Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Anti-Asthmatic Agents: Drugs that are used to treat asthma.Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.Respiratory Sounds: Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Administration, Inhalation: The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.Bronchodilator Agents: Agents that cause an increase in the expansion of a bronchus or bronchial tubes.Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Asthma, Exercise-Induced: Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).Bronchial Hyperreactivity: Tendency of the smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree to contract more intensely in response to a given stimulus than it does in the response seen in normal individuals. This condition is present in virtually all symptomatic patients with asthma. The most prominent manifestation of this smooth muscle contraction is a decrease in airway caliber that can be readily measured in the pulmonary function laboratory.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Adrenal Cortex HormonesAllergens: Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Hypersensitivity, Immediate: Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Budesonide: A glucocorticoid used in the management of ASTHMA, the treatment of various skin disorders, and allergic RHINITIS.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Hypersensitivity: Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.Asthma, Occupational: Asthma attacks caused, triggered, or exacerbated by OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE.Albuterol: A short-acting beta-2 adrenergic agonist that is primarily used as a bronchodilator agent to treat ASTHMA. Albuterol is prepared as a racemic mixture of R(-) and S(+) stereoisomers. The stereospecific preparation of R(-) isomer of albuterol is referred to as levalbuterol.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Methacholine Chloride: A quaternary ammonium parasympathomimetic agent with the muscarinic actions of ACETYLCHOLINE. It is hydrolyzed by ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE at a considerably slower rate than ACETYLCHOLINE and is more resistant to hydrolysis by nonspecific CHOLINESTERASES so that its actions are more prolonged. It is used as a parasympathomimetic bronchoconstrictor agent and as a diagnostic aid for bronchial asthma. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1116)Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Leukotriene Antagonists: A class of drugs designed to prevent leukotriene synthesis or activity by blocking binding at the receptor level.Beclomethasone: An anti-inflammatory, synthetic glucocorticoid. It is used topically as an anti-inflammatory agent and in aerosol form for the treatment of ASTHMA.Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial: Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose similar to that found in hay fever except that symptoms persist throughout the year. The causes are usually air-borne allergens, particularly dusts, feathers, molds, animal fur, etc.Rhinitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA, the mucous membrane lining the NASAL CAVITIES.Cough: A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Nedocromil: A pyranoquinolone derivative that inhibits activation of inflammatory cells which are associated with ASTHMA, including eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, monocytes, and platelets.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal: Allergic rhinitis that occurs at the same time every year. It is characterized by acute CONJUNCTIVITIS with lacrimation and ITCHING, and regarded as an allergic condition triggered by specific ALLERGENS.Bronchoconstriction: Narrowing of the caliber of the BRONCHI, physiologically or as a result of pharmacological intervention.Nebulizers and Vaporizers: Devices that cause a liquid or solid to be converted into an aerosol (spray) or a vapor. It is used in drug administration by inhalation, humidification of ambient air, and in certain analytical instruments.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Meteorology: The science of studying the characteristics of the atmosphere such as its temperature, density, winds, clouds, precipitation, and other atmospheric phenomena and aiming to account for the weather in terms of external influences and the basic laws of physics. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Bronchial Provocation Tests: Tests involving inhalation of allergens (nebulized or in dust form), nebulized pharmacologically active solutions (e.g., histamine, methacholine), or control solutions, followed by assessment of respiratory function. These tests are used in the diagnosis of asthma.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Histamine Agents: Drugs used for their actions on histaminergic systems. Included are drugs that act at histamine receptors, affect the life cycle of histamine, or affect the state of histaminergic cells.Bronchoconstrictor Agents: Agents causing the narrowing of the lumen of a bronchus or bronchiole.Adrenergic beta-Agonists: Drugs that selectively bind to and activate beta-adrenergic receptors.Ethanolamines: AMINO ALCOHOLS containing the ETHANOLAMINE; (-NH2CH2CHOH) group and its derivatives.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Pregnenediones: Unsaturated pregnane derivatives containing two keto groups on side chains or ring structures.Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A form of hypersensitivity affecting the respiratory tract. It includes ASTHMA and RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.Mites: Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.Bronchitis: Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Metered Dose Inhalers: A small aerosol canister used to release a calibrated amount of medication for inhalation.Eosinophils: Granular leukocytes with a nucleus that usually has two lobes connected by a slender thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round granules that are uniform in size and stainable by eosin.Androstadienes: Derivatives of the steroid androstane having two double bonds at any site in any of the rings.Vital Capacity: The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Nitrogen Dioxide: Nitrogen oxide (NO2). A highly poisonous gas. Exposure produces inflammation of lungs that may only cause slight pain or pass unnoticed, but resulting edema several days later may cause death. (From Merck, 11th ed) It is a major atmospheric pollutant that is able to absorb UV light that does not reach the earth's surface.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Tobacco Smoke Pollution: Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.Bronchi: The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Glucocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Fossil Fuels: Any combustible hydrocarbon deposit formed from the remains of prehistoric organisms. Examples are petroleum, coal, and natural gas.Heating: The application of heat to raise the temperature of the environment, ambient or local, or the systems for accomplishing this effect. It is distinguished from HEAT, the physical property and principle of physics.Airway Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.QuinolinesOccupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Breath Tests: Any tests done on exhaled air.