A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).
Drugs that are used to treat asthma.
Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).
The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.
Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.
Asthma attacks caused, triggered, or exacerbated by OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE.
Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.
Tendency of the smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree to contract more intensely in response to a given stimulus than it does in the response seen in normal individuals. This condition is present in virtually all symptomatic patients with asthma. The most prominent manifestation of this smooth muscle contraction is a decrease in airway caliber that can be readily measured in the pulmonary function laboratory.
Agents that cause an increase in the expansion of a bronchus or bronchial tubes.
Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.
Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.
Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.
Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.
Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA, the mucous membrane lining the NASAL CAVITIES.
A short-acting beta-2 adrenergic agonist that is primarily used as a bronchodilator agent to treat ASTHMA. Albuterol is prepared as a racemic mixture of R(-) and S(+) stereoisomers. The stereospecific preparation of R(-) isomer of albuterol is referred to as levalbuterol.
A quaternary ammonium parasympathomimetic agent with the muscarinic actions of ACETYLCHOLINE. It is hydrolyzed by ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE at a considerably slower rate than ACETYLCHOLINE and is more resistant to hydrolysis by nonspecific CHOLINESTERASES so that its actions are more prolonged. It is used as a parasympathomimetic bronchoconstrictor agent and as a diagnostic aid for bronchial asthma. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1116)
Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose similar to that found in hay fever except that symptoms persist throughout the year. The causes are usually air-borne allergens, particularly dusts, feathers, molds, animal fur, etc.
Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.
A glucocorticoid used in the management of ASTHMA, the treatment of various skin disorders, and allergic RHINITIS.
Granular leukocytes with a nucleus that usually has two lobes connected by a slender thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round granules that are uniform in size and stainable by eosin.
An anti-inflammatory, synthetic glucocorticoid. It is used topically as an anti-inflammatory agent and in aerosol form for the treatment of ASTHMA.
The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
A class of drugs designed to prevent leukotriene synthesis or activity by blocking binding at the receptor level.
Devices that cause a liquid or solid to be converted into an aerosol (spray) or a vapor. It is used in drug administration by inhalation, humidification of ambient air, and in certain analytical instruments.
Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
A sudden intense and continuous aggravation of a state of asthma, marked by dyspnea to the point of exhaustion and collapse and not responding to the usual therapeutic efforts.
Agents causing the narrowing of the lumen of a bronchus or bronchiole.
The structural changes in the number, mass, size and/or composition of the airway tissues.
Narrowing of the caliber of the BRONCHI, physiologically or as a result of pharmacological intervention.
Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Drugs that selectively bind to and activate beta-adrenergic receptors.
A form of hypersensitivity affecting the respiratory tract. It includes ASTHMA and RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.
An albumin obtained from the white of eggs. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.
Family of house dust mites, in the superfamily Analgoidea, order Astigmata. They include the genera Dermatophagoides and Euroglyphus.
A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. It is especially concerned with diagnosis and treatment of diseases and defects of the lungs and bronchial tree.
The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.
Asthmatic adverse reaction (e.g., BRONCHOCONSTRICTION) to conventional NSAIDS including aspirin use.
Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.
Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.
A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.
The act of BREATHING out.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.
A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.
The contamination of indoor air.
Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
Abnormal increase of EOSINOPHILS in the blood, tissues or organs.
Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.
Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.
Any tests done on exhaled air.
A pyranoquinolone derivative that inhibits activation of inflammatory cells which are associated with ASTHMA, including eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, monocytes, and platelets.
Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.
Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.
Derivatives of the steroid androstane having two double bonds at any site in any of the rings.
A small aerosol canister used to release a calibrated amount of medication for inhalation.
A cytokine synthesized by T-LYMPHOCYTES that produces proliferation, immunoglobulin isotype switching, and immunoglobulin production by immature B-LYMPHOCYTES. It appears to play a role in regulating inflammatory and immune responses.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.
A chromone complex that acts by inhibiting the release of chemical mediators from sensitized mast cells. It is used in the prophylactic treatment of both allergic and exercise-induced asthma, but does not affect an established asthmatic attack.
Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.
Nitrogen oxide (NO2). A highly poisonous gas. Exposure produces inflammation of lungs that may only cause slight pain or pass unnoticed, but resulting edema several days later may cause death. (From Merck, 11th ed) It is a major atmospheric pollutant that is able to absorb UV light that does not reach the earth's surface.
The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.
AMINO ALCOHOLS containing the ETHANOLAMINE; (-NH2CH2CHOH) group and its derivatives.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
Virus diseases caused by the PICORNAVIRIDAE.
Insects of the order Dictyoptera comprising several families including Blaberidae, BLATTELLIDAE, Blattidae (containing the American cockroach PERIPLANETA americana), Cryptocercidae, and Polyphagidae.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
Skin irritant and allergen used in the manufacture of polyurethane foams and other elastomers.
A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.
An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)
Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.
Compounds bind to and activate ADRENERGIC BETA-2 RECEPTORS.
Unsaturated pregnane derivatives containing two keto groups on side chains or ring structures.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
One of several basic proteins released from EOSINOPHIL cytoplasmic granules. Eosinophil cationic protein is a 21-kDa cytotoxic peptide with a pI of 10.9. Although eosinophil cationic protein is considered a member of the RNAse A superfamily of proteins, it has only limited RNAse activity.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Agents that are used to treat allergic reactions. Most of these drugs act by preventing the release of inflammatory mediators or inhibiting the actions of released mediators on their target cells. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p475)
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
A cytokine that promotes differentiation and activation of EOSINOPHILS. It also triggers activated B-LYMPHOCYTES to differentiate into IMMUNOGLOBULIN-secreting cells.
A condition characterized by infiltration of the lung with EOSINOPHILS due to inflammation or other disease processes. Major eosinophilic lung diseases are the eosinophilic pneumonias caused by infections, allergens, or toxic agents.
The mucous membrane lining the RESPIRATORY TRACT, including the NASAL CAVITY; the LARYNX; the TRACHEA; and the BRONCHI tree. The respiratory mucosa consists of various types of epithelial cells ranging from ciliated columnar to simple squamous, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.
The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
A genus of PICORNAVIRIDAE inhabiting primarily the respiratory tract of mammalian hosts. It includes over 100 human serotypes associated with the COMMON COLD.
The viscous secretion of mucous membranes. It contains mucin, white blood cells, water, inorganic salts, and exfoliated cells.
Living facilities for humans.
A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
The unstable triatomic form of oxygen, O3. It is a powerful oxidant that is produced for various chemical and industrial uses. Its production is also catalyzed in the ATMOSPHERE by ULTRAVIOLET RAY irradiation of oxygen or other ozone precursors such as VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS and NITROGEN OXIDES. About 90% of the ozone in the atmosphere exists in the stratosphere (STRATOSPHERIC OZONE).
An adrenergic beta-2 agonist that is used as a bronchodilator and tocolytic.
Spasmodic contraction of the smooth muscle of the bronchi.
Organic compounds that contain the -NCO radical.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
Antigens from the house dust mites (DERMATOPHAGOIDES), mainly D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus. They are proteins, found in mite feces or mite extracts, that can cause ASTHMA and other allergic diseases such as perennial rhinitis (RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, PERENNIAL) and atopic dermatitis (DERMATITIS, ATOPIC). More than 11 groups of Dermatophagoides ALLERGENS have been defined. Group I allergens, such as Der f I and Der p I from the above two species, are among the strongest mite immunogens in humans.
A selective beta-2 adrenergic agonist used as a bronchodilator and tocolytic.
Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in one or more of the PARANASAL SINUSES.
Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.
Gases, fumes, vapors, and odors escaping from the cylinders of a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
The status of health in urban populations.
A muscarinic antagonist structurally related to ATROPINE but often considered safer and more effective for inhalation use. It is used for various bronchial disorders, in rhinitis, and as an antiarrhythmic.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.
Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.
Conjunctivitis due to hypersensitivity to various allergens.
The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.
Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.
The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.
Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.
The rate of airflow measured during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A broad approach to appropriate coordination of the entire disease treatment process that often involves shifting away from more expensive inpatient and acute care to areas such as preventive medicine, patient counseling and education, and outpatient care. This concept includes implications of appropriate versus inappropriate therapy on the overall cost and clinical outcome of a particular disease. (From Hosp Pharm 1995 Jul;30(7):596)
Immunosuppression by the administration of increasing doses of antigen. Though the exact mechanism is not clear, the therapy results in an increase in serum levels of allergen-specific IMMUNOGLOBULIN G, suppression of specific IgE, and an increase in suppressor T-cell activity.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
A biologically active principle of SRS-A that is formed from LEUKOTRIENE D4 via a peptidase reaction that removes the glycine residue. The biological actions of LTE4 are similar to LTC4 and LTD4. (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)
A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)
Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.
Chronic absence from work or other duty.
Difficult or labored breathing.
A family of biologically active compounds derived from arachidonic acid by oxidative metabolism through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. They participate in host defense reactions and pathophysiological conditions such as immediate hypersensitivity and inflammation. They have potent actions on many essential organs and systems, including the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and central nervous system as well as the gastrointestinal tract and the immune system.
Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.
A glandular epithelial cell or a unicellular gland. Goblet cells secrete MUCUS. They are scattered in the epithelial linings of many organs, especially the SMALL INTESTINE and the RESPIRATORY TRACT.
A variety of devices used in conjunction with METERED DOSE INHALERS. Their purpose is to hold the released medication for inhalation and make it easy for the patients to inhale the metered dose of medication into their lungs.
The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
A soluble factor produced by activated T-LYMPHOCYTES that induces the expression of MHC CLASS II GENES and FC RECEPTORS on B-LYMPHOCYTES and causes their proliferation and differentiation. It also acts on T-lymphocytes, MAST CELLS, and several other hematopoietic lineage cells.
Voluntary cooperation of the patient in taking drugs or medicine as prescribed. This includes timing, dosage, and frequency.
A CC-type chemokine that is specific for CCR3 RECEPTORS. It is a potent chemoattractant for EOSINOPHILS.
The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.
Focal accumulations of EDEMA fluid in the NASAL MUCOSA accompanied by HYPERPLASIA of the associated submucosal connective tissue. Polyps may be NEOPLASMS, foci of INFLAMMATION, degenerative lesions, or malformations.
Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)

Direct costs of occupational asthma due to sensitization in Quebec (1988 to 2002): revisited. (1/37)

BACKGROUND: In a previous study, the authors assessed direct costs for occupational asthma (OA) in a random sample of eight to 10 accepted claims per year for OA between 1988 and 2002. Compensation for loss of income (CLI) was found to be significantly higher for men and for OA caused by low-molecular-weight agents. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: To identify sociodemographic factors that modulate CLI, the dossier of each claimant in the previous study was re-examined. RESULTS: Higher CLI costs were directly related to the duration of CLI (over which loss of income was reimbursed) (r=0.65). Costs of CLI were higher in patients 30 years of age or older at diagnosis, married subjects and individuals who were offered early retirement or were enrolled in an active interventional rehabilitation program. Higher CLI costs in men, but not in women, were associated with the following sociodemographic factors: older age, different rehabilitation program (early retirement and active program versus no specific program) and married status. Older age was found to be significant in the multivariate analysis performed for men. The cost of CLI was higher in workers with OA caused by low-molecular-weight agents. Although proportionally fewer men and younger workers were affected with OA caused by low-molecular-weight agents, the longer duration of CLI for this category of agent could explain the higher costs. CONCLUSION: Higher costs for CLI were associated in men (but not women) with older age, married status and type of rehabilitation program (early retirement and active rehabilitation). Higher costs of CLI for OA caused by low-molecular-weight agents were associated with a longer duration of CLI per se, and not with sociodemographic factors.  (+info)

Barriers to the recognition and reporting of occupational asthma by Canadian pulmonologists. (2/37)

BACKGROUND: Occupational asthma is a common, but probably under-recognized problem. OBJECTIVE: To identify the factors that suggest work-related asthma when a pulmonologist encounters an adult patient with new-onset asthma, and to identify the barriers to recognizing and reporting such cases. METHODS: A postal questionnaire was sent to all pulmonologists in Canada. The questionnaire asked participants to respond to several questions about recognizing, diagnosing and reporting occupational asthma. Answers were scored using visual analogue scales. RESULTS: A total of 201 eligible responses were received from 458 pulmonologists. Pulmonologists identified that the most important factor in initially considering the role of work in occupational asthma was having seen others affected at the same workplace, or exposed to the same agent. Important perceived barriers to considering a diagnosis of occupational asthma were physicians' low awareness, lack of knowledge and time. The most important barriers to reporting cases were the pulmonologists' perceived patient concerns regarding job security and income. Quebec pulmonologists generally perceived barriers to recognizing and reporting occupational asthma to be less important, and believed that the use of specific inhalation challenge was more important in considering a diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonologists most readily recognized occupational asthma caused by a substance or process that they previously encountered as a possible cause of asthma. Time constraints and knowledge may hamper their ability to recognize occupational asthma. Concerns regarding the effect of the diagnosis on the patient's job and income may discourage reporting.  (+info)

Work-related respiratory symptoms and lung function among solderers in the electronics industry: a meta-analysis. (3/37)

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Environmental isocyanate-induced asthma: morphologic and pathogenetic aspects of an increasing occupational disease. (4/37)

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Sensitization and irritant-induced occupational asthma with latency are clinically indistinguishable. (5/37)

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Guidelines for the management of work-related asthma. (6/37)

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Assessment of public health impact of work-related asthma. (7/37)

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Is specific IgE antibody analysis feasible for the diagnosis of methylenediphenyl diisocyanate-induced occupational asthma? (8/37)

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Surveillance data from four states on work-related asthma are now available online from the Work-Related Lung Disease Surveillance System (eWoRLD), developed and maintained by CDCs National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Work-related asthma data presented through this surveillance system include information on associated industry, occupation, and exposures. Tables using data from California, Massachusetts, Michigan, and New Jersey for the period 1993-2006 now are available online from eWoRLD at http://www2a.cdc.gov/drds/worldreportdata/subsectiondetails.asp?archiveid=1&subsectiontitleid=23. More years of state-based work-related asthma data will be posted online as they become available. Additional information about the state-based work-related asthma program is available at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/surveillance/ords/statebasedsurveillance.html. ...
Abstract: Nearly 9 million workers are exposed to chemical agents associated with occupational asthma, with isocyanates representing the chemical class most responsible. Isocyanate-induced asthma has been difficult to diagnose and control, in part because the biologic mechanisms responsible for the disease and the determinants of exposure have not been well defined. Isocyanate-induced asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, and we hypothesized that inflammation is a prerequisite of isocyanate-induced asthma, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α being critical to this process. To explore this hypothesis, wildtype mice, athymic mice, TNF-α receptor knockout (TNFR), and anti-TNF-α antibody-treated mice were sensitized by subcutaneous injection (20µ .l on Day 1; 5µl, Days 4 and 11), and challenged 7 d later by inhalation (100 ppb; Days 20, 22, and 24) with toluene diisocyanate (TDI). Airway inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia, epithelial cell damage, and nonspecific airtent way ...
Background: The links between asthma and rhinitis are nowadays referred to as the united airways disease (UAD). Current evidence shows that the UAD model seems to be applicable to occupational rhinitis (OR) and occupational asthma (OA). Objective: We aimed to objectively assess, in the context of specific inhalation challenge (SIC) testing, the concomitance of bronchial and nasal reaction in the investigation of OR and OA Methods: Forty-three subjects with a history of work-related asthma symptoms underwent SIC for confirmation of OA and investigation of OR. Subjects underwent assessment of changes in bronchial calibre by spirometry and assessment of nasal patency and airway inflammation by acoustic rhinometry and nasal lavage. Results: A positive nasal challenge was observed in 25 SIC whereas a positive bronchial challenge was observed in 17 SIC. A concomitant positive nasal and bronchial challenge was observed in 13 instances. This association was significant (risk ratio= 1.7; 95% CI=1.0 to ...
Sensitizer-induced occupational asthma immunologic form of asthma which occurs due to inhalation of specific substances (i.e., high-molecular-weight proteins from plants and animal origins, or low-molecular-weight agents that include chemicals, metals and wood dusts) and occurs after a latency period of several weeks to years.[1]. Irritant-induced (occupational) asthma is a non-immunologic form of asthma that results from a single or multiple high dose exposure to irritant products. It is usually develops early after exposure; however can also develop insidiously over a few months after a massive exposure to a complex mixture of alkaline dust and combustion products, as shown in the World Trade Center disaster. Unlike those with sensitizer-induced occupational asthma, subjects with irritant-induced occupational asthma do not develop work-related asthma symptoms after re-exposure to low concentrations of the irritant that initiated the symptoms.[2] Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) is ...
According to the California Work-Related Asthma Prevention Program, part of the Occupational Health Branch of California Department of Public Health, cleaning products used in workplaces can cause or trigger work-related asthma. To prevent harsh affects of cleaning products, employers should make sure the safest products and practices are used in the workplace. The program has found that nearly 10 percent of all work-related asthma cases were caused by exposure to cleaning products. Most of these cases had new asthma that started only after they began work - the exposures caused their asthma. About one in five people (almost 20 percent) used cleaning products directly, such as janitors. The other 80 percent of workers attributed their asthma symptoms to cleaning products used nearby. Many workplaces, like schools, hospitals, and restaurants are places where everyone, including children, can be affected by cleaning products. How can asthma from cleaning products be prevented? ...
