Aspirin: The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Anti-Asthmatic Agents: Drugs that are used to treat asthma.Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors: Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Asthma, Exercise-Induced: Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).Administration, Inhalation: The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.Asthma, Occupational: Asthma attacks caused, triggered, or exacerbated by OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE.Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Bronchial Hyperreactivity: Tendency of the smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree to contract more intensely in response to a given stimulus than it does in the response seen in normal individuals. This condition is present in virtually all symptomatic patients with asthma. The most prominent manifestation of this smooth muscle contraction is a decrease in airway caliber that can be readily measured in the pulmonary function laboratory.Bronchodilator Agents: Agents that cause an increase in the expansion of a bronchus or bronchial tubes.Respiratory Sounds: Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Allergens: Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Adrenal Cortex HormonesTiclopidine: An effective inhibitor of platelet aggregation commonly used in the placement of STENTS in CORONARY ARTERIES.Thromboxane B2: A stable, physiologically active compound formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides. It is important in the platelet-release reaction (release of ADP and serotonin).Hypersensitivity: Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.Asthma, Aspirin-Induced: Asthmatic adverse reaction (e.g., BRONCHOCONSTRICTION) to conventional NSAIDS including aspirin use.Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with cyclooxygenase (PROSTAGLANDIN-ENDOPEROXIDE SYNTHASES) and thereby prevent its substrate-enzyme combination with arachidonic acid and the formation of eicosanoids, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes.Platelet Aggregation: The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.Hypersensitivity, Immediate: Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.Rhinitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA, the mucous membrane lining the NASAL CAVITIES.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Salicylates: The salts or esters of salicylic acids, or salicylate esters of an organic acid. Some of these have analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory activities by inhibiting prostaglandin synthesis.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Albuterol: A short-acting beta-2 adrenergic agonist that is primarily used as a bronchodilator agent to treat ASTHMA. Albuterol is prepared as a racemic mixture of R(-) and S(+) stereoisomers. The stereospecific preparation of R(-) isomer of albuterol is referred to as levalbuterol.Methacholine Chloride: A quaternary ammonium parasympathomimetic agent with the muscarinic actions of ACETYLCHOLINE. It is hydrolyzed by ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE at a considerably slower rate than ACETYLCHOLINE and is more resistant to hydrolysis by nonspecific CHOLINESTERASES so that its actions are more prolonged. It is used as a parasympathomimetic bronchoconstrictor agent and as a diagnostic aid for bronchial asthma. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1116)Platelet Function Tests: Laboratory examination used to monitor and evaluate platelet function in a patient's blood.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial: Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose similar to that found in hay fever except that symptoms persist throughout the year. The causes are usually air-borne allergens, particularly dusts, feathers, molds, animal fur, etc.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Eosinophils: Granular leukocytes with a nucleus that usually has two lobes connected by a slender thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round granules that are uniform in size and stainable by eosin.Bronchi: The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Budesonide: A glucocorticoid used in the management of ASTHMA, the treatment of various skin disorders, and allergic RHINITIS.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Beclomethasone: An anti-inflammatory, synthetic glucocorticoid. It is used topically as an anti-inflammatory agent and in aerosol form for the treatment of ASTHMA.Leukotriene Antagonists: A class of drugs designed to prevent leukotriene synthesis or activity by blocking binding at the receptor level.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Nebulizers and Vaporizers: Devices that cause a liquid or solid to be converted into an aerosol (spray) or a vapor. It is used in drug administration by inhalation, humidification of ambient air, and in certain analytical instruments.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Sodium Salicylate: A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent that is less effective than equal doses of ASPIRIN in relieving pain and reducing fever. However, individuals who are hypersensitive to ASPIRIN may tolerate sodium salicylate. In general, this salicylate produces the same adverse reactions as ASPIRIN, but there is less occult gastrointestinal bleeding. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p120)Status Asthmaticus: A sudden intense and continuous aggravation of a state of asthma, marked by dyspnea to the point of exhaustion and collapse and not responding to the usual therapeutic efforts.Bronchoconstrictor Agents: Agents causing the narrowing of the lumen of a bronchus or bronchiole.Airway Remodeling: The structural changes in the number, mass, size and/or composition of the airway tissues.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Bronchoconstriction: Narrowing of the caliber of the BRONCHI, physiologically or as a result of pharmacological intervention.Bronchitis: Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Adrenergic beta-Agonists: Drugs that selectively bind to and activate beta-adrenergic receptors.Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A form of hypersensitivity affecting the respiratory tract. It includes ASTHMA and RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Ovalbumin: An albumin obtained from the white of eggs. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Pyroglyphidae: Family of house dust mites, in the superfamily Analgoidea, order Astigmata. They include the genera Dermatophagoides and Euroglyphus.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Warfarin: An anticoagulant that acts by inhibiting the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Warfarin is indicated for the prophylaxis and/or treatment of venous thrombosis and its extension, pulmonary embolism, and atrial fibrillation with embolization. It is also used as an adjunct in the prophylaxis of systemic embolism after myocardial infarction. Warfarin is also used as a rodenticide.Tablets, Enteric-Coated: Tablets coated with material that delays release of the medication until after they leave the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Cyclooxygenase 1: A constitutively-expressed subtype of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase. It plays an important role in many cellular processes.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Pulmonary Medicine: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. It is especially concerned with diagnosis and treatment of diseases and defects of the lungs and bronchial tree.Vital Capacity: The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.Glucocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases: Enzyme complexes that catalyze the formation of PROSTAGLANDINS from the appropriate unsaturated FATTY ACIDS, molecular OXYGEN, and a reduced acceptor.Platelet Activation: A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.Thromboxanes: Physiologically active compounds found in many organs of the body. They are formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides and cause platelet aggregation, contraction of arteries, and other biological effects. Thromboxanes are important mediators of the actions of polyunsaturated fatty acids transformed by cyclooxygenase.Bleeding Time: Duration of blood flow after skin puncture. This test is used as a measure of capillary and platelet function.Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Sputum: Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Cough: A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.Exhalation: The act of BREATHING out.Ibuprofen: A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with analgesic properties used in the therapy of rheumatism and arthritis.Acetaminophen: Analgesic antipyretic derivative of acetanilide. It has weak anti-inflammatory properties and is used as a common analgesic, but may cause liver, blood cell, and kidney damage.Thromboxane A2: An unstable intermediate between the prostaglandin endoperoxides and thromboxane B2. The compound has a bicyclic oxaneoxetane structure. It is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation and causes vasoconstriction. It is the principal component of rabbit aorta contracting substance (RCS).Airway Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.Drug Resistance: Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Eosinophilia: Abnormal increase of EOSINOPHILS in the blood, tissues or organs.Drug Hypersensitivity: Immunologically mediated adverse reactions to medicinal substances used legally or illegally.Mites: Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Lipoxins: Trihydroxy derivatives of eicosanoic acids. They are primarily derived from arachidonic acid, however eicosapentaenoic acid derivatives also exist. Many of them are naturally occurring mediators of immune regulation.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Cromolyn Sodium: A chromone complex that acts by inhibiting the release of chemical mediators from sensitized mast cells. It is used in the prophylactic treatment of both allergic and exercise-induced asthma, but does not affect an established asthmatic attack.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors: A subclass of cyclooxygenase inhibitors with specificity for CYCLOOXYGENASE-2.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Breath Tests: Any tests done on exhaled air.Nedocromil: A pyranoquinolone derivative that inhibits activation of inflammatory cells which are associated with ASTHMA, including eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, monocytes, and platelets.Dipyridamole: A phosphodiesterase inhibitor that blocks uptake and metabolism of adenosine by erythrocytes and vascular endothelial cells. Dipyridamole also potentiates the antiaggregating action of prostacyclin. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p752)Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Androstadienes: Derivatives of the steroid androstane having two double bonds at any site in any of the rings.Metered Dose Inhalers: A small aerosol canister used to release a calibrated amount of medication for inhalation.Indomethacin: A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Interleukin-13: A cytokine synthesized by T-LYMPHOCYTES that produces proliferation, immunoglobulin isotype switching, and immunoglobulin production by immature B-LYMPHOCYTES. It appears to play a role in regulating inflammatory and immune responses.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.United StatesRespiratory System: The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.Th2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Nitrogen Dioxide: Nitrogen oxide (NO2). A highly poisonous gas. Exposure produces inflammation of lungs that may only cause slight pain or pass unnoticed, but resulting edema several days later may cause death. (From Merck, 11th ed) It is a major atmospheric pollutant that is able to absorb UV light that does not reach the earth's surface.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Ethanolamines: AMINO ALCOHOLS containing the ETHANOLAMINE; (-NH2CH2CHOH) group and its derivatives.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Tobacco Smoke Pollution: Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Picornaviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the PICORNAVIRIDAE.Cyclooxygenase 2: An inducibly-expressed subtype of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase. It plays an important role in many cellular processes and INFLAMMATION. It is the target of COX2 INHIBITORS.Primary Prevention: Specific practices for the prevention of disease or mental disorders in susceptible individuals or populations. These include HEALTH PROMOTION, including mental health; protective procedures, such as COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL; and monitoring and regulation of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS. Primary prevention is to be distinguished from SECONDARY PREVENTION and TERTIARY PREVENTION.Cockroaches: Insects of the order Dictyoptera comprising several families including Blaberidae, BLATTELLIDAE, Blattidae (containing the American cockroach PERIPLANETA americana), Cryptocercidae, and Polyphagidae.Sulfinpyrazone: A uricosuric drug that is used to reduce the serum urate levels in gout therapy. It lacks anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and diuretic properties.Prostaglandins: A group of compounds derived from unsaturated 20-carbon fatty acids, primarily arachidonic acid, via the cyclooxygenase pathway. They are extremely potent mediators of a diverse group of physiological processes.Gastric Mucosa: Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.Toluene 2,4-Diisocyanate: Skin irritant and allergen used in the manufacture of polyurethane foams and other elastomers.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Reye Syndrome: A form of encephalopathy with fatty infiltration of the LIVER, characterized by brain EDEMA and VOMITING that may rapidly progress to SEIZURES; COMA; and DEATH. It is caused by a generalized loss of mitochondrial function leading to disturbances in fatty acid and CARNITINE metabolism.Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Aerosols: Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.Adrenergic beta-2 Receptor Agonists: Compounds bind to and activate ADRENERGIC BETA-2 RECEPTORS.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in one or more of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Desensitization, Immunologic: Immunosuppression by the administration of increasing doses of antigen. Though the exact mechanism is not clear, the therapy results in an increase in serum levels of allergen-specific IMMUNOGLOBULIN G, suppression of specific IgE, and an increase in suppressor T-cell activity.Pregnenediones: Unsaturated pregnane derivatives containing two keto groups on side chains or ring structures.Stomach Ulcer: Ulceration of the GASTRIC MUCOSA due to contact with GASTRIC JUICE. It is often associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI infection or consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).Bronchial Spasm: Spasmodic contraction of the smooth muscle of the bronchi.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Dinoprostone: The most common and most biologically active of the mammalian prostaglandins. It exhibits most biological activities characteristic of prostaglandins and has been used extensively as an oxytocic agent. The compound also displays a protective effect on the intestinal mucosa.Eosinophil Cationic Protein: One of several basic proteins released from EOSINOPHIL cytoplasmic granules. Eosinophil cationic protein is a 21-kDa cytotoxic peptide with a pI of 10.9. Although eosinophil cationic protein is considered a member of the RNAse A superfamily of proteins, it has only limited RNAse activity.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Naproxen: An anti-inflammatory agent with analgesic and antipyretic properties. Both the acid and its sodium salt are used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic or musculoskeletal disorders, dysmenorrhea, and acute gout.Dermatitis, Atopic: A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Anti-Allergic Agents: Agents that are used to treat allergic reactions. Most of these drugs act by preventing the release of inflammatory mediators or inhibiting the actions of released mediators on their target cells. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p475)