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Pollen: The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Sputum: Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Acetates: Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.Sickness Impact Profile: A quality-of-life scale developed in the United States in 1972 as a measure of health status or dysfunction generated by a disease. It is a behaviorally based questionnaire for patients and addresses activities such as sleep and rest, mobility, recreation, home management, emotional behavior, social interaction, and the like. It measures the patient's perceived health status and is sensitive enough to detect changes or differences in health status occurring over time or between groups. (From Medical Care, vol.xix, no.8, August 1981, p.787-805)Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Ventilation: Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Antigens, Dermatophagoides: Antigens from the house dust mites (DERMATOPHAGOIDES), mainly D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus. They are proteins, found in mite feces or mite extracts, that can cause ASTHMA and other allergic diseases such as perennial rhinitis (RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, PERENNIAL) and atopic dermatitis (DERMATITIS, ATOPIC). More than 11 groups of Dermatophagoides ALLERGENS have been defined. Group I allergens, such as Der f I and Der p I from the above two species, are among the strongest mite immunogens in humans.Symptom Assessment: Evaluation of manifestations of disease.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Terbutaline: A selective beta-2 adrenergic agonist used as a bronchodilator and tocolytic.Air Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Housekeeping: The care and management of property.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Vehicle Emissions: Gases, fumes, vapors, and odors escaping from the cylinders of a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Absenteeism: Chronic absence from work or other duty.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Histamine: An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.United StatesChileCaliforniaRandomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Saline Solution, Hypertonic: Hypertonic sodium chloride solution. A solution having an osmotic pressure greater than that of physiologic salt solution (0.9 g NaCl in 100 ml purified water).Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Immunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Status Asthmaticus: A sudden intense and continuous aggravation of a state of asthma, marked by dyspnea to the point of exhaustion and collapse and not responding to the usual therapeutic efforts.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Airway Remodeling: The structural changes in the number, mass, size and/or composition of the airway tissues.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Schools: Educational institutions.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.BrazilFinlandPyroglyphidae: Family of house dust mites, in the superfamily Analgoidea, order Astigmata. They include the genera Dermatophagoides and Euroglyphus.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Ovalbumin: An albumin obtained from the white of eggs. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Behavioral Symptoms: Observable manifestations of impaired psychological functioning.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Respiratory Tract DiseasesIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Great BritainSensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Pulmonary Medicine: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. It is especially concerned with diagnosis and treatment of diseases and defects of the lungs and bronchial tree.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).EuropeEosinophilia: Abnormal increase of EOSINOPHILS in the blood, tissues or organs.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Asthma, Aspirin-Induced: Asthmatic adverse reaction (e.g., BRONCHOCONSTRICTION) to conventional NSAIDS including aspirin use.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Exhalation: The act of BREATHING out.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Proton Pump Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE. They are used as ANTI-ULCER AGENTS and sometimes in place of HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS for GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Omeprazole: A 4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridyl, 5-methoxybenzimidazole derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits an H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Respiratory System: The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.Anti-Allergic Agents: Agents that are used to treat allergic reactions. Most of these drugs act by preventing the release of inflammatory mediators or inhibiting the actions of released mediators on their target cells. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p475)Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Toluene 2,4-Diisocyanate: Skin irritant and allergen used in the manufacture of polyurethane foams and other elastomers.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Th2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Interleukin-13: A cytokine synthesized by T-LYMPHOCYTES that produces proliferation, immunoglobulin isotype switching, and immunoglobulin production by immature B-LYMPHOCYTES. It appears to play a role in regulating inflammatory and immune responses.Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)Aerosols: Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.Dermatitis, Atopic: A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.Cromolyn Sodium: A chromone complex that acts by inhibiting the release of chemical mediators from sensitized mast cells. It is used in the prophylactic treatment of both allergic and exercise-induced asthma, but does not affect an established asthmatic attack.Cockroaches: Insects of the order Dictyoptera comprising several families including Blaberidae, BLATTELLIDAE, Blattidae (containing the American cockroach PERIPLANETA americana), Cryptocercidae, and Polyphagidae.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Picornaviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the PICORNAVIRIDAE.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Adrenergic beta-2 Receptor Agonists: Compounds bind to and activate ADRENERGIC BETA-2 RECEPTORS.Eosinophil Cationic Protein: One of several basic proteins released from EOSINOPHIL cytoplasmic granules. Eosinophil cationic protein is a 21-kDa cytotoxic peptide with a pI of 10.9. Although eosinophil cationic protein is considered a member of the RNAse A superfamily of proteins, it has only limited RNAse activity.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Rhinovirus: A genus of PICORNAVIRIDAE inhabiting primarily the respiratory tract of mammalian hosts. It includes over 100 human serotypes associated with the COMMON COLD.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.
Asthma[edit]. Infants may develop respiratory symptoms as a result of exposure to Penicillium, a fungal genus. Signs of mold- ... Symptoms[edit]. Symptoms of mold exposure may include nasal and sinus congestion; runny nose, eye irritation; itchy, red, ... Damp indoor environments correlate with upper-respiratory-tract symptoms, such as coughing and wheezing in people with asthma.[ ... "Levels of Household Mold Associated with Respiratory Symptoms in the First Year of Life in a Cohort at Risk for Asthma". ...
Used historically to treat asthma.[40] Used in some toothpastes to relieve asthma symptoms.[41] ... Orville Harry Brown (1917). Asthma, presenting an exposition of the nonpassive expiration theory. C.V. Mosby company. p. 277. ... Joe Graedon (May 15, 2010). "'Sensitive' toothpaste may help asthma". The Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on ... Used in Thailand as main ingredient in kidney tablets to relieve the symptoms of cystitis, pyelitis and urethritis.[42] ...
Health effects linking to asthmaEdit. Infants may develop respiratory symptoms as a result of exposure to a specific type of ... Symptoms of mold exposureEdit. Symptoms of mold exposure can include:[9] ... and upper respiratory symptoms.[14] A later analysis determined that 30% to 50% of asthma-related health outcomes are ... "Levels of Household Mold Associated with Respiratory Symptoms in the First Year of Life in a Cohort at Risk for Asthma". ...
Chronic Conditions dermatological sensitivity; respiratory disease including lung fibrosis and chronic bronchitis; asthma-like ... syndromes; cancer; and neurological symptoms. The issue of preconceptional prenatal exposure is another factor in the health of ...
"Childhood Asthma: Symptoms & Treatments". www.filterbuy.com. Retrieved 21 April 2016.. *↑ Everard ML (February 2009). "Acute ... Asthma[change , change source]. Epinephrine can be given for asthma attacks, if regular asthma medications like albuterol do ... It also treats some of the other symptoms of anaphylaxis. People with allergies can get a doctor's prescription for an ... asthma, anaphylaxis, cardiac surgery, trauma, pregnancy, electrocution. Resuscitation. Oct. pp.1400-1433 ...
Occasionally patients with double aortic arches present late (during later childhood or adulthood). Symptoms may mimic asthma. ... Children with very mild symptoms may outgrow their symptoms but need regular follow-up. The procedure is performed in general ... The symptoms are related to the compression of the trachea, esophagus or both by the complete vascular ring. Diagnosis can ... The obstructive airway symptoms may be worse in the first postoperative weeks. Only a few patients have immediate relief of ...
In nonendemic countries, patients are commonly thought to have bronchial asthma. Chronic symptoms may delay the diagnosis by up ... This disease can be confused with tuberculosis, asthma, or coughs related to roundworms. Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia is a ... Jiva, T.; Israel, R.; Poe, R. (1996). "Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia masquerading as acute bronchial asthma". Respiration; ...
... s are also thought to decrease the symptoms of asthma; a small 1998 placebo-controlled trial of Boswellia extract ... "Effects of Boswellia serrata gum resin in patients with bronchial asthma: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 6-week ... for the treatment of asthma showed good results.[11] Boswellia extracts are sold in tablet, capsule and tincture form, but no ...
A range of extraintestinal symptoms, which can be the only manifestation of NCGS in absence of gastrointestinal symptoms, have ... Current Allergy and Asthma Reports (Review). 13 (6): 631-8. doi:10.1007/s11882-013-0386-4. PMID 24026574. Caio G, Volta U, ... The symptoms usually occur soon after gluten ingestion, improve or disappear within hours or a few days after gluten withdrawal ... Reported symptoms of NCGS are similar to those of celiac disease, with most patients reporting both gastrointestinal and non- ...
"Work-related asthma-like symptoms among florists". Chest. 125 (6): 2336-9. doi:10.1378/chest.125.6.2336. PMID 15189959. ...
Quickly stopping the medication in those with coronary artery disease may worsen symptoms. It may worsen the symptoms of asthma ... Individuals given propranolol immediately after trauma experienced fewer stress-related symptoms and lower rates of PTSD than ... Propranolol may be contraindicated in people with: Reversible airways diseases, particularly asthma or chronic obstructive ... and other sympathetic nervous system symptoms, such as muscle tremor) associated with various conditions, including anxiety, ...
When ingested, gastrointestinal symptoms can manifest within 6 hours; these symptoms do not always become apparent. Within 2 to ... This is indicated by edema of the eyes and lips; asthma; bronchial irritation; dry, sore throat; congestion; skin redness ( ... Symptoms of ricin inhalation are different from those caused by ingestion. Early symptoms include a cough and fever. When skin ... Because the symptoms are caused by failure to make protein, they may take anywhere from hours to days to appear, depending on ...
Asthma[edit]. Asthma is the most common reason for presenting to the emergency room with shortness of breath.[2] It is the most ... Symptoms can include loss of concentration, focus, fatigue, language faculty impairment and memory loss.[17][citation needed] ... "Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 56 (4): 493-500. doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2018.07.001. ISSN 0885-3924. PMID 30009968. ... The symptoms of pneumonia are fever, productive cough, shortness of breath, and pleuritic chest pain.[2] Inspiratory crackles ...
"The importance of vancomycin in drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome". Allergy and Asthma ... Symptoms may be treated or prevented with antihistamines, including diphenhydramine, and are less likely to occur with slow ... Halting the progression of primary sclerosing cholangitis and preventing symptoms; vancomycin does not cure the patient and ...
... it will not stop an asthma attack already in progress. Because it has no effect on asthma symptoms when used alone, it is most ... These inhaled medications are best for treating sudden and severe or new asthma symptoms. Taken 15 to 20 minutes ahead of time ... These are quick-relief or "rescue" medications that provide quick, temporary relief from asthma symptoms or flare-ups. These ... Commonly taken twice a day with an anti-inflammatory medication, they maintain open airways and prevent asthma symptoms, ...
... may act as a potent inhalant allergen capable of eliciting asthma symptoms.[17] Health care professionals at geriatric ... Alemán AM, Quirce S, Bombín C, Sastre J (2001). "[Asthma related to inhalation of Plantago ovata]". Med Clin (Barc) (in Spanish ... Psyllium is mainly used as a dietary fiber to relieve symptoms of both constipation and mild diarrhea, and occasionally as a ... Dec 2003). "Psyllium-associated anaphylaxis and death: a case report and review of the literature". Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ...
... and other symptoms. Stress may and in many cases will worsen certain conditions, such as asthma. Stress also has been linked to ... may lead to the relief or prevention of symptoms commonly associated with stress, which may include high blood pressure, ... "Review of the effectiveness of various modes of breathing training in asthma management". African Journal for Physical, Health ...
Other allergic reactions, such as asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and cutaneous symptoms have been reported.[118] Workers are ... Some of the main reasons for this substitute were 'less withdrawal', 'fewer side-effects' and 'better symptom management'.[83][ ... most of the patients with multiple sclerosis showed dramatic improvements on their symptoms.[65] After the treatment, their ...
Used historically to treat asthma. Used in some toothpastes to relieve asthma symptoms. Used in Thailand as main ingredient in ... Orville Harry Brown (1917). Asthma, presenting an exposition of the nonpassive expiration theory. C.V. Mosby company. p. 277. ... Joe Graedon (May 15, 2010). "'Sensitive' toothpaste may help asthma". The Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on ... kidney tablets to relieve the symptoms of cystitis, pyelitis and urethritis. Combats high blood pressure and was once used as a ...
Common allergy symptoms include rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma. Ficus plants can be of particular concern to latex ...
As air pollution increases, symptoms of asthma worsen. Asthma's etiology is poorly understood and currently has no cure. There ... "Environmental Health Perspectives - Asthma in Inner-City Children at 5-11 Years of Age and Prenatal Exposure to Phthalates: The ... Mothers who were exposed to PM2.5 weekly during gestation, were likely to have a child diagnosed with asthma by the age 6 years ... Among African American children, one out of six children suffer from asthma, which has rose from 50% since 2001. This issue of ...
... it can produce allergy-like symptoms or asthma. Wintergreen essential oil is usually obtained by steam distillation of the ... Native Americans brewed a tea from the leaves to alleviate rheumatic symptoms, headache, fever, sore throat, and various aches ...
Dampness has therefore been suggested to be a strong and consistent indicator of risk for asthma and respiratory symptoms such ... Exposure to microbial contaminants is clinically associated with respiratory symptoms, allergies, asthma and immunological ... Symptoms[edit]. Dampness tends to cause secondary damage to a building. The unwanted moisture enables the growth of various ... Asthma is also triggered by the sensitization of dust mites accruing humid, wet regions of a structure.[2]:146 Another health ...
However, she had no prior history of asthma, and no symptoms of a heart condition. Uncertain of the medical examiner's ... The official cause of death was an acute asthma attack complicated by sudden cardiac arrhythmia. ...
"Manual therapy for asthma". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2): CD001002. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD001002.pub2. PMID ... Effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative therapy for managing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome: a systematic review. J Am ... A 2005 Cochrane Review of OMT in asthma treatment concluded that there was insufficient evidence that OMT can be used to treat ... and are less commonly used to treat systemic conditions such as asthma and Parkinson's disease.[1][4] ...
A belief that a substance that causes the symptoms of a disease in healthy people cures similar symptoms in sick people.[n 8] ... "Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 46 (6): 887-96. doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2013.02.010. ISSN 1873-6513. PMID 23707384.. ... This may be due to a natural recovery from the illness, or a fluctuation in the symptoms of a long-term condition.[119] The ... Many medications may cause minor but bothersome symptoms such as cough or upset stomach. In all of these cases, patients may be ...
The latest research to investigate their impact finds that they may also worsen asthma symptoms. ... Additionally, symptom scores could have been affected by smoking or by COPD, which shares many symptoms with asthma. ... Being overweight has previously been linked to worse asthma symptoms, but in the present study, body mass index (BMI) accounted ... The 10 best asthma blogs. We have put together the best blogs for asthma that educate, inspire, and support individuals with ...
A new study suggests that daily use of a gas stove may trigger asthma attacks in adults with the disease. ... Gas Stoves May Worsen Asthma Symptoms. Gas Stoves May Worsen Asthma Symptoms ... The symptoms of asthma -- wheezing and difficulty breathing -- can be triggered by exposure to irritants that cause the airways ... "For now, the issue of asthma and gas stoves is a research question. The dozen or so studies about gas stoves and asthma have ...
... for future asthma treatment, a new study shows an asthma pill is effective in treating symptoms of the condition. ... "New asthma pill reduces troublesome symptoms." Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 8 Aug. 2016. Web.. 18 Oct. 2019. ,https ... A new asthma pill has been proven effective in reducing symptoms, according to the latest study. ... Early-life asthma may contribute to childhood obesity A new study examines the link between early-life asthma and the risk of ...
Percentage of adults with current asthma who reported ever being taught how to recognize asthma signs or symptoms by state/ ... State and City Asthma Contacts and Programs. * Historical Information: Asthma at a Glance 2002-2010plus icon * 2010 At A Glance ... Asthma Surveillance dataplus icon * NHIS Asthma Prevalence Dataplus icon *2018 Data ... CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. ...
Eating large amounts of cured meats was linked to worse symptoms among asthma sufferers, a French study found. ... Reuters Health) - Eating large amounts of cured meats was linked to worse symptoms among asthma sufferers, a French study found ... Each participant was assigned an asthma symptom score, ranging from zero to five, based on difficulty breathing, chest ... over one-fourth said their symptoms had improved and about 20 percent felt their symptoms had gotten worse. ...
Some patients only experience symptoms at night and have normal pulmonary function in the daytime. This ... more ... A large percentage of patients with asthma experience nocturnal symptoms once or twice a month. ... Asthma symptoms and severity. Recommended guidelines for determination of asthma severity based on clinical symptoms, ... Which nocturnal symptoms are associated with asthma?) and Which nocturnal symptoms are associated with asthma? What to Read ...
Discover information about asthma attacks, asthma symptoms, and asthma treatments. ... Learn about asthma, a chronic inflammation disorder of the bronchiole tubes. ... Acute Asthma Attack. An "asthma attack" is an acute worsening of asthma symptoms. During an acute asthma attack, there is ... Asthma: Mild to Severe. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program classifies asthma based on a patients symptoms ...
... symptoms. Improvements in asthma symptoms were noted in the same patient group. Past medical treatments for chronic sinus ... Asthma and Immunology. "We found that womens lung function and asthma symptoms improve when estrogen and progesterone levels ... Progesterone and estrogen appear to have a positive effect on lung function and reduce the symptoms of asthma, according to a ... High levels of hormones may reduce asthma severity and improve lung.... March 20, 2003. ...
Area doctors estimate that one in three people who live in Middle Tennessee suffer from allergies, and according to the Asthma ... This system has been proven beneficial for people who suffer from asthma, allergies or other breathing difficulties. ... Nashville consistently ranks in the top 45 most challenging metropolitan areas to live with allergies and asthma. Those ...
Asthma or Other Diseases?. The signs of asthma sometimes mimic those of other diseases. Be aware that the symptoms of canine ... Additional Asthma Triggers. If your dog is diagnosed with asthma, there are several things that can worsen his symptoms. Or ... During asthma, the air passages of the lungs (the bronchi) fill up with heavy mucus. If your dog is experiencing asthma, he may ... Canine asthma usually affects middle aged dogs. When a dog has an asthma attack, he normally has trouble breathing. ...
Learn more from WebMD about preventing symptoms before, during, and after a workout. ... Some forms of exercise are likelier than others to trigger asthma symptoms. ... Infections can cause asthma (colds, flu, sinusitis) and increase asthma symptoms, so its best to restrict your exercise when ... Exercise and Asthma: A Dangerous Mix? * The Athletes Guide to Exercise-Induced Asthma: How to Control Symptoms of Exercise- ...
Diets with better asthma outcomes are characterized by being healthier, with greater consumption of fruits, vegetables and ... People who eat a healthy diet experience fewer asthma symptoms and better control of their condition, according to a new study ... of men who the researchers identified as having at least one asthma symptom. The number of asthma symptoms experienced by all ... Healthy diet reduces asthma symptoms. European Lung Foundation. Journal. European Respiratory Journal. Keywords. *DIET/BODY ...
Wheezing Coughing Shortness of breath Chest tightness/pain Other nonspecific symptoms in infants or young children may be a ... Signs and symptoms of asthma include the following: ... Signs and symptoms of asthma include the following:. * Wheezing ... Asthma symptoms and severity. Recommended guidelines for determination of asthma severity based on clinical symptoms, ... Asthma and obesity: does weight loss improve asthma control? a systematic review. J Asthma Allergy. 2012. 5:21-6. [Medline]. ...
... symptoms, triggers, causes, and prevention. Asthma is chronic airway inflammation marked by recurrent airway obstruction. ... Read about asthma attacks and asthma treatment, types, medications, ... What Is Asthma? Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments See Slideshow From Asthma and Allergy Resources. *Eosinophilic Asthma ... Patients experiencing acute asthma symptoms should first use their rescue inhaler (albuterol). If asthma symptoms are worsening ...
A symptom is something only you can feel. A sign is something others may observe. Her ... One positive thing about asthma is your body lets you know how things are going inside through symptoms and signs. ... Cold symptoms One of the most common causes of asthma are viral infections. Inside your lungs they may trigger the asthma ... Asthma. Learning Your Asthma Symptoms and Signs. John BottrellHealth Professional. Feb 19, 2015. ...
... a type of asthma medication called a beta-agonist, enhanced the bronchodilating effects. ... a type of asthma medication called a beta-agonist, enhanced the bronchodilating effects. ... Ginger Helps Treat Asthma Symptoms. Another recent study, which was presented at the American Thoracic Society International ... While asthma is a serious condition that can be fatal if left untreated, asthma medications themselves carry serious, even ...
... preventive action and treatment of your childs asthma, provided by Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center. ... Childhood Asthma Asthma is a chronic disease. With asthma, breathing is sometimes difficult due to these changes in the lungs: ... Although asthma is a chronic disease, anyone with asthma can have an acute (sudden) attack of symptoms. ... Causes of an Asthma AttackShow Even if your child has no symptoms, being asthmatic means that there is almost always some ...
Learn about early warning symptoms as well as symptoms of asthma episodes. ... Asthma has many symptoms, many of which depend on the severity of an asthmatic episode. ... Severe Asthma Episode Symptoms. Severe asthma symptoms are a life-threatening emergency. If any of these severe asthma symptoms ... Asthma Episode Symptoms. Asthma symptoms indicate that an asthma episode is occurring. Changes have taken place in the airways ...
The symptoms vary from person to person, as well as in severity and frequency. ?With good management and the correct treatment ... Asthma Symptoms - How to Avoid Symptoms of Asthma, by Dr John Anne ... Asthma Symptoms of Note ?Asthma is a chronic inflammation that makes airways (the bronchial tubes) extra sensitive to irritants ... The symptoms of asthma include: ?Coughing that may become worse at night or first thing in the morning causing sleep disruption ...
What is an asthma exacerbation?. Also known as an asthma attack or episode, it is when symptoms flare up and progressively ... inflammation triggers asthma symptoms.. As well, we know stress is bad for our health, and can be a trigger of asthma, similar ... there is a form of asthma in which the only symptom is a chronic cough. This is known as cough-variant asthma. People with this ... Is all asthma the same?. No! It is usually classified based on the frequency and severity of symptoms: intermittent, mild ...
A new study suggests that vitamin D could help to treat steroid-resistant asthma, as well as reducing the amount of medication ... IL-17A helps the body fight infection, but also exacerbates asthma symptoms and can reduce the effectiveness of steroids.. The ... Researchers at Kings College London have published a study showing how vitamin D may help to reduce asthma symptoms, paving ... They found that people with asthma had much higher levels of a natural chemical called IL-17A than those without asthma, with ...
Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for Asthma. Find Asthma information, treatments for Asthma and Asthma symptoms. ... I am 66 years old and have periodically had increased PVCs causing symptom an d both brady... ... I have been diagnosed with Bronchiolar asthma all my life (22 years), My inhalers have not ... ...
When Treg function is low, the cells fail to block the inflammatory responses that are the hallmark of asthma symptoms. ... and that the decreased level of Treg function was linked to greater severity of asthma symptoms and lower lung capacity. ... the study found that the children in Fresno had lower overall levels of Treg function and more severe symptoms of asthma than ... It is also a region known for its high incidence of asthma: Nearly one in three children there have the condition, earning ...
This is the second of four stages of asthma and typically means you have symptoms more than twice a week, but less than once ... Mild persistent asthma is a classification of asthma symptoms. ... symptoms of asthma or you believe your asthma symptoms are ... Symptoms. Asthma classifications are determined by how frequent your symptoms are, how much the symptoms interfere with your ... Mild persistent asthma is one of four asthma classifications. People with mild persistent asthma experience symptoms more than ...
... and asthma symptoms - in 120 school-aged children with preexisting asthma in the Baltimore area. One-third of the study ... including worsening of asthma symptoms and more hospital visits.. "Asthma is an immune-mediated disease," said Sonali Bose, M.D ... Study: Vitamin D Protects Against Asthma Symptoms. Research analyses obese children living in urban environments. NIH , ... higher blood vitamin D levels were linked to fewer asthma symptoms in obese children. ...
  • Increased consumption of salami and other such meats has been tied to lung cancer , decreased lung function, and increased symptoms and incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Prof. Brightling says their study was unique in that it "included measurements of symptoms, lung function using breathing tests, sampling of the airway wall and CT scans of the chest to give a complete picture of how the new drug works. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • We found that women's lung function and asthma symptoms improve when estrogen and progesterone levels are raised, both naturally during certain times in the menstrual cycle and with the administration of oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy," said one of the study's lead researchers. (scienceblog.com)
  • This data includes the age of asthma onset , the presence or absence of environmental allergies , the presence or absence of elevated blood or sputum levels of eosinophils (a type of white blood cell ), lung function testing ( spirometry and fractional excretion of nitric oxide ), obesity, and cigarette smoke exposure. (rxlist.com)
  • People with mild persistent asthma have lung function of over 80 percent of predicted normal during FEV1 breathing testing . (healthline.com)
  • Doctors can classify asthma based on your lung function. (healthline.com)
  • In addition to reduced symptoms, the patients receiving dupilumab showed improved lung function in a test of 'forced expiratory volume. (news-medical.net)
  • Changes in nerve structure are clearly tied to worse lung function in asthma,' Drake said. (news-medical.net)
  • Not only was Dupilumab able to relieve asthma symptoms, but it was also able to improve lung function in most of the participants taking the drug. (medindia.net)
  • Data on respiratory symptoms, lung function, activity patterns, as well as personal air pollution exposures were collected at the same time. (nyu.edu)
  • This results in permanent abnormalities of their lung function with symptoms of obstructive lung disease occurring all the time. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Your doctor will diagnose asthma based on lung function tests, your medical history, and a physical exam. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of asthma-related symptoms in a group of primary school children, by means of a questionnaire completed by their parents, and their lung function using spirometry and the forced oscillation technique (FOT). (nih.gov)
  • The Lancet has published data from two trials of AstraZeneca's biologic benralizumab showing that the drug significantly reduced exacerbations and improved lung function and symptoms in patients with severe eosinophilic asthma. (pharmatimes.com)
  • Results show reductions in the annual rate of asthma exacerbations of up to 51 percent, and an improvement in lung function with a change in FEV1 of up to 159 mL, seen at four weeks after the first benralizumab dose and sustained throughout the treatment period. (pharmatimes.com)
  • This study comes on the heels of another paper by National Jewish Health faculty, which showed that low levels of vitamin D in adult asthma patients are associated with lower lung function and reduced responsiveness to corticosteroids. (nationaljewish.org)
  • When cured meat intake was examined, the researchers found that 14 percent of low consumers, 20 percent of medium consumers, and 22 percent of high consumers had worsening symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • After accounting for other factors such as smoking, physical activity, age, other dietary habits, and education, researchers found that participants who ate the most cured meat (four or more servings per week) were 76 percent more likely to see a worsening of symptoms compared to those who ate the least (less than one full serving per week). (reuters.com)
  • This included 28% of women and 25% of men who the researchers identified as having at least one asthma symptom. (eurekalert.org)
  • To assess asthma control in the participants already living with asthma, the researchers used a self-administered questionnaire, which evaluates asthma control over a four-week period. (eurekalert.org)
  • The researchers adjusted their analysis to consider other factors known to be linked with asthma, such as smoking and exercise. (eurekalert.org)
  • The researchers say that the results suggest a healthy diet may have a role in preventing the onset of asthma as well as controlling asthma in adults. (eurekalert.org)
  • The researchers note that caution is needed when interpreting the results from this study as it only provides a snap-shot of the possible effects of diet on asthma, and say they plan to conduct longer-term studies in future to confirm their findings. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers at King's College London have published a study showing how vitamin D may help to reduce asthma symptoms, paving the way for the development of new therapies that work in a similar way. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • A joint study by researchers at Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley has found that exposure to dirty air is linked to decreased function of a gene that appears to increase the severity of asthma in children. (sify.com)
  • The researchers found that air pollution exposure suppressed the immune system's regulatory T cells (Treg), and that the decreased level of Treg function was linked to greater severity of asthma symptoms and lower lung capacity. (sify.com)
  • The researchers also recruited 30 children from Fresno who did not have asthma. (sify.com)
  • The researchers compared the participants from Fresno with 80 children, half with asthma and half without, in the relatively low-pollution city of Palo Alto, Calif. (sify.com)
  • To study airway nerves in asthma, researchers used OHSU's state-of-the-art confocal microscopes to generate three-dimensional imagery capturing a complete picture of airway nerves and their interactions with eosinophils. (news-medical.net)
  • The severity of Parkinson's Disease symptoms changes faster than researchers thought, so clinical trials should be designed differently. (patientslikeme.com)
  • NEW YORK, October 16, 2006 - Soot particles spewing from the exhaust of diesel trucks constitute a major contributor to the alarmingly high rates of asthma symptoms among school-aged children in the South Bronx, according to the results of a five-year study by researchers at New York University's School of Medicine and Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. (nyu.edu)
  • A six-month study of children from Baltimore City by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers has added to evidence that having more omega-3 fatty acids in the diet results in fewer asthma symptoms triggered by indoor air pollution. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Researchers at the University of Newcastle in Australia found that diet may contribute to the increasing incidence of asthma. (healthcastle.com)
  • These findings suggest that researchers measuring the impact of asthma on QoL should also consider the importance of asthma control as measured by the RAND Asthma Control Measure (RAND-ACM) and generic QoL scales that measure aspects of daily life that are uniquely affected by asthma. (rand.org)
  • Photo (c) ArtistGNDphotography - Getty Images A new study conducted by researchers from Rutgers University explored the risk that asthma sufferers face during the current COVID-19 pandemic . (consumeraffairs.com)
  • According to the researchers, asthma doesn't seem to be one of the preexisting conditions that could worsen the severity of the coronavirus. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • However, the researchers assessed what information is currently available regarding both asthma and the coronavirus to best understand what effect the virus could have on those with asthma. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • Ultimately, the researchers learned that asthma operates in much the same way as other risk factors. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • The researchers also found that quarantine orders could actually benefit those with asthma. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • In sum, whether asthma represents a comorbidity associated with susceptibility to and progression of COVID-19 remains unclear," the researchers wrote. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • The researchers found that a room temperature of about 71 degrees Fahrenheit did not trigger asthma symptoms , but breathing in super-hot air at 120 degrees F did. (everydayhealth.com)
  • The researchers who studied the effects of hot air saw asthma symptoms occur within as little as four minutes of inhaling the hot and humid air. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Researchers use the term "nocturnal asthma" to describe the phenomenon of asthma symptoms worsening at night. (kimatv.com)
  • Led by Monika Nitschke, Ph.D., of University of Adelaide, Australia, the researchers examined the relationship between nitrogen dioxide and dust mite levels and asthma symptoms in 174 asthmatic schoolchildren. (health.am)
  • Researchers report in the journal Lancet Respiratory Medicine that a new genetic test may be able to predict a child's risk of having asthma into adulthood, and therefore help doctors figure out which children might need more intensive care in childhood to potentially lower their risk of longer term symptoms. (time.com)
  • In the 40-year long study, Duke University researchers developed a genetic risk score that was based on 15 variants gleaned from previous GWAS, and looked at how these scores matched up to physical symptoms of asthma over time among 880 participants. (time.com)
  • Healthcare professionals must find the time to discuss diet with their patients, as this research suggests it could play an important role in preventing asthma," the researchers noted. (chennaionline.com)
  • The researchers examined electronic medical records of 100 pediatric asthma patients referred to National Jewish Health. (nationaljewish.org)
  • The researchers conclude in the journal Epidemiology that: 'Even low-level pollen exposure was associated with daily asthmatic symptoms [in children 4-12 years]. (ei-resource.org)
  • Diagnosis and management of work-related asthma: American College Of Chest Physicians Consensus Statement. (medscape.com)
  • Professor Mina Gaga, President of the European Respiratory Society, and Medical Director and Head of the Respiratory Department of Athens Chest Hospital, said: "This research adds to the evidence on the importance of a healthy diet in managing asthma and its possible role in helping prevent the onset of asthma in adults. (eurekalert.org)
  • It can be difficult to distinguish the symptoms of childhood asthma from other respiratory conditions, such as a head or chest cold. (healthline.com)
  • Some research indicates that asthma sufferers have low serum levels of certain antioxidants, particularly vitamin C and beta-cryptoxanthin (found in red and orange colored fruits and vegetables). (emaxhealth.com)
  • Additionally, foods high in fiber including fruits, vegetables and whole grains, can help asthma sufferers by promoting weight loss. (emaxhealth.com)
  • According to a recent study, individuals with asthma who consume relatively high amounts of cured meats, such as ham, sausage, and salami, are more likely to experience worsening symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • High levels of hormones may reduce asthma severity and improve lung. (scienceblog.com)
  • The heater replacement study has demonstrated the health benefits of reducing indoor nitrogen dioxide levels - more research is needed to determine whether reducing exposure to house dust mite will reduce asthma symptoms. (health.am)
  • Quercetin's antihistamine properties may help to reduce asthma symptoms and allergic reactions. (nutralegacy.com)
  • IL-17A helps the body fight infection, but also exacerbates asthma symptoms and can reduce the effectiveness of steroids. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Steroids are beneficial in treating asthma symptoms, both on the spot and for prolonged treatment, but they do come with a number of side effects, which can be worrisome for parents. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • These inhaled medicines are most useful for nighttime symptoms and to prevent exercise-related symptoms and are commonly used with inhaled steroids. (drugs.com)
  • Asthma- Is a condition in which a person airway become inflamed , narrow and swell, it also produce extra mucus, which make it difficult to breathe. (bartleby.com)
  • Guideline] National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. (medscape.com)
  • The study demonstrates that this recently advocated treatment is not effective and reminds us to focus on evidence-based practice in real-world settings," said family physician Kurt Elward, M.D., of Charlottesville, Va., the Academy's liaison to the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. (aafp.org)
  • A recent study, published in the journal Thorax , set out to identify whether cured meat consumption also had a negative impact on asthma . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Taking data from the French Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), 971 adult participants were used. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A new asthma pill has been proven effective in reducing symptoms, according to the latest study. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Asthma is an immune-mediated disease," said Sonali Bose, M.D., lead author of the study and assistant professor of medicine, pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and adjunct faculty at Johns Hopkins. (infowars.com)
  • While previous studies have found associations between pollution - especially motor vehicle exhaust - and an increased risk of developing asthma, few have traced its molecular pathway so completely, the study authors said. (innovations-report.com)
  • The first new asthma pill for nearly 20 years has the power to significantly reduce the severity of the condition, a study led by our University has found. (le.ac.uk)
  • In a study recently published in BMJ Open Respiratory Research , experts from Concordia University, the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal and several other institutions* analyzed the exercise habits of 643 participants who had been diagnosed with asthma. (eurekalert.org)
  • This is an entirely novel and quite exciting approach to treating asthma, unlike anything else available,' said pulmonologist Imre Noth, MD, associate professor of medicine and co-director of the study at the University of Chicago. (uchospitals.edu)
  • According to Bronx Congressman Jose Serrano, the study shows there is a relationship between childhood asthma and the transportation pattern. (news12.com)
  • The study found that the major type of air pollutant associated with the asthma symptoms is elemental carbon found in diesel exhaust. (news12.com)
  • A French study of over 60,000 women found that those who gained more than 20 pounds between puberty and adulthood had a 66% higher risk of developing asthma. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The new study piggy backs on so-called genome-wide association (GWAS) studies, which compare those affected by asthma to those who are not to isolate specific genetic markers that could be associated with the disease. (time.com)
  • What we are discovering in GWAS and doing molecular studies of asthma, is giving us new information over and above the old fashioned way we used to evaluate the genetic risk for asthma and still are in the clinic, which is to take family histories," says study author Dan Belsky, a postdoctoral Fellow at Duke University. (time.com)
  • About 40 percent of participants in the study tested positive for GERD, as determined by pH probe testing, but did not show symptoms. (aafp.org)
  • The present study extends the inverse relationship between tuberculosis rates and asthma prevalence to the 6-7-year-old age group and suggests that the association, if causal, may be stronger at this younger age. (nih.gov)
  • The research was led by Prof. Chris Brightling, from the University of Leicester in the U.K., who says the pill "could be a game changer for future treatment of asthma. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The research was funded by Novartis Pharmaceuticals, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and the EU (AirPROM), and is described by the lead researcher as "a game changer for future treatment of asthma. (le.ac.uk)
  • It is not yet there in the treatment of asthma, but I think it will be coming. (time.com)