Abstract/Full Text -- Ding. Pneumococcal Vaccine for Only Half With Work-Related Asthma. WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with work-related asthma are more likely that those with non-work-related asthma to have received pneumococcal vaccination, although only 53.7 percent with work-related asthma have been vaccinated, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.. Abstract/Full Text. Working With a Scribe Improves Physician Satisfaction. WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Working with a scribe significantly improves physicians overall satisfaction, satisfaction with chart quality and accuracy, and charting efficiency, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in the Annals of Family Medicine.. Abstract/Full Text. Chronic Respiratory Disease Mortality Up From 1980 to 2014. TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- From 1980 to 2014 there was a considerable increase in mortality from chronic respiratory ...
In the second part of this respiratory health special report, Bernard Garbe looks at how serial peak expiratory flow can be used to identify occupational asthma.. The first part of the report explores the 2010 BOHRF Occupational Asthma Guidance on sensitiser-induced occupational asthma.. In occupational health, lung disease is the most common form of disease encountered after skin problems. Occupational lung diseases include byssinosis (typically cotton dust), allergic rhinitis, farmers lung, asbestosis, pneumoconiosis (most commonly coal dust), silicosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While COPD has the greatest mortality rate, occupational asthma (OA) has by far the greater incidence. OA, by definition, is a lung disease caused by occupational exposures and is the cause of about 15% of adult-onset asthma. Occupational asthma often results in skilled and experienced people having to end their careers, in many cases without a confirmed diagnosis. In nearly half the diagnosed ...
Description of disease Occupational asthma. Treatment Occupational asthma. Symptoms and causes Occupational asthma Prophylaxis Occupational asthma
Walsh SL, Wells AU, Desai SR, Poletti V, Piciucchi S, Dubini A, Nunes H, Valeyre D, Brillet PY, Kambouchner M, Morais A, Pereira JM, Moura CS, Grutters JC, van den Heuvel DA, van Es HW, van Oosterhout MF, Seldenrijk CA, Bendstrup E, Rasmussen F, Madsen LB, Gooptu B, Pomplun S, Taniguchi H, Fukuoka J, Johkoh T, Nicholson AG, Sayer C, Edmunds L, Jacob J, Kokosi MA, Myers JL, Flaherty KR, Hansell DM, Multicentre evaluation of multidisciplinary team meeting agreement on diagnosis in diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a case-cohort study., Lancet respiratory, 2016;:557-565,10.1016/S2213-2600(16)30033-9 ...
Background Periodic health surveillance (HS) of workers can identify early cases of occupational asthma. Information about its uptake and its content in the UK is lacking. Aims To identify the overall levels of uptake and quality of HS for occupational asthma within three high risk industry sectors in the UK. Methods A telephone survey of employers, and their occupational health (OH) professionals, carried out in three sectors with exposures potentially capable of causing occupational asthma (bakeries, wood working and motor vehicle repair). Results A total of 457 organizations participated (31% response rate). About 77% employed ,10 people, 17% between 10 and 50 and 6% ,50. Risk assessments were common (67%) and 14% carried out some form of HS for occupational asthma, rising to 19% if only organizations reporting asthma hazards and risks were considered. HS was carried out both by in-house (31%) and external providers (69%). Organizational policies were often used to define HS approaches (80%), ...
Symptoms of Occupational asthma - Bakers including 4 medical symptoms and signs of Occupational asthma - Bakers, alternative diagnoses, misdiagnosis, and correct diagnosis for Occupational asthma - Bakers signs or Occupational asthma - Bakers symptoms.
OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence of occupational asthma in the seven aluminum smelters of Australia and New Zealand from 1991 to 2006.. METHODS: Incidence and exposure data were collected by survey from the smelters prospectively during the study period.. RESULTS: The incidence of occupational asthma across all smelters combined was highest in 1992 at 9.46/1,000/year, declining to 0.36/1,000/year in 2006; a 96.2% reduction. The incidence of occupational asthma was correlated with geometric mean total fluoride concentration, measured as personal samples from employees undertaking anode changing (r(s) = 0.497, P , 0.001).. CONCLUSIONS: The control of exposures, respiratory protection and pre-placement medical assessments undertaken during the study period seem to have contributed to the substantial decline in occupational asthma incidence.. ...
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GPs need to be better at recognising occupational asthma after figures show many people who develop work-related asthma are not correctly diagnosed.
Vandenplas O, Suojalehto H, Aasen T, Baur X, Burge PS, de Blay F, Fishwick D, Hoyle J, Maestrelli P, Muñoz X, Moscato G, Sastre J, Sigsgaard T, Suuronen K, Walusiak-Skorupa J, Cullinan P, the ERS Task Force on Specific Inhalation Challenges with Occupational Agents, Specific inhalation challenge in the diagnosis of occupational asthma: consensus statement, Eur Respir J, 2014;43:1573-1587 ...
Occupational asthma (OA) is steadily emerging as the principal cause of respiratory disease due to the workplace environment. One of the key means to ascertain diagnosis of OA is specific inhalation challenge (SIC) with occupational agents. This review: 1) describes the methodology of SIC, with a special emphasis on procedures aimed at increasing the safety and validity of these tests; and 2) outlines the roles of SIC in the diagnosis of OA in clinical and medicolegal assessment, epidemiological studies, surveillance programmes and the investigation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma and OA. We discuss areas of future development, including the development of apparatus which allows exposure of subjects to low and stable concentrations of the occupational agent and the assessment of preventive procedures.. ...
Work-related asthma includes work aggravation of preexisting asthma and new-onset asthma induced by occupational exposure.. To identify cases of asthma related to the occupational exposure, assess the severity and control of asthma at work and appreciate the consequences on employment, we conducted a cross-sectional study involving all active asthmatic patients who had consulted the pulmonology department of the University Hospital of Sfax in Tunisia for a period of four months.. We collected the records of 104 patients. The group of elementary occupations was 69.2%. Workers in the textile and food industry represented 16.3% and 15.4% respectively. Symptoms appear in the first ten years of occupational exposure in 39.4% of cases. The asthma was 31.7% partially controlled and uncontrolled in 7.7% of cases. The professional investigation had concluded that the occupational origin of asthma represented 44.2% of patients and the worsening by the professional environment 28.8% of cases. The ...
Another name for Occupational Asthma is Asthma. A nebulizer is a small plastic bowl with a lid and a mouthpiece. The bowl is connected to a tube that ...
Occupational Asthma - Boiler Cleaners information including symptoms, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, treatment, causes, patient stories, videos, forums, prevention, and prognosis.
Occupational asthma is a lung disorder in which substances found in the workplace cause the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. This leads to attacks of wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing.
If you have suffered an industrial injury such as occupational asthma - we can help.. Here is a guide to the standard compensation amounts: ...
I agree with both Trisha and Alex, and that is not to undermine Barbaras condition or concerns. Im sure there are people that are adversly affected by many aspects of their jobs. Some are truly legitimate and SHOULD be addressed by the employer. however I think there may be some individuals who would jump on the band wagon and persue it for all its worth--(is this a can of worms?) hope no one is offended, just MY opinion. jerry P. Emry wrote: , Dear ? , , I would like more information on the condition you discribe. I would also , like to know who you are and who you are doing the research for. , , I think that such information could be a dangerous thing in some hands. I , dont have a back-up profession and a note in my employment folder could , block future employment if/when we run out of grant money here, or when , the boss retires. , , I would like to know if others feel this way about medical information and , the workplace. , , Trisha , Seattle , , On Fri, 16 Oct 1998 [email protected] ...
Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment of Environmental Pulmonary Diseases from the Professional Version of the Merck Manuals.
It may be that your chest problems have arisen many years after your exposure at work. However, this time lapse does not necessarily prevent you from bringing a claim for compensation. If you have recently been diagnosed with one of the above conditions then you may have a claim ...
equivalent of 134 people every week - according to new figures from the TUC. The statistics, published in the union bodys Risk online bulletin, come ...
Mounting evidence suggests that diisocyanates are able to bind airway epithelial cell proteins, resulting in airway inflammation with cytokine and chemokine production and cellular recruitment [29]. The toxicity of diisocyanates toward airway epithelial tissues has also been reported, and MDI and HDI prepolymers were shown to induce airway epithelial barrier dysfunction that was partly associated with altered glutamine levels [30, 31]. The effect of TDI on the expression of lung cytokine P450 enzymes has also been documented [32]. We attempted to culture human bronchial epithelial cells, Beas-2B, with TDI-HSA conjugates to identify the source of the IL-8 detected in the sputum of TDI-induced asthma patients [33]. The production of IL-8 and regulated upon activation in normal T cell expressed, and secreted (RANTES) was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner after exposure to a peripheral mononuclear cell culture supernatant derived from a TDI-induced asthma patient, and this effect ...
Immediate hypersensitivity reactions ranging from mild urticaria to life threatening anaphylaxis after exposure to natural rubber latex have been reported frequently in health care workers while occupational asthma due to latex exposure is less well studied. The results of specific challenge tests and immunological tests in four health care workers with work related respiratory and skin disorders induced by the use of latex gloves are described. Occupational asthma was confirmed in three subjects by specific challenge tests. All had a positive skin test reaction to the latex extract; specific IgE antibodies were detected in only one subject. The fourth subject had a negative specific inhalation and skin test reaction to the latex extract. Peak expiratory flow monitoring at work and away from work showed a pattern consistent with work related asthma. These findings confirm that latex is a cause of occupational asthma in health care workers.. ...
Asthma is a potentially serious disease that is growing in prevalence in most developed countries.1 One of the factors that might have prompted this trend is the greater number of cases of asthma that develop in adults.2 In addition to a possible allergic origin, as occurs in childhood asthma, epidemiological studies indicate that occupational exposure may be the cause of up to 25% of all cases of adult-onset asthma.3 Asthma caused by exposure to a specific substance in the workplace is known as occupational asthma (OA), while pre-existing or concomitant asthma which is intensified by stimuli present in the workplace is known as work-exacerbated asthma (WEA). OA can be further subclassified as immunological and non-immunological, depending on the mechanisms causing the disease.2 Immunological OA requires time for sensitization to the causative agent to develop, while non-immunological OA refers to patients whose asthma is caused by irritants, the most obvious example of which is reactive airway ...
Patients with coexisting work-related rhinitis and asthma would benefit from an adequate and simultaneous recognition of both diseases. The present case illustrates the advantages and importance of using an integrated approach to confirm a diagnosis of occupational rhinitis (OR) and occupational asthma (OA).A 38-year-old woman, who worked as an animal laboratory technician since 2004, first noticed the appearance of rhinitis and conjunctivitis symptoms in 2007 when she was exposed to rats. A skin-prick test with rat extract was strongly positive. A specific inhalation challenge with parallel assessment of nasal and bronchial responses was conducted. After 10 min of exposure, she developed rhinitis and conjunctivitis symptoms, her forced expiratory volume in 1 s dropped by 27.5% and her nasal volume, measured by acoustic rhinometry, decreased by 80% from baseline values. After allergen exposure, induced sputum and nasal lavage examination demonstrated an increase in eosinophils (11% and 20%, respectively
The article discusses occupational asthma as the most common occupational lung disease in western countries. The disease is found to a contribution on the exposure to silica, asbestos, and coal dust. Its association on the kind of occupation that a person has, makes the diagnosis of the disease to be unsuccessful. In order for the diagnosis to be successful, clinicians have to get involved with the primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of occupational asthma ...
15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 2 2. 23. 24. 25. 2009. pdf. Accessed April 13, 2010. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trends in Asthma Morbidity and Mortality. National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey Raw Data, 1997-2006. Analysis performed by American Lung Association Research and Program Services using SPSS and SUDAAN software. PDF. Accessed April 1, 2009. Cohn RD, Arbes SJ Jr, Jaramillo R, Reid LH, Zeldin DC. S. households. Environ Health Perspect. 2006;114(4):522-6. In one study researchers identified that 85% of infants hospitalized for wheezing did seem to outgrow their symptoms by adolescence. , they no longer have exacerbations) they continue to have changes in their airway structure and abnormal pulmonary function testing when measured in adulthood. 10 Can You Outgrow Asthma? indd 18 6/14/10 8:31:58 AM Defining Asthma 19 Work-Related/Occupational Asthma Work-related asthma (WRA) is defined as an asthmatic airway response to dust, vapors, gases, or ...
About the Author Home Remedies For Asthma - Easy And Simple 0 Any person who believes he secretions can not drain and strengthens his injury to full relocation. My mom says Im obese because my asthma medicine cells, chick embryo, and ingredients similar to antifreeze, among other things. Asthma symptoms can be brought on by dozens of different things, and into the esophagus and back down into the lungs causing irritation. Ive read that the more asthma attacks you , has also proven successful in preventing asthmatic attacks in some persons.. People with breathing problems that can breath steamy air often report up within the middle of the night with terribly strong n sharp. Van Helmont, the famous physician who suffered from asthma was the is you can apply for asthma grants especially if you are suffering from chronic asthma problem. With good performance patients on doctors advice can reduce is significantly abnormal chart and i definately have asthma. These exercises are not only a ...
BACKGROUND:. Respiratory diseases are strongly related with exposure in the workplace. A considerable proportion of adult onset asthma is associated with these exposures. The importance of occupational risk factors for asthma has been underestimated, particularly among women. The occupational asthma study (ECRHS-OA) forms part of a wider international multicentre survey on respiratory health (European Community Respiratory Health Survey-ECRHS). The first phase of the ECRHS was conducted in 1991/92 and examined risk factors for asthma and atopy in subjects aged 20-44 years. The study updated (ECRHS-II), following-up approximately 17,000 young adults from 12 countries (Australia, Belgium, France, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK and USA).. The study provided valid and precise estimates on the importance of specific occupations, industries and exposures in relation to asthma incidence and prevalence, similar estimates for other respiratory symptoms and diseases and ...
To investigate the incidence of occupational asthma and its relationship to new cases of persistent asthma, the data was collected from two national registers which cover practically all new cases of both diseases. In 1986 to 1993, the annual incidence of persistent asthma in adults from 15 to 64 years increased from 6,645 to 8,056 21%. The...
How to deal with an asthma attack at work - description and flow diagram Occupational asthma guidance - G?? (HSE guidance) Occupational asthma standard of care - PDF (link) CWH respiratory questionnaire?? Case study - video of Jane (beauty) ...
Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment of Environmental Lung Diseases from the Home Version of the Merck Manuals.
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Many people with asthma have symptoms from triggers at work. This is called occupational asthma. Read on to find out how to get help with this problem.
With the reduction in the disease burden from the pneumoconioses in recent years, especially in developed countries, occupational asthma has emerged as the occupational lung disease of greatest importance. It is usually the most common respiratory condition reported in occupational disease surveillance programmes and makes a substantial contribution to the burden of asthma in the community, with an estimated population attributable risk of 15% and estimated annual cost to the USA of $US1.6 billion.1 Therefore, the introduction of prevention strategies to reduce the impact of occupational asthma, should be strongly supported.. The editorial by Snashall in this issue2 describes the latest proposal by the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) to reduce the incidence of occupational asthma in the United Kingdom.3 This article acknowledges the limited success of past HSC prevention programmes. The proposed Strategy has five components corresponding to the key programmes in Securing health together, the ...
Occupational asthma is an occupational lung disease and a type of asthma. Like other types of asthma, it is characterized by airway inflammation, reversible airways obstruction, and bronchospasm, but it is caused by something in the workplace environment. Symptoms include shortness of breath, tightness of the chest, nasal irritation, coughing and wheezing. The first person to use it in reference to a medical condition was Hippocrates, and he believed that tailors, anglers and metalworkers were more likely to be affected by the disease. Although much research has been done since, the inflammatory component of asthma was recognized only in the 1960s. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a related condition, with many occupational examples (e.g. flock workers lung, farmers lung, and indium lung). However, although overlapping in many cases, hypersensitivity pneumonitis may be distinguished from occupational asthma in that it isnt restricted to only occupational exposure, and involves type III ...
Sensitization: plastics (TDI and MDI), car paints (HDI and IPDI), polyurethanes (TDI), casting/melts and glues (MDI). Exposure; purely via the airways, may induce cutaneous sensitisation even in the absence of any contact with the skin. Isocyanate induced asthma (particularly TDI) is characterized by lymphocyte activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. After exposure has ceased, a remodelling of the airways persists. The realisation of the problems associated with TDI, MDI and HDI, etc has led the industries to use oligomers with high molecular weights (BIC) with the aims of reducing the risks of sensitization. The norms for tolerable levels of these monomers are not sufficient to prevent work-related asthma. No norms have been fixed for polyisocyanates or polymer precursors. The response to TDI is regulated by the MHC class II loci DQA1 and DQB1. Fire retardants contain polyurethanes. A Swedish study performed in 2001 demonstrated that above 300°C these polyurethanes degrade ...
Sensitization: plastics (TDI and MDI), car paints (HDI and IPDI), polyurethanes (TDI), casting/melts and glues (MDI). Exposure; purely via the airways, may induce cutaneous sensitisation even in the absence of any contact with the skin. Isocyanate induced asthma (particularly TDI) is characterized by lymphocyte activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. After exposure has ceased, a remodelling of the airways persists. The realisation of the problems associated with TDI, MDI and HDI, etc has led the industries to use oligomers with high molecular weights (BIC) with the aims of reducing the risks of sensitization. The norms for tolerable levels of these monomers are not sufficient to prevent work-related asthma. No norms have been fixed for polyisocyanates or polymer precursors. The response to TDI is regulated by the MHC class II loci DQA1 and DQB1. Fire retardants contain polyurethanes. A Swedish study performed in 2001 demonstrated that above 300°C these polyurethanes degrade ...
Minister for Health. 10 April 2013. Minister for Health Tanya Plibersek today announced $7.9 million for 11 Partnerships for Better Health - Partnership Projects including research into medication regimes for kidney transplants, chlamydia testing, work-related asthma and cancer, suicide prevention, and mental health disorders in rural children.. Ms Plibersek made the announcement today at the University of Adelaide where she met with grant recipient Professor John Lynch who will receive $273,131 for a whole-of-population study into child health and development.. This study is supported by the Australian Government and project partners from the Womens and Childrens Health Network and the South Australian Department for Education and Child Development.. The Australian Government is focussed on improved patient care, better disease prevention and more cost-effective delivery of services, Ms Plibersek said.. Jointly funded through the National Health and Medical Research Council and partners, ...
Occupational asthma caused by chloramines in indoor swimming-pool air K.M. Thickett1, J.S. McCoach1, J.M. Gerber4, S. Sadhra3 and P.S. Burge1 1 Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Occupational Lung Diseases Unit, Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, UK. 4 Institut National de Recherche et de Securite, Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex, France. 3 Institute of Occupational Health, University of Birmingham, Birmingham,…
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... causing occupational asthma". Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 58 (5): 354-360, 290. doi:10.1136/oem.58.5.354. PMC ... Factory workers who work with amylase for any of the above uses are at increased risk of occupational asthma. Five to nine ... "Alpha amylase is a major allergenic component in occupational asthma patients caused by porcine pancreatic extract". The ... Bakers with long exposure to amylase-enriched flour are at risk of developing dermatitis[7] or asthma.[8] ...
"Relationship between cigarette smoking and occupational exposures". Asthma and COPD: Basic Mechanisms and Clinical Management ... Many people with COPD mistakenly think they have asthma.[36] The distinction between asthma and COPD is made on the basis of ... Asthma (Status asthmaticus. Aspirin-induced. Exercise-induced. Bronchiectasis. Cystic fibrosis. unspecified. Bronchitis. ... An outcomes strategy for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma in England (PDF). Department of ...
2009). "Relationship between cigarette smoking and occupational exposures". Asthma and COPD: Basic Mechanisms and Clinical ... Many people with COPD mistakenly think they have asthma. The distinction between asthma and COPD is made on the basis of the ... In contrast to asthma, the airflow reduction does not improve much with the use of a bronchodilator. Most cases of COPD can be ... Barnes, Peter (2009). Asthma and COPD : basic mechanisms and clinical management (2nd ed.). Academic. p. 837. ISBN 978-0-12- ...
Artikel utama untuk bagian ini adalah: Occupational asthma. Asma sebagai akibat dari (atau yang diperburuk oleh) pajanan tempat ... Third Expert Panel on the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma (2007). Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. ... a b Shah, R; Saltoun, CA (2012 May-Jun). "Chapter 14: Acute severe asthma (status asthmaticus).". Allergy and asthma ... "Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention" (PDF). Global Initiative for Asthma. 2011. ...
... occupational acne; tracheitis; esophagitis; bronchitis; asthma; allergy; hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP); and worsening of ... Occupational exposure is associated with increases in cardiovascular disease. These mechanisms are based on the external (skin ... "Occupational health and safety - chemical exposure". www.sbu.se. Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment ... Salt Lake City: U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. "General Soluble Cutting Oil - Water ...
Asthma (Status asthmaticus. Aspirin-induced. Exercise-induced. Bronchiectasis. unspecified. Bronchitis. Bronchiolitis ... occupational. lung disease. Pneumoconiosis Aluminosis. Asbestosis. Baritosis. Bauxite fibrosis. Berylliosis. Caplan's syndrome ... Occupational. Caused by work. Inflammatory disease of the nose causing intermittent and persistent symptoms arising out of ... profuse rhinorrhea, red eyes, periorbital edema, asthma attacks Hormonal. Pregnancy. Nasal congestion present during pregnancy ...
Bardy, J-D.; Malo, J-L.; Seguin, P.; Ghezzo, H.; Desjardins, J.; Dolovich, J.; Cartier, A. (1987). "Occupational Asthma and IgE ... Alemán AM, Quirce S, Bombín C, Sastre J (2001). "[Asthma related to inhalation of Plantago ovata]". Med Clin (Barc) (in Spanish ... Dec 2003). "Psyllium-associated anaphylaxis and death: a case report and review of the literature". Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ... manufacturing employees who have been exposed to psyllium during the processing have developed occupational asthma and IgE ...
Development of occupational asthma is often preceded by occupational rhinitis. Among the causative agents are flours, enzymes ... Accordingly, prognosis of occupational asthma is contingent on early diagnosis and the adoption of protective measures for ... Scherer Hofmeier K, Bircher A, Tamm M, Miedinger D (April 2012). "[Occupational rhinitis and asthma]". Therapeutische Umschau. ... It is an umbrella term of rhinitis of multiple causes, such as occupational (chemical), smoking, gustatory, hormonal, senile ( ...
... use is a main source of occupational asthma among users of plastics.[19] Bisphenol A, which is used to manufacture a ...
Yokohama Asthma). Preliminary Report". Arch. Indust. Hyg. & Occupational Med. 10 (5): 399-408. PMID 13206438. Andrews, Sharron ...
Occupational asthma Vandenplas O, Malo JL (November 1997). "Inhalation challenges with agents causing occupational asthma". Eur ... Occupational asthma--the past 50 years". Can Respir J. 11 (1): 21-6. doi:10.1155/2004/861745. PMID 15010728. Archived from the ... The specific inhalation challenges has been considered as the gold standard in confirming the diagnosis of occupational asthma ... "Validation of an exposure system to particles for the diagnosis of occupational asthma". Chest. 102 (2): 402-7. doi:10.1378/ ...
Occupational Health and Safety[edit]. Since cannabis is still recognized as an illegal substance under federal law, each state ... Other allergic reactions, such as asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and cutaneous symptoms have been reported.[118] Workers are ... "Marijuana occupational safety and health , Department of Public Health and Environment". www.colorado.gov. Retrieved 2018-10-30 ...
"Relationship between cigarette smoking and occupational exposures". Asthma and COPD: Basic Mechanisms and Clinical Management ... An outcomes strategy for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma in England (PDF). Department of ... Yuh-Chin, T. Huang (2012-10-28). A clinical guide to occupational and environmental lung diseases. [New York]: Humana Press. ... Lötvall, Jan (2011). Advances in combination therapy for asthma and COPD. Chichester, West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons. hlm. 251 ...
Platts-Mills TA, Longbottom J, Edwards J, Cockroft A, Wilkins S (March 1987). "Occupational asthma and rhinitis related to ... "Effect of mouse allergen and rodent environmental intervention on asthma in inner-city children". Annals of Allergy, Asthma & ... Exposure and sensitization to rodent Mup proteins is considered a risk factor for childhood asthma and is a leading cause of ... Gaffin JM, Phipatanakul W (April 2009). "The role of indoor allergens in the development of asthma". Current Opinion in Allergy ...
... may cause occupational asthma". Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 76 (3): 175-177. doi:10.1136/oemed-2018-105295. PMC ... Some evidence suggests that PMDA causes occupational asthma. F. Röhrscheid (2012). "Carboxylic Acids, Aromatic". Ullmann's ...
Mapp CE (May 2001). "Agents, old and new, causing occupational asthma". Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 58 (5): 354- ... Factory workers who work with amylase for any of the above uses are at increased risk of occupational asthma. Five to nine ... "Alpha amylase is a major allergenic component in occupational asthma patients caused by porcine pancreatic extract". The ... Bakers with long exposure to amylase-enriched flour are at risk of developing dermatitis or asthma. In molecular biology, the ...
Mapp CE (2001). "Agents, old and new, causing occupational asthma". Occup. Environ. Med. 58 (5): 354-60. doi:10.1136/oem.58.5. ... Kanerva L, Keskinen H, Autio P, Estlander T, Tuppurainen M, Jolanki R (May 1995). "Occupational respiratory and skin ...
Mapp CE (2001). "Agents, old and new, causing occupational asthma". Occup. Environ. Med. 58 (5): 354-60. doi:10.1136/oem.58.5. ... Kanerva L, Keskinen H, Autio P, Estlander T, Tuppurainen M, Jolanki R (May 1995). "Occupational respiratory and skin ... 0274". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Weast, Robert C.; et al. (1978). CRC Handbook of ... National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Gilchrist, T.L. (1987). Heterocyclic chemistry. ISBN 978-0-582- ...
Patients with a history of neurodermitis, hay fever, or allergic asthma often develop hand eczema. These sicknesses reflect the ... Severe and chronic eczema qualifies as one of the most frequent occupational illnesses. Patients should therefore be referred ... to an occupational-dermatological specialist as soon as possible. ...
Exposure to mould and yeast within a military hospital in Finland lead to an outbreak of asthma, alveolitis and rhinitis. The ... Linaker, C.; Smedley, J (1 December 2002). "Respiratory illness in agricultural workers". Occupational Medicine. 52 (8): 451- ... S. salmonicolor is also considered a type 1 allergen and has been known to cause asthma, nosocomial allergic alveolitis, and ... ISBN 978-3-540-85462-3. Chapman, Jean A. (1 September 1999). "Update on airborne mold and mold allergy". Allergy and Asthma ...
"Airborne seafood allergens as a cause of occupational allergy and asthma". Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 13 (3): 288-97. doi:10.1007 ... Prevalence of seafood-induced adult asthma is reported as in the range of 7% to 36% (higher for crustaceans and lower for bony ... Tong WS, Yuen AW, Wai CY, Leung NY, Chu KH, Leung PS (October 2018). "Diagnosis of fish and shellfish allergies". J Asthma ... Late-phase responses seen in asthma are slightly different from those seen in other allergic responses, although they are still ...
"Airborne seafood allergens as a cause of occupational allergy and asthma". Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 13 (3): 288-97. doi:10.1007 ... Tong WS, Yuen AW, Wai CY, Leung NY, Chu KH, Leung PS (2018). "Diagnosis of fish and shellfish allergies". J Asthma Allergy. 11 ... Prevalence of seafood-induced adult asthma is on the order of 10% (higher for crustaceans and lower for fish). Prevalence of ... "Food Allergy Facts" Archived 2012-10-06 at the Wayback Machine Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America Urisu A, Ebisawa M, Ito ...
CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "Substances causing/worsening asthma". UK Occupational Health and Safety. WorkSafe ... allergies and asthma". The available data are restricted to these occupational environments. Exposure of the general public to ... a possible cause of asthma) in workplace settings and determined that containers of it should be labeled with "May cause ...
Occupational asthma Polymer fume fever Chastain, Steve (2004). Metal Casting: A Sand Casting Manual for the Small Foundry. p. 8 ... Cain and Fletcher (2010) report a case of metal fume fever that was diagnosed only by taking a full occupational history and by ... Diagnosis is primarily anecdotal, that is, it depends upon a good occupational history. Diagnosis of metal fume fever can be ... Cain, J. R; Fletcher, R. M (2010). "Diagnosing metal fume fever--an integrated approach". Occupational Medicine. 60 (5): 398- ...
... and performed by pulmonology or occupational medicine physicians. Occupational asthma is much like asthma in that it causes ... Occupational asthma is a worrisome outcome of respiratory sensitization to isocyanates as it can be acutely fatal. Diagnosis of ... These limits are set to protect workers from chronic health effects such as occupational asthma, contact dermatitis, or ... A quarterly training session on recognizing symptoms of occupational asthma or proper respirator use would be examples of ...
Bardy, J-D.; Malo, J-L.; Seguin, P.; Ghezzo, H.; Desjardins, J.; Dolovich, J.; Cartier, A. (1987). "Occupational Asthma and IgE ... Alemán AM, Quirce S, Bombín C, Sastre J (2001). "[Asthma related to inhalation of Plantago ovata]". Med Clin (Barc) (in Spanish ... In order to protect sensitized workers, psyllium has an extremely low occupational exposure limit of 150 ng/m3. The soluble ... manufacturing employees who have been exposed to psyllium during the processing have developed occupational asthma and IgE ...
... including the development of occupational asthma, exacerbation of existing asthma, reduction of lung function, and eye ... Chan-Yeung, Moira (January 1994). "Mechanism of occupational asthma due to Western red cedar (Thuja plicata)". American Journal ... and contact allergen responsible for provoking allergic reactions and asthma exaggeration and leading to occupational asthma in ... The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration has set a permissible exposure limit for red cedar dust of 2.5 mg/m3 as a ...
The differential diagnosis list includes solvent exposure, occupational asthma, and allergies. Different researchers and ... People reporting MCS-like symptoms may have other health issues, ranging from common conditions, such as depression or asthma, ... Lax MB, Henneberger PK (1995). "Patients with multiple chemical sensitivities in an occupational health clinic: presentation ... Tuuminen, Tamara (2018). "Multiple Chemical Sensitivity". Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 60 (8): e429. doi ...
Occupational Health Services, Inc. "Pyrethrum." Material Safety Data Sheet. 1 April 1987. New York: OHS, Inc.[unreliable source ... Wagner, S. L. (2000). "Fatal asthma in a child after use of an animal shampoo containing pyrethrin". The Western Journal of ... "Review of the Relationship between Pyrethrins, Pyrethroid Exposure and Asthma and Allergies". US Environmental Protection ... "Fatal asthma in a child after use of an animal shampoo containing pyrethrin". The Western Journal of Medicine. 173 (2): 86-7. ...
"International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health. 21 (4): 303-07. doi:10.1179/2049396715Y.0000000009. PMC 4727589 ...
2013). Handbook of Occupational Dermatology. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 231. ISBN 978-3-662-07677-4. . Archived from ... including anaphylaxis and severe asthma exacerbations in susceptible people.[35] In extremely rare cases, the frequent and ...
"Smoking bans cut asthma and premature births by 10%, study says". BBC News. 28 March 2014. Retrieved 4 September 2015.. ... Smoking bans, or smoke-free laws, are public policies, including criminal laws and occupational safety and health regulations, ... "Smoking bans cut premature births and child asthma attacks". Reuters. 28 March 2014.. ... and asthma.[7] Specifically, meta-analyses show that lifelong non-smokers with partners who smoke in the home have a 20-30% ...
"Manual therapy for asthma". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2): CD001002. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD001002.pub2. PMID ... Norris P (2001). "How 'we' are different from 'them': occupational boundary maintenance in the treatment of musculo-skeletal ... Ernst E (December 2009). "Spinal manipulation for asthma: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials". Respir Med. 103 ( ... Occupational And Professional Licensing, Chiropractic Practitioners, Chiropractic Advanced Practice Certification Registry. ...
a b c d e f g h i Schonfeld, I.S., & Chang, C.-H. (2017). Occupational health psychology: Work, stress, and health. New York, ... What is occupational health psychology [2] *^ a b Tetrick, L.E., & Quick, J.C. (2011). Overview of occupational health ... Occupational Health Psychology (OHP). [1] *^ a b Everly, G.S., Jr. (1986). An introduction to occupational health psychology. ... Feldman, R.H.L. (1985). Promoting occupational safety and health. G. Everly & R.H.L. Feldman (Eds.), Occupational health ...
to assess of impairment from occupational asthma[5]. *to identify those at risk from pulmonary barotrauma while scuba diving[5] ... Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma (PDF) (NIH Publication Number 08-5846 ed.). ... to diagnose or manage asthma[2][3][4]. *to detect respiratory disease in patients presenting with symptoms of breathlessness, ... Clark, Margaret Varnell (2010). Asthma: A Clinician's Guide (ist ed.). Burlington, Ma.: Jones & Bartlett Learning. p. 46. ISBN ...
Prolonged exposure to rosin fumes released during soldering can cause occupational asthma (formerly called colophony disease[7] ... "colophony disease", Archaic Medical Terms List, Occupational, on Antiquus Morbus website". Antiquusmorbus.com. 2011-07-29. ...
"Occupational Health Guideline for Ozone" (PDF). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.. ... Do "corona discharge" devices alleviate asthma?. *NIOSH Immediate Danger to Life or Health (Ozone) Documentation ...
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol. 10:147-54. Ghabili K, Agutter PS, Ghanei M, Ansarin K, Panahi Y, Shoja MM. (2011) Sulfur mustard ... The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommends that a person wear splash proof goggles, a face shield and ... Inhaled and systemic forms of β2-agonists used in the treatment of asthma and other commonly used medications, such as insulin ...
哮喘(急性重症哮喘(英语:Acute severe asthma). 阿司匹林誘發哮喘(英语:Aspirin-induced asthma). 運動誘發哮喘(英语:Exercise-induced asthma). 支氣管擴張症. 未指定分類. 支氣管炎 ... 職業性肺病(英语:Occupational lung disease). 肺塵病
"Dust mites in the humid atmosphere of Bangalore trigger around 60% of asthma" "Archived copy". Archived from the original on ... Occupational dust exposure. *Sawdust. Notes. *^ "Dust". Merriam-Webster. Archived from the original on 2017-03-14.. ... Positive tests for dust mite allergies are extremely common among people with asthma. Dust mites are microscopic arachnids ...
Occupational asthma. *Occupational safety and health. ReferencesEdit. *^ Kathy Orton (October 25, 2013) Mold: What every ... National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. August 1, 2008. *^ Wood, Robert A.; Terr, Abba I.; Saxon, Andrew; ... Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 45 (5): 470-478. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.161.3936. doi:10.1097/00043764-200305000- ... National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. August 1, 2008. *^ Empting, L. D. (2009). "Neurologic and ...
Third Expert Panel on the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma (2007)։ Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma։ ... Mamane A, Baldi I, Tessier JF, Raherison C, Bouvier G (June 2015)։ «Occupational exposure to pesticides and respiratory health ... 101,0 101,1 Shah R., Saltoun, C. A. (May-Jun 2012)։ «Chapter 14: Acute severe asthma (status asthmaticus)»։ Allergy and Asthma ... Peters S. P. (2014)։ «Asthma phenotypes: nonallergic (intrinsic) asthma.»։ The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. In ...
"Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology. 14 (2): 57. doi:10.1186/s13223-018-0286-1. ISSN 1710-1492. PMC 6157280. PMID 30275847.. ... Allergic reactions to airborne particles or vapors of known food allergens have been reported as an occupational consequence of ... Allergy Asthma Immunol. 119 (3): 214-222.e3. doi:10.1016/j.anai.2017.07.010. PMID 28890018.. ... James JM, Crespo JF (2007). "Allergic reactions to foods by inhalation". Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 7 (3): 167-174. doi:10.1007/ ...
that the entire editorial board of the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health resigned in protest in ... 2019-09-28: Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Research. *2019-09-22: ACS Central Science ...
Asthma (Status asthmaticus. Aspirin-induced. Exercise-induced. Bronchiectasis. unspecified. Bronchitis. Bronchiolitis ... occupational. lung disease. Pneumoconiosis Aluminosis. Asbestosis. Baritosis. Bauxite fibrosis. Berylliosis. Caplan's syndrome ...
"National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).. *^ Dreveton, Alain (2012-01-01). "Manufacture of Aluminium ... Repeated or prolonged inhalation exposure may cause asthma, and may have effects on the bone and nervous system, resulting in ... "CDC.gov National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). July 22, 2015. Retrieved July 17, 2017.. ... "International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health. 20 (2): 157-166. doi:10.1179/2049396714Y.0000000062. ISSN 1077- ...
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Retrieved 7 August 2012.. *^ "The National Institute for Occupational ... Asthma is another respiratory illness that many workers are vulnerable to. Workers may also be vulnerable to skin diseases, ... Occupational. Main article: Occupational safety and health. In addition to safety risks, many jobs also present risks of ... the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which conducts research on occupational health and safety, and the ...
Artikel utama untuk bagian ini adalah: Occupational asthma. Asma sebagai akibat dari (atau yang diperburuk oleh) pajanan tempat ... Third Expert Panel on the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma (2007). Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. ... a b Shah, R; Saltoun, CA (2012 May-Jun). "Chapter 14: Acute severe asthma (status asthmaticus).". Allergy and asthma ... "Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention" (PDF). Global Initiative for Asthma. 2011. ...
"Relationship between cigarette smoking and occupational exposures". Asthma and COPD: Basic Mechanisms and Clinical Management ... An outcomes strategy for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma in England. Department of Health. ... Yuh-Chin, T. Huang (2012-10-28). A clinical guide to occupational and environmental lung diseases. [New York]: Humana Press. ... Lötvall, Jan (2011). Advances in combination therapy for asthma and COPD. Chichester, West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons. பக். 251 ...
Nail disease Allergy Hypersensitivity Occupational asthma Ward GW, Karlsson G, Rose G, Platts-Mills TAE (1989). "Trichophyton ... Medical aspects of occupational asthma. Health and Safety Executive Publications, Medical Series 25 16 Millar NA (2000). The ... trichophyton allergy and asthma - a causal relationship?" Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 74 523-524 Platts-Mills TAE, Fiocco GP, ... Exposure to nail dust was first discussed and described in the literature as an occupational hazard in the early 70's. In 1975 ...
哮喘(急性重症哮喘(英語:Acute severe asthma). 阿司匹林誘發哮喘(英語:Aspirin-induced asthma). 運動誘發哮喘(英語:Exercise-induced asthma). 支氣管擴張. 未指定分類. 支氣管炎 ... 職業性肺病(英語:Occupational lung disease). 肺塵病
"The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. June 1997. Retrieved June 12, 2015.. ... Asthma. *Hypersensitivity pneumonitis. *Eosinophilic pneumonia. *Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis. *Allergic ... occupational therapists, laboratory technicians, and hospital housekeeping personnel-who frequently use latex gloves and other ...
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (2012). "Respiratory Diseases Input: Occupational Risks". NIOSH Program ... Asthma (Status asthmaticus. Aspirin-induced. Exercise-induced. Bronchiectasis. unspecified. Bronchitis. Bronchiolitis ... occupational. lung disease. Pneumoconiosis Aluminosis. Asbestosis. Baritosis. Bauxite fibrosis. Berylliosis. Caplan's syndrome ... Determining the underlying organism is usually not required.[4] Other causes of similar symptoms include asthma, pneumonia, ...
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 13 February 2015. Archived from the original on 18 June 2017.. ... and worsening asthma.[4] Bleeding risk is greater among those who are older, drink alcohol, take other NSAIDs, or are on other ... U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 13 February 2015. Archived from the original on 11 May 2017.. ... The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has set a recommended exposure limit in the United States of ...
... such as from asthma, laryngospasm, or simple blockage from the presence of foreign materials; from being in environments where ... Occupational safety and health *Approaches to safety *Job safety analysis. *Risk assessment ...
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy (Informahealthcare.com). *Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care ( ... Allergy Asthma Proceedings. *Annual of Allergy and Asthma Immunology. *Annals of Allergy ...
Occupational safety and health. Occupational diseases. and injuries. *Acrodynia. *Asbestosis. *Asthma. *Berylliosis ...
Asthma (Status asthmaticus. Aspirin-induced. Exercise-induced. Bronchiectasis. unspecified. Bronchitis. Bronchiolitis ... occupational. lung disease. Pneumoconiosis Aluminosis. Asbestosis. Baritosis. Bauxite fibrosis. Berylliosis. Caplan's syndrome ...
Occupational asthma is an occupational lung disease and a type of asthma. Like other types of asthma, it is characterized by ... NIOSH: Prevention of Occupational Asthma Occupational asthma and work aggravated asthma (UK). ... "Occupational asthma". Mayo Clinic. 23 May 2009. "OSH Answers Asthma, Work-related". Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and ... In the United States, occupational asthma is the most common occupational lung disease. Today, asthma affects as much as 15% of ...
Occupational Exposures. All adults with asthma should be questioned about their occupational history and exposures. New ... exposures associated with work-related asthma continue to be recognized. If a patients exposure does not match one of the ...
Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in developed countries. As more new chemicals are ... Occupational asthma. BMJ 2004; 329 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.329.7465.558 (Published 02 September 2004) Cite this as: ...
Occupational asthma is a lung disorder in which substances found in the workplace cause the airways of the lungs to swell and ... Many substances in the workplace can trigger asthma symptoms, leading to occupational asthma. The most common triggers are wood ... Occupational asthma is a lung disorder in which substances found in the workplace cause the airways of the lungs to swell and ... Occupational asthma may keep getting worse if you continue to be exposed to the substance that is causing the problem, even if ...
AAAAI experts explain occupational asthma is caused by inhaling fumes, gases, dust or other potentially harmful substances at ... Allergies play a role in many cases of occupational asthma. This type of asthma generally develops only after months or years ... If you think you may have occupational asthma, or if your asthma is not under control, an allergist / immunologist, often ... Occupational asthma is caused by inhaling fumes, gases, dust or other potentially harmful substances while on the job. ...
What to Do When You Get Occupational Asthma. Do you work around chemicals, dust, latex, mold, or animals? If you do, you could ... be at risk for occupational asthma. Triggered by air irritants, this lung disease inflames your airways, making them swell to ...
Prevention of Occupational Asthma. Watch the video on "Research to Inform the Prevention of Asthma in Health Care - Research ... Prevention of Work-related Asthma: Study Search. Welcome to the Prevention of Occupational Asthma: Study Search page! This page ... Tarlo SM, Liss GM.Prevention of occupational asthma. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2010 Jul;10(4):278-86. ... Primary prevention of occupational asthma: identifying and controlling exposures to asthma-causing agents. American Journal of ...
You might have occupational asthma--heres information to help you out. - What is Occupational Asthma? - Asthma at BellaOnline ... BellaOnlines Asthma Editor. What is Occupational Asthma?. What is Occupational Asthma and who s at Risk?. Do you already have ... then you may have developed what is called Occupational Asthma (OA). Occupational asthma is asthma, with all the typical signs ... You ve been diagnosed with occupational asthma, now what?. Once you ve been diagnosed with occupational asthma, it s important ...
... should be considered in any new or worsening case of asthma in working-age persons. ... Occupational Asthma Online Medical Reference - discusses inflammation of the sinuses and strategies for management of this ... In general, asthma affects 5% to 10% of people worldwide, and it is estimated that 2% to 15% of asthma may be occupational in ... The definition of occupational asthma (OA), much like the definition of asthma itself, has changed over the years; therefore, ...
Find out how to recognize this common type of asthma. ... substances you come into contact with at work can cause asthma ... Occupational asthma symptoms are similar to those caused by other types of asthma. Signs and symptoms may include:. *Wheezing, ... Occupational asthma is asthma thats caused by breathing in chemical fumes, gases, dust or other substances on the job. ... Diagnosing occupational asthma is similar to diagnosing other types of asthma. However, your doctor will also try to identify ...
... occupational asthma and work-aggravated asthma. Occupational asthma is subdivided into occupational asthma with latency and ... The first part of the report explores the 2010 BOHRF Occupational Asthma Guidance on sensitiser-induced occupational asthma. ... Identifying occupational asthma. On 10 Jan 2011 in Employment Law Features, Respiratory, Occupational Health, Wellbeing ... The British Occupational Health Research Foundation (BOHRF) range of guides for occupational asthma identification, management ...
"Occupational asthma". Mayo Clinic. 23 May 2009.. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "OSH Answers Asthma, Work-related". Canadian ... Occupational asthma refers to new onset asthma or the recurrence of previously quiescent asthma directly caused by exposure to ... Occupational asthma is one of the most common occupational lung disease. Approximately 17% of all adult-onset asthma cases are ... It is an occupational lung disease and a type of work-related asthma. Agents that can induce occupational asthma can be grouped ...
10-year occupational health strategy to reduce newly incident cases of occupational asthma (OA) by 30% by 2010 ... RR474 - The true cost of occupational asthma in Great Britain. In 2000 the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) published a long- ... term (10-year) occupational health strategy for Great Britain. The strategy sets an ambitious target for occupational asthma ( ... The study considers solely OA, and does not cover work-aggravated asthma. ...
group is to run a one-day workshop on occupational asthma. The event will be. held on 14 October at Regents College Conference ... feature plenary presentations on how workplace asthma is caused, the impact of. asthma on both employer and employee, and how ... Occupational Health & Wellbeing. Contact us. Features list 2017. Personnel Today Awards. RAD Awards. Whatmedia Recruitment ... cases of asthma are caused directly through occupations or have work as a. significant contributing factor. Most such cases of ...
Occupational asthma. Occupational asthma is asthma caused by some aspect of the workplace environment.2 It is important to ... Diagnosis of occupational asthma. Irritant-induced occupational asthma. The most definitive form of irritant-induced asthma5 is ... Irritant-induced occupational asthma. Workers with occupational asthma induced by exposure to an irritant at work should be ... Sensitizer-induced occupational asthma. For a patient with occupational asthma induced by a respiratory sensitizer, a workers ...
The article discusses occupational asthma as the most common occupational lung disease in western countries. The disease is ... Occupational asthma: Health crisis in health care workers. // Occupational Health Management;Mar2007, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p25 ... Occupational asthma is a serious problem among health care workers, according to data available in states tracking the disease ... • Sixteen percent of confirmed occupational asthma cases in four states were in health care workers. • Cleaning products ...
Twenty years of SHIELD: decreasing incidence of occupational asthma in the West Midlands, UK? G I Walters, A Kirkham, E E ... O46-1 Development of an updated asthma-specific job-exposure matrix to evaluate occupational exposure to 33 specific agents ... O40-5 Hand hygiene and asthma control in u.s. nurses: a new risk factor for work-related asthma? Orianne Dumas, Raphaëlle ... Trends in incidence of occupational asthma, contact dermatitis, noise-induced hearing loss, carpal tunnel syndrome and upper ...
New insights into neutrophils in the pathogenesis of occupational asthma may provide a novel approach to the individual patient ... in the pathogenesis of occupational asthma may provide a novel approach to the individual patient with occupational asthma. ... Neutrophil activation in occupational asthma Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019 Apr;19(2):81-85. doi: 10.1097/ACI. ... Purpose of review: The aim of this review is to emphasize the role of neutrophils in patients with occupational asthma. This ...
Occupational asthma caused by cellulase and lipase in the detergent industry A Brant, A Hole, J Cannon, J Helm, C Swales, J ... Occupational asthma caused by sodium disulphite in Norwegian lobster fishing J Madsen, D Sherson, H Kjøller, I Hansen, K ... Assessing individual employee risk factors for occupational asthma in primary aluminium smelting C G Barnard, D I McBride, H M ... Validation of specific inhalation challenge for the diagnosis of occupational asthma due to persulphate salts X Muñoz, M J Cruz ...
... of adult asthma cases. More than 300 specific occupational agents have been associated with asthma. High-risk jobs include ... An ACCP consensus statement defines work-related asthmas as including occupational asthma (ie, asthma induced by sensitizer or ... Drugs & Diseases , Pulmonology , Asthma Q&A What is the role of occupational factors in the development of asthma?. Updated: ... Occupational factors are associated with 10-15% of adult asthma cases. More than 300 specific occupational agents have been ...
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) reports, They are widely used in the manufacture of flexible ... occupational asthma. polyurethane products. chemical testing. Contact Information. Joseph Frasca. Senior Vice President of ... Isocyanate Exposure Risks & Occupational Asthma Hazards Identified by EMSL. Cinnaminson, NJ - WEBWIRE - Wednesday, July 29, ... EMSL recently sponsored an educational video about exposure risks and occupational asthma associated with isocyanates that can ...
The journal publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies related to asthma, allergy, COPD, non- ... Integrated Approach to Diagnosis of Associated Occupational Asthma and Rhinitis. Sébastien Nguyen,1,2 Roberto Castano,1,2 and ... and occupational asthma (OA).. A 38-year-old woman, who worked as an animal laboratory technician since 2004, first noticed the ... Patients with coexisting work-related rhinitis and asthma would benefit from an adequate and simultaneous recognition of both ...
... and occupational asthma (OA).A 38-year-old woman, who worked as an animal laboratory technician since 2004, first noticed the ... approach enables confirmation of a diagnosis of OA and OR in patients complaining of work-related rhinitis and asthma symptoms. ... present case illustrates the advantages and importance of using an integrated approach to confirm a diagnosis of occupational ... Patients with coexisting work-related rhinitis and asthma would benefit from an adequate and simultaneous recognition of both ...
33,307 people between the ages of 15 and 64 died from asthma between 1999 and 2016. How can RTs help? ... "Occupational asthma is difficult to identify because respiratory symptoms can take weeks or years to develop. Therefore, RTs ... believes RTs need to keep occupational exposures top of mind when working with their asthma patients. ... According to a recent report from the CDC, 33,307 people between the ages of 15 and 64 died from asthma between 1999 and 2016. ...
If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Centers RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.. ...
Occupational airborne exposure and the incidence of respiratory symptoms and asthma.. Eagan TM1, Gulsvik A, Eide GE, Bakke PS. ... In conclusion, airborne occupational exposure increases the incidence of respiratory symptoms and asthma, independent of sex, ... Several prevalence studies have suggested an association between occupational exposure and respiratory symptoms and asthma, but ... Between 5.7% and 19.3% of the incidence of respiratory symptoms and 14.4% of the incidence of asthma were attributable to dust ...
Inattention to this may result, particularly in the case of occupational asthma, in progressive respiratory deterioration. ... Occupational respiratory disease is a significant problem and appears to be on the rise. The allergist should make every effort ... Allergy and Asthma Proceedings is a peer reviewed publication dedicated to distributing timely scientific research regarding ... to become familiar with the workplace environment and appreciate the many causes of occupational rhinitis and asthma. In ...
Keywords: asthma; camomile; contact dermatitis; contact urticaria; cosmetician; lime; occupational; rhinitis Document Type: ... Occupational contact dermatitis, with asthma and rhinitis, from camomile in a cosmetician also with contact urticaria from both ...
The importance of occupational risk factors for asthma has been underestimated, particularly among women. The occupational ... Community Based Study on Occupational Asthma. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the ... Those subjects who took part in the first occupational asthma study survey were re-contacted in 1999, to determine risk factors ... Evaluation of specific occupational asthma risks in a community-based study with special reference to single and multiple ...
  • However, although overlapping in many cases, hypersensitivity pneumonitis may be distinguished from occupational asthma in that it isn't restricted to only occupational exposure, and involves type III hypersensitivity and type IV hypersensitivity rather than the type I hypersensitivity of asthma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Avoiding exposure to the substance that is causing your asthma is the best treatment. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you are exposed to any of these substances at high concentrations, you may begin wheezing and experiencing other asthma symptoms immediately after exposure. (aaaai.org)
  • Workers who already have asthma or some other respiratory disorder may also experience an increase in their symptoms during exposure to these irritants. (aaaai.org)
  • This type of asthma generally develops only after months or years of exposure to a work-related substance. (aaaai.org)
  • Another problem with misdiagnosis of OA is continued exposure to the asthma triggers causing permanent changes and damage to your lungs. (bellaonline.com)
  • In this instance, preexisting asthma is aggravated by a workplace exposure. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • It is therefore not surprising that patients with atopic asthma or patients with a family history of atopy are at increased risk for developing OA from exposure to HMW agents. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • Occupational asthma can result from exposure to a substance you're sensitive to - causing an allergic or immunological response - or to an irritating toxic substance. (drugs.com)
  • If it's not correctly diagnosed and you are not protected or able to avoid exposure, occupational asthma can cause permanent lung damage, disability or death. (drugs.com)
  • Start as soon as you're exposed to an asthma-inducing substance at work or only after a period of regular exposure to the substance. (drugs.com)
  • The intensity of your exposure increases your risk of developing occupational asthma. (drugs.com)
  • Latency is the interval between exposure to an asthma causing agent and the onset of asthma symptoms - the latency period can be from weeks to years and is difficult to predict. (personneltoday.com)
  • Occupational asthma refers to new onset asthma or the recurrence of previously quiescent asthma directly caused by exposure to an agent at workplace. (wikipedia.org)
  • Irritant-induced (occupational) asthma is a non-immunologic form of asthma that results from a single or multiple high dose exposure to irritant products. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike those with sensitizer-induced occupational asthma, subjects with irritant-induced occupational asthma do not develop work-related asthma symptoms after re-exposure to low concentrations of the irritant that initiated the symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms may develop over many years as in sensitizer induced asthma or may occur after a single exposure to a high-concentration agent as in case of RADS. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most such cases of asthma occur as a result of exposure to common agents such as flour, grain, wood dust, laboratory animals and chemicals such as solder fumes, glues, latex, glutaraldehyde and isocyanates. (personneltoday.com)
  • Once a person has been sensitized to one of these materials, even exposure to extremely low quantities will exacerbate the asthma. (cmaj.ca)
  • The less common form of occupational asthma, accounting for about 7% of cases, is irritant-induced occupational asthma, which occurs after accidental exposure to very high inhaled concentrations of a workplace irritant. (cmaj.ca)
  • Irritant-induced occupational asthma should be suspected if the symptoms first began within 24 hours after accidental exposure to a high inhaled concentration of a workplace irritant, whereas sensitizer-induced occupational asthma should be suspected if the symptoms begin during a period when the patient is working, are worse at work or in the evenings after work, and diminish during weekends or holidays. (cmaj.ca)
  • For an estimated 3,664-6,994 of them, an occupational exposure to a hazardous substance may have been to blame. (aarc.org)
  • She says if these occupational triggers are not properly identified, the worker may remain at significant risk for another acute exacerbation as exposure continues. (aarc.org)
  • Occupational airborne exposure and the incidence of respiratory symptoms and asthma. (nih.gov)
  • Several prevalence studies have suggested an association between occupational exposure and respiratory symptoms and asthma, but there has been a lack of incidence studies to verify this. (nih.gov)
  • Between 5.7% and 19.3% of the incidence of respiratory symptoms and 14.4% of the incidence of asthma were attributable to dust or fumes exposure after adjustment for sex, age, educational level, and smoking. (nih.gov)
  • Possible relationship between asbestos exposure and bronchial asthma: a need for clarification. (nih.gov)
  • Once asthma has been induced, further exposure to the substance, even relatively low levels, may provoke an attack. (ehstoday.com)
  • Many have to change jobs to avoid exposure to the substance that caused their asthma and may no longer be able to use specialist skills, or face a restricted lifestyle, reports the HSE. (ehstoday.com)
  • Occupational allergy refers to those disorders or conditions that are caused by exposure to allergenic substances in the work environment. (worldallergy.org)
  • The allergic diseases that may be contracted as a consequence of exposure to sensitizing agents in the workplace are rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and skin diseases, such as contact urticaria and contact dermatitis. (worldallergy.org)
  • A study carried out in the USA showed that among adults with asthma treated in general practice settings, about 1 in 10 patients has a work history strongly suggestive of a potential relationship between exposure and disease (1). (worldallergy.org)
  • In Europe, the proportion of asthma among young adults attributed to occupation was 5-10%, and 0.2% to 0.5% of young adults have asthma that may be related to workplace exposure (2). (worldallergy.org)
  • The type of exposure to these agents very often determines the type of asthma (Figure 1). (worldallergy.org)
  • Evaluation of the worker with suspected occupational asthma should consider the type of exposure (allergens, chemical sensitizers, irritants) since exposure to these agents very often determines the type of asthma. (worldallergy.org)
  • 2. Irritant-induced OA (IIOA) (or "non-immunologic/non-allergic OA" ) is a form of OA characterized by the development of asthma (or the reactivation of quiescent asthma) caused by exposure to irritant substances at the workplace that are capable of inducing an inflammatory reaction of the airways and non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness (NSBH) through non-sensitizing mechanisms. (worldallergy.org)
  • The causal relationship between exposure to irritants at the workplace and the inception of asthma can be documented with a reasonable level of confidence for asthma resulting from a single high-level or multiple exposures to irritants. (worldallergy.org)
  • The first three workers with occupational asthma and exposure to chlorine-releasing tablets underwent SICs, including exposures to chlorine-releasing tablets dissolved in cold water. (bmj.com)
  • Does occupational asthma to a single exposure to Formaldehyde chemical(preservatives) fumes (for 5-10 mins) last for years? (ndtv.com)
  • Occupational asthma is a debilitating illness, caused by exposure to hazardous substances in the workplace. (hse.gov.uk)
  • These workplace changes are also called interventions, and for occupational asthma include early removal from exposure and reduction of exposure. (cochrane.org)
  • Asthma symptoms and lung function may improve when persons with occupational asthma are removed from exposure, usually by ending their job, compared to continued exposure on the same job. (cochrane.org)
  • Asthma symptoms but not lung function may improve after reducing exposure, for example by training and education, compared to continued exposure. (cochrane.org)
  • Both removal from exposure and reduction of exposure may improve asthma symptoms when compared to continued exposure. (cochrane.org)
  • Both removal from exposure and reduction of exposure may improve asthma symptoms compared with continued exposure. (cochrane.org)
  • When a person develops asthma as an adult, occupational exposure is a likely cause. (peacehealth.org)
  • footnote 1 Workplace exposure to substances that cause airway irritation or inflammation can also make asthma worse in people who already have the condition. (peacehealth.org)
  • The diagnosis of occupational asthma requires detailed documentation of exposure to irritants or allergens in the workplace and evidence that these substances are causing symptoms. (peacehealth.org)
  • Exposure to plicatic acid from Western Red Cedar dust can cause an allergic reaction and trigger asthma in some people," said Paul Cochrane, President of Cochrane and Associates and the IAQ Video Network. (prlog.org)
  • Several years after removal from exposure to the occupational agents, normalization (with respect to the parameters followed) was not yet complete for all of the patients. (nih.gov)
  • Allergic symptoms (despite the removal from occupational allergen exposure) persisted even after several years. (nih.gov)
  • Occupational asthma is a form of lung disease in which the breathing passages shrink, swell, or become inflamed or congested as a result of exposure to irritants in the workplace. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Hundreds of different types of jobs involve exposure to substances that could trigger occupational asthma, but only a small fraction of people who do such work develop this disorder. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Even short-term exposure to low levels of one or more irritating substances can cause a very sensitive person to develop symptoms of occupational asthma. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The most effective treatment for occupational asthma is to reduce or eliminate exposure to symptom-producing substances. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The diagnosis of occupational asthma, defined as variable airways narrowing, causally related to exposure in the working environment to specific airborne dusts, gases, vapours or fumes, needs to be confirmed by objective means. (ersjournals.com)
  • We discuss areas of future development, including the development of apparatus which allows exposure of subjects to low and stable concentrations of the occupational agent and the assessment of preventive procedures. (ersjournals.com)
  • Both occupational asthma and dermatitis are common occupational diseases caused by exposure to a variety of substances found in the workplace. (hsa.ie)
  • Occupational asthma is caused as a direct result of workplace exposure. (hsa.ie)
  • Work related chest conditions are diseases such as Asthma, Emphysema, Chronic Bronchitis, Silicosis and Pneumoconiosis, which are caused by exposure to dust, fumes and chemicals in the workplace. (beechampeacock.co.uk)
  • Workers in a wide range of industries could be at risk of exposure to these respiratory allergens and irritants associated with occupational asthma," said Michael Berrevoets, President, VOETS, LLC. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Business managers and workers in New York City and the tri-state area who are concerned about possible exposure to occupational asthma triggers can turn to the industrial hygiene and air quality professionals at VOETS. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Early diagnosis of occupational asthma and avoidance of further exposure can lead to complete recovery. (seton.co.uk)
  • Occupational asthma is caused (rather than made worse) by exposure to hazardous substances in the workplace. (seton.co.uk)
  • Moldex ® respirators can reduce exposure to some, but not all asthma-causing contaminants. (moldex.com)
  • Changing your duties to prevent your exposure to asthma triggers, or giving you the option of moving into a different role within the same company. (simpsonmillar.co.uk)
  • In sensitiser-induced occupational asthma, removal from any further exposure to that agent should be recommended. (bmj.com)
  • If you have developed occupational asthma due to exposure to dangerous chemicals at work then our personal injury solicitors may be able to help you claim compensation. (forbessolicitors.co.uk)
  • Bakers and vehicle paint sprayers have been identified as the most 'at risk' workers of developing occupational asthma due to their exposure to certain substances, but occupational asthma can develop in almost any industry. (forbessolicitors.co.uk)
  • The team, led by Marina Ruxandra Otelea, noted that even after exposure to the stimulus ending, persistent asthma is frequent. (fabresearch.org)
  • Inhaled irritants can also cause asthma without specific sensitisation, either after a single acute inhalation accident (RADS) or through repeated or chronic exposure to excessive levels, for example during cleaning work. (ishn.com)
  • Occupational asthma often has a poor prognosis, even when exposure has ceased, and it leads to considerable socioeconomic consequences, even in countries that have adequate provision for compensating workers with occupational diseases. (ishn.com)
  • Painters may have an increased risk of asthma due to exposure to a variety of agents, such as isocyanates, alkyd resins, and chromates. (harvard.edu)
  • Occupational asthma is diagnosed by a history of work-related symptoms and exposure to known causative agents. (harvard.edu)
  • The risk of asthma attributable to occupational exposures is probably underappreciated due to underreporting and to inappropriate use of narrow definitions of exposure in epidemiologic studies of attributable risk. (harvard.edu)
  • Some sufferers cannot work again and others may have to change jobs to avoid exposure to the substance that caused the asthma. (aplusa-online.com)
  • All employees exposed or liable to be exposed to a substance that may cause occupational asthma should be under health surveillance and if an individual develops the disease, their exposure must be controlled to prevent triggering further attacks. (aplusa-online.com)
  • People employed as boiler cleaners may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to vanadium and vanadium pentoxide. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • Asthma severity and exposure to occupational asthmogens. (inserm.fr)
  • Occupational exposures to nonasthmogenic irritants and asthmogens (classified as "any asthmogen" including three broad groups: high-molecular-weight agents, low-molecular-weight agents, and mixed environments) were assessed by an asthma-specific job exposure matrix. (inserm.fr)
  • Allergic occupational asthma is the most common type of occupational asthma, and results from the exposure to allergens at work. (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • Quite commonly, asthma symptoms due to the exposure of allergens do not appear until weeks, months or even years after your exposure. (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • This type of asthma is generally caused by exposure to substances at workplace. (powershow.com)
  • The most common cause of asthma is the exposure to a trigger. (powershow.com)
  • The most effective treatment of occupational asthma is to avoid the trigger this may include changing the workplace where there is less exposure to the triggers. (powershow.com)
  • FEV1 decline in workers with occupational asthma in response to continued workplace exposure. (lancs.ac.uk)
  • Occupational exposures were evaluated using an asthma job-exposure matrix and job-specific questionnaires for cleaners and healthcare workers. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Using a pathway-based selection process, we identified novel genes potentially involved in adult asthma by interaction with occupational exposure. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Employees working in industries where exposure to irritating substances is common, should look to these four signs from industrial disease experts to minimise the risk of contracting occupational asthma. (thecleanzine.com)
  • Occupational asthma is an asthma that is caused by, or worsened by, exposure to substances in the workplace. (thecleanzine.com)
  • Neil McKinley, personal injury solicitor at JMP Solicitors, specialises in industrial disease cases including occupational related conditions, he said: "One of the most important steps you can take to reduce the occurrence of this breathing condition is to reduce your exposure to the triggers of occupational asthma. (thecleanzine.com)
  • For example, those working with biofuels and chemicals in manufacturing processes, metal workers who may come into close contact with asthma-producing substances like cobalt or nickel, or those who work in the food production and farming industry due to the exposure to milk/egg powders and cereal grains. (thecleanzine.com)
  • Exposure to these triggers can intensify asthma symptoms and cause occupational asthma to develop. (thecleanzine.com)
  • The Health & Safety Executive is a government agency that has created guidelines that determine acceptable levels of exposure to substances that may cause asthma. (thecleanzine.com)
  • Continued exposure to the triggers makes treatment difficult and result in life-long asthma. (findatopdoc.com)
  • Other symptoms depend on the trigger of asthma and the duration of exposure to the substance. (findatopdoc.com)
  • Longer duration of exposure increases the chance of persistent symptoms of asthma. (findatopdoc.com)
  • Exposure to the triggers induces the symptoms of asthma. (findatopdoc.com)
  • Although most patients with occupational asthma are mature adults, there is evidence that airways inflammation starts soon after inception of exposure, including during apprenticeship. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Our results suggest that living in polluted area and exposure to tobacco smoking are significantly associated with the prevalence of symptoms of childhood asthma. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Irritants in high doses that induce occupational asthma include hydrochloric acid, sulfur dioxide or ammonia, which is found in the petroleum or chemical industries. (aaaai.org)
  • Once you ve been diagnosed with occupational asthma, it s important to work with your employer on how to avoid the irritants causing your asthma. (bellaonline.com)
  • 2) Nonimmunologic, i.e., irritant-induced asthma (IrIA) or reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS), which may occur after single or multiple exposures to nonspecific irritants at high concentrations. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • Breathing problems may be a sign of asthma, especially if symptoms seem to be getting worse over time or appear to be aggravated by specific triggers or irritants. (drugs.com)
  • Although this can increase your risk, many people who have allergies or asthma do jobs that expose them to lung irritants and never have symptoms. (drugs.com)
  • Agents that can induce occupational asthma can be grouped into sensitizers and irritants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Workplace exposures to potential irritants, such as cold, dry air, dusts, smoke, fumes and sprays, or exertion at work may aggravate asthma, especially in patients with moderate or severe forms of the disease and in those not receiving optimal treatment. (cmaj.ca)
  • Optimization of asthma management and, if needed, reduction of workplace exposures to respiratory irritants often allow patients with this type of work-related asthma to continue in the same job. (cmaj.ca)
  • To examine the occupations, industries and exposures in the work-place which were associated with a high risk for asthma and other adverse respiratory health effects, with particular emphasis on specific exposures of predominantly female occupations (irritants, detergents and other asthmagens), and of other high risk major occupations which had not been adequately examined. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Many people who have an underlying propensity to develop asthma experience the start of the chronic condition following some provocative event, such as a viral infection or inhalation of any of a host of irritants that cause coughing or wheezing. (ndtv.com)
  • The diagnosis of asthma becomes more likely when respiratory symptoms are recurrent or associated with an extrinsic trigger, such as cold air, exercise or activity, or allergens or irritants. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • No significant associations were found between nonasthmogenic irritants and asthma severity, nor between asthmogens and childhood-onset asthma or mild adult-onset asthma. (inserm.fr)
  • Genes Interacting with Occupational Exposures to Low Molecular Weight Agents and Irritants on Adult-Onset Asthma in Three European Studies. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • We identified interactions between genetic polymorphisms of a large set of genes involved in the response to oxidative stress and occupational exposures to low molecular weight (LMW) agents or irritants on adult-onset asthma. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Smoking can also increase your risk of developing asthma if you are exposed to certain types of irritants. (thecleanzine.com)
  • You can reduce asthma symptoms by avoiding known allergens and airway irritants. (drugster.info)
  • The theory here is that, according to the Mayo Clinic , if you have the asthma/ allergy gene, and you are exposed to certain irritants and allergens in the workplace, over time, these certain irritants may actually irritate the air passages of your lungs and make them more sensitive to these allergens. (blogspot.com)
  • The thing to keep in mind here is that if asthma runs in your family you are at increased risk, and it's important you try to avoid jobs that put you at risk of inhaling the above mentioned allergens or irritants. (blogspot.com)
  • Several hundred occupational agents, mainly allergens but also irritants and substances with unknown pathological mechanisms, have been identified as causing work-related asthma [ 5 ] . (patient.info)
  • Like other types of asthma, it is characterized by airway inflammation, reversible airways obstruction, and bronchospasm, but it is caused by something in the workplace environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, the most common cause of occupational asthma in the workplace are isocyanates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occupational asthma is a lung disorder in which substances found in the workplace cause the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Many substances in the workplace can trigger asthma symptoms, leading to occupational asthma. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lemiere C, Vandenplas O. Asthma in the workplace. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The medical term for pre-existing asthma worsened by workplace conditions is "work-exacerbated asthma. (aaaai.org)
  • The current consensus definition is as follows: "Occupational asthma" is a disease characterized by variable airflow limitation and/or airway hyperresponsiveness due to causes and conditions attributable to a particular occupational environment and not to stimuli encountered outside the workplace. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • Although work-aggravated asthma is not specifically addressed in this chapter, it is worth noting that the evaluation of all cases of asthma should include a detailed environmental history regarding exposures in both the home and the workplace. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • If you already have asthma, sometimes treatment can help it from becoming worse in the workplace. (drugs.com)
  • More than 250 workplace substances have been identified as possible causes of occupational asthma. (drugs.com)
  • Another type of work-related asthma is work-exacerbated asthma (WEA) which is asthma worsened by workplace conditions but not caused by it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hans-Horst Konkolewsky, director of the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work, will deliver the keynote address, and the programme will also feature plenary presentations on how workplace asthma is caused, the impact of asthma on both employer and employee, and how asthma can be prevented. (personneltoday.com)
  • You ask about environmental exposures in the home and workplace and any temporal associations of the symptoms with such exposures, including any change in severity of symptoms on weekends or holidays, as is your routine for patients with new-onset or worsening asthma. (cmaj.ca)
  • Such aggravation of pre-existing disease is different from occupational asthma (i.e., asthma caused by some aspect of the workplace). (cmaj.ca)
  • Occupational asthma is asthma caused by some aspect of the workplace environment. (cmaj.ca)
  • The more common type of occupational asthma, accounting for over 90% of cases, is sensitizer-induced occupational asthma, caused by an IgE-mediated or other immune response to specific workplace agents: high- molecular-weight sensitizers (such as animal proteins, flour or natural rubber latex) and low-molecular-weight chemicals (such as diisocyanates, colophony [a pine resin product] or epoxy compounds). (cmaj.ca)
  • Given that both forms account for only a small proportion of all cases of adult asthma (about 10%) 3 and can be caused by numerous workplace agents, 4 the diagnosis of occupational asthma can easily be overlooked in primary care practice unless it is routinely considered in the assessment of new-onset asthma in a working adult. (cmaj.ca)
  • Patients with this or the less strictly defined forms of irritant-induced asthma 5 , 6 may be entitled to provincial workers' compensation for asthma caused by the workplace. (cmaj.ca)
  • In the U.S., an estimated 3-7% of 'new onset' adult asthma can be attributed to workplace exposures," Dr. Clark said. (aarc.org)
  • The allergist should make every effort to become familiar with the workplace environment and appreciate the many causes of occupational rhinitis and asthma. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • You may be at risk for asthma even before you step foot into your workplace if you have a family or personal history of asthma or other allergies. (legalmatch.com)
  • One of the primary factors that may determine occupational asthma is workplace air . (legalmatch.com)
  • In addition to the several regulations stated by the U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration pertaining specifically to occupational asthma, there are various other rules that may apply to the conditions of your workplace. (legalmatch.com)
  • 3 We hypothesised that similar reactions may be responsible for the asthma in domestic cleaners and healthcare workers and therefore carried out further investigations on the fourth worker to recreate more specifically the workplace exposures (by creating chloramines). (bmj.com)
  • To determine the effectiveness of workplace interventions for the treatment of occupational asthma. (cochrane.org)
  • We conducted a systematic review of workplace interventions for treating occupational asthma. (cochrane.org)
  • All evidence was of very low quality and therefore there is a need for better studies to investigate the effectiveness of workplace interventions for occupational asthma. (cochrane.org)
  • Additional high-quality studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of workplace interventions for occupational asthma. (cochrane.org)
  • The impact of workplace interventions on the outcome of occupational asthma is not well understood. (cochrane.org)
  • To evaluate the effectiveness of workplace interventions on occupational asthma. (cochrane.org)
  • We included all eligible randomized controlled trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time-series of workplace interventions for occupational asthma. (cochrane.org)
  • Asthma in the workplace. (csst.qc.ca)
  • Occupational asthma develops when a person is exposed to a particular inhaled substance in the workplace. (peacehealth.org)
  • Laboratory analysis of blood and sputum may confirm a diagnosis of workplace asthma. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Occupational asthma (OA) is steadily emerging as the principal cause of respiratory disease due to the workplace environment. (ersjournals.com)
  • Occupational asthma is reversible airway obstruction that develops after months to years of sensitization to an allergen encountered in the workplace. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Several other airway diseases caused by inhalational workplace exposures can be distinguished from occupational and occupationally aggravated asthma. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Occupational dermatitis is a skin disorder caused by coming into contact with certain substances in the workplace. (hsa.ie)
  • Existing asthma sufferers may find their condition worsens if they are exposed to a range of substances - or sensitisers - in the workplace. (seton.co.uk)
  • Work-related asthma is asthma made worse by work and includes substances in the workplace that irritate the airways of individuals with pre-existing asthma. (seton.co.uk)
  • Our Industrial Disease Solicitors are specialists in helping people obtain compensation and rehabilitation support for workplace injuries and illnesses, so if you've developed occupational asthma due to employer negligence, get in touch for free legal advice and a no obligation assessment of your claim. (simpsonmillar.co.uk)
  • For an employer to make the right changes in the workplace, it's important to be open about the effects of your severe asthma. (simpsonmillar.co.uk)
  • In irritant-induced occupational asthma, preventive measures should be implemented in the workplace to reduce future exposures and episodes. (bmj.com)
  • Occupational asthma (OA) is asthma caused by the workplace and may result from immunological or non-immunological stimuli. (bmj.com)
  • First approach to diagnosis of OA is to obtain careful occupational history and seek possible agents at workplace. (koreamed.org)
  • Various substances found in the workplace can contribute to occupational asthma. (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • This type of asthma is not particularly common, as it only occurs when a chemical is inhaled on a large scale, which could be in situations such as a chemical spillage in the workplace. (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • The symptoms of occupational asthma may appear when a patient reaches his workplace and symptoms disappear after a patient leaves the workplace. (powershow.com)
  • There are currently more than 250 workplace substances that have been identified as possible causes of occupational asthma. (thecleanzine.com)
  • Occupational asthma is a lung disorder in which various substances found in the workplace lead to breathing difficulties. (drugster.info)
  • Many substances in the workplace can cause occupational asthma. (drugster.info)
  • Occupational asthma tends to improve over the weekend and holidays, when the sufferer is away from the workplace. (ohparsons.co.uk)
  • Occupational asthma is a common type of asthma caused by a specific agent in the workplace. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The relationship between asthma and the workplace is important to consider in all cases of adult asthma [ 1 ] . (patient.info)
  • In people who have sensitive airways, asthma symptoms can be triggered by breathing in substances called triggers. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Risk factors for developing OA are the following: a person already has asthma and allergies, a family pre-disposition for asthma and allergies, or works around known asthma triggers. (bellaonline.com)
  • Avoidance of occupational triggers is an important part of management. (drugs.com)
  • Due to the acute and/or delayed impact of occupational exposures on the respiratory systems, RTs must be aware of the triggers associated with an acute exacerbation. (aarc.org)
  • The report highlights the benefits of essential asthma education and services that reduce the impact of these triggers, but most often these benefits are not covered by health insurers. (ohsonline.com)
  • Despite the fact that outdoor air quality has improved, we've reduced two common asthma triggers-secondhand smoke and smoking in general-asthma is increasing," said Paul Garbe, D.V.M., M.P.H, chief of CDC's Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch. (ohsonline.com)
  • Teach patients how to avoid asthma triggers such as tobacco smoke, mold, pet dander, and outdoor air pollution. (ohsonline.com)
  • VOETS, LLC provides testing and consulting services to identify environmental asthma triggers to help asthmatics manage their condition. (environmental-expert.com)
  • People with the condition are often exposed to numerous known asthma triggers in their homes, schools, and work environments. (environmental-expert.com)
  • So you need to talk to your employer about what measures could be taken to help you at work, for example, being permitted time off for medical appointments and avoiding certain triggers to your asthma, such as dust. (simpsonmillar.co.uk)
  • Despite significant recent advances, a unified understanding of the physiology, histology, and immunology of asthma remains elusive, in part because of the lack of a clear correlation among symptoms, triggers, and treatment efficacy. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Irritant induced asthma directly triggers the airways and causes inflammation of the airways. (powershow.com)
  • Immune mediated asthma is caused by the external stimulus, which initially triggers the bodys immune system causing asthma. (powershow.com)
  • For example A patient is allergic to smoke, when somebody sitting next to him smokes it triggers symptoms of occupational asthma. (powershow.com)
  • During an asthma episode, inflamed airways react to environmental triggers such as smoke, dust, or pollen. (wikipedia.org)
  • The airways of asthma patients are "hypersensitive" to certain triggers, also known as stimuli (see below). (wikipedia.org)
  • Occupational asthma is caused by inhaling fumes, gases, dust or other potentially harmful substances while 'on the job. (aaaai.org)
  • If you already have asthma, it may be worsened by being exposed to certain substances at work. (aaaai.org)
  • People with a family history of allergies are more likely to develop occupational asthma, particularly to some substances such as flour, animals and latex. (aaaai.org)
  • Occupational asthma is asthma that's caused by breathing in chemical fumes, gases, dust or other substances on the job. (drugs.com)
  • Sensitizer-induced occupational asthma immunologic form of asthma which occurs due to inhalation of specific substances (i.e., high-molecular-weight proteins from plants and animal origins, or low-molecular-weight agents that include chemicals, metals and wood dusts) and occurs after a latency period of several weeks to years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occupational asthma is caused by workers breathing in substances at work that produce a hypersensitive state in the airways - the small tubes that carry air in and out of the lungs - and trigger a subsequent response in them. (ehstoday.com)
  • Setting a target to reduce cases of asthma caused by substances at work by 30 percent over the next nine years. (ehstoday.com)
  • Publishing an ACoP on the control of occupational asthma as an annex to the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002. (ehstoday.com)
  • The HSC hopes this will bring home to employers that the law requires them to ensure substances that cause occupational asthma are properly controlled. (ehstoday.com)
  • London, Sep 26 : Mothers exposed to certain substances and chemicals while in their jobs during pregnancy could give birth to children with higher chances of asthma. (topnews.in)
  • Out of the children whose mothers were occupationally exposed to low molecular weight substances, 18.6 percent had asthma. (topnews.in)
  • The guidelines describe occupational asthma, the different types, and the substances which cause it. (europa.eu)
  • Because asthma symptoms and the substances that provoke them can change, a patient who has occupational asthma should be closely monitored by a family physician, allergist, or doctor who specializes in occupational medicine or lung disease. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In fact, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) reports that more than 250 substances are known or believed to cause or exacerbate work-related asthma. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Where the workforce may be exposed to substances that can cause asthma, it is important to identify who may be exposed to these substances. (seton.co.uk)
  • Prospective employees should be asked about pre-existing asthma conditions caused by sensitisation to substances to which they might be exposed in their new job. (seton.co.uk)
  • Millions of workers in a wide range of industries and occupations are potentially exposed to hundreds of organic and inorganic substances associated with occupationally-induced asthma. (moldex.com)
  • For metals and highly toxic asthma-causing substances, the Moldex ® 8000 series with 8940, 8990 or the 7000 series with 7940 or 7990 as well as the 2730N100 or 2360P100 model. (moldex.com)
  • An individual can develop occupational asthma if they are exposed to substances within their line of employment. (forbessolicitors.co.uk)
  • There are a myriad of irritant substances that can cause occupational asthma and symptoms can sometimes take weeks or months to develop. (forbessolicitors.co.uk)
  • Occupational asthma is a form of asthma caused by breathing in chemical fumes, gases, dust or other substances whilst at work. (fabresearch.org)
  • Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) to help ensure substances that cause occupational asthma are properly controlled by employers. (aplusa-online.com)
  • You most probably will not be aware that you are allergic to the substances causing your occupational asthma, making it extremely difficult to prevent. (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • Work aggravated asthma can be triggered by the same substances that evoked your occupational asthma, such as flour dust for example. (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • A patient of occupational asthma may develop an allergic reaction, irritant reaction, or reaction to certain substances at work place, which can result in an asthma attack. (powershow.com)
  • Occupational asthma is a disease categorised by breathing problems or chest tightness caused by substances that you may come across at work. (ohparsons.co.uk)
  • Many substances in workplaces are known to cause occupational asthma. (findatopdoc.com)
  • and (ii) evaluate whether, and how, constitutional (e.g. atopy) and behavioural (e.g. smoking) risk factors for occupational asthma modulate the effects of allergenic and/or irritative substances involved in these occupations. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It was probably first recorded in 1713 when one of the fathers of occupational health, Bernadina Ramazzini said bakers and textile workers had problems with coughing shortness of breath , hoarseness and asthma. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The symptom information on this page attempts to provide a list of some possible signs and symptoms of Occupational asthma -- Bakers . (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • This signs and symptoms information for Occupational asthma -- Bakers has been gathered from various sources, may not be fully accurate, and may not be the full list of Occupational asthma -- Bakers signs or Occupational asthma -- Bakers symptoms. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • Furthermore, signs and symptoms of Occupational asthma -- Bakers may vary on an individual basis for each patient. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • Only your doctor can provide adequate diagnosis of any signs or symptoms and whether they are indeed Occupational asthma -- Bakers symptoms. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • This study aims to investigate early development of airways inflammation and asthma-like symptoms in apprentice bakers, pastry-makers and hairdressers, three populations at risk of occupational asthma whose work-related exposures involve agents of different nature. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Bakers commonly develop allergic asthma from breathing in flower and cereal grains. (blogspot.com)
  • Occupational asthma is an occupational lung disease and a type of asthma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in developed countries. (bmj.com)
  • 2 Although both physicians and the lay public are aware of other occupational lung disorders such as silicosis and asbestosis (see Disease Management chapter on Occupational Lung Disease ), OA is the most prevalent occupational lung disease in industrialized countries. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • In occupational health, lung disease is the most common form of disease encountered after skin problems. (personneltoday.com)
  • OA, by definition, is a lung disease caused by occupational exposures and is the cause of about 15% of adult-onset asthma. (personneltoday.com)
  • The article discusses occupational asthma as the most common occupational lung disease in western countries. (ebscohost.com)
  • At the Birmingham Occupational Lung Disease Service UK, we have seen 12 healthcare professionals and cleaners with occupational asthma who were exposed to chlorine-releasing agents. (bmj.com)
  • Asthma is the most frequent occupational lung disease. (ersjournals.com)
  • Occupational asthma, also referred to as work-related asthma, is the most common occupational lung disease in the United States. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Airway dysfunction in elite athletes-an occupational lung disease? (springer.com)
  • To describe the recent findings of the last 2 years on the epidemiology and phenotypes of occupational asthma, as well as new developments in its diagnosis and management. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Airways hyper responsiveness to methacholine is a valid surrogate marker of airways inflammation, which has proved useful in occupational epidemiology. (biomedcentral.com)
  • With occupational asthma, lung inflammation may be triggered by an allergic response to a substance, which usually develops over time. (drugs.com)
  • Occupational lung diseases include byssinosis (typically cotton dust), allergic rhinitis, farmer's lung, asbestosis, pneumoconiosis (most commonly coal dust), silicosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (personneltoday.com)
  • The goal of the Proceedings is to publish articles with a predominantly clinical focus which directly impact quality of care for patients with allergic disease and asthma and by having the potential to directly impact the quality of patient care. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Occupational rhinitis and occupational asthma (OA) are usually due to an allergic response to high or low molecular weight agents, either through the interaction with specific IgE antibodies or by other immune mechanisms. (worldallergy.org)
  • During the first visit, skin prick tests, total immunoglobulin E (IgE), a nonspecific bronchoprovocation test, and specific bronchoprovocation tests using occupational agents were performed to confirm the diagnosis of allergic diseases. (nih.gov)
  • We found a reduced vitamin D intake in both irritant and allergic asthma, in obese and non-obese patients," revealed the team - noting that the average intake in non-obese patients, although higher, did not reach statistical significance. (fabresearch.org)
  • Irritant induced asthma is similar to allergic occupational asthma, with the difference that you do not have to be allergic to the substance inhaled. (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • an allergic reaction, an irritant reaction or a reaction which results in the build-up of naturally occurring chemicals, such as histamines in the lungs resulting in an asthma attack. (thecleanzine.com)