Effect of in vitro aspirin stimulation on basophils in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. (1/27)

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Update on recent advances in the management of aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease. (2/27)

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Diagnosis of aspirin-induced asthma combining the bronchial and the oral challenge tests: a pilot study. (3/27)

BACKGROUND: We investigated the usefulness of the bronchial challenge (BC) with lysine-acetylsalicylate (L-ASA) in the diagnosis of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) using a protocol that combined both the oral challenge (OC) and the BC tests. METHODS: Adult asthmatic patients with suspected AERD who underwent BC with L-ASA were included in the study. If the BC result with L-ASA was negative, an OC was carried out to establish the diagnosis. AERD was ruled out if both the BC and the OC results were negative (nonresponders). Both responders and nonresponders were compared for age, gender, a personal or family history of atopy, underlying disease, current asthma treatment, and presence of nasal polyps. Six patients with asthma but no suggestive history of AERD were included as controls. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients completed the study. Ten patients tested positive to the BC and/or OC (responders), whereas 12 did not (nonresponders). Seven out of the 10 responders had a positive BC result and 3 a positive OC result. After BC, 4 patients had an early asthmatic response, 1 had a dual response, and 2 had isolated late responses. No significant differences were observed in the aforementioned variables between responders and nonresponders. The results of both challenges were negative in the 6 controls. CONCLUSIONS: The BC had a high positive predictive value, was safe, and when negative, the subsequent OC did not result in any severe adverse reactions. The BC elicited an isolated late asthmatic response that has not been previously described in the literature.  (+info)

Positive association between aspirin-intolerant asthma and genetic polymorphisms of FSIP1: a case-case study. (4/27)

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Airway responsiveness to inhaled aspirin is influenced by airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic patients. (5/27)

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Association of CACNG6 polymorphisms with aspirin-intolerance asthmatics in a Korean population. (6/27)

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Increase in salivary cysteinyl-leukotriene concentration in patients with aspirin-intolerant asthma. (7/27)

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Nuclear translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor in fibroblasts of asthmatic patients with nasal polyposis insensitive to glucocorticoid treatment. (8/27)

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*Aspirin-induced asthma

... and rhinitis (AIAR) A sufferer who has not yet experienced asthma or aspirin sensitivity might be ... Aspirin-induced asthma, also termed Samter's triad, Samter's syndrome, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), and ... are often helpful in treating the symptoms of aspirin-induced asthma. Some patients require oral steroids to alleviate asthma ... Aspirin-induced asthma is also referred to as leukotriene associated hypersensitivity Samter's triad goes by several other ...

*Leukotriene E4

Lee TH, Christie PE (1993). "Leukotrienes and aspirin induced asthma". Thorax. 48 (12): 1189-1190. doi:10.1136/thx.48.12.1189. ... urinary LTE4 levels are increased during severe asthma attacks and are especially high in people with aspirin-induced asthma, ... "Leukotriene E4-induced pulmonary inflammation is mediated by the P2Y12 receptor". The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 206 (11 ... also known as Samter's Triad or aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). Studies have suggested that LTE4 works through ...

*Andrzej Szczeklik

Szczeklik A, Stevenson DD (2003). "Aspirin-induced asthma: advances in pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management". J. Allergy ... He is perceived as an expert on aspirin-sensitive asthma. For the research on asthma he received "Lancet Investigators Award" ... aspirin-induced asthma, chemical mediators in diseases of circulatory and respiratory systems with special reference to ... In 2001 he was awarded the gold medal and "The Robert A. Cook Memorial Lectureship" by American Academy Allergy Asthma and ...

*TBX21

"Functional promoter polymorphism in the TBX21 gene associated with aspirin-induced asthma". Human Genetics. 117 (1): 16-26. doi ... Asthma is a disease of chronic inflammation, and it is known that transgenic mice born without TBX21 spontaneously develop ... It is thought that TBX21, therefore, may play a role in the development of asthma in humans as well. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89 ... "HIV-1 Tat modulates T-bet expression and induces Th1 type of immune response". Biochemical and Biophysical Research ...

*Eicosanoid

... see Aspirin-induced asthma); exercise- and cold-air induced asthma (see Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction); and childhood ... or aspirin-treated COX2 to form the lipoxins and epi-lipoxins or with P450 oxygenases or aspirin-treated COX2 to form Resolvin ... are used clinically as maintenance treatment for allergen-induced asthma and rhinitis; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug- ... Aspirin and NSAIDS-drugs that block the COX pathways and stop prostanoid synthesis-limit fever or the heat of localized ...

*Filipendula ulmaria

About one in five people with asthma has Samter's triad, in which aspirin induces asthma symptoms. Therefore, asthmatics should ... ISBN 0-85389-446-9 Jenkins, C; Costello, J; Hodge, L (2004). "Systematic review of prevalence of aspirin induced asthma and its ... will also induce symptoms of asthma. Filipendula ulmaria flowers or herb have been used in the traditional Austrian medicine ... The new drug, formally acetylsalicylic acid, was named aspirin by Hoffmann's employer Bayer AG after the old botanical name for ...

*GPR17

... see Aspirin-induced asthma). Subsequent reports, however, have varied in results: studies focusing on the allergen and non- ... In consequence, GPR17 attracted attention as a potential mediator of reactions caused by LTC4 and LTD4 viz., asthma, rhinitis, ... Kanaoka Y, Boyce JA (2014). "Cysteinyl leukotrienes and their receptors; emerging concepts". Allergy, Asthma & Immunology ... GPR17 expression is induced in dying neurons within and on the borders of injury, in infiltrating microglia and macrophages, ...

*Prostaglandin EP3 receptor

A in PTGER3 has been associated with Aspirin-induced asthma in a Korean population; and 6 SNP variants have been associated ... In a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced asthma, a selective EP3 agonist reduced airway cellularity, mucus, and ... "Prostaglandin E2 receptors in asthma and in chronic rhinosinusitis/nasal polyps with and without aspirin hypersensitivity". ... Furthermore, a selective EP3 agonist, ONO-AE-248, induces hyperalgesia pain in wild type but not EP3-deficient mice. While pain ...

*Salicylic acid

Ongoing clinical studies of patients with aspirin-induced asthma have shown some benefits of a diet low in salicylic acid. ... It is poorly soluble in water (2 g/L at 20 °C). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid or ASA) can be prepared by the esterification of ... It is involved in the systemic acquired resistance in which a pathogenic attack on one part of the plant induces resistance in ... In addition to serving as an important active metabolite of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), which acts in part as a prodrug to ...

*Salicylate sensitivity

Samter's triad refers to aspirin sensitivity in conjunction with nasal polyps and asthma. Aspirin-induced asthma NSAID ... Montelukast is one form of treatment used in aspirin-intolerant asthma. An important salicylate drug is aspirin, which has a ... However, it is possible for aspirin to trigger non-allergic hypersensitivity reactions. About 5-10% of asthmatics have aspirin ... November 2008). "Obesity in aspirin-tolerant and aspirin-intolerant asthmatics". Respirology. 13 (7): 1034-8. doi:10.1111/j. ...

*Prinzmetal's angina

Raynaud's phenomenon or aspirin-induced asthma. In contrast to patient with unstable angina secondary to coronary ... It was first referred to as cardiac syndrome X (CSX) by Kemp in 1973, to describe patients with exercise-induced angina and ... While acetylcholine induces vasoconstriction of vascular smooth muscle cells through a direct mechanism, acetylcholine also ... In healthy arterial walls, the overall indirect relaxation induced by acetylcholine (via nitric oxide) is of greater effect ...

*Prostaglandin EP2 receptor

... allergic diseases such as asthma (particular aspirin and nonsteroidal inflammatory drug-induced asthma syndromes) and rhinitis ... in a Korean population have been associated with an increased incidence of Aspirin-induced asthma. Prostanoid receptors ... "Prostaglandin E2 receptors in asthma and in chronic rhinosinusitis/nasal polyps with and without aspirin hypersensitivity". ... Desai S, April H, Nwaneshiudu C, Ashby B (December 2000). "Comparison of agonist-induced internalization of the human EP2 and ...

*Eoxin

... aspirin-induced asthma attacks, and perhaps other allergic reactions. A subsequent study found that eoxin levels in the exhaled ... "Exhaled Eicosanoids following Bronchial Aspirin Challenge in Asthma Patients with and without Aspirin Hypersensitivity: The ... breath of aspirin-sensitive and aspirin-intolerant asthmatic individuals did not rise after aspirin challenge and did not ... Eoxins have been implicated in inflammation of the airways in asthma patients, and in those with Hodgkin lymphoma, a malignant ...

*15-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid

... aspirin-induced asthma attacks, and perhaps other allergic reactions. The production of eoxins by Reed-Sternburg cells has also ... When pretreated with aspirin, however, COX-1 is inactive while COX-2 attacks arachidonic acid to produce almost exclusively 15( ... Some of the inhibitory effects of 15(S)-HpETE and 15(S)-HETE, particularly when induced by high concentrations (e.g. >1-10 ... Serhan, C. N.; Takano, T; Maddox, J. F. (1999). "Aspirin-triggered 15-epi-lipoxin A4 and stable analogs on lipoxin A4 are ...

*ALOX15

... human allergen-induced asthma, aspirin-induced asthma, and perhaps other allergic diseases. In colorectal, breast, and kidney ... which have pro-inflammatory actions and contribute to severe asthma, aspirin-induced asthma attacks, and other allergy ... Neighbour H (2014). "Mechanisms of aspirin-intolerant asthma: identifying inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis of asthma ... and other pathogen-induced inflammatory responses; in eczema, arthritis, asthma, cystic fibrosis, atherosclerosis, and adipose ...

*AERD

... may refer to: Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, also known aspirin-induced asthma Atheroembolic renal disease, a ...

*Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

... see aspirin-induced asthma) symptoms in individuals with a history of asthma or rhinitis and 2) exacerbation or first-time ... aspirin-induced asthma The widespread use of NSAIDs has meant that the adverse effects of these drugs have become increasingly ... excluding aspirin) Past stroke (excluding aspirin) Past myocardial infarction (excluding aspirin) Coronary artery disease ( ... NSAIDs, aside from aspirin, increase the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. This occurs at least within a week of use. ...

*NSAID hypersensitivity reactions

... see aspirin-induced asthma) in individuals with a history of asthma and/or nasal congestion, rhinorrhea or other symptoms of ... Allergy Asthma Immunol Res. 2015 Jul;7(4):312-20. doi: 10.4168/aair.2015.7.4.312 Buer JK (Oct 2014). "Origins and impact of the ... 5 Single NSAID-induced delayed reactions (SNIDR) are a set of delayed onset (usually more than 24 hour) reactions to NSAIDs. ... 4) Single NSAID-induced urticarial/angioedema or anaphylaxis (SNIUAA) is the acute development of urticarial, angioedema, or ...

*Hypereosinophilia

... asthma, atopic dermatitis, eosinophilic esophagitis, chronic sinusitis, aspirin-induced asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary ... Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology. 118 (4): 411-418. doi: ... Manti S, Leonardi S, Salpietro A, Del Campo G, Salpietro C, Cuppari C (2017). "A systematic review of food protein-induced ... Chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified (i.e. CEL, NOS), is a leukemia-inducing disorder in the eosinophil cell ...

*Eosinophilic myocarditis

Allergic and autoimmune diseases such as severe asthma, rhinitis, or urticarial, chronic sinusitis, aspirin-induced asthma, ... Before cardiac symptoms are detected, some 66% of cases have symptoms of a common cold and 33% have symptoms of asthma, ... These causes are classified as primary (i.e. a defect intrinsic to the eosinophil cell line), secondary (induced by an ... Sentürk T, Özdemir B, Keçebaş M, Beşli F, Yesilbursa D, Serdar OA (2012). "Ascaris-induced eosinophilic myocarditis presenting ...

*Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase

ALOX5 contributes to non-allergic reactions of the respiratory system and skin such as Aspirin-induced asthma, NSAID ... asthma, rashes, and eczema; d) NSAID-induced acute non-allergic reactions such as asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, angioedema ... NSAID-induced non-allergic conjunctivitis, NSAID-induced Angioedema, NSAID-induced urticarial; it may also contribute to ... and conjunctiva reactions as well as exercise-induced asthma. Zileuton has shown some beneficial effects in clinical trials for ...

*Thromboxane receptor

... a South Korean test group was found to be elevated in patients suffering a type of severe asthma termed Aspirin-induced asthma ... For example, prostacyclin I2 (PGI2)-induced activation of its prostacyclin receptor (IP) and prostaglandin D2-induced ... prevented from developing angiotensin II-induced and N-Nitroarginine methyl ester-induced hypertension along with associated ... These findings suggest that TP contributes to asthma in animal models at least in part by mediating the actions of LTC4. ...

*Metamizole

... history of aspirin-induced asthma and other hypersensitivity reactions to analgesics. Oral anticoagulants (blood thinners), ... Despite this studies in animals have found that the CB1 cannabinoid receptor is not involved in the analgesia induced by ... "The dipyrone metabolite 4-MAA induces hypothermia and inhibits PGE2-dependent and -independent fever while 4-AA only blocks ... especially in those with asthma. Serious side effects include agranulocytosis, aplastic anaemia, hypersensitivity reactions ( ...

*Prostacyclin receptor

The rare SNP variant 795C of 794T in the PTGIR gene is associated with an increased incidence of Aspirin-induced asthma and a ... or bradykinin-induced paw edema. IP antagonists likewise reduce experimentally-induced capillary permeability and swelling in ... These IP-induced responses likely contribute to its apparent function in inhibiting certain mouse inflammation responses as ... IP(-/-) mice exhibit little or no writhing responses in an acetic acid-induced pain model. The mouse IP receptor also appears ...

*Diflunisal

... and hands Yellowing of skin Rash Ecchymosis Hypersensitivity to aspirin/NSAID-induced asthma or urticaria Aspirin triad 3rd ... New Metabolic Pathway Reveals Aspirin-Like Compound's Anti-Cancer Properties. June 2016 Jayamani, E. "Characterization of a ... after showing promise in a research project studying more potent chemical analogs of aspirin. It was first sold under the brand ... Impaired liver function Impaired kidney function Dehydration Fluid retention History of gastrointestinal bleeds/PUD Asthma ...

*Eicosanoid receptor

PGF2α-induced activation of FP has pro-inflammatory effects as well as roles in ovulation, luteolysis, contraction of uterine ... Claar D, Hartert TV, Peebles RS (2015). "The role of prostaglandins in allergic lung inflammation and asthma". Expert Review of ... aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4>leukotriene C4=leukotriene D4>>15-deoxy-LXA4>>N-Formylmethionine-leucyl-phenylalanine (http://www. ... and asthma, particularly in the area of airways constriction. EP2-(PGE2) (PTGER2) - PTGER2; EP2 is a receptor for prostaglandin ...
Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), also known as Samters Triad, is a chronic condition consisting of asthma, sinus disease with recurrent nasal polyps, and sensitivity to aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
I have Samters Syndrome (consisting of asthma, aspirin sensitivity and nasal polyps) also known as Samters Triad or aspirin-induced asthma. For the last 29 years I have been taking medications and trying to stay alive. When I found the Australian
International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology. 2016. April; 6(4): 385-91. 30 patients diagnosed with aspirin sensitivity and aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) were entered into a diet trial. They ate either a regular diet or a low-salicylate diet for 6 weeks, and then ate the opposite one for another 6 weeks.. The patients were assigned their diet order randomly, and the physician evaluating them did not know which diet they were on at their evaluations. They were evaluated before beginning the study, after the first 6 weeks, and again at the end (12th week). The evaluations consisted of questionnaires including one named the SNOT-22 * and two others with the more boring names NSSS and ACQ-7, as well as measurements using instruments to evaluate their breathing and sinus condition.. * SNOT = Sino-Nasal Outcome Test. According to all the measurements, the patients had significant improvement on the low-salicylate diet.. QUOTE: "The study further reinforces that a low-salicylate diet can ...
BACKGROUND: Nasal polyposis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the upper respiratory tract that affects around 2% of the population and almost 67% of patients with aspirin-intolerant asthma. Polyps are rich in mast cells and eosinophils, resulting in high levels of the proinflammatory cysteinyl leukotrienes. OBJECTIVES: To better understand the role of the proinflammatory leukotrienes in nasal polyposis, we asked the following questions: (1) How do nasal polyps produce leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4))? (2) Can LTC(4) feed back in a paracrine way to maintain mast cell activation? (3) Could a combination therapy targeting the elements of this feed-forward loop provide a novel therapy for allergic disease? METHODS: We have used immunohistochemistry, enzyme immunoassay, and cytoplasmic calcium ion (Ca(2+)) imaging to address these questions on cultured and acutely isolated human mast cells from patients with polyposis. RESULTS: Ca(2+) entry through store-operated Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels
Paracetamol is not an NSAID, as may be understood from the wording "though paracetamol is generally considered safe" - Preceding unsigned comment added by 88.90.68.85 (talk) 15:32, 21 September 2011 (UTC). The pathogenesis section is extremely confusing. In particular, the way the sentence describing differential PGE modulation I found difficult to understand. - Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.98.209.88 (talk) 14:09, 22 January 2013 (UTC). Has anybody else encountered this condition with the additional symptom of severe acute pain around diaphragm & back (possibly associated with gallbladder/spleen) and, later, likely autoimmune haemolytic anaemia? - Preceding unsigned comment added by 95.151.241.169 (talk) 19:52, 25 September 2013 (UTC). Also, interested in finding out more about the efficacy of aspirin desensitization for this condition. Does it reduce sensitivity to other allergens, such as ibuprofen & certain tree pollens (salicylate perhaps)? Does it really prevent or delay nasal ...
Suppression of nitric oxide production from nasal fibroblasts by metabolized clarithromycin in vitro. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
Effect of rapid desensitization on platelet inhibition and basophil activation in patients with aspirin hypersensitivity and coronary disease Cases were patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) ... European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy, Original Article, Stéphane Manzo-Silberman, Pascale Nicaise-Roland, Catherine Neukirch, Florence Tubach, Marie-Geneviève Huisse, Sylvie ... ...
Banerjee, Probal and lyengar, Raghu R and Ayyer, Jayalekshmy and Bhattacharyya, PK (1984) Carbonation of Phenol: A Novel Reaction Involving Enzyme Model Catalysis. In: Current Science, 53 (23). pp. 1226-1228. Bhattacharyya, PK and Samanta, TB and Ullah, AHJ and Gunsalus, IC (1984) Chemical probes into the active centre of a heme thiolate monoxygenase. In: Journal of Chemical Sciences, 93 (8). pp. 1289-1304. Bhattacharyya, PK and Bhattacharyya, Apares (1981) Fluorescent labelling of strychnine: A novel approach for recognition of strychnine binding sites on neuronal membrane. In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 101 (1). pp. 273-280. Ramanjaneyulu, R. and Madyastha, KM and Bhattacharyya, PK (1981) Chemical approach to aspirin hypersensitivity. In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 101 (1). pp. 258-264. Bhattacharyya, Apares and Madyastha,, KM and Bhattacharyya, PK and Devanandan, MS (1981) Studies on bicuculline binding sites on neuronal membrane using ...
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Background: A clear association between allergy and nasal polyposis (NP) is not determined and the role of food intolerance in patients with NP is not investigated by oral food challenge (OFC). Objective: To investigate the relation of salicylate food intolerance and atopy in patients with NP according to recurrence and aspirin sensitivity. Methods: A cross sectional multicenter study was done in two tertiary centers for allergy in Iran. Adult patients with NP were selected for the study that had been referred to allergy clinics. The oral aspirin challenge (OAC) test was performed to identify aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) and the OFC test was used to investigate food intolerance. Atopic evaluation was performed by skin-prick tests, nasal smear and blood eosinophil count as well as serum total IgE. Results: One hundred and nineteen Iranian patients (female to male ratio 1.05) with NP were enrolled (mean age, 38 ± 11 years). Recurrence of nasal polyposis was 64.7%. OAC was
Main / New Prescription / Clopidogrel post mi nice NICE have issued guidance as to the use of antiplatelet agents post myocardial infarction (1). aspirin should be offered to all people after an MI and continue it indefinitely, unless they are aspirin intolerant or have an indication for anticoagulation; aspirin should be offered to people who have had an MI more than Cardiac rehabilitation after an acute myocardial infarction (MI); Lifestyle changes after an MI; Drug therapy; Coronary revascularisation after an MI; Selected .. For patients with aspirin hypersensitivity, clopidogrel monotherapy should be considered as an alternative treatment.. The combination of appetite and clopidogrel is not recommended for certain use for any longer than 12 hours clopidogrel post mi nice the acute phase of myocardial infarction (MI), unless there are other opioids to continue dual antiplatelet medication, and the combination is clopidogrel post mi nice recommended for a shorter duration after an. Does ...
OBJECTIVES/PROBLEM: To determine the sinonasal effect of aspirin salicylic acid (ASA) desensitization in patients with nasal polyps, asthma and aspirin intolerance (ASA triad). Patients with ASA triad were recruited from the outpatient otolaryn
AbeBooks.com: Nasal Polyposis: Pathogenesis, Medical and Surgical Treatment (9783642114113) and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great prices.
The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is the oldest and largest archaeological organization in North America. The AIA seeks to educate people of all ages about the significance of archaeological discovery. For more than a century the AIA has been dedicated to the encouragement and support of archaeological research and publication, and to the protection of the worlds archaeological resources and cultural heritage. By traveling on an AIA Tour you directly support the AIA while personally gaining the benefit of the AIAs network of scholars and worldwide contacts.. ...
The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is the oldest and largest archaeological organization in North America. The AIA seeks to educate people of all ages about the significance of archaeological discovery. For more than a century the AIA has been dedicated to the encouragement and support of archaeological research and publication, and to the protection of the worlds archaeological resources and cultural heritage. By traveling on an AIA Tour you directly support the AIA while personally gaining the benefit of the AIAs network of scholars and worldwide contacts.. ...
Summary is not available for the mouse gene. This summary is for the human ortholog.] This gene encodes a receptor for prostaglandin E2, a metabolite of arachidonic acid which has different biologic activities in a wide range of tissues. Mutations in this gene are associated with aspirin-induced susceptibility to asthma. [provided by RefSeq, Oct 2009 ...
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TY - JOUR. T1 - Therapeutic Antibodies for Nasal Polyposis Treatment. T2 - Where Are We Headed?. AU - Agarwal, Aarti. AU - Spath, Derek. AU - Sherris, David A.. AU - Kita, Hirohito. AU - Ponikau, Jens U.. PY - 2019/1/1. Y1 - 2019/1/1. N2 - This review article aims to outline what is known in the pathophysiology of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) and describe the mechanism of the biologic agents being investigated for this disease. Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis is an inflammatory disease of the nasal and paranasal mucosa, which causes symptoms of nasal obstruction, hyposmia, and rhinorrhea. Conventional therapy for CRSwNP includes intranasal corticosteroids (INCS) and polypectomy, but INCS offer only modest benefits, and recurrence after surgery is common. Therefore, effective pharmacologic therapies for CRSwNP are being actively sought. Monoclonal antibodies have been successful in other chronic diseases involving eosinophilic inflammation, such as chronic ...
How to Treat Nasal Polyps: Nasal Polyposis From Pathogenesis To Treatment An Update. Nasal Polyps Site, Info, tips and treatments for Nasal Polyps.
In the face of increasing prevalence of hypersensitivity reactions, introduction of effective, reliable and safe methods plays a crucial role in their diagnosing. Among the currently available laboratory (in vitro) methods is basophil activation test (BAT). It is a flow- cytometry based assay that allows to identificate in the blood sample basophils and additionally to asses the degree of cell activation after exposure to an antigen. The most common superficial identification markers are CD63 and CD203c, which increase in number after activation. Basophil actvation test can be applied to confirm diagnosis of allergy to Hymenoptera venoms, food, pollens and hypersensitivity to drugs. The aim of present paper is to present theoretical methods of this test as well as its pros and cons. We focus also on presentation of clinical case where BAT seemed to be a necessary addition to a routine diagnostic pathway. We present a case of identification of the culprit drug which caused an anaphylactic ...
Induced sputum cell counts are a non-invasive, reliable method for evaluating the presence, type, and degree of inflammation in the airways of the lungs. Current reference values for induced sputum cell counts in healthy adults do not account for the effects of circadian rhythm, including diurnal variation. The objective of this study was to describe the diurnal variation in induced sputum cell counts, compared between early morning and late afternoon, in healthy adult individuals. 100 healthy adult subjects with no history of lung disease and normal bronchial reactivity proceeded with induced sputum testing at 7 am and 4 pm on different days. The order of testing was randomized. The cytotechnologist preparing and performing the cell counts was blinded to the sample collection time and subject characteristics. 65 subjects were included in the final analyses. There was no significant change in the total and differential sputum cell counts between the 7 am and 4 pm collections. There was good inter
Q: After taking aspirin recently, I began to get asthma symptoms. Ive since read online that some asthmatics are sensitive to aspirin. Can you tell me why? Dr. Bassett: A small number of those with asthma can be adversely affected by aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen.. In some cases, the resulting wheezing, shortness of breath and related respiratory distress can be serious, even life-threatening.. There is an association between the following conditions: aspirin intolerance, nasal polyps and/or sinusitis and asthma.. It is essential for your specialist to give you a medical evaluation to determine the best course of coordinated care. Your doctors can help you to identify the names of the various NSAIDs that you should avoid.. An allergist may need to discuss additional therapies (e.g. aspirin desensitization) if its appropriate. That may not only improve the sinus symptoms, but your asthma as well.. Dr. Clifford Bassett, allergist and asthma ...
The lack of understanding of AERD and its underlying cause has created a critical barrier in developing effective treatments for the condition. "Many practitioners are unaware of AERD and this is often why it takes so long to connect all the pieces of the puzzle before the correct treatment can be offered," Dr. Jerschow said.. Additionally, the very act of diagnosing AERD is risky, since many patients will suffer an asthma attack in response to the standard oral-graded aspirin challenge. Dr. Jerschows study will compare the pharmacological effects (biochemical changes in the body) of aspirin in AERD patients to those of aspirin-tolerant asthmatics. Her protocol, conducted on 25-30 participants aged 25-62 (some of whom are referred by the Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery), will use a low-dose aspirin challenge to avoid allergic reactions. The low-dose aspirin challenge begins by giving the patient a small amount of aspirin. This approach usually does not lead to a ...
Expression of CACNG4 (MGC11138, MGC24983) in cancer tissue. The cancer tissue page shows antibody staining of the protein in 20 different cancers.
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Hong Kong, 27 September 2017 - AIA Hong Kong announces today the launch of AIA Metro-Trio Medical & Critical Illness Protection Plan, a market-first solution tailor-made to cover individuals with
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Talk:Aspirin-induced asthma - WikipediaTalk:Aspirin-induced asthma - Wikipedia

Here are links to possibly useful sources of information about Aspirin-induced asthma.. *PubMed provides review articles from ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Talk:Aspirin-induced_asthma&oldid=598253608" ... Also, interested in finding out more about the efficacy of aspirin desensitization for this condition. Does it reduce ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Aspirin-induced_asthma

Aspirin induced asthma | The BMJAspirin induced asthma | The BMJ

EDITOR-The prevalence of aspirin induced asthma on oral provocation testing in the systematic review by Jenkins et al was ... Aspirin induced asthma. BMJ 2004; 328 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.328.7447.1076-a (Published 29 April 2004) Cite this as: ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/328/7447/1076.2

Aspirin-induced asthma - WikipediaAspirin-induced asthma - Wikipedia

Aspirin-induced asthma and rhinitis (AIAR) A sufferer who has not yet experienced asthma or aspirin sensitivity might be ... Aspirin-induced asthma, also termed Samters triad, Samters syndrome, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), and ... are often helpful in treating the symptoms of aspirin-induced asthma. Some patients require oral steroids to alleviate asthma ... Aspirin-induced asthma is also referred to as leukotriene associated hypersensitivity Samters triad goes by several other ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspirin-induced_asthma

The importance of COX-2 inhibition for aspirin induced asthma | ThoraxThe importance of COX-2 inhibition for aspirin induced asthma | Thorax

1999) Aspirin-induced asthma: advances in pathogenesis and management. J Allergy Clin Immunol 104:5-13, . ... There have been recent reviews of aspirin induced asthma (AIA),1 2 the use of the COX-2 preferential inhibitor nimesulide in ... 1998) Aspirin-induced asthma and cyclooxygenases. in Selective COX-2 inhibitors. Pharmacology, clinical effects and therapeutic ... Aspirin and other NSAIDs cause bronchoconstriction in about 10% of asthmatic subjects but NSAIDs relieve asthma in about 0.3%.2 ...
more infohttp://thorax.bmj.com/content/55/suppl_2/S54

Platelets and Aspirin-Induced Asthma: Pathogenesis and Melatonin | 9780128000335 | VitalSourcePlatelets and Aspirin-Induced Asthma: Pathogenesis and Melatonin | 9780128000335 | VitalSource

Buy or Rent Platelets and Aspirin-Induced Asthma: Pathogenesis and Melatonin as an eTextbook and get instant access. With ... Platelets and Aspirin-Induced Asthma: Pathogenesis and Melatonin Edition by Evsyukova, Helen and Publisher Academic Press. Save ...
more infohttps://www.vitalsource.com/products/platelets-and-aspirin-induced-asthma-pathogenesis-evsyukova-helen-v9780128001035

Acetylsalicylic acid Completed Phase 4 Trials for Asthma, Aspirin-Induced Treatment - DrugBankAcetylsalicylic acid Completed Phase 4 Trials for Asthma, Aspirin-Induced Treatment - DrugBank

Acetylsalicylic acid Completed Phase 4 Trials for Asthma, Aspirin-Induced Treatment. Back to Acetylsalicylic acid ... The Effect of Aspirin Desensitization on Patients With Aspirin-exacerbated Respiratory Diseases. *Acetylsalicylic acid (DB00945 ...
more infohttps://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB00945/clinical_trials?conditions=DBCOND0001812&phase=4&purpose=treatment&status=completed

228] Severe Aspirin Induced Asthma (January 2003) - Food Intolerance Network228] Severe Aspirin Induced Asthma (January 2003) - Food Intolerance Network

I have Samters Triad syndrome, also known as Aspirin Induced Asthma (AIA). About 10 per cent of people with Samters syndrome ... I have Samters Triad syndrome, also known as Aspirin Induced Asthma (AIA). About 10 per cent of people with Samters syndrome ... No one, not even the doctors knew what causing the problems as the asthma was so very different from common asthma. During that ... My mouth, face and eyes and lips all swelled inside out and I had asthma and hives. For the next 3 years, it was a constant ...
more infohttps://fedup.com.au/stories/2003/228-severe-aspirin-induced-asthma-january-2003

994] Salicylates: Aspirin-induced asthma and nasal polyps (March 2011) - Food Intolerance Network994] Salicylates: Aspirin-induced asthma and nasal polyps (March 2011) - Food Intolerance Network

... consisting of asthma, aspirin sensitivity and nasal polyps) also known as Samters Triad or aspirin-induced asthma. For the ... aspirin sensitivity and nasal polyps) also known as Samters Triad or aspirin-induced asthma. For the last 29 years I have been ... I have Samters Syndrome (consisting of asthma, ... 994] Salicylates: Aspirin-induced asthma and nasal polyps ( ...
more infohttps://fedup.com.au/stories/2011/994-salicylates-aspirin-induced-asthma-and-nasal-polyps-march-2011

Pediatric Advisor: Aspirin-Induced AsthmaPediatric Advisor: Aspirin-Induced Asthma

Aspirin-induced asthma is asthma triggered by taking aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Aspirin, ... The asthma attack triggered by aspirin and NSAIDs can be life threatening. In many cases, people with aspirin-induced asthma ... aspirin-induced asthma is managed in the same way as other types of asthma. Three types of medicines are used to control asthma ... What is aspirin-induced asthma?. Asthma is a long-lasting (chronic) lung disease. It causes coughing, wheezing, and shortness ...
more infohttp://foresthillspediatrics.com/pedsadvisor/pa/pa_aspasthm_pep.htm

Aspirin-induced Asthma | Asthma.netAspirin-induced Asthma | Asthma.net

... of adults with asthma are sensitive to aspirin. Aspirin-induced asthma is more common in adults than children. ... How is aspirin-induced asthma treated?. The first step in treating aspirin-induced asthma is to manage the underlying asthma.2 ... How is aspirin-induced asthma diagnosed?. An ongoing sinus infection is a hallmark of aspirin-induced asthma. Without a sinus ... What happens during an aspirin-induced asthma attack?. An aspirin-induced asthma attack can be deadly.4 The attack can begin ...
more infohttps://asthma.net/types/aspirin-induced/

Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 - Galectin-10 mRNA is overexpressed in peripheral blood of aspirin-induced asthmaUniversité Claude Bernard Lyon 1 - Galectin-10 mRNA is overexpressed in peripheral blood of aspirin-induced asthma

... allowing an effective distinction between aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) and aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA) are missing. ... METHODS: Patients experiencing symptoms following aspirin ingestion were considered as aspirin sensitive. Peripheral blood was ... suggesting a novel candidate gene and a potentially innovative pathway for mucosal inflammation in aspirin intolerance. ... aspirin is associated with nasal and bronchial inflammation, eliciting local symptoms. Although the disease is clinically well ...
more infohttps://hal-univ-lyon1.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01838995

Three Things You Need To Know About Aspirin-Induced Asthma - Living With A Chronic Disease: What You Should KnowThree Things You Need To Know About Aspirin-Induced Asthma - Living With A Chronic Disease: What You Should Know

How is aspirin-induced asthma managed?. If you have aspirin-induced asthma, you need to avoid aspirin completely. This can be ... What are the signs of aspirin-induced asthma?. In people with aspirin-induced asthma, an asthma attack occurs after ingesting ... How is aspirin-induced asthma diagnosed?. If you think that aspirin is triggering your asthma symptoms, see your allergist. ... If you suffer from asthma, your symptoms may be triggered by ingesting aspirin. If youre worried about aspirin-induced asthma ...
more infohttp://acnearticle.info/2016/07/27/three-things-you-need-to-know-about-aspirin-induced-asthma/

AJOU Open Repository: A case of acetaminophen induced bronchial asthma -without aspirin sensitivityAJOU Open Repository: A case of acetaminophen induced bronchial asthma -without aspirin sensitivity

of acetaminophen-induced asthma without aspirin sensitivity. Cyclo-oxygenase inhibition may not be a pathogenic mechanism of ... We experienced a case of acetaminophen- induced bronchial asthma without aspirin sensitivity. An oral challenge test upto 650mg ... Acetaminophen-induced asthma; oral provocation test. Appears in Collections:. Journal Papers > School of Medicine / Graduate ... Chʿŏnsik mit alrerugi; Journal of asthma, allergy and clinical immunology; Korean journal of asthma, allergy and clinical ...
more infohttp://repository.ajou.ac.kr/handle/201003/5707

Respiratory Pharm Flashcards by lauren Poe | BrainscapeRespiratory Pharm Flashcards by lauren Poe | Brainscape

Aspirin-induced asthma (See nasal polyps) 16 What is the MOA of zileuton? ... Allergic asthma that is resistant to inhaled steroids and long acting b2 agonists ...
more infohttps://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/respiratory-pharm-862288/packs/1343872

ENT - Common conditions of the nose Flashcards by 🌈  Languages  | BrainscapeENT - Common conditions of the nose Flashcards by 🌈 Languages | Brainscape

Aspirin intolerance. Asthma. Nasal polyps. It is Aspirin-induced asthma 10 What is rhinitis? List its (7) classes of causes ...
more infohttps://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/ent-common-conditions-of-the-nose-5318847/packs/7941832

Search of: Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies | Drug Hypersensitivity - List Results - ClinicalTrials.govSearch of: Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies | 'Drug Hypersensitivity' - List Results - ClinicalTrials.gov

Oral Ifetroban to Treat Aspirin Exacerbated Respiratory Disease (AERD). *Asthma, Aspirin-Induced ... Therapeutic efficacy of high-dose aspirin as assessed by asthma symptom control (Asthma Control Questionnaire) ... Asthma, Nasal Polyps, And Aspirin Intolerance. *Behavioral: Restricting daily intake of omega-6 fatty acids to less than 4 ... An occurrence of allopurinol-induced severe cutaneous adverse reaction. 600. All. Child, Adult, Senior. NCT03046914. SNUIMA002 ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?recr=Open&cond=%22Drug+Hypersensitivity%22&show_rss=Y&sel_rss=new14

Thanai Pongdee, M.D. - Doctors and Medical Staff - Mayo ClinicThanai Pongdee, M.D. - Doctors and Medical Staff - Mayo Clinic

Aspirin-induced asthma. *Drug allergy. *Hypereosinophilic syndrome. *Systemic mastocytosis. Interests. *Clinical management of ...
more infohttps://www.mayoclinic.org/biographies/pongdee-thanai-m-d/bio-20055338

Challenge Test for Acetylsalicylic Acid Hypersensitivity - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govChallenge Test for Acetylsalicylic Acid Hypersensitivity - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Asthma Aspirin-sensitive ASA Intolerant Asthma Asthma, Aspirin-Induced Asthma, Nasal Polyps, and Aspirin Intolerance Drug: ... Asthma. Hypersensitivity. Nasal Polyps. Asthma, Aspirin-Induced. Bronchial Diseases. Respiratory Tract Diseases. Lung Diseases ... with aspirin: a sensitive and safe method to diagnose aspirin-induced asthma (AIA). Allergy. 2002 Jul;57(7):632-5. ... Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2001 Sep;87(3):177-80. Hedman J, Kaprio J, Poussa T, Nieminen MM. Prevalence of asthma, aspirin ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01681615?recr=Open&cond=%22Asthma%22&rank=17

Choking and Gait disturbances - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosisChoking and Gait disturbances - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis

5. Allergic asthma. 6. Alzheimers Disease. 7. Anaphylaxis. 8. Angina. 9. Aspirin-induced asthma. 10. Asthma. More causes » , ...
more infohttp://wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/choking/gait-disturbances.htm

Early Detection of Atherosclerosis: a Randomized Trial in the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases.Early Detection of Atherosclerosis: a Randomized Trial in the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases.

Asthma, Aspirin-induced. Asthmatic adverse reaction (e.g., BRONCHOCONSTRICTION) to conventional NSAIDS including aspirin use. ... Aspirin Plus Clopidogrel vs Aspirin Alone for Preventing Cardiovascular Events Among Patients at High Risk for Cardiovascular ... Aspirin, Dipyridamole Drug Combination. A drug combination of aspirin and dipyridamole that functions as a PLATELET AGGREGATION ... Resistance to Aspirin and/or Clopidogrel Among Patients With PAD.. 1000 patients with atherosclerosis of lower limbs are ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/85737/Early-Detection-of-Atherosclerosis-a-Randomized-Trial-in-the-Primary-Prevention-of.html

Carisoprodol, Aspirin, And Codeine (Oral Route) Description and Brand Names - Mayo ClinicCarisoprodol, Aspirin, And Codeine (Oral Route) Description and Brand Names - Mayo Clinic

Aspirin-induced asthma, history of or * Asthma with nasal polyps and runny nose or ... Do not give aspirin to a child or teenager who has chickenpox or flu symptoms, unless approved by a doctor. Aspirin can cause a ... Carisoprodol, aspirin, codeine: * Adults-1 or 2 tablets four times a day for 2 to 3 weeks. One tablet contains 200 milligrams ( ... Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used for pain and fever. Codeine is a narcotic analgesic (pain ...
more infohttps://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/carisoprodol-aspirin-and-codeine-oral-route/description/drg-20071917?p=1

A | SpringerLinkA | SpringerLink

Power I (1993) Aspirin-induced asthma. Editorial. Brit J Anaesth 71: 619-621Google Scholar ... McNulty SE (1993) Induced hypotension during head and neck surgery. Anesthesiol Clin N Am 11: 593-614Google Scholar ... Anesth Analg 7o: S 317 Sarma VJ (1992) Use of ketamine in acute severe asthma. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 36: 196-107Google ... Haddow, GR, Riley E, Isaacs R, McSharry R (1993) Ketorolac, nasal polyposis, and bronchial asthma: a cause of concern. Anesth ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-662-11140-6_1

Elevated urinary leukotriene E4 excretion in asthma: a comparison of HPLC-mass spectrometry and ELISA - Sanak - 2009 - Allergy ...Elevated urinary leukotriene E4 excretion in asthma: a comparison of HPLC-mass spectrometry and ELISA - Sanak - 2009 - Allergy ...

Hyperleukotrienuria is a hallmark of aspirin-induced asthma. Both ELISA and HPLC-MS have diagnostic value in this disease. ... Targeted eicosanoid lipidomics of exhaled breath condensate provide a distinct pattern in the aspirin-intolerant asthma ... Aspirin provocation increases 8-iso-PGE2 in exhaled breath condensate of aspirin-hypersensitive asthmatics, Prostaglandins & ... Elevated urinary leukotriene E4 excretion in asthma: a comparison of HPLC-mass spectrometry and ELISA. Authors. *. M. Sanak,. ...
more infohttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2009.02206.x/full

Symptomatic Treatment of Common Cold SymptomsSymptomatic Treatment of Common Cold Symptoms

Asthma, Aspirin-induced. Asthmatic adverse reaction (e.g., BRONCHOCONSTRICTION) to conventional NSAIDS including aspirin use. ... Pharmacokinetic Study Comparing Aspirin and Aspirin Granules. To determine the bioequivalence of new formula of aspirin ... Aspirin, Dipyridamole Drug Combination. A drug combination of aspirin and dipyridamole that functions as a PLATELET AGGREGATION ... commercial aspirin plain tablet and aspirin dry granules when taken orally by healthy adult subjects ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/69760/Symptomatic-Treatment-of-Common-Cold-Symptoms.html

Table of contents | ThoraxTable of contents | Thorax

Leukotrienes and aspirin induced asthma. (1 December, 1993) Free T H Lee, P E Christie ... Is exercise testing useful in a community based asthma survey? (1 December, 1993) Free T K Ninan, G Russell ... Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings: lessons from early childhood asthma. (1 December, 1993) Free M Silverman ... Respiratory symptoms questionnaire for asthma epidemiology: validity and reproducibility. (1 December, 1993) Free K P McKinlay ...
more infohttps://thorax.bmj.com/content/48/12
  • 1000 patients with atherosclerosis of lower limbs are examined to evaluate the activity of the platelets during the standard treatment, including aspirin. (bioportfolio.com)
  • My mouth, face and eyes and lips all swelled inside out and I had asthma and hives. (fedup.com.au)
  • Since PGE 2 and other prostanoids are formed by both constitutive COX-1 and induced COX-2, the effect on the lung may partly reflect the relative activities of each NSAID on the enzymes. (bmj.com)
  • The NSAID-induced reactions do not appear to involve the common mediators of true allergic reactions, immunoglobulin E or T cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • I had what they called mini-anaphylactic reactions nearly every day and was put on prednisone, asthma medication and an antihistamine on a daily schedule to control reