disease. (readabstracts.com)
  • Many minimally invasive procedures, including coronary angiography, angioplasty, stent insertion and atherectomy are also performed in our Cath Lab. (methodisthospitals.org)
  • 8 The extent and nature of dissections following atherectomy, however, may have been under-appreciated on cine angiography. (invasivecardiology.com)
  • Inclusion criteria were angiography-proven diseased native coronary vessels with no previous coronary interventions, stenosis of ≥ 60% on visual assessment, lesion length of 12 mm, and suitability for either a 6-French cutter or larger or for a 3.0-mm balloon or larger. (acpjc.org)
  • The need for post-TAVR coronary angiography (CA) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was thus far relatively rare amongst initial TAVR cohorts who were deemed either inoperable or at high-to-extreme surgical risk. (hindawi.com)
  • Transradial approach of cardiac catheterization is a common alternative to transfemoral access for diagnostic coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). (bioportfolio.com)
  • This non-mechanical atherectomy catheter can be delivered over any .014" wire and can de-bulk and modify plaque of multiple morphologies and is approved for the broadest range of coronary indications in atherectomy. (philips.com)
  • Atherectomy uses a shaver, which is placed at the end of the catheter that helps in shaving off the plaque. (marketresearch.com)
  • A technique of removing obstructions from the coronary artery with a cutting instrument inserted through a cardiac catheter. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Coronary atherectomy or commonly referred to as rotablation, is a catheter-based procedure that includes a high-speed rotating metallic burr that abrades calcified (hardened) plaque that is blocking an artery and blood supply to the heart, rotating at speeds of up to 200,000 RPM. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Then, a special atherectomy catheter carrying a grinding device is positioned at the narrow spot in your coronary artery. (vidanthealth.com)
  • There are four types of atherectomy depending on the type of device that is attached to the catheter for removing the plaque . (medindia.net)
  • Directional atherectomy The catheter is provided with a cutting tip that shaves the plaque off gently. (medindia.net)
  • Laser atherectomy The catheter tip is provided with a device that emits high-energy laser to alter or vaporize the plaque material. (medindia.net)
  • An atherectomy catheter is provided having a tissue collection chamber capable of being cleaned out in a simple, fast and effective way, and also provides methods of using said catheter to remove material from a blood vessel lumen. (google.se)
  • Atherectomy is a minimally invasive, catheter-based treatment for atherosclerosis and peripheral artery disease in the lower extremities. (gottliebhospital.org)
  • During angioplasty and stenting, a doctor uses a catheter to guide a tiny balloon and stent (mesh tube) to a blockage in a coronary (heart) artery. (rexhealth.com)
  • An atherectomy system for cutting, ingesting and removing an obstruction from within a patient's artery, comprising a flexible guide-wire insertable into the artery, a flexible rotary-catheter rotatably disposed and slidable over the flexible guide-wire, a blade forming a distal end of the flexible rotary-catheter. (google.ca)
  • 3. An atherectomy system as in claim 1, wherein said flexible rotary-catheter has an increased wall thickness and increased torque carrying capacity at the vicinity of its proximal end compared with the same at its distal end. (google.ca)
  • 4. An atherectomy system as in claim 1, wherein said flexible rotary-catheter has a wall reinforced with a spiral member. (google.ca)
  • The company's Orbital Atherectomy Systems treat calcified and fibrotic plaque in arterial vessels throughout the leg and heart in a few minutes of treatment time, and address many of the limitations associated with existing surgical, catheter and pharmacological treatment alternatives. (businesswire.com)
  • Methodist Hospitals uses these catheter-based techniques to open plaque-filled vessels in patients who have coronary artery disease. (methodisthospitals.org)
  • A coronary angioplasty involves inserting a small balloon catheter into the clogged or narrowed vessel. (mercyhealthsystem.org)
  • Designed to quickly and safely deliver a guidewire via the true lumen or subintimal pathways, CrossBoss Catheter gives you total access to coronary chronic total occlusions. (bostonscientific.com)
  • The NC Quantum Apex Catheter is a high-performance, post-dilatation balloon catheter developed specifically to address physicians' needs in optimizing coronary stent deployment. (bostonscientific.com)
  • Neither CAs‐nor PCIs‐performed after valve implantation revealed significant differences regarding arterial access site, catheter diameter, number of diagnostic or guiding catheters used, procedural duration, fluoroscopy time, or achievement of selective coronary injection. (hindawi.com)
  • The system typically includes an elongate catheter member, a filtration apparatus disposed within the distal region, and an atherectomy assembly which includes a mechanism for trapping and holding mobile or fixed plaque and an excising mechanism for removing the plaque. (patents.com)
  • In use, the catheter is positioned so that the atherectomy assembly lies within a region of interest, the filtration apparatus is deployed downstream of the region of interest, the plaque is trapped and held by a snare, vacuum, or other trapping means, and then the excising mechanism is activated to remove the plaque. (patents.com)
  • in-hospital death, Q-wave myocardial infarction and emergency coronary bypass surgery occurred in 3, 1 and 4% of patients, respectively. (elsevier.com)
  • These procedures are used to treat coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and myocardial infarction, better known as heart attack. (kaweahdelta.org)
  • Primary percutaneous coronary intervention represents the gold standard for the treatment of ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a high burden of coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death. (scribd.com)
  • This data demonstrates the safety and effectiveness of OAS in treating severely calcified coronary artery disease. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Cardiovascular Systems, Inc., based in St. Paul, Minn., is a medical device company focused on developing and commercializing innovative solutions for treating coronary and peripheral artery disease. (csi360.com)
  • We are devoted to developing innovative solutions for treating peripheral and coronary artery disease, to help physicians conquer calcium, one of the largest challenges when treating PAD and CAD and help patients get back to what matters. (csi360.com)
  • Coronary atherectomy specimens from 50 patients with coronary heart disease were examined for the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae by two different methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by in situ hybridization. (oup.com)
  • It is estimated that moderate to severe arterial calcium is present in nearly 40 percent of those treated annually for coronary artery disease (CAD). (medlatest.com)
  • Atherectomy is a procedure that relieves symptoms of coronary artery disease by improving blood flow to your heart. (vidanthealth.com)
  • It has also been used to treat coronary artery disease, albeit without evidence of superiority to angioplasty. (wikipedia.org)
  • The results of this pivotal trial demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of the Revolution Peripheral Atherectomy System for Lower Extremity Peripheral Arterial Revascularization in 121 subjects with femoropopliteal/tibial occlusive disease. (mpo-mag.com)
  • Commenting on the recent regulatory milestone, Rex Medical President, Lindsay L. Carter, "We are pleased to provide a new, innovative and differentiated peripheral atherectomy system designed for effective treatment of the global patient population impacted by symptomatic infrainguinal lower extremity arterial occlusive disease. (mpo-mag.com)
  • If a coronary artery disease (CAD) is suspected, a coronary angiogram is first performed, by injecting a contrast dye into the arterial system and the coronary vessels are then visualized on x-ray to determine the location and extent of blockages of the blood vessels and decide upon mode of treatment. (medindia.net)
  • Our coronary imaging catheters help assess the location of the disease and lesion morphology, including calcium and thrombus. (philips.com)
  • Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Coronary Artery Disease. (lww.com)
  • ST. PAUL, Minn.--( BUSINESS WIRE )--Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (CSI ® ) (NASDAQ: CSII), a medical device company developing and commercializing innovative interventional treatment systems for patients with peripheral and coronary artery disease, announced today that the first patient in Hong Kong has been treated with its Stealth 360 ® Peripheral Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS). (businesswire.com)
  • While men in their 40s have a higher risk of coronary artery disease than women, as women get older (especially after they reach menopause), their risk increases to almost equal that of a man's risk. (methodisthospitals.org)
  • At Methodist Hospitals, a number of techniques are used to diagnose and treat coronary artery disease. (methodisthospitals.org)
  • This technology aids in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, to distinguish among life-threatening possible causes of chest pain and the rapid assessment of stroke patients. (methodisthospitals.org)
  • Coronary artery disease, also called coronary heart disease or heart disease , is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States . (encyclopedia.com)
  • According to the American Heart Association, deaths from coronary artery disease have declined some since about 1990, but more than 40,000 people still died from the disease in 2000. (encyclopedia.com)
  • About 13 million Americans have active symptoms of coronary artery disease . (encyclopedia.com)
  • Coronary artery disease is usually caused by atherosclerosis. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Recent research indicates that infection from organisms such as chlamydia bacteria may be responsible for some cases of coronary artery disease. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A number of major contributing factors increase the risk of developing coronary artery disease. (encyclopedia.com)
  • People with more risk factors are more likely to develop coronary artery disease. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Major risk factors significantly increase the chance of developing coronary artery disease. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Heredity - People whose parents have coronary artery disease are more likely to develop it. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Over age 60, however, women have coronary artery disease at a rate equal to that of men. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Age - Men who are 45 years of age and older and women who are 55 years of age and older are more likely to have coronary artery disease. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Occasionally, coronary disease may strike a person in the 30s. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Smoking - Smoking increases both the chance of developing coronary artery disease and the chance of dying from it. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Risk of developing coronary artery disease increases steadily as blood cholesterol levels increase above 160 mg/dL. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Coronary artery disease (also called coronary heart disease ) is the number-one killer of both men and women in the United States, and it's the most common type of heart disease. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Without enough blood, coronary artery disease can lead to angina (chest pain). (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Coronary artery disease develops slowly, usually over decades, so the good news is that we have a huge window of opportunity for prevention, through a good lifestyle and healthy habits," says Seth Martin, M.D., M.H.S. , of the Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Preventing coronary artery disease is largely about controlling the risk factors. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • If you're overweight, losing just 5 percent to 10 percent of your current weight will lower your risk of developing coronary artery disease. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Because coronary artery disease develops over time, the symptoms depend on the stage of illness. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • To diagnose coronary artery disease, your doctor will look at markers such as blood pressure, cholesterol profile and blood glucose (from a blood test) as well as your health history and family history, says McEvoy. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • This test may be considered in persons without known coronary heart disease in whom the decision to treat with a statin and aspirin is unclear. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Orbital Atherectomy for Calcific Coronary Artery Disease in Patients W" by Ibrahim Kassas, Ahmed Nagy et al. (umassmed.edu)
  • BACKGROUND: Percutaneous revascularization followed by transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been increasingly utilized as an alternative to surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) and coronary artery disease (CAD). (umassmed.edu)
  • This valuable trial will inform physicians regarding the most effective treatment protocols and strategies for treating patients with calcific coronary artery disease, ultimately improving PCI outcomes. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • The ECLIPSE trial reflects the growing complexity of coronary artery disease seen in the modern-day cardiac catheterisation laboratory, and will be the largest randomised clinical trial to date to assess the use of adjunctive coronary atherectomy for calcific coronary artery disease," commented co-principal investigator Ajay Kirtane (director of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratories, NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, USA). (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • Since FDA approval in 2013, more than 20,000 devices have been used to treat patients with coronary artery disease. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • To evaluate the long-term efficacy of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and alternative angioplasty devices in patients with coronary heart disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A comparison of directional atherectomy with coronary angioplasty in patients with coronary artery disease. (acpjc.org)
  • To compare clinical outcomes after directional atherectomy and angioplasty for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). (acpjc.org)
  • Coronary artery disease (CAD) and aortic stenosis often coexist. (hindawi.com)
  • There is considerable overlap in both the pathophysiology and presence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) and calcific aortic stenosis (AS), with concomitant significant CAD observed in up to 50% of individuals presenting with severe AS [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Anyone with coronary heart disease can benefit from the expertise within the Complex Coronary Intervention Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital Corrigan Minehan Heart Center. (massgeneral.org)
  • Our physicians are at the forefront when it comes to the latest treatment and therapies for coronary artery disease. (massgeneral.org)
  • The death evaluations to determine their medical certificate listed ventricular fibrillation due to coronary ability to perform duties without presenting artery disease as the cause of death. (cdc.gov)
  • CSII is a medical device company developing and commercializing innovative interventional treatment systems for patients with peripheral and coronary artery disease. (infomeddnews.com)
  • Among 1,012 patients with coronary artery disease, 512 had atherectomy and 500 had angioplasty. (readabstracts.com)
  • Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) appears to result in 5-year survival rates that are similar to bypass surgery in patients with coronary artery disease in more than one artery. (readabstracts.com)
  • Nevertheless, chest discomfort led to the discovery that he had coronary artery disease and a referral to the CVI. (bidmc.org)
  • The affiliated heart specialists utilize advanced technology to assist in providing fast, accurate diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease, close to home. (memorialhermann.org)
  • In-Hospital Outcomes of Chronic Total Occlusion Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The effect of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on in-hospital outcomes of chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has received limited study. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on cardiac function in multi-vessel disease patients with concurrent chronic total occlus. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The American Heart Association estimates that over 16 million Americans suffer from coronary artery disease--the number one killer of both men and women in the U.S. (ahealthyme.com)
  • What are the risk factors for coronary artery disease? (ahealthyme.com)
  • What are the symptoms of coronary artery disease? (ahealthyme.com)
  • The symptoms of coronary heart disease will depend on the severity of the disease. (ahealthyme.com)
  • How is coronary artery disease diagnosed? (ahealthyme.com)
  • A stress test may be used to detect coronary artery disease, or to determine safe levels of exercise after a heart attack or heart surgery. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Coronary revascularisation in chronic kidney disease. (scribd.com)
  • Part 1: stable coronary artery disease. (scribd.com)
  • Detection and treatment of coronary artery disease in CKD patients has been hampered by the limitations of screening tests, the lack of direct evidence for therapeutic interventions in this specific population, and concerns about therapy-related adverse effects. (scribd.com)
  • current evidence regarding the treatment of coronary artery disease in patients with CKD, with the focus on coronary revascularisation by percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting. (scribd.com)
  • Antonis specialises in the treatment of complex coronary disease and he is the lead for the chronic total occlusion angioplasty programme at St Thomas' Hospital. (guysandstthomas.nhs.uk)
  • The present study was performed to compare the safety and efficacy of immediate RA and delayed RA in the treatment with nondilatable calcified lesion complicated by coronary dissection. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Lesion suitable for either atherectomy or angioplasty. (acc.org)
  • The OAS is contraindicated when the VIPERWIRE guide wire cannot pass across the coronary lesion or the target lesion is within a bypass graft or stent. (csi360.com)
  • 02). An additional 8 patients with stable coronary syndromes due to a restenosis lesion were also negative for TF. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Using a less invasive procedure, orbital atherectomy has the ability to significantly modify lesion morphology, enabling successful stent delivery to help optimize stent expansion and apposition. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • Atherectomy has not been shown to be superior to angioplasty in reducing target-lesion revascularization (TLR) or restenosis, 8 which may be partly explained by undetected deeper dissections on an angiogram. (invasivecardiology.com)
  • The development of various techniques and equipments for percutaneous coronary artery intervention (PCI) has led to an increase in age of the PCI population, and an increase in complexity of cases such as chronic total occlusion and calcified lesion. (sch.ac.kr)
  • Dr. Shigero Saito, of Shonan Kamakura General Hospital, Kamakura City, Japan and National Principal Investigator of CSI's COAST trial, who treated the first patient with both of the newly approved products, said, "Using the new ViperWire Advance FlexTip combined with the GlideAssist feature on Classic Crown allowed me to easily track the OAS device through tortuous coronary vessels and effectively modify a calcified lesion facilitating stent deployment. (infomeddnews.com)
  • Chronic total occlusion continues to be a challenging lesion subset for percutaneous coronary intervention. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Indications: The laser catheters are intended for use either as a stand-alone modality or in conjunction with percutaneous transluminal coronary balloon angioplasty (PTCA) in patients who are acceptable candidates for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. (philips.nl)
  • Directional atherectomy vs. PTCA for adverse event in CAD. (acc.org)
  • Millennium Research Group's US Markets for Interventional Cardiology Devices 2012 report includes procedure, unit, average selling price and revenue information, along with market drivers and limiters and competitive landscape for coronary stents, PTCA balloon catheters, accessory devices, intravascular imaging catheters and pressure guidewires and coronary atherectomy devices in the United States. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Coronary atherectomy, endoluminal stenting, and laser angioplasty are alternative interventions to balloon angioplasty (PTCA) for the percutaneous revascularization of obstructive CAD. (acpjc.org)
  • The Coronary Angioplasty versus Excisional Atherectomy Trial (CAVEAT) by Topol and colleagues and the Canadian Coronary Atherectomy Trial (CCAT) by Adelman and colleagues are important because they are the first randomized trials to compare PTCA with an alternative intervention device. (acpjc.org)
  • Our leading coronary imaging, physiology and therapy devices enable health care providers to optimize and streamline percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs). (philips.com)
  • Akkus N.I., Abdulbaki A. (2018) Laser Atherectomy in Peripheral Arterial Interventions. (springer.com)
  • At 6 months the groups did not differ for death, bypass surgery, need for other coronary interventions, or adverse clinical outcomes. (acpjc.org)
  • The demand for performing post-TAVR coronary angiograms (CAs) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) will thus increase, posing new technical challenges. (hindawi.com)
  • Significant calcium contributes to poor outcomes and higher treatment costs in coronary interventions when traditional therapies are used, including a significantly higher occurrence of death and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). (finances.com)
  • He has performed thousands of cardiac and vascular interventions, and chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention's (CTO PCI's) in the cardiac and peripheral vessels. (buecher.de)
  • Management of patients with CKD presenting with acute coronary syndromes is more complex than in the general population, due to greater diagnostic uncertainty and the lack of direct evidence for therapeutic interventions in this specific population, coupled with concerns about therapy-related adverse effects. (scribd.com)
  • Kini co-established, with Samin K. Sharma, the Live Symposium of Complex Coronary and Vascular Cases in 1998 and has served as Director of the Annual Live Symposium of Complex Coronary & Vascular Cases at The Mount Sinai Medical Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the range of equipment available to the interventional cardiologist evolves, together with necessary operator expertise, more complex coronary anatomy is being treated percutaneously. (bmj.com)
  • The Complex Coronary Intervention Program is made up of a highly experienced clinical team that plans and applies a treatment process that is tailored to each patient's condition, age, symptoms and risk factors. (massgeneral.org)
  • At the Complex Coronary Intervention Program at the Massachusetts General Hospital Corrigan Minehan Heart Center, patients benefit from a collective recommendation made by a team of three cardiac specialists. (massgeneral.org)
  • FlexTip is a unique new atherectomy guidewire with a nitinol core and shapeable stainless-steel tip for increased flexibility and kink-resistance, improved navigation, and reduced guidewire bias in complex coronary vessels. (infomeddnews.com)
  • Thus, immediate strategies cope with coronary dissection induced by balloon dilation is needed for the early recovery of those patients. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • OrbusNeich ® PCI balloons include the Sapphire ® II Pro, the first and only 1.0mm coronary balloon available in the United States. (businesswire.com)
  • Coronary atherectomy is an alternative method of clearing a clogged or narrowed vessel of plaque that is resistant to balloon angioplasty. (mercyhealthsystem.org)
  • When balloon angioplasty alone is not enough to restore blood flow to the heart muscle, Mercyhealth's cardiologists have the option of using coronary stents. (mercyhealthsystem.org)
  • Conclusions: In patients with stenoses in saphenous vein bypass grafts, TEC atherectomy is limited by the frequent need for adjunctive balloon angioplasty to achieve adequate lumen enlargement and to manage TEC atherectomy-induced complications. (nebraska.edu)
  • and adjunctive balloon angioplasty after calcium modification with the JETSTREAM Atherectomy System showed further lumen increase without major complications. (evtoday.com)
  • 01). However, the prevalence of dissections also increased from 3/11 after atherectomy to 8/11 after adjunct balloon inflations ( P = .03). (evtoday.com)
  • Cine and IVUS images were obtained at baseline, after atherectomy, and after adjunctive balloon angioplasty. (invasivecardiology.com)
  • Of these dissections, 13% and 30.8% were ≥180° in circumference post atherectomy and adjunctive balloon angioplasty, respectively ( P =.047). (invasivecardiology.com)
  • Also, 39.1% and 33.3% involved the media and/or adventitia as seen on IVUS post atherectomy and adjunctive balloon angioplasty, respectively ( P =.58). (invasivecardiology.com)
  • However, on the other hand, these subsets can increase the rate of balloon failure (inability to cross or dilate a coronary stenosis with a balloon) [ 1 ]. (sch.ac.kr)
  • To report on the feasibility and technical differences between coronary procedures performed before and after TAVR with the balloon-expandable Edwards-SAPIEN or the SAPIEN XT valves. (hindawi.com)
  • Transcatheter heart valves (THV) can be broadly divided into balloon-, self- or mechanically expanding in nature [ 4 ], with each prosthetic class possessing unique characteristics pertaining to their design, material, annuloaortic orientation, and anatomic relation to the native coronary tree. (hindawi.com)
  • Despite various reports describing technical differences and potential challenges of CA and PCI in TAVR recipients [ 5 ], the nuances and technicalities for catheterizing and effectively accessing the native epicardial coronary vasculature in the presence of in situ THV are yet to be systematically reported in the presence of a balloon-expandable valve system. (hindawi.com)
  • A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Optimal Spaced Excimer Laser Coronary Catheters Performance Analysis, Journal of Clinical Laser Medicine and Surgery, Vol 19, Issue 1, 9-14. (philips.com)
  • Used in conjunction with Philips catheters and atherectomy devices, you will be able to provide superior care to your patients and attain superior outcomes. (philips.com)
  • Taylor K, Reiser C. Next generation catheters for excimer laser coronary angioplasty. (springer.com)
  • Of the 443 patients enrolled in ORBIT II, 343 were treated with CSI's original pneumatic orbital atherectomy system (OAS) and 100 with the company's new electric OAS. (medlatest.com)
  • The U.S. FDA granted 510(k) clearance for the use of the Diamondback Orbital Atherectomy System in August 2007. (medlatest.com)
  • Scott Addonizio, Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of OrbusNeich, concluded, "Our experienced sales force is thrilled to bring CSI's orbital atherectomy technology to Hong Kong. (businesswire.com)
  • The Stealth 360 ® Peripheral Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) received CE Mark in October 2014. (businesswire.com)
  • There is a paucity of data on the safety of orbital atherectomy (OA) in patients with severe AS and concurrent calcific CAD. (umassmed.edu)
  • The trial will compare the company's Diamondback 360 coronary orbital atherectomy system with conventional angioplasty, including specialty balloons, for vessel preparation prior to drug-eluting stent implantation. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • Half the participants will receive orbital atherectomy prior to drug-eluting stent implantation, while the other half will receive conventional angioplasty, including specialty balloons, followed by drug-eluting implantation. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • According to the press release, the second-generation of the system builds on the technology of the first generation coronary orbital atherectomy system, which has been approved in the US since 2013. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • The unique orbital mechanism of action for both the first and second generation orbital atherectomy system is designed to allow continuous flow of blood during treatment, which is important for both acute and long-term success. (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • We are excited by the growing clinical evidence supporting the procedural success of the Diamondback 360 (R) Orbital Atherectomy System in severe coronary calcium. (finances.com)
  • Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (CSI ® ) (NASDAQ: CSII) announced today that Japan's Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) has approved the Diamondback 360 ® Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) with Classic Crown (Classic Crown) and ViperWire Advance ® Coronary Guidewire FlexTip (FlexTip). (infomeddnews.com)
  • Orbital atherectomy modifies calcific plaque to improve PCI results. (infomeddnews.com)
  • ViperWire Advance with Flex Tip is the latest advancement to CSI's coronary Diamondback 360® orbital atherectomy system. (infomeddnews.com)
  • The rate of restenosis was 46 percent in the atherectomy group (95 percent confidence interval, 37 to 54 percent) and 43 percent in the angioplasty group (95 percent confidence interval, 34 to 52 percent) (P = 0.71). (acc.org)
  • Although the procedural success rate was somewhat higher and the postprocedure lumen larger in patients treated with atherectomy, lumen dimensions, restenosis rates and clinical outcomes were similar in the two groups at six months. (acc.org)
  • Directional atherectomy was associated with a trend toward lower rates of restenosis at 6 months, and increased mortality and ischemic events at one year. (acc.org)
  • Our CVX-300(R) excimer laser is the only system approved by the FDA for multiple cardiovascular procedures, including coronary atherectomy , the treatment of in-stent restenosis prior to radiation therapy, and the removal of problematic pacemaker and defibrillator leads. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Randomized controlled study of excimer laser atherectomy for treatment of femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis: initial results from the EXCITE ISR trial (EXCImer laser randomized controlled study for treatment of FemoropopliTEal in-stent restenosis). (springer.com)
  • In this prospective pilot study, a total of 15 patients were evaluated by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) following treatment of femoropopliteal de novo or non-stent restenosis using atherectomy. (invasivecardiology.com)
  • Patients in the atherectomy group showed a trend toward a lower rate of restenosis at 6 months (50% vs 57%, P = 0.06). (acpjc.org)
  • Despite initial claims by atherectomy enthusiasts and persistent claims by industry representatives that CAVEAT showed lower restenosis rates with DCA, the published studies clearly show no clinical advantage for DCA as a general primary intervention strategy. (acpjc.org)
  • Unlike angioplasty and stents, which push plaque into the vessel wall, atherectomy cuts plaque from the wall of the artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coronary artery stenting is less expensive than coronary artery bypass surgery, but patients who receive stents will need additional treatments to keep the artery open. (readabstracts.com)
  • Donarumo (right) benefitted from a recently advanced, highly complex, state-of-the-art medical intervention - Chronic Total Occlusion Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (CTO-PCI) - that opened a completely blocked coronary artery and restored his heart to maximum efficiency. (bidmc.org)
  • Use of sodium nitroprusside in retrograde percutaneous coronary intervention for chronic total occlusion: A case report. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Safety and efficacy of dedicated guidewire and microcatheter technology for chronic total coronary occlusion revascularization: principal results of the Asahi Intecc Chronic Total Occlusion Study. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Use of chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention techniques for treating acute vessel closure. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The aim of this study is to investigate the role of functional evaluation for predicting clinical outcome in patients with coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) undergoing percutaneous co. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Under the circumstances that appropriate first-choice guidewires for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) have yet to be established, the objective of. (bioportfolio.com)
  • PATIENTS: Twenty-three patients with angina pectoris refractory to medical therapy who were suitable candidates for coronary bypass surgery. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The OAS is contraindicated when the patient is not an appropriate candidate for bypass surgery, angioplasty, or atherectomy therapy, or has angiographic evidence of thrombus, or has only one open vessel, or has angiographic evidence of significant dissection at the treatment site and for women who are pregnant or children. (csi360.com)
  • During heart bypass surgery, a bypass is created by attaching a piece of a vein above and below the blocked area of a coronary artery, enabling blood to flow around the blockage. (lvhn.org)
  • Because of its ability to aspirate clot and atheromatous material, TEC atherectomy may be useful in patients with stenoses in saphenous vein bypass grafts. (nebraska.edu)
  • Background: Transluminal extraction coronary (TEC) atherectomy is a relatively new device that has recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. (nebraska.edu)
  • Our coronary pressure and flow wires can measure arterial stenosis precisely and accurately. (philips.com)
  • Therefore, the differentiation between superficial and deep calcification and their respective roles in severe stenosis is important when evaluating the true efficacy of any atherectomy procedure and device. (evtoday.com)
  • A-C) Baseline images show diffuse moderate stenosis of the left anterior descending artery, and severe stenosis of the proximal left circumflex artery (LCX) and the distal right coronary artery with severe calcification. (sch.ac.kr)
  • Initially, atherectomy resulted in a greater gain in lumen size and a higher initial success rate (reduction to ≤ 50% stenosis) compared with angioplasty, but early complications were higher, costs were increased, and no clinical benefit was apparent at 6 months. (acpjc.org)
  • In patients who need a coronary angioplasty but the plaque is too hard and calcified. (medindia.net)
  • In such cases, an atherectomy is performed to break the atheromatous plaque, and may be followed by angioplasty and/or stent placement if necessary. (medindia.net)
  • Atherectomy devices are used to remove plaque from blood vessels. (medgadget.com)
  • However, photo-ablative atherectomy systems represent a technological advance over directional atherectomy systems and are thus likely to rise in demand over the coming years, as they present a higher efficacy in removing plaque buildup. (medgadget.com)
  • This is a type of X-ray test that can see if there is coronary calcification that may suggest a future heart problem. (massgeneral.org)
  • He said: "Coronary calcification has been shown to increase procedural complexity and adverse events following conventional percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). (cardiovascularnews.com)
  • 1 The main question was whether the JETSTREAM Atherectomy System was effective in removing calcification. (evtoday.com)
  • Coronary angioplasty and Rotablator atherectomy trial (CARAT): immediate and late results of a prospective multicenter randomized trial. (nih.gov)
  • PTCRA utilises small rotating devices to selectively remove the build-up of atherosclerotic plaques from within coronary vessels. (cochrane.org)
  • In this first report of the commercial experience with coronary OAS, procedure success, adverse events, and clinical outcomes were favorable. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Once the decision to perform an atherectomy is made, then as for any surgical procedure, several blood tests, urine tests and imaging tests will be carried out to assess your general health condition. (medindia.net)
  • Any abnormal test results such as underlying infection, uncontrolled blood sugar or low hemoglobin concentration (anemia) may have to be corrected with treatment before the atherectomy procedure. (medindia.net)
  • What Happens During the Atherectomy Procedure? (medindia.net)
  • This medical exhibit illustrates the Atherectomy Procedure. (nucleuscatalog.com)
  • To examine the clinical outcome of percutaneous coronary intervention where the procedure was complicated by vessel perforation. (bmj.com)
  • Vessel perforation during or following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a rare complication of this procedure. (bmj.com)
  • If you and your doctor determine that atherectomy is the right treatment for you, the procedure will be performed under local anesthesia with a mild sedative. (gottliebhospital.org)
  • Procedural characteristics were gathered from all coronary procedures and subsequently compared amongst the same type of procedure performed at these two distinct time periods. (hindawi.com)
  • Atherectomy is a procedure that involves the direct removal of lipid-containing plaques from the inside of the coronary artery. (readabstracts.com)
  • In November 2016, CSI announced that Medikit, Co., Ltd. signed an exclusive distribution agreement to sell its coronary and peripheral OAS in Japan. (businesswire.com)
  • For an atherectomy, a doctor threads a tiny medical tool up to a blockage in a coronary (heart) artery. (rexhealth.com)
  • Patients with CTO have a complete blockage of a coronary artery that can cause a great deal of pain or discomfort. (bidmc.org)
  • After reviewing Donarumo's medical record and tests, including an EKG and chest X-rays, Yeh and Pinto identified a 100 percent right coronary blockage. (bidmc.org)
  • Atherectomy is a minimally invasive endovascular surgery technique for removing atherosclerosis from blood vessels within the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • To restore blood flow to the affected tissue or organ in patients whose coronary or peripheral blood vessels have been affected by atherosclerosis. (medindia.net)
  • We have not had much advancement in the field of coronary atherectomy since we only had a single device that we worked with, a rotablator. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • She researches on the field of percutaneous coronary intervention and heart valve therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the feasibility of RA in CTO percutaneous coronary intervention had already been suggested, this case reports on the novel use of RA to allow further manipulation of the subadventitial space (reverse CART) prior to successful recanalization. (cbsmd.org)
  • The procedural records of 6245 patients undergoing coronary intervention were reviewed. (bmj.com)
  • METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of all patients with severe AS who underwent OA-facilitated percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at our center between September 1, 2015 and November 1, 2018. (umassmed.edu)
  • The third registry, the New Approaches to Coronary Intervention (NACI), followed approximately 4,424 patients between November 1990 and February 1997. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • According to estimates, significant arterial calcium is present in nearly 40 percent of patients undergoing a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). (finances.com)
  • Memorial Hermann Southeast Hospital is designated as a Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) hospital. (memorialhermann.org)
  • Acute vessel closure due to dissection is a known complication of percutaneous coronary intervention and can be challenging to treat, especially if guidewire position is lost. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The purpose of this project is to objectively assess the change (improvement) in exercise capacity in patients undergoing routine percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Prehospital initiated facilitation of primary percutaneous coronary intervention by fibrinolysis might be helpful in re-opening the infarct related artery prior to percutaneous coronary in. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Same day discharge is safe and feasible in selected troponin negative patients undergoing coronary planned percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or ad hoc PCI via the transfemoral appro. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Transradial versus transfemoral intervention in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: the Korean transradial intervention registry of 1 285 patients. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Association Between Maximal Activated Clotting Time and Major Bleeding Complications During Transradial and Transfemoral Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. (bioportfolio.com)
  • This study sought to determine whether higher maximal activated clotting time (ACT) during transradial (TR) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with greater bleeding risk. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The predictive value of aVR in determining the infarct related artery during primary percutaneous coronary intervention. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Isolation of infract related artery and timely revascularisation remains vital in the setting of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Pentraxin level is the key to determine primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) or fibrinolysis. (bioportfolio.com)
  • To examine if pentraxin can help identifying patients benefitting most from primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) vs. fibrinolysis. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Effect of hemorheological parameters on myocardial injury after primary or elective percutaneous coronary intervention. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Its effect on coronary microvasculature during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Prasugrel as antiplatelet therapy in patients with acute coronary syndromes or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. (scribd.com)
  • CSI received MHLW approval for the Diamondback 360 ® Coronary OAS Micro Crown in March 2017 and reimbursement approval in February 2018. (infomeddnews.com)
  • Directional atherectomy systems hold the largest share in the global atherectomy devices market due to their widespread use and high efficacy in treating atherosclerosis. (medgadget.com)
  • The growing prevalence of atherosclerosis in North America is likely to ensure continued dominance of the Americas in the global atherectomy devices market over the forecast period. (medgadget.com)
  • Angiographic success was achieved in 135 of 138 patients undergoing atherectomy (98 percent) and 124 of 136 patients undergoing angioplasty (91 percent) (P = 0.017). (acc.org)
  • 001) of a severe clinical complication was the development of one or more serious angiographic complications (no-reflow, distal embolization, or abrupt closure) immediately after TEC atherectomy. (nebraska.edu)
  • Atherectomy has been reported to reduce angiographic dissections and therefore bailout stenting. (invasivecardiology.com)
  • Revascularization was repeated in 39 patients in the atherectomy group and 36 patients in the angioplasty group. (acc.org)
  • Eleven percent of the patients in the atherectomy group developed early complications, compared with 5% of those in the angioplasty group. (readabstracts.com)
  • In-hospital costs were also higher for the patients in the atherectomy group. (readabstracts.com)
  • Acute coronary syndrome is an umbrella term for when blood supplied to the heart muscle is decreased or blocked, leading to a heart attack . (heart.org)
  • 1012 patients (mean age 59 y, 73% men) with symptomatic CAD who were eligible for either atherectomy or angioplasty. (acpjc.org)
  • Completing ORBIT II enrollment is a significant milestone in our efforts to secure a coronary indication to treat arterial calcium-a vastly underestimated problem in medicine today," said David L. Martin, CSI president and chief executive officer. (medlatest.com)
  • Atherectomy falls under the general category of percutaneous revascularization, which implies re-canalizing blocked vasculature via a needle puncture in the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nonstudy methods of revascularization were used for 26% of patients assigned to atherectomy and for 14% assigned to angioplasty. (acpjc.org)
  • The global atherectomy devices market is poised to exhibit a strong 6.12% CAGR over the forecast period from 2018 to 2023, according to the latest research report from Market Research Future (MRFR). (medgadget.com)
  • Regulatory factors affecting the global atherectomy devices market are also studied in the report to provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of the market. (medgadget.com)
  • Growing consumption of junk food and the growing consumption of cigarettes, especially in developing economies, are likely to remain major drivers for the global atherectomy devices market. (medgadget.com)
  • The growing demand for minimally invasive devices in the healthcare sector is likely to be a major driver for the global atherectomy devices market. (medgadget.com)
  • The global atherectomy devices market is segmented on the basis of product type, application, end user, and region. (medgadget.com)
  • By end-use, the global atherectomy devices market is segmented into hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, and others. (medgadget.com)
  • The Americas holds the dominant share in the global atherectomy devices market, followed by Europe. (medgadget.com)
  • A device called a stent may be placed within the coronary artery to keep the vessel open. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • The company says its new electric coronary OAS offers a simpler design that gives physicians complete control of device operation, with minimal set up time. (medlatest.com)
  • Rex Medical, L.P. , a medical device design and development company, has received 510(k) Clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the Revolution Peripheral Atherectomy System. (mpo-mag.com)
  • The COMET Pressure Guidewire is a true workhorse FFR (Fractional Flow Reserve) coronary guidewire designed to be highly deliverable with a shapeable, atraumatic Asahi tip, optimized rail support for device delivery and easy integration of FFR into the cath lab. (bostonscientific.com)
  • The rapid development of minimally invasive device technology has led to a growing demand for more developed, advanced versions of atherectomy devices and is likely to remain a key driver for the atherectomy devices market over the forecast period. (medgadget.com)
  • The higher costs of photo-ablative atherectomy systems have been the primary factors holding them back, with many healthcare agencies, particularly in developing regions, unable to afford the latest in medical device technology and having to rely on legacy systems. (medgadget.com)
  • Classic Crown is the market-leading coronary atherectomy device in the United States. (infomeddnews.com)
  • 001 for both baseline vs post atherectomy and post atherectomy vs adjunctive angioplasty). (invasivecardiology.com)
  • Ultimately, CSI will offer a full line of semi-compliant, non-compliant and specialty balloons for both coronary and peripheral vascular procedures. (businesswire.com)
  • This is a latticed metal scaffold put inside the coronary artery to keep the vessel open. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Fortunately, the cardiologists in Mercyhealth's cardiac catheterization laboratories can perform a coronary angioplasty that widens the passage of the affected vessel before permanent damage can occur. (mercyhealthsystem.org)