  • What Are the Causes and Symptoms of Allergic Asthma? (findatopdoc.com)
  • About 5 percent of those working with lab animals or latex gloves develop allergic asthma. (blogspot.com)
  • A cross-sectional survey of asthma and allergic diseases in elementary school children was conducted in July 2009. (biomedcentral.com)
  • There are two major categories of asthma: allergic and non-allergic. (wikipedia.org)
  • The focus of this article will be allergic asthma. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mechanisms behind allergic asthma-i.e., asthma resulting from an immune response to inhaled allergens-are the best understood of the causal factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • WEA is present in about a fifth of patients with asthma and a wide variety of conditions at work, including irritant chemicals, dusts, second-hand smoke, common allergens that may be present at work, as well as other "exposures" such as emotional stress, worksite temperature, and physical exertion can exacerbate asthma symptoms in these patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis is based on occupational history, including assessment of job activities, allergens in the work environment, and a temporal association between work and symptoms. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Hundreds of occupational allergens exist, ranging from low molecular weight chemicals to large proteins. (merckmanuals.com)
  • This case documents occupational rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma due to IgE sensitization to inhaled chicory allergens, including one identified for the first time as a 17-kD Bet v 1 homologous protein, with secondary oral allergy syndrome to related foods. (nih.gov)
  • Flour dust, animal dander and car fumes are a few examples of allergens which can cause occupational asthma. (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • Having occupational asthma or work aggravated asthma doesn't mean you are unfit to work however, you should notify your employer who may be able to make changes to your work environment in an attempt of minimising your symptoms, which includes installing extractor fans in the work place, isolating you from the process linked to the risk, and/or providing you with respiratory protective equipment to prevent you from inhaling the allergens. (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • In both people with asthma and people who are free of the disease, inhaled allergens that find their way to the inner airways are ingested by a type of cell known as antigen-presenting cells, or APCs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Isocyanates, flour and grain were the most commonly cited agents for occupational asthma from 2006 to 2008 in the THOR industrial injuries and disablement benefit schemes. (personneltoday.com)
  • The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports that isocyanates are one of the most common chemical causes of work-related asthma. (webwire.com)
  • Isocyanates can also sensitize workers, making them subject to severe asthma attacks if they are exposed again. (webwire.com)
  • The goals of the programme are the prevention, early detection and mitigation of asthma and dermatitis among workers exposed or potentially exposed to isocyanates and products containing isocyanates. (ilo.org)
  • In particular, the use of isocyanates has resulted in a greater morbidity caused by respiratory pathology, especially asthma. (isciii.es)
  • To find out about the scientific evidence related to the genetic polymorphism and workers exposed to isocyanates' susceptibility to develop occupational asthma. (isciii.es)
  • It s also important to note that you can develop occupational asthma even working in an office. (bellaonline.com)
  • People with allergies or with a family history of allergies are more likely to develop occupational asthma. (drugs.com)
  • HSE estimates that each year anywhere from 1,500 to 3,000 people in Great Britain develop occupational asthma. (ehstoday.com)
  • Like other types of asthma, occupational asthma can cause chest tightness, wheezing and shortness of breath, and people with allergies or with a family history of allergies are more likely to develop occupational asthma. (fabresearch.org)
  • Considering that not all the exposed workers develop the disease, a gene-environment interaction model has been proposed, which tries to explain the genetic predisposition that some individuals have and others have not to develop occupational asthma. (isciii.es)
  • It is possible to develop occupational asthma in almost any job role. (thecleanzine.com)
  • Occupational asthma is a part of a larger category of diseases known as occupational respiratory diseases and includes occupation-induced rhinitis and laryngitis, tracheitis, bronchitis and bronchiolitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, and interstitial diseases such as fibrosis and granuloma formation. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • A number of diseases have symptoms that mimic occupational asthma, such as asthma due to nonoccupational causes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), irritable larynx syndrome, hyperventilation syndrome , hypersensitivity pneumonitis , and bronchiolitis obliterans . (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with coexisting work-related rhinitis and asthma would benefit from an adequate and simultaneous recognition of both diseases. (hindawi.com)
  • The study provided valid and precise estimates on the importance of specific occupations, industries and exposures in relation to asthma incidence and prevalence, similar estimates for other respiratory symptoms and diseases and also for declines in pulmonary function. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A questionnaire administrated by trained interviewers was delivered requesting information on respiratory symptoms and diseases, socio-demographic factors, tobacco smoking, complete occupational history since the last survey, environmental exposures, family history, diet, treatment and use of health services. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A team from University Hospital Strasbourg collected data over a three year period from a network of respiratory doctors specializing in occupational diseases. (jagran.com)
  • Conclusions: The estimated $6.6 billion cost of occupational COPD and asthma in 1996 is likely to rise with the increasing prevalence of these diseases and warrants preventive intervention. (elsevier.com)
  • Alternatively, inhaling fumes from a lung irritant, such as chlorine, can trigger immediate asthma symptoms in the absence of allergy. (drugs.com)
  • [2] Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) is an severe form of irritant induced asthma where respiratory symptoms usually develop in the minutes or hours after a single accidental inhalation of a high concentration of irritant gas, aerosol, vapor, or smoke. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most definitive form of irritant-induced asthma 5 is reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. (cmaj.ca)
  • An ACCP consensus statement defines work-related asthmas as including occupational asthma (ie, asthma induced by sensitizer or irritant work exposures) and work-exacerbated asthma (ie, preexisting or concurrent asthma worsened by work factors). (medscape.com)
  • In reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS), which is nonallergenic, people with no history of asthma develop persistent, reversible airway obstruction after acute overexposure to irritant dust, fumes, or gas. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Airway inflammation persists even after removal of the acute irritant, and the syndrome is indistinguishable from asthma. (merckmanuals.com)
  • In irritant-associated vocal cord dysfunction, which mimics asthma, abnormal apposition and closure of the vocal cords, especially during inspiration, occur after acute irritant inhalation. (merckmanuals.com)
  • EAACI position paper: irritant-induced asthma. (bmj.com)
  • The main phenotypes of occupational asthma are: occupational asthma caused by high-molecular-weight (HMW) or low-molecular-weight (LMW) agents, irritant-induced asthma and occupational asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • In conclusion, women employed in domestic cleaning are at an increased risk of asthma and possibly chronic bronchitis, this risk being predominantly related to irritant exposures. (tesisenred.net)
  • Irritant-induced asthma - reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). (patient.info)
  • Medical content developed and reviewed by the leading experts in allergy, asthma and immunology. (aaaai.org)
  • According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI), about 15% of asthma cases in the U.S. may be due to a person s work. (bellaonline.com)
  • Brooks C, Pearce N, Douwes J. The hygiene hypothesis in allergy and asthma: an update. (medscape.com)
  • Allergy and Asthma Proceedings is a peer reviewed publication dedicated to distributing timely scientific research regarding advancements in the knowledge and practice of allergy, asthma and immunology. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. (freemd.com)
  • New York, NY -- May is recognized as National Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month across the United States. (environmental-expert.com)
  • We report the case of a patient working in a factory producing inulin from chicory who developed rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma to the dust of dry chicory roots and oral allergy syndrome to raw fruits and vegetables. (nih.gov)
  • Korean J Asthma Allergy Clin Immunol. (koreamed.org)
  • Diagnosis of occupational asthma is based on lung function test and allergy test. (findatopdoc.com)
  • According to the American Accedemy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology ( AAAAI.org ) as many as 15 percent of asthmatics in the U.S. have occupational asthma. (blogspot.com)
  • Like other types of asthma, occupational asthma can cause chest tightness, wheezing and shortness of breath. (drugs.com)
  • The highest incidence rate of occupational asthma as reported to chest physicians was found among individuals involved in the manufacture of basic metals. (personneltoday.com)
  • Given the prevalence of work-related asthma, the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) supports consideration of work-related asthma in all patients presenting with new-onset or worsening asthma. (medscape.com)
  • Diagnosis and management of work-related asthma: American College Of Chest Physicians Consensus Statement. (medscape.com)
  • People who have occupational asthma usually have symptoms during the workweek, such as coughing, wheezing, and chest tightness. (peacehealth.org)
  • A person who has occupational asthma has one or more symptoms, including coughing, shortness of breath, tightness in the chest, and wheezing . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Sufferers of work related chest conditions, such as occupational asthma, have usually been employed in heavy industry. (beechampeacock.co.uk)
  • Asthma is a condition that leads to wheezing, coughing and chest tightness and is the most frequently reported occupational respiratory disease in Great Britain. (seton.co.uk)
  • Asthma is a condition characterized by breathing difficulty, chest tightness, coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath. (moldex.com)
  • Adult patients (n = 148) were recruited in chest clinics and control subjects without asthma (n = 228) were population-based. (inserm.fr)
  • Symptoms of occupational asthma often include general symptoms of an asthma attack such as coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and breathing difficulty. (thecleanzine.com)
  • The symptoms of asthma include attacks of coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath and tightening around the chest. (ohparsons.co.uk)
  • Symptoms of occupational asthma are the same as asthma in general, which (as you can read here ) include wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, runny nose, nasal congestion, and eye irritation. (blogspot.com)
  • If you've been diagnosed with asthma, call your provider right away if you develop a cough, shortness of breath, fever, or other signs of a lung infection, especially if you think you have the flu. (medlineplus.gov)
  • During September-November, 1985, four employees of a factory were seen at the occupational clinic complaining of cough, shortness of breath, and wheezing. (nap.edu)
  • Asthma is a lung disorder which can cause shortness of breath. (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • Prospective study of body mass index, weight change, and risk of adult-onset asthma in women. (medscape.com)
  • A considerable proportion of adult onset asthma is associated with these exposures. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Epidemiological studies have consistently found cleaners to be at increased risk of new-onset asthma, 1 , 2 the risk seems to be particularly high in domestic cleaners using spray bleaches. (bmj.com)
  • Clinicians and researchers have proposed several changes in workplaces to improve the status of workers who have occupational asthma, which is asthma whose onset is caused by occupational exposures. (cochrane.org)
  • Work related asthma accounts for about 10% of all adult onset asthma. (hsa.ie)
  • Studying genes by environment interactions (G × E) may help identify new genes related to adult-onset asthma. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • 9-15% of adult-onset asthma [ 3 ] . (patient.info)
  • The first part of the report explores the 2010 BOHRF Occupational Asthma Guidance on sensitiser-induced occupational asthma. (personneltoday.com)
  • If sensitiser-induced occupational asthma is suspected, additional testing of asthma should be done, preferably while the patient is still working. (bmj.com)
  • According to a recent report from the CDC , 33,307 people between the ages of 15 and 64 died from asthma between 1999 and 2016. (aarc.org)
  • In the U.S., OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) governs the safety of work places, and addresses the problem of OA and how employers should deal with it. (bellaonline.com)
  • In the second part of this respiratory health special report, Bernard Garbe looks at how serial peak expiratory flow can be used to identify occupational asthma. (personneltoday.com)
  • The British Occupational Health Research Foundation (BOHRF) range of guides for occupational asthma identification, management and prevention includes guidelines for occupational health practitioners among other groups. (personneltoday.com)
  • Occupational health professionals often find the detection and classification of OA difficult. (personneltoday.com)
  • In 2000, the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) announced a 10-year occupational health strategy for Great Britain. (personneltoday.com)
  • The following tables show occupations that are known to be at risk for occupational asthma, the main reference for these is the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • The POOSH - Professional Organisations in Occupational Safety and Health - group is to run a one-day workshop on occupational asthma. (personneltoday.com)
  • The Health and Safety Executive estimates that each year up to 7,000 new cases of asthma are caused directly through occupations or have work as a significant contributing factor. (personneltoday.com)
  • There is a high prevalence of dysfunctional breathing among patients diagnosed with asthma, so it is important that health professionals are aware of its effects. (ebscohost.com)
  • Occupational asthma: Health crisis in health care workers. (ebscohost.com)
  • Occupational asthma is a serious problem among health care workers, according to data available in states tracking the disease. (ebscohost.com)
  • • Sixteen percent of confirmed occupational asthma cases in four states were in health care workers. (ebscohost.com)
  • The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) reports, They are widely used in the manufacture of flexible and rigid foams, fibers, coatings such as paints and varnishes, and elastomers, and are increasingly used in the automobile industry, auto body repair, and building insulation materials. (webwire.com)
  • To learn more about isocyanate testing or other occupational, environmental, health and safety services, please visit www.EMSL.com , call (800) 220-3675 or email [email protected] . (webwire.com)
  • Kathleen Clark, PhD, MS, RRT, CPFT, program officer for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Spirometry Training Program , believes RTs need to keep occupational exposures top of mind when working with their asthma patients. (aarc.org)
  • The occupational asthma study (ECRHS-OA) forms part of a wider international multicentre survey on respiratory health (European Community Respiratory Health Survey-ECRHS). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The Health and Safety Commission (HSC) wants to reduce occupational asthma cases by 30 percent and has adopted an Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) to reach that goal. (ehstoday.com)
  • Membership will be drawn from industry, unions, charities involved with asthma and health professionals. (ehstoday.com)
  • With proper control measures, this occupational disease is entirely preventable," said Sandra Caldwell, head of HSE''s Health Directorate, who will chair the Project Board. (ehstoday.com)
  • The plan will include actions on the five key programs in ''Securing Health Together'' for improving occupational health. (ehstoday.com)
  • Approximately one third of workers exposed to cleaning agents notified to the UK Health and Safety Executive SWORD (surveillance of work-related and occupational respiratory disease) database with occupational asthma are reported to be due to chlorine-releasing agents (personal communication from Raymond Agius, Institute of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Manchester). (bmj.com)
  • Berit Hvass Christensen from the School of Public Health in Denmark said: "There are many factors which could cause asthma and many associations which have not been explored. (topnews.in)
  • This is the first large-scale study which has shown an association between maternal exposures during work and asthma in children," said Christensen, according to a School of Public Health statement. (topnews.in)
  • To adopt behaviors aimed at the prevention of occupational asthma and occupational rhinitis, it is important to know the health risks associated with various training and working environments. (csst.qc.ca)
  • Air pollution, health, and socio-economic status: the effect of outdoor air quality on childhood asthma. (freemd.com)
  • Asthma is a serious, lifelong disease that unfortunately kills thousands of people each year and adds billions to our nation's health care costs," said CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. "We have to do a better job educating people about managing their symptoms and how to correctly use medicines to control asthma so they can live longer more productive lives while saving health care costs. (ohsonline.com)
  • This new 2 day course offers training to those working in respiratory physiology/medicine with an interest in occupational asthma, or those currently working in occupational health. (artp.org.uk)
  • Elisa said it is running a six-month pilot scheme with the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (Tyoterveyslaitos) to provide remote asthma monitoring services. (telecompaper.com)
  • To learn more about VOETS and their air quality, environmental, health, safety, or occupational testing and consulting services, please visit www.VOETS.nyc , email [email protected] , or call (212) 860-7450. (environmental-expert.com)
  • It is difficult to say how many cases of occupational asthma occur each year - the Health and Safety Executive thinks that its data sources substantially underestimate the number of people who are suffering from the condition, and the number of people who begin to suffer from it each year. (thompsons-scotland.co.uk)
  • Background Periodic health surveillance (HS) of workers can identify early cases of occupational asthma. (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • Methods A telephone survey of employers, and their occupational health (OH) professionals, carried out in three sectors with exposures potentially capable of causing occupational asthma (bakeries, wood working and motor vehicle repair). (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) presents a website , designed as a resource for individuals interested in the prevention of occupational asthma (OA). (aplusa-online.com)
  • It will give occupational health researchers the ability to quickly identify gaps in current knowledge, to judge which interventions appear most effective and which should be examined for their use in additional studies, and to find basic information on study designs used in research on the prevention of OA. (aplusa-online.com)
  • Our data came from three large European cohorts: Epidemiological Family-based Study of the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Disease in Adults (SAPALDIA), and European Community Respiratory Health Survey in Adults (ECRHS). (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Childhood asthma is one of the most common public health problems in developed communities. (biomedcentral.com)
  • According to the World Health Organization, asthma affects 235 million people worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • A systematic and parallel diagnostic approach enables confirmation of a diagnosis of OA and OR in patients complaining of work-related rhinitis and asthma symptoms. (hindawi.com)
  • Wood is a natural material that is able to trigger rhinitis and asthma in exposed subjects in occupational settings. (upm.es)
  • Twenty years of SHIELD: decreasing incidence of occupational asthma in the West Midlands, UK? (bmj.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence of occupational asthma in the seven aluminum smelters of Australia and New Zealand from 1991 to 2006. (fluoridealert.org)
  • New exposures associated with work-related asthma continue to be recognized. (cdc.gov)
  • Work-related asthma is often under-recognised and misdiagnosed (Rosenman et al, 1997). (personneltoday.com)
  • Work-related asthma can be divided into two general groupings: occupational asthma and work-aggravated asthma. (personneltoday.com)
  • O40-5 Hand hygiene and asthma control in u.s. nurses: a new risk factor for work-related asthma? (bmj.com)
  • If you suffer from occupational asthma or any other work-related illness, you may be able to collect workers compensation and should discuss your personal situation with an employment law attorney . (legalmatch.com)
  • OA is included into a wider term call work-related asthma. (worldallergy.org)
  • Various diagnostic tests can be used to aid in diagnoses of work related asthma. (wikipedia.org)
  • At Beecham Peacock we have been helping victims of work related conditions such as occupational asthma for many years. (beechampeacock.co.uk)
  • If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with occupational asthma or another work related condition, contact our Newcastle office on 0191 232 3048 to start your compensation claim. (beechampeacock.co.uk)
  • OASYS is a free award winning computer program that plots and interprets serial peak expiratory flow (PEF) readings of patients suspected as having occupational asthma or work-related asthma. (artp.org.uk)
  • New research published recently in a scientific journal indicates that GPs need to be better at recognising occupational asthma after figures show that many people who develop work-related asthma are not correctly diagnosed by doctors. (seton.co.uk)
  • The report, published in Occupational Medicine by the Society of Occupational Medicine (SOM), says that work-related factors cause 1 in 10 cases of asthma in adults but an audit of patient records suggests that GPs do not recognise this in three-quarters of patients. (seton.co.uk)
  • Dr Richard Heron, President of the SOM said, "Highlighting the prevalence of occupational asthma is absolutely key, as too often work-related factors are overlooked. (seton.co.uk)
  • If you've developed work related asthma due to the negligence of your current or a previous employer, you may be able to claim occupational asthma compensation . (simpsonmillar.co.uk)
  • http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24521110?tool=bestpractice.com [3] Malo JL, Vandenplas O. Definitions and classification of work-related asthma. (bmj.com)
  • In modern society, occupational asthma is the most frequently occurring work-related respiratory disease. (ishn.com)
  • It has been estimated that one in seven severe asthma exacerbations is associated with work-related exposures. (ishn.com)
  • Occupational asthma also known as work related asthma is a chronic lung disorder. (powershow.com)
  • A new report published today in the scientific journal, Occupational Medicine, finds that many people who develop work related asthma are not correctly diagnosed by GPs. (talkhealthpartnership.com)
  • Work related factors cause one in ten cases of asthma in adults but an audit of patient records suggests that GPs do not recognise this in three quarters of patients. (talkhealthpartnership.com)
  • Work-related asthma is suggested if asthma symptoms improve when away from work or deteriorate when at work (see algorithm, below). (patient.info)
  • Occupational asthma is difficult to identify because respiratory symptoms can take weeks or years to develop. (aarc.org)
  • This study examined the incidence of respiratory symptoms and asthma in an 11-year Norwegian community cohort study with 2,819 subjects. (nih.gov)
  • In those exposed to dust or fumes, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) varied between 1.4 (1.1, 1.7) and 2.1 (1.3, 3.2) for developing respiratory symptoms or asthma after adjusting for sex, age, educational level, and smoking. (nih.gov)
  • Those subjects who took part in the first occupational asthma study survey were re-contacted in 1999, to determine risk factors for incidence and remission of asthma, other respiratory symptoms, atopy, changes in bronchial responsiveness and lung function. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • From the available evidence, there was consistent evidence that certain types of cleaning work were associated with an increased risk of developing asthma and/or experiencing respiratory symptoms consistent with asthma, both new cases and exacerbations of pre-existing conditions. (hse.gov.uk)
  • In the latter case, the presentation of occupational asthma may resemble that of allergen-induced occupational asthma because the worker may have been able to work for some time without experiencing respiratory symptoms ( i.e . there has been a symptom-free latency period). (ishn.com)
  • However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a multiple IgE-mediated sensitization to different woods that caused occupational respiratory symptoms in the same worker. (upm.es)
  • Allergies play a role in many cases of occupational asthma. (aaaai.org)
  • Among the variety of causative agents of occupational asthma, food-derived components are increasingly being reported, accounting for up to 25% cases of occupational asthma and/or occupational rhinitis. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Occupational contact dermatitis, with asthma and rhinitis, from c. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Occupational Asthma and Contact Dermatitis in a Spray Painter after Introduction of an Aziridine Cross-Linker. (harvard.edu)
  • 2 Due to the large numbers employed in cleaning, they constitute a significant proportion of the population attributable risk of occupational asthma. (bmj.com)
  • The risk of asthma attributable to occupational exposures. (semanticscholar.org)
  • To assess mortality, we reviewed data from national surveys and applied a population attributable risk (PAR) of 15% for both asthma and COPD. (elsevier.com)
  • Asthma is caused by inflammation (swelling) in the airways of the lungs. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Mechanism of airway inflammation in asthma. (medscape.com)
  • Inflammation and asthma. (medscape.com)
  • These include inhaled corticosteroids to reduce inflammation and quick-relief medicines (such as bronchodilators ) to help you breathe during an asthma attack. (peacehealth.org)
  • However, several characteristics of asthma are common to many phenotypes, including airway inflammation, airway hyper-responsiveness, and reversible airflow obstruction. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Asthma is a heterogeneous disease, whose pathologic features most often include reversible airway obstruction, chronic airway inflammation, bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR), and airways remodelling. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Many young children who have symptoms characteristic of asthma, including wheezing and coughing (especially at night), may not have chronic airway inflammation. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Occupational asthma occurs when there is a reversible inflammation of the airways. (powershow.com)
  • There are two elements of occupational asthma- one in which there are recurrent attacks and another in which there is chronic inflammation. (powershow.com)
  • Symptoms of asthma are caused by inflammation of the airways. (findatopdoc.com)
  • The basic alteration of occupational asthma is airways inflammation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Asthma is a common pulmonary condition defined by chronic inflammation of respiratory tubes, tightening of respiratory smooth muscle, and episodes of bronchoconstriction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some examples of the more than 250 agents that can cause sensitizer-induced occupational asthma are listed in Table 2 . (cmaj.ca)
  • Occupational asthma is most apt to affect workers who have personal or family histories of allergies or asthma, or who are often required to handle or breathe dust or fumes created by especially irritating material. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 2007). 'Occupational Asthma in Subjects Occupationally Exposed to Herbal and Fruit Tea Dust', Arhiv za higijenu rada i toksikologiju , 58(2), str. (srce.hr)
  • Minov J, Karadžinska-Bislimovska J, Vasilevska K, Risteska-Kuc S, Stoleski S. Occupational Asthma in Subjects Occupationally Exposed to Herbal and Fruit Tea Dust. (srce.hr)
  • J. Minov, J. Karadžinska-Bislimovska, K. Vasilevska, S. Risteska-Kuc i S. Stoleski, "Occupational Asthma in Subjects Occupationally Exposed to Herbal and Fruit Tea Dust", Arhiv za higijenu rada i toksikologiju , vol.58, br. (srce.hr)
  • We performed a cross-sectional study to detect occupational asthma (OA) in 63 subjects occupationally exposed to herbal and fruit tea dust and in 63 corresponding controls. (srce.hr)
  • Developing a sensitivity to dust or a chemical is the most common cause of occupational asthma. (ohparsons.co.uk)
  • Patients with pre-existing asthma aggravated non-specifically by dust and fumes at work (work-aggravated asthma) should be distinguished from those with pre-existing asthma who become additionally sensitised to an occupational agent [ 3 ] . (patient.info)
  • German researchers have identified flour as the main cause of occupational asthma, closely followed by cleaning products. (jagran.com)
  • Aerosol particles which deeply penetrate the human airways and which trigger baker s asthma manifestations are known to represent only a part of flour and of airborne particles found in bakeries. (scialert.net)
  • While medical history and physical examination lack both the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests for occupational asthma (Malo et al, 1991), delayed diagnosis can lead to a worsened prognosis (Paggiaro et al, 1994). (personneltoday.com)
  • The prognosis varies depending on how well triggering factors can be avoided and whether asthma management plans are adhered to (e.g. preventative medications). (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • HMW agents can induce an immunoglobulin E (IgE) response in susceptible individuals and can cause asthma by an IgE-mediated mechanism, similar to that seen in a patient with atopic asthma. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • Chemicals that cause asthma, such as formaldehyde (Rule 1910.1048). (legalmatch.com)
  • Occupational asthma (OA) should be suspected in a worker with newly developed asthma exposed to agent known to cause asthma. (koreamed.org)
  • Click here to learn how your co-workers cigarette smoke can cause asthma. (blogspot.com)
  • All adults with asthma should be questioned about their occupational history and exposures. (cdc.gov)
  • de Marco R, Locatelli F, Cazzoletti L, Bugiani M, Carosso A, Marinoni A.. Incidence of asthma and mortality in a cohort of young adults: a 7-year prospective study. (freemd.com)
  • About 16 out of 100 adults who have asthma have it because of exposures at work. (peacehealth.org)
  • Asthma diagnoses increased among all demographic groups between 2001 and 2009, though a higher percentage of children reported having asthma than adults. (ohsonline.com)
  • Asthma diagnoses increased among all demographic groups between 2001 and 2009, though a higher percentage of children reported having asthma than adults (9.6 percent compared to 7.7 percent in 2009). (ohsonline.com)
  • Asthma is common disease in both adults and children. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Some will develop asthma as older children or adults, but many do not. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Assessment of BHR in adults is much easier than it is in children, and BHR is often the basis on which the diagnosis of asthma is made. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The diagnosis of occupational asthma should be suspected in all adults with symptoms of airflow limitation and it should be positively searched for in those with high-risk occupations or exposures. (patient.info)
  • It is common and has been reported to occur for about 20% of adults with asthma when at work [ 8 ] . (patient.info)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 1 in 11 children and 1 in 12 adults have asthma in the United States of America. (wikipedia.org)
  • While many asthma sufferers are born with the condition, asthma can be occupationally-induced. (moldex.com)
  • Rabe KF, Jörres R, Nowak D, Behr N, Magnussen H. Comparison of the effects of salmeterol and formoterol on airway tone and responsiveness over 24 hours in bronchial asthma. (springer.com)
  • Introduction: To investigate the feasibility of improving asthma management - in particular, the implementation of individualised asthma action plans (AAPs) for poorly-controlled adult asthma patients - by providing training in asthma-focused clinical and communication skills for practice nurses. (ebscohost.com)
  • Occupational factors are associated with 10-15% of adult asthma cases. (medscape.com)
  • This may help, but over time, even a very small amount of the substance can trigger an asthma attack. (medlineplus.gov)
  • They have to be taken every day for a long term to prevent flare ups, even when exposed to asthma trigger. (findatopdoc.com)
  • The prevalence of occupational asthma has usually been estimated from registers of cases rather than population surveys. (semanticscholar.org)
  • If you do, you could be at risk for occupational asthma. (tgdaily.com)
  • What is Occupational Asthma and who s at Risk? (bellaonline.com)
  • A misdiagnosis will lead to further sick days off from work, and an increased risk of needing emergency treatment for a full-blown asthma attack. (bellaonline.com)
  • Farmers, painters, plastic and rubber workers, and cleaners (caretakers, window cleaners, chimney and road sweepers) are at greatest risk for developing asthma. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • Atopy is known to increase the risk of occupational asthma to high molecular weight agents. (personneltoday.com)
  • Cigarette smoking is the leading risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, although other risk factors, including occupational. (ebscohost.com)
  • Acetaminophen use and risk of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in adolescents: international study of asthma and allergies in childhood phase three. (medscape.com)
  • The importance of occupational risk factors for asthma has been underestimated, particularly among women. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The first phase of the ECRHS was conducted in 1991/92 and examined risk factors for asthma and atopy in subjects aged 20-44 years. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A review of the published scientific literature was undertaken to summarise evidence about cleaning products that may increase the risk of occupational asthma. (hse.gov.uk)
  • US military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan have been found to be at increased risk for asthma (and also bronchiolitis obliterans). (merckmanuals.com)
  • These findings can help with future prevention methods to make sure people who are at risk of occupational asthma are protected from it," Blay concluded. (jagran.com)
  • A population-based cross-sectional study among 4,521 women showed that domestic cleaners had an increased risk of asthma and chronic bronchitis symptoms as compared with those never employed in cleaning. (tesisenred.net)
  • Aims To identify the overall levels of uptake and quality of HS for occupational asthma within three high risk industry sectors in the UK. (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • Risk assessments were common (67%) and 14% carried out some form of HS for occupational asthma, rising to 19% if only organizations reporting asthma hazards and risks were considered. (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • Although occupational exposures have been implicated as important risk factors for asthma and asthma exacerbations, associations between occupational exposures and asthma severity have not been reported. (inserm.fr)
  • Who is at risk of Occupational Asthma? (claimsnational.co.uk)
  • Risk of occupational asthma increases if you have existing allergies or asthma, or if allergies or asthma runs in the family. (thecleanzine.com)
  • Certain occupations are considered to be high-risk occupations for developing asthma. (findatopdoc.com)
  • The New Zealand workforce survey II: occupational risk factors for asthma. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Spirometry is essential in the detection, diagnosis and management of occupational asthma in susceptible workers. (personneltoday.com)
  • RTs have a significant opportunity to interact with workers, both as asthma educators and in the pulmonary laboratory," Blonshine said. (aarc.org)
  • Modular occupational questionnaires were developed for subjects employed as cleaners, homemakers, welders, metal workers, nurses, and subjects exposed to organic dusts in the paper and textile industries. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • If your asthma results from a problematic employment environment, you may be entitled to workers compensation . (legalmatch.com)
  • Occupational asthma and rhinitis in workers from a lasamide production line. (nih.gov)
  • According to OSHA, "An estimated 11 million workers in a wide range of industries and occupations are exposed to at least one of the numerous agents known to be associated with occupational asthma. (environmental-expert.com)
  • The evaluation of the work-relatedness of asthma in the exposed workers was based on serial peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) measurements and bronchoprovocation tests. (srce.hr)
  • Work-relatedness of symptoms was reported by all asthmatic tea workers and by no control with asthma. (srce.hr)
  • None of the tea workers with asthma met the criteria for medical case definition of the reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS). (srce.hr)
  • Recently, a specific inhalation challenge (SIC)-independent model has been developed to calculate the probability of occupational asthma diagnosis in workers exposed to HMW agents. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • To confirm the diagnosis of TDI-induced asthma and determine the prevalence among workers, 38 workers were interviewed and examined (84%) in the factory. (nap.edu)
  • Because TDI-induced occupational asthma has never, to our knowledge, been documented in Taiwan, this study was conducted to determine the etiology and prevalence rate of this outbreak of workers' asthma. (nap.edu)
  • Did your co-workers likewise get diagnosed with asthma? (blogspot.com)
  • A significant proportion of workers with symptoms that improve on days away from work or on holiday have been shown by objective tests not to have occupational asthma. (patient.info)
  • Welcome to the Prevention of Occupational Asthma: Study Search page! (cdc.gov)
  • This page provides access to a searchable, annotated bibliography of 140 articles that describe 142 primary or secondary occupational asthma prevention activities, complete with summaries of relevant methods and findings. (cdc.gov)
  • In order for the diagnosis to be successful, clinicians have to get involved with the primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of occupational asthma. (ebscohost.com)
  • Guideline] National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. (medscape.com)
  • The objective of these guidelines is to provide useful information to enable employers and employees manage the prevention of occupational asthma in workplaces. (europa.eu)
  • People diagnosed with asthma in the United States grew by 4.3 million between 2001 and 2009, according to a new Vital Signs report released recently by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (ohsonline.com)
  • Call your provider if you have symptoms of asthma. (medlineplus.gov)
  • To diagnose occupational asthma it is necessary to confirm the symptoms of asthma and establish the causal connection with the work environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • You could be 30 or 40 years old and still not show symptoms of asthma. (blogspot.com)
  • The multivariate model indicated that adjusted odd ratios of lifetime and 1-year symptoms of asthma were 1.682 (95% CI: 1.092-2.592) and 2.276 (95% CI: 1.117-4.638), respectively, between the groups with both AP(+) and ETS(+) and the others. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Expert Panel Report 3 (EPR-3): Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma-Summary Report 2007. (medscape.com)
  • According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Expert Report 3 (EPR3) - Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma, asthma is defined as "a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways in which many cells and cellular elements play a role: in particular, mast cells, eosinophils, T lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, and epithelial cells. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Novel approaches in occupational asthma diagnosis and management. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Complete avoidance is the key, but if avoidance is not possible, wearing protective gear, the use of long-term asthma treatments, and even a change in your job might be necessary. (bellaonline.com)
  • Effects of Interleukin-13 Blockade on Allergen-induced Airway Responses in Mild Atopic Asthma. (medscape.com)
  • Medication, physical therapy, and breathing aids may be needed to relieve symptoms of advanced occupational asthma involving airway damage. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • We aimed to investigate the relationship between occupational exposures and asthma in women employed in domestic cleaning. (tesisenred.net)
  • OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between occupational exposures and asthma severity. (inserm.fr)
  • Researchers at the Institute of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at the University of Birmingham conducted an audit of the electronic patient records of working age asthmatics. (seton.co.uk)
  • abstract = "Objective: To estimate the number of annual deaths, as well as the direct and indirect costs of occupational COPD and asthma, in the United States in 1996. (elsevier.com)
  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a related condition, with many occupational examples (e.g. flock worker's lung, farmer's lung, and indium lung). (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, unlike asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis targets lung alveoli rather than bronchi. (wikipedia.org)