Infections that do not exhibit symptoms.
A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that infects man and animals and causes visceral leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL). Human infections are confined almost entirely to children. This parasite is commonly seen in dogs, other Canidae, and porcupines with humans considered only an accidental host. Transmission is by Phlebotomus sandflies.
A chronic disease caused by LEISHMANIA DONOVANI and transmitted by the bite of several sandflies of the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia. It is commonly characterized by fever, chills, vomiting, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, leukopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, emaciation, and an earth-gray color of the skin. The disease is classified into three main types according to geographic distribution: Indian, Mediterranean (or infantile), and African.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.
The condition of harboring an infective organism without manifesting symptoms of infection. The organism must be readily transmissible to another susceptible host.
Any part or derivative of any protozoan that elicits immunity; malaria (Plasmodium) and trypanosome antigens are presently the most frequently encountered.
Diseases that do not exhibit symptoms.
Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.
The presence of parasites (especially malarial parasites) in the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A species of protozoa that is the causal agent of falciparum malaria (MALARIA, FALCIPARUM). It is most prevalent in the tropics and subtropics.
The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)
Infection with any of the rotaviruses. Specific infections include human infantile diarrhea, neonatal calf diarrhea, and epidemic diarrhea of infant mice.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Proteins found in any species of protozoan.
EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.
A genus of flagellate protozoa comprising several species that are pathogenic for humans. Organisms of this genus have an amastigote and a promastigote stage in their life cycles. As a result of enzymatic studies this single genus has been divided into two subgenera: Leishmania leishmania and Leishmania viannia. Species within the Leishmania leishmania subgenus include: L. aethiopica, L. arabica, L. donovani, L. enrietti, L. gerbilli, L. hertigi, L. infantum, L. major, L. mexicana, and L. tropica. The following species are those that compose the Leishmania viannia subgenus: L. braziliensis, L. guyanensis, L. lainsoni, L. naiffi, and L. shawi.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.
Acute infectious disease characterized by primary invasion of the urogenital tract. The etiologic agent, NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE, was isolated by Neisser in 1879.
Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM VIVAX. This form of malaria is less severe than MALARIA, FALCIPARUM, but there is a higher probability for relapses to occur. Febrile paroxysms often occur every other day.
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
A genus of REOVIRIDAE, causing acute gastroenteritis in BIRDS and MAMMALS, including humans. Transmission is horizontal and by environmental contamination. Seven species (Rotaviruses A thru G) are recognized.
The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of protozoa.
A genus of protozoa that comprise the malaria parasites of mammals. Four species infect humans (although occasional infections with primate malarias may occur). These are PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; PLASMODIUM OVALE, and PLASMODIUM VIVAX. Species causing infection in vertebrates other than man include: PLASMODIUM BERGHEI; PLASMODIUM CHABAUDI; P. vinckei, and PLASMODIUM YOELII in rodents; P. brasilianum, PLASMODIUM CYNOMOLGI; and PLASMODIUM KNOWLESI in monkeys; and PLASMODIUM GALLINACEUM in chickens.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CHLAMYDIA.
A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.
An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.
A protozoan parasite that causes vivax malaria (MALARIA, VIVAX). This species is found almost everywhere malaria is endemic and is the only one that has a range extending into the temperate regions.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.
Type species of CHLAMYDIA causing a variety of ocular and urogenital diseases.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context. It is a geographical location, referring to the Republic of India, a country in South Asia. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help with those!
Agents used in the treatment of malaria. They are usually classified on the basis of their action against plasmodia at different stages in their life cycle in the human. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1585)
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The quantity of measurable virus in a body fluid. Change in viral load, measured in plasma, is sometimes used as a SURROGATE MARKER in disease progression.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.

Household transmission of the 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 influenza virus: elevated laboratory-confirmed secondary attack rates and evidence of asymptomatic infections. (1/107)

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Rotavirus antigenemia in Indian children with rotavirus gastroenteritis and asymptomatic infections. (2/107)

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Increased frequency of anti-retina antibodies in asymptomatic patients with chronic t. gondii infection. (3/107)

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Unapparent microsporidial infection among immunocompetent humans in the Czech Republic. (4/107)

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IL-17 and Regulatory Cytokines (IL-10 and IL-27) in L. braziliensis Infection. (5/107)

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Antileishmania immunological tests for asymptomatic subjects living in a visceral leishmaniasis-endemic area in Brazil. (6/107)

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Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin following oral treatment in pregnant women with asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infections in Kinshasa DRC. (7/107)

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Clearance of asymptomatic P. falciparum Infections Interacts with the number of clones to predict the risk of subsequent malaria in Kenyan children. (8/107)

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Asymptomatic infections are those in which an individual carries and may transmit a pathogen, such as a virus or bacteria, but does not develop any symptoms associated with the infection. These individuals are often referred to as being "asymptomatically infected" or "asymptomatic carriers."

Asymptomatic infections can occur with various infectious diseases, including COVID-19, HIV, hepatitis B, and some sexually transmitted infections. In many cases, asymptomatic individuals may not realize they are infected and unknowingly transmit the pathogen to others. This makes identifying and controlling asymptomatic infections crucial for preventing outbreaks and limiting the spread of infectious diseases.

It's important to note that while asymptomatic individuals do not experience symptoms, they can still develop immunity to the infection, similar to those who experienced symptoms. Additionally, some asymptomatic infections may progress to symptomatic illness over time or upon subsequent exposures to the pathogen.

"Leishmania infantum" is a species of protozoan parasite that causes a type of disease known as leishmaniasis. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected female sandflies, primarily of the genus Phlebotomus in the Old World and Lutzomyia in the New World.

The parasite has a complex life cycle, alternating between the sandfly vector and a mammalian host. In the sandfly, it exists as an extracellular flagellated promastigote, while in the mammalian host, it transforms into an intracellular non-flagellated amastigote that multiplies within macrophages.

"Leishmania infantum" is the primary causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the Mediterranean basin, parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. VL, also known as kala-azar, is a systemic infection that can affect multiple organs, including the spleen, liver, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. Symptoms include fever, weight loss, anemia, and enlargement of the spleen and liver. If left untreated, VL can be fatal.

In addition to VL, "Leishmania infantum" can also cause cutaneous and mucocutaneous forms of leishmaniasis, which are characterized by skin lesions and ulcers, respectively. These forms of the disease are typically less severe than VL but can still result in significant morbidity.

Prevention and control measures for "Leishmania infantum" infection include avoiding sandfly bites through the use of insect repellents, protective clothing, and bed nets, as well as reducing sandfly breeding sites through environmental management. Effective treatment options are available for leishmaniasis, including antimonial drugs, amphotericin B, and miltefosine, among others. However, access to treatment and drug resistance remain significant challenges in many endemic areas.

Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), also known as kala-azar, is a systemic protozoan disease caused by the Leishmania donovani complex. It is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and is characterized by fever, weight loss, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, and pancytopenia. If left untreated, it can be fatal in over 95% of cases within 2 years of onset of symptoms. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected female sandflies (Phlebotomus spp. or Lutzomyia spp.). The parasites enter the skin and are taken up by macrophages, where they transform into amastigotes and spread to internal organs such as the spleen, liver, and bone marrow. Diagnosis is typically made through demonstration of the parasite in tissue samples or through serological tests. Treatment options include antimonial drugs, amphotericin B, miltefosine, and paromomycin. Prevention measures include vector control, early detection and treatment, and protection against sandfly bites.

Antibodies, protozoan, refer to the immune system's response to an infection caused by a protozoan organism. Protozoa are single-celled microorganisms that can cause various diseases in humans, such as malaria, giardiasis, and toxoplasmosis.

When the body is infected with a protozoan, the immune system responds by producing specific proteins called antibodies. Antibodies are produced by a type of white blood cell called a B-cell, and they recognize and bind to specific antigens on the surface of the protozoan organism.

There are five main types of antibodies: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each type of antibody has a different role in the immune response. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody and provides long-term immunity to previously encountered pathogens. IgM is the first antibody produced in response to an infection and is important for activating the complement system, which helps to destroy the protozoan organism.

Overall, the production of antibodies against protozoan organisms is a critical part of the immune response and helps to protect the body from further infection.

A carrier state is a condition in which a person carries and may be able to transmit a genetic disorder or infectious disease, but does not show any symptoms of the disease themselves. This occurs when an individual has a recessive allele for a genetic disorder or is infected with a pathogen, but does not have the necessary combination of genes or other factors required to develop the full-blown disease.

For example, in the case of cystic fibrosis, which is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene, a person who carries one normal allele and one mutated allele for the disease is considered a carrier. They do not have symptoms of cystic fibrosis themselves, but they can pass the mutated allele on to their offspring, who may then develop the disease if they inherit the mutation from both parents.

Similarly, in the case of infectious diseases, a person who is infected with a pathogen but does not show any symptoms may still be able to transmit the infection to others. This is known as being an asymptomatic carrier or a healthy carrier. For example, some people who are infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) may not develop any symptoms of liver disease, but they can still transmit the virus to others through contact with their blood or other bodily fluids.

It's important to note that in some cases, carriers of certain genetic disorders or infectious diseases may have mild or atypical symptoms that do not meet the full criteria for a diagnosis of the disease. In these cases, they may be considered to have a "reduced penetrance" or "incomplete expression" of the disorder or infection.

Antigens are substances (usually proteins) found on the surface of cells, or viruses, that can be recognized by the immune system and stimulate an immune response. In the context of protozoa, antigens refer to the specific proteins or other molecules found on the surface of these single-celled organisms that can trigger an immune response in a host organism.

Protozoa are a group of microscopic eukaryotic organisms that include a diverse range of species, some of which can cause diseases in humans and animals. When a protozoan infects a host, the host's immune system recognizes the protozoan antigens as foreign and mounts an immune response to eliminate the infection. This response involves the activation of various types of immune cells, such as T-cells and B-cells, which recognize and target the protozoan antigens.

Understanding the nature of protozoan antigens is important for developing vaccines and other immunotherapies to prevent or treat protozoan infections. For example, researchers have identified specific antigens on the surface of the malaria parasite that are recognized by the human immune system and have used this information to develop vaccine candidates. However, many protozoan infections remain difficult to prevent or treat, and further research is needed to identify new targets for vaccines and therapies.

The term "asymptomatic disease" refers to a medical condition or infection that does not cause any obvious symptoms in an affected individual. Some people with asymptomatic diseases may never develop any signs or symptoms throughout their lives, while others may eventually go on to develop symptoms at a later stage. In some cases, asymptomatic diseases may still be detected through medical testing or screening, even if the person feels completely well. A classic example of an asymptomatic disease is a person who has a positive blood test for a latent viral infection, such as HIV or HSV (herpes simplex virus), but does not have any symptoms related to the infection at that time.

Malaria, Falciparum is defined as a severe and often fatal form of malaria caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It is transmitted to humans through the bites of infected Anopheles mosquitoes. This type of malaria is characterized by high fever, chills, headache, muscle and joint pain, and vomiting. If left untreated, it can cause severe anemia, kidney failure, seizures, coma, and even death. It is a major public health problem in many tropical and subtropical regions of the world, particularly in Africa.

Parasitemia is a medical term that refers to the presence of parasites, particularly malaria-causing Plasmodium species, in the bloodstream. It is the condition where red blood cells are infected by these parasites, which can lead to various symptoms such as fever, chills, anemia, and organ damage in severe cases. The level of parasitemia is often used to assess the severity of malaria infection and to guide treatment decisions.

'Plasmodium falciparum' is a specific species of protozoan parasite that causes malaria in humans. It is transmitted through the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes and has a complex life cycle involving both human and mosquito hosts.

In the human host, the parasites infect red blood cells, where they multiply and cause damage, leading to symptoms such as fever, chills, anemia, and in severe cases, organ failure and death. 'Plasmodium falciparum' malaria is often more severe and life-threatening than other forms of malaria caused by different Plasmodium species. It is a major public health concern, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions of the world where access to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment remains limited.

An endemic disease is a type of disease that is regularly found among particular people or in a certain population, and is spread easily from person to person. The rate of infection is consistently high in these populations, but it is relatively stable and does not change dramatically over time. Endemic diseases are contrasted with epidemic diseases, which suddenly increase in incidence and spread rapidly through a large population.

Endemic diseases are often associated with poverty, poor sanitation, and limited access to healthcare. They can also be influenced by environmental factors such as climate, water quality, and exposure to vectors like mosquitoes or ticks. Examples of endemic diseases include malaria in some tropical countries, tuberculosis (TB) in many parts of the world, and HIV/AIDS in certain populations.

Effective prevention and control measures for endemic diseases typically involve improving access to healthcare, promoting good hygiene and sanitation practices, providing vaccinations when available, and implementing vector control strategies. By addressing the underlying social and environmental factors that contribute to the spread of these diseases, it is possible to reduce their impact on affected populations and improve overall health outcomes.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea among children under 5 years of age. It is responsible for around 215,000 deaths among children in this age group each year.

Rotavirus infection causes inflammation of the stomach and intestines, resulting in symptoms such as vomiting, watery diarrhea, and fever. The virus is transmitted through the fecal-oral route, often through contaminated hands, food, or water. It can also be spread through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Rotavirus infections are highly contagious and can spread rapidly in communities, particularly in settings where children are in close contact with each other, such as child care centers and schools. The infection is usually self-limiting and resolves within a few days, but severe cases can lead to dehydration and require hospitalization.

Prevention measures include good hygiene practices, such as handwashing with soap and water, safe disposal of feces, and rotavirus vaccination. The WHO recommends the inclusion of rotavirus vaccines in national immunization programs to reduce the burden of severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus infection.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

A disease outbreak is defined as the occurrence of cases of a disease in excess of what would normally be expected in a given time and place. It may affect a small and localized group or a large number of people spread over a wide area, even internationally. An outbreak may be caused by a new agent, a change in the agent's virulence or host susceptibility, or an increase in the size or density of the host population.

Outbreaks can have significant public health and economic impacts, and require prompt investigation and control measures to prevent further spread of the disease. The investigation typically involves identifying the source of the outbreak, determining the mode of transmission, and implementing measures to interrupt the chain of infection. This may include vaccination, isolation or quarantine, and education of the public about the risks and prevention strategies.

Examples of disease outbreaks include foodborne illnesses linked to contaminated food or water, respiratory infections spread through coughing and sneezing, and mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika virus and West Nile virus. Outbreaks can also occur in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, where vulnerable populations may be at increased risk of infection.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Protozoan Proteins" is not a specific medical or scientific term. Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic organisms, and proteins are large biological molecules consisting of one or more chains of amino acid residues. Therefore, "Protozoan Proteins" generally refers to the various types of proteins found in protozoa.

However, if you're looking for information about proteins specific to certain protozoan parasites with medical relevance (such as Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malaria), I would be happy to help! Please provide more context or specify the particular protozoan of interest.

Seroepidemiologic studies are a type of epidemiological study that measures the presence and levels of antibodies in a population's blood serum to investigate the prevalence, distribution, and transmission of infectious diseases. These studies help to identify patterns of infection and immunity within a population, which can inform public health policies and interventions.

Seroepidemiologic studies typically involve collecting blood samples from a representative sample of individuals in a population and testing them for the presence of antibodies against specific pathogens. The results are then analyzed to estimate the prevalence of infection and immunity within the population, as well as any factors associated with increased or decreased risk of infection.

These studies can provide valuable insights into the spread of infectious diseases, including emerging and re-emerging infections, and help to monitor the effectiveness of vaccination programs. Additionally, seroepidemiologic studies can also be used to investigate the transmission dynamics of infectious agents, such as identifying sources of infection or tracking the spread of antibiotic resistance.

Leishmania is a genus of protozoan parasites that are the causative agents of Leishmaniasis, a group of diseases with various clinical manifestations. These parasites are transmitted to humans through the bite of infected female phlebotomine sandflies. The disease has a wide geographic distribution, mainly in tropical and subtropical regions, including parts of Asia, Africa, South America, and Southern Europe.

The Leishmania species have a complex life cycle that involves two main stages: the promastigote stage, which is found in the sandfly vector, and the amastigote stage, which infects mammalian hosts, including humans. The clinical manifestations of Leishmaniasis depend on the specific Leishmania species and the host's immune response to the infection.

The three main forms of Leishmaniasis are:

1. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL): This form is characterized by skin lesions, such as ulcers or nodules, that can take several months to heal and may leave scars. CL is caused by various Leishmania species, including L. major, L. tropica, and L. aethiopica.

2. Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL): Also known as kala-azar, VL affects internal organs such as the spleen, liver, and bone marrow. Symptoms include fever, weight loss, anemia, and enlarged liver and spleen. VL is caused by L. donovani, L. infantum, and L. chagasi species.

3. Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (MCL): This form affects the mucous membranes of the nose, mouth, and throat, causing destruction of tissues and severe disfigurement. MCL is caused by L. braziliensis and L. guyanensis species.

Prevention and control measures for Leishmaniasis include vector control, early diagnosis and treatment, and protection against sandfly bites through the use of insect repellents and bed nets.

Feces are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested or absorbed in the small intestine, along with bacteria and other waste products. After being stored in the colon, feces are eliminated from the body through the rectum and anus during defecation. Feces can vary in color, consistency, and odor depending on a person's diet, health status, and other factors.

Serologic tests are laboratory tests that detect the presence or absence of antibodies or antigens in a patient's serum (the clear liquid that separates from clotted blood). These tests are commonly used to diagnose infectious diseases, as well as autoimmune disorders and other medical conditions.

In serologic testing for infectious diseases, a sample of the patient's blood is collected and allowed to clot. The serum is then separated from the clot and tested for the presence of antibodies that the body has produced in response to an infection. The test may be used to identify the specific type of infection or to determine whether the infection is active or has resolved.

Serologic tests can also be used to diagnose autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, by detecting the presence of antibodies that are directed against the body's own tissues. These tests can help doctors confirm a diagnosis and monitor the progression of the disease.

It is important to note that serologic tests are not always 100% accurate and may produce false positive or false negative results. Therefore, they should be interpreted in conjunction with other clinical findings and laboratory test results.

Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, also known as "gono" bacteria. It can infect various parts of the body including the genitals, rectum, and throat. The bacteria are typically transmitted through sexual contact with an infected person.

Symptoms may vary but often include abnormal discharge from the genitals or rectum, painful or burning sensations during urination, and in women, vaginal bleeding between periods. However, many people with gonorrhea do not develop symptoms, making it essential to get tested regularly if you are sexually active with multiple partners or have unprotected sex.

If left untreated, gonorrhea can lead to severe complications such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women and epididymitis in men, which may result in infertility. In rare cases, it can spread to the bloodstream and cause life-threatening conditions like sepsis.

Gonorrhea is curable with appropriate antibiotic treatment; however, drug-resistant strains of the bacteria have emerged, making accurate diagnosis and effective treatment increasingly challenging. Prevention methods include using condoms during sexual activity and practicing safe sex habits.

Malaria, Vivax:

A type of malaria caused by the parasite Plasmodium vivax. It is transmitted to humans through the bites of infected Anopheles mosquitoes. Malaria, Vivax is characterized by recurring fevers, chills, and flu-like symptoms, which can occur every other day or every third day. This type of malaria can have mild to severe symptoms and can sometimes lead to complications such as anemia and splenomegaly (enlarged spleen). One distinguishing feature of Malaria, Vivax is its ability to form dormant stages in the liver (called hypnozoites), which can reactivate and cause relapses even after years of apparent cure. Effective treatment includes medication to kill both the blood and liver stages of the parasite. Preventive measures include using mosquito nets, insect repellents, and antimalarial drugs for prophylaxis in areas with high transmission rates.

Antibodies, viral are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection with a virus. These antibodies are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens on the surface of the virus, which helps to neutralize or destroy the virus and prevent its replication. Once produced, these antibodies can provide immunity against future infections with the same virus.

Viral antibodies are typically composed of four polypeptide chains - two heavy chains and two light chains - that are held together by disulfide bonds. The binding site for the antigen is located at the tip of the Y-shaped structure, formed by the variable regions of the heavy and light chains.

There are five classes of antibodies in humans: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has a different function and is distributed differently throughout the body. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody found in the bloodstream and provides long-term immunity against viruses, while IgA is found primarily in mucous membranes and helps to protect against respiratory and gastrointestinal infections.

In addition to their role in the immune response, viral antibodies can also be used as diagnostic tools to detect the presence of a specific virus in a patient's blood or other bodily fluids.

An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is a type of analytical biochemistry assay used to detect and quantify the presence of a substance, typically a protein or peptide, in a liquid sample. It takes its name from the enzyme-linked antibodies used in the assay.

In an ELISA, the sample is added to a well containing a surface that has been treated to capture the target substance. If the target substance is present in the sample, it will bind to the surface. Next, an enzyme-linked antibody specific to the target substance is added. This antibody will bind to the captured target substance if it is present. After washing away any unbound material, a substrate for the enzyme is added. If the enzyme is present due to its linkage to the antibody, it will catalyze a reaction that produces a detectable signal, such as a color change or fluorescence. The intensity of this signal is proportional to the amount of target substance present in the sample, allowing for quantification.

ELISAs are widely used in research and clinical settings to detect and measure various substances, including hormones, viruses, and bacteria. They offer high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility, making them a reliable choice for many applications.

Rotavirus is a genus of double-stranded RNA virus in the Reoviridae family, which is a leading cause of severe diarrhea and gastroenteritis in young children and infants worldwide. The virus infects and damages the cells lining the small intestine, resulting in symptoms such as vomiting, watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever.

Rotavirus is highly contagious and can be spread through contact with infected individuals or contaminated surfaces, food, or water. The virus is typically transmitted via the fecal-oral route, meaning that it enters the body through the mouth after coming into contact with contaminated hands, objects, or food.

Rotavirus infections are often self-limiting and resolve within a few days to a week, but severe cases can lead to dehydration, hospitalization, and even death, particularly in developing countries where access to medical care and rehydration therapy may be limited. Fortunately, there are effective vaccines available that can prevent rotavirus infection and reduce the severity of symptoms in those who do become infected.

Microscopy is a technical field in medicine that involves the use of microscopes to observe structures and phenomena that are too small to be seen by the naked eye. It allows for the examination of samples such as tissues, cells, and microorganisms at high magnifications, enabling the detection and analysis of various medical conditions, including infections, diseases, and cellular abnormalities.

There are several types of microscopy used in medicine, including:

1. Light Microscopy: This is the most common type of microscopy, which uses visible light to illuminate and magnify samples. It can be used to examine a wide range of biological specimens, such as tissue sections, blood smears, and bacteria.
2. Electron Microscopy: This type of microscopy uses a beam of electrons instead of light to produce highly detailed images of samples. It is often used in research settings to study the ultrastructure of cells and tissues.
3. Fluorescence Microscopy: This technique involves labeling specific molecules within a sample with fluorescent dyes, allowing for their visualization under a microscope. It can be used to study protein interactions, gene expression, and cell signaling pathways.
4. Confocal Microscopy: This type of microscopy uses a laser beam to scan a sample point by point, producing high-resolution images with reduced background noise. It is often used in medical research to study the structure and function of cells and tissues.
5. Scanning Probe Microscopy: This technique involves scanning a sample with a physical probe, allowing for the measurement of topography, mechanical properties, and other characteristics at the nanoscale. It can be used in medical research to study the structure and function of individual molecules and cells.

There doesn't seem to be a specific medical definition for "DNA, protozoan" as it is simply a reference to the DNA found in protozoa. Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic organisms that can be found in various environments such as soil, water, and the digestive tracts of animals.

Protozoan DNA refers to the genetic material present in these organisms. It is composed of nucleic acids, including deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), which contain the instructions for the development, growth, and reproduction of the protozoan.

The DNA in protozoa, like in other organisms, is made up of two strands of nucleotides that coil together to form a double helix. The four nucleotide bases that make up protozoan DNA are adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C). These bases pair with each other to form the rungs of the DNA ladder, with A always pairing with T and G always pairing with C.

The genetic information stored in protozoan DNA is encoded in the sequence of these nucleotide bases. This information is used to synthesize proteins, which are essential for the structure and function of the organism's cells. Protozoan DNA also contains other types of genetic material, such as regulatory sequences that control gene expression and repetitive elements with no known function.

Understanding the DNA of protozoa is important for studying their biology, evolution, and pathogenicity. It can help researchers develop new treatments for protozoan diseases and gain insights into the fundamental principles of genetics and cellular function.

"Plasmodium" is a genus of protozoan parasites that are the causative agents of malaria in humans and other animals. There are several species within this genus, including Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, P. malariae, and P. knowlesi, among others.

These parasites have a complex life cycle that involves two hosts: an Anopheles mosquito and a vertebrate host (such as humans). When a person is bitten by an infected mosquito, the parasites enter the bloodstream and infect red blood cells, where they multiply and cause the symptoms of malaria.

Plasmodium species are transmitted through the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes, which become infected after taking a blood meal from an infected person. The parasites then develop in the mosquito's midgut, eventually making their way to the salivary glands, where they can be transmitted to another human through the mosquito's bite.

Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease that affects millions of people worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. It is characterized by fever, chills, headache, muscle and joint pain, and anemia, among other symptoms. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent severe illness and death from malaria.

Chlamydia infections are caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis and can affect multiple body sites, including the genitals, eyes, and respiratory system. The most common type of chlamydia infection is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that affects the genitals.

In women, chlamydia infections can cause symptoms such as abnormal vaginal discharge, burning during urination, and pain in the lower abdomen. In men, symptoms may include discharge from the penis, painful urination, and testicular pain or swelling. However, many people with chlamydia infections do not experience any symptoms at all.

If left untreated, chlamydia infections can lead to serious complications, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women, which can cause infertility and ectopic pregnancy. In men, chlamydia infections can cause epididymitis, an inflammation of the tube that carries sperm from the testicles, which can also lead to infertility.

Chlamydia infections are diagnosed through a variety of tests, including urine tests and swabs taken from the affected area. Once diagnosed, chlamydia infections can be treated with antibiotics such as azithromycin or doxycycline. It is important to note that treatment only clears the infection and does not repair any damage caused by the infection.

Prevention measures include practicing safe sex, getting regular STI screenings, and avoiding sharing towels or other personal items that may come into contact with infected bodily fluids.

Malaria is not a medical definition itself, but it is a disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes. Here's a simple definition:

Malaria: A mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by Plasmodium parasites, characterized by cycles of fever, chills, and anemia. It can be fatal if not promptly diagnosed and treated. The five Plasmodium species known to cause malaria in humans are P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, P. malariae, and P. knowlesi.

Diarrhea is a condition in which an individual experiences loose, watery stools frequently, often exceeding three times a day. It can be acute, lasting for several days, or chronic, persisting for weeks or even months. Diarrhea can result from various factors, including viral, bacterial, or parasitic infections, food intolerances, medications, and underlying medical conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease or irritable bowel syndrome. Dehydration is a potential complication of diarrhea, particularly in severe cases or in vulnerable populations like young children and the elderly.

"Plasmodium vivax" is a species of protozoan parasite that causes malaria in humans. It's one of the five malaria parasites that can infect humans, with P. falciparum being the most deadly.

P. vivax typically enters the human body through the bite of an infected Anopheles mosquito. Once inside the human host, the parasite travels to the liver where it multiplies and matures. After a period of development that can range from weeks to several months, the mature parasites are released into the bloodstream, where they infect red blood cells and continue to multiply.

The symptoms of P. vivax malaria include fever, chills, headache, muscle and joint pain, and fatigue. One distinctive feature of P. vivax is its ability to form dormant stages (hypnozoites) in the liver, which can reactivate and cause relapses of the disease months or even years after the initial infection.

P. vivax malaria is treatable with medications such as chloroquine, but resistance to this drug has been reported in some parts of the world. Prevention measures include using insecticide-treated bed nets and indoor residual spraying to reduce mosquito populations, as well as taking prophylactic medications for travelers visiting areas where malaria is common.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

Influenza, also known as the flu, is a highly contagious viral infection that attacks the respiratory system of humans. It is caused by influenza viruses A, B, or C and is characterized by the sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, muscle pain, sore throat, cough, runny nose, and fatigue. Influenza can lead to complications such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and ear infections, and can be particularly dangerous for young children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems or chronic medical conditions. The virus is spread through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks, and can also survive on surfaces for a period of time. Influenza viruses are constantly changing, which makes it necessary to get vaccinated annually to protect against the most recent and prevalent strains.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Bacterial antibodies are a type of antibodies produced by the immune system in response to an infection caused by bacteria. These antibodies are proteins that recognize and bind to specific antigens on the surface of the bacterial cells, marking them for destruction by other immune cells. Bacterial antibodies can be classified into several types based on their structure and function, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE. They play a crucial role in the body's defense against bacterial infections and provide immunity to future infections with the same bacteria.

'Chlamydia trachomatis' is a species of bacterium that is the causative agent of several infectious diseases in humans. It is an obligate intracellular pathogen, meaning it can only survive and reproduce inside host cells. The bacteria are transmitted through sexual contact, and can cause a range of genital tract infections, including urethritis, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and epididymitis. In women, chlamydial infection can also lead to serious complications such as ectopic pregnancy and infertility.

In addition to genital infections, 'Chlamydia trachomatis' is also responsible for two other diseases: trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV). Trachoma is a leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide, affecting mostly children in developing countries. It is spread through contact with contaminated hands, clothing, or eye secretions. LGV is a sexually transmitted infection that can cause inflammation of the lymph nodes, rectum, and genitals.

'Chlamydia trachomatis' infections are often asymptomatic, making them difficult to diagnose and treat. However, they can be detected through laboratory tests such as nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) or culture. Treatment typically involves antibiotics such as azithromycin or doxycycline. Prevention measures include safe sex practices, regular screening for STIs, and good hygiene.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country in South Asia, the second-most populous country in the world, known for its rich history, diverse culture, and numerous contributions to various fields including medicine. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!

Antimalarials are a class of drugs that are used for the prevention, treatment, and elimination of malaria. They work by targeting the malaria parasite at various stages of its life cycle, particularly the erythrocytic stage when it infects red blood cells. Some commonly prescribed antimalarials include chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, and artemisinin-based combinations. These drugs can be used alone or in combination with other antimalarial agents to increase their efficacy and prevent the development of drug resistance. Antimalarials are also being investigated for their potential use in treating other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and cancer.

A viral RNA (ribonucleic acid) is the genetic material found in certain types of viruses, as opposed to viruses that contain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). These viruses are known as RNA viruses. The RNA can be single-stranded or double-stranded and can exist as several different forms, such as positive-sense, negative-sense, or ambisense RNA. Upon infecting a host cell, the viral RNA uses the host's cellular machinery to translate the genetic information into proteins, leading to the production of new virus particles and the continuation of the viral life cycle. Examples of human diseases caused by RNA viruses include influenza, COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2), hepatitis C, and polio.

Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a type of antibody, which is a protective protein produced by the immune system in response to foreign substances like bacteria or viruses. IgG is the most abundant type of antibody in human blood, making up about 75-80% of all antibodies. It is found in all body fluids and plays a crucial role in fighting infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and toxins.

IgG has several important functions:

1. Neutralization: IgG can bind to the surface of bacteria or viruses, preventing them from attaching to and infecting human cells.
2. Opsonization: IgG coats the surface of pathogens, making them more recognizable and easier for immune cells like neutrophils and macrophages to phagocytose (engulf and destroy) them.
3. Complement activation: IgG can activate the complement system, a group of proteins that work together to help eliminate pathogens from the body. Activation of the complement system leads to the formation of the membrane attack complex, which creates holes in the cell membranes of bacteria, leading to their lysis (destruction).
4. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC): IgG can bind to immune cells like natural killer (NK) cells and trigger them to release substances that cause target cells (such as virus-infected or cancerous cells) to undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death).
5. Immune complex formation: IgG can form immune complexes with antigens, which can then be removed from the body through various mechanisms, such as phagocytosis by immune cells or excretion in urine.

IgG is a critical component of adaptive immunity and provides long-lasting protection against reinfection with many pathogens. It has four subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) that differ in their structure, function, and distribution in the body.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "seasons" is not a term that has a medical definition. Seasons refer to the four divisions of the year (spring, summer, autumn or fall, and winter) based on the position of the earth in its orbit around the sun. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Viral load refers to the amount or quantity of virus (like HIV, Hepatitis C, SARS-CoV-2) present in an individual's blood or bodily fluids. It is often expressed as the number of virus copies per milliliter of blood or fluid. Monitoring viral load is important in managing and treating certain viral infections, as a higher viral load may indicate increased infectivity, disease progression, or response to treatment.

Genotype, in genetics, refers to the complete heritable genetic makeup of an individual organism, including all of its genes. It is the set of instructions contained in an organism's DNA for the development and function of that organism. The genotype is the basis for an individual's inherited traits, and it can be contrasted with an individual's phenotype, which refers to the observable physical or biochemical characteristics of an organism that result from the expression of its genes in combination with environmental influences.

It is important to note that an individual's genotype is not necessarily identical to their genetic sequence. Some genes have multiple forms called alleles, and an individual may inherit different alleles for a given gene from each parent. The combination of alleles that an individual inherits for a particular gene is known as their genotype for that gene.

Understanding an individual's genotype can provide important information about their susceptibility to certain diseases, their response to drugs and other treatments, and their risk of passing on inherited genetic disorders to their offspring.

Viral DNA refers to the genetic material present in viruses that consist of DNA as their core component. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is one of the two types of nucleic acids that are responsible for storing and transmitting genetic information in living organisms. Viruses are infectious agents much smaller than bacteria that can only replicate inside the cells of other organisms, called hosts.

Viral DNA can be double-stranded (dsDNA) or single-stranded (ssDNA), depending on the type of virus. Double-stranded DNA viruses have a genome made up of two complementary strands of DNA, while single-stranded DNA viruses contain only one strand of DNA.

Examples of dsDNA viruses include Adenoviruses, Herpesviruses, and Poxviruses, while ssDNA viruses include Parvoviruses and Circoviruses. Viral DNA plays a crucial role in the replication cycle of the virus, encoding for various proteins necessary for its multiplication and survival within the host cell.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

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Most infections (~80%) are asymptomatic. Infections may be long-lasting, persisting for many years or decades (up to 25 years) ... those who consume raw fish are at risk of infection. The infection is often asymptomatic and usually presents only with mild ... D. latum infection has been shown to cause local changes in the host, leading to altered GI function (including motility) via ... Infections in Europe and North America were traditionally associated with Jewish women due to the practice of tasting bits of ...
On 6 January, after reporting 63 new cases in the northern province of Hebei, of which 20 were infections and 43 asymptomatic ... The confirmed case count in mainland China only includes symptomatic cases; asymptomatic infections are reported separately. ... the actual number of asymptomatic infections. On 20 December, the Chinese State Council narrowed its definition of what would ... "Transmission of 2019-nCoV Infection from an Asymptomatic Contact in Germany". New England Journal of Medicine. 382 (10): 970- ...
Many of the maternal infections with these organisms are asymptomatic in the mother. Other maternal infections that may be ... Maternal infections are usually asymptomatic. This pathogen is vertically transmitted (transmitted directly from the mother's ... Neonatal infections may present soon after delivery, or take several weeks to show symptoms. Some neonatal infections such as ... Chronic hepatitis B infection is the largest concern globally. Chronic hepatitis B infection can lead to acute liver failure ...
Asymptomatic infections are reported separately. It is also reported that there were more than 43,000 by the end of February ... In October, 137 asymptomatic cases were detected in Kashgar, Xinjiang and were linked to a garment factory. On December 18, a ... It also said that it was not prepared to take these people with a high risk of viral infections home. Tsai Ing-wen criticized ... The US CDC reported that the infections were initially spread through a shared elevator used at different times, and led to at ...
Asymptomatic infections are reported separately. It is also reported that there were more than 43,000 by the end of February ... Chinese official data counts "asymptomatic" cases, when an individual tests positive for the virus, separately from "confirmed ...
Kass, Edward H. (2002). "Asymptomatic infections of the urinary tract". Journal of Urology. 167 (2 Part 2): 1016-1020. doi: ... He made laboratory and clinical studies of renal tract infections and in 1962 he published his first paper, with W E Miall, on ... He is known for his research on toxic shock syndrome and urinary tract infections. His parents were Jewish emigrants from ... He also published experimental studies on such topics as the role of alveolar macrophages in lung infections, the effects of ...
Most infections are light, almost asymptomatic. In heavy infections, symptoms can include abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, ... Treatment is effective in early or light infections. Heavy infections are more difficult to treat. Studies of the effectiveness ... Infections occur most often in school-aged children or in impoverished areas with a lack of proper sanitation systems. A study ... The infection, or the eggs which hatch in the aquatic environment, were correlated with the water pollution in different ...
There can be (rare) asymptomatic infections. A study from the Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, reported multiple ... In infections before the current outbreak, 1-3 per cent of people with known infections have died (without treatment). Cases in ... 2022). "Retrospective detection of asymptomatic monkeypox virus infections among male sexual health clinic attendees in Belgium ... Mpox infection was immediately suspected, and the patient was hospitalised at a specialist clinical unit of the Guy's and St ...
The majority of infections, however, are asymptomatic. Among cases in which symptoms do appear, symptoms tend to be non- ... Tambyah, P. A.; Koay, E. S. C.; Poon, M. L. M.; Lin, R. V. T. P.; Ong, B. K. C.; Transfusion-Transmitted Dengue Infection Study ... In humans, symptoms of arbovirus infection generally occur 3-15 days after exposure to the virus and last three or four days. ... The incubation period - the time between when infection occurs and when symptoms appear - varies from virus to virus, but is ...
Asymptomatic infections are more common in adults, and the rate of asymptomatic infections is very high, up to two-thirds, in ... 20-40% of infections are asymptomatic or are restricted to mild respiratory symptoms, sometimes with a fever. Over the course ... As time went on with vaccine use, these asymptomatic infections declined in frequency, likely leading to a reduction in long- ... About one third of infections are asymptomatic. Complications are rare but include deafness and a wide range of inflammatory ...
"Zidovudine in Asymptomatic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection". New England Journal of Medicine. 322 (14): 941-949. doi: ... The Johns Hopkins University Press published in 1991 The Guide to Living with HIV Infection by Dr. Bartlett and Ann Finkbeiner ... Friedland, Gerald H. (1992). "The Guide to Living with HIV Infection: Developed at the Johns Hopkins AIDS Clinic". JAMA: The ... Matthis, E. J. (1991). "Review of The Guide to Living with HIV Infection". Home Healthcare Now. 9 (6): 59. doi:10.1097/00004045 ...
E. histolytica, as its name suggests (histo-lytic = tissue destroying), is pathogenic; infection can be asymptomatic, or it can ... Blessmann J, Tannich E (October 2002). "Treatment of asymptomatic intestinal Entamoeba histolytica infection". The New England ... The infection can occur when a person puts anything into their mouth that has touched the feces of a person who is infected ... E. histolytica infection is estimated to kill more than 55,000 people each year. Previously, it was thought that 10% of the ...
Asymptomatic bacteriuria is bacteriuria without accompanying symptoms of a urinary tract infection and is commonly caused by ... For example, confusion or other changes in behaviour can be a sign of an infection in the elderly. Screening for asymptomatic ... Bacteriuria accompanied by symptoms is a urinary tract infection while that without is known as asymptomatic bacteriuria. ... Nicolle LE (March 2014). "Urinary tract infections in special populations: diabetes, renal transplant, HIV infection, and ...
"Asymptomatic "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" Infections in Immunocompetent Humans". Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 52 ( ... Wennerås, C. (2015-05-11). "Infections with the tick-borne bacterium Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis". Clinical Microbiology ... "Infections With the Tick-Borne Bacterium "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" Mimic Noninfectious Conditions in Patients With B ... "Human Infection with Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, China". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 18 (10): 1636-1639. doi:10.3201/ ...
Not all hosts of asymptomatic subclinical infections will become asymptomatic carriers. For example, hosts of Mycobacterium ... A subclinical infection-sometimes called a preinfection or inapparent infection-is an infection by a pathogen that causes few ... Bogoch, Isaac (16 May 2020). "The Term 'Asymptomatic' Is More Complicated Than It Seems When It Comes To Coronavirus Infections ... Sutton TL, Martinko T, Hale S, Fairchok MP (December 2003). "Prevalence and high rate of asymptomatic infection of Chlamydia ...
... percutaneous infection). Infection with hookworms often remains asymptomatic in cats. In more severe infestations, they can ... Treatment of worm infections is mostly limited to cats kept in human care. Most infections are rather harmless for cats, since ... Nevertheless, infection via transport hosts such as rodents is the most common route of infection in adult cats. The larvae ... The infection corresponds to that of a transport host and - in contrast to infection with the dog roundworm - is usually ...
... of infections are asymptomatic, and asymptomatic individuals were 42% less likely to transmit the virus. However, an ... This means each infection from the virus is expected to result in 2.39 to 3.44 new infections when no members of the community ... The man's second infection was symptomatically more severe than the first infection, but the mechanisms that could account for ... Nogrady B (November 2020). "What the data say about asymptomatic COVID infections". Nature. 587 (7835): 534-535. Bibcode: ...
Many people have asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic infections. If they are wearing face masks, it can prevent droplets that carry ... They highlighted that the proportion of asymptomatic and mild infection increased in settings adopting population-level masking ... In a study of 124 Beijing households with at least one laboratory-confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 infection, mask use by the index ... The US CDC also highlighted the use of masks for source control, pointing out that asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic cases are ...
... es typically cause chronic asymptomatic infection in rodents. Humans may become infected with hantaviruses ... Hantavirus infections in humans are associated with two diseases: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus ... Dobrava infections are similar, except that they often also have hemorrhagic complications.[citation needed] Puumala virus is ... Jiang H, Zheng X, Wang L, Du H, Wang P, Bai X (2017). "Hantavirus infection: a global zoonotic challenge". Virol Sin. 32 (1): ...
... infection is generally asymptomatic. This virus appears to have evolved around 1700 AD. This date is corroborated by the ... In milder infections, affected pigs lose weight, become thin, and develop signs of pneumonia, skin ulcers, and swollen joints. ... ASFV is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa and exists in the wild through a cycle of infection between ticks and wild pigs, bushpigs ... Within a few days of infection, they enter a comatose state and then die. In pregnant sows, spontaneous abortions may occur. ...
T. asiatica infection in human is usually asymptomatic. There was an isolated report of severe pathogenic lesions in a 60-year- ... Niclosamide (2 mg) is very effective against experimental infection in human. In general cestode infections are treated with ... Humans contract the infection by eating raw or undercooked meat - a practice common in East and Southeast Asia - which is ... Eom, K S; Rim, H J; Geerts, S (1992). "Experimental infection of pigs and cattle with eggs of Asian Taenia saginata with ...
... typically after an upper respiratory tract infection). Fistulas, if present, are asymptomatic until infection arises. Branchial ... Infection of the cysts in this region can compress trachea, causing respiratory problems, or it can compress the oesophagus, ...
... is an infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Most infections are asymptomatic or have a mild ... Asymptomatic transmission and chronic infection are also possible. Different strains of C. diphtheriae are the main cause in ... Previous infection may not protect against infection. A diphtheria vaccine is effective for prevention, and is available in a ... malignant throat infection, gangrenous throat infection, etc.] Paris, France: Crevot. A condensed version of this work is ...
T. saginata infection is usually asymptomatic, but heavy infection often results in weight loss, dizziness, abdominal pain, ... Its infection is relatively harmless and clinically asymptomatic. T. saginata is the largest of species in the genus Taenia. An ... In the US, the incidence of infection is low, but 25% of cattle sold are still infected. The total global infection is ... Taenia saginata adult worms can live in the host for up to 25 years and most infections will last 2 to 3 years without ...
B. Studeri infection in humans is usually asymptomatic. Although, infection can also lead to gastrointestinal irritation, ... "CDC - DPDX - Bertiella Infection". 30 May 2019. Sun, X; Fang, Q; Chen, XZ; Hu, SF; Xia, H; Wang, XM (2006). "Bertiella studeri ... Geographic distribution of cases demonstrate Bertiellia infection within countries from Asia, Africa, and the Americas. An ... "FIRST CASE OF HUMAN INFECTION BY Bertiella studeri (Blanchard, 1891) Stunkard,1940 (Cestoda; Anoplocephalidae) IN BRAZIL". Rev ...
Irreversible puplitis may be symptomatic or asymptomatic. Asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis results from transition of ... Teeth with pulp necrosis undergo a root canal or extraction to prevent further spread of the infection, which may lead to an ... Asymptomatic necrosis is may go unnoticed by the patient and so a diagnosis may not be attempted. Diagnosis may involve X-rays ... Asymptomatic necrosis is non-responsive to thermal stimuli or electric pulp tests, leaving the patient unaware of the pathology ...
The stages include primary infection, asymptomatic infection, symptomatic infection, and AIDS. In the primary infection stage, ... Syphilis infections are increasing in the United States. Trichomoniasis is a common STI that is caused by infection with a ... When the HIV infection becomes life-threatening, it is called AIDS. People with AIDS fall prey to opportunistic infections and ... In the asymptomatic stage, symptoms usually disappear, and the patient can remain asymptomatic for years. When HIV progresses ...
The majority of the 60 million Americans infected with T. gondii are asymptomatic. The group most vulnerable to this pathogen ... Sometimes the infection can be observed; the most common symptoms include diarrhea, stomach pains, loss of appetite, nausea, ... Protozoan infections are parasitic diseases caused by organisms formerly classified in the kingdom Protozoa. They are usually ... Symptoms of this infection include diarrhea with blood and mucus, and can alternate between constipation and remission, ...
Several viral infections have displayed a variety of effects, ranging from asymptomatic to symptomatic or even critical ... A viral infection does not always cause disease. A viral infection simply involves viral replication in the host, but disease ... Viruses need to establish infections in host cells in order to multiply. For infections to occur, the virus has to hijack host ... Importantly, viral infections can differ by the "lifestyle strategy". Persistent infections happen when cells continue to ...
Up to 71% of EV-71 infections are asymptomatic. EV-71 infection can be divided into four stages. Stage 1 of EV-71 infection is ... However, Cosackie A virus infection does not provide immunity against EV-71 virus infection. Questions remain about whether an ... Dual infection with other enteroviruses or adenovirus does not increase the risk of neurological complications. HFMD outbreaks ... EV-71 virus may continuously shed into faeces up to 42 days after the infection, longer than its shedding into the throat. ...
... of days among those suffering from asymptomatic infection, with many of these episodes occurring without visible outbreak (" ... Most sexual transmissions occur during periods of asymptomatic shedding. Asymptomatic reactivation means that the virus causes ... It is primarily a sexually transmitted infection. Human alphaherpesvirus 2 tends to reside in the sacral ganglia. Human ... Atypical symptoms are often attributed to other causes, such as a yeast infection. Human alphaherpesvirus 1 Wikispecies has ...
Prior to the outbreak, Zika was considered a mild infection, as most infections are asymptomatic, making it difficult to ... Zika infections in adults can result in Guillain-Barré syndrome. In approximately one in five cases, Zika virus infections ... "As first imported case of Zika virus infection identified in Taiwan, Taiwan CDC to list Zika virus infection as Category II ... Zika infections in adults can cause Guillain-Barré syndrome. Symptoms are similar to other flaviviruses such as dengue fever or ...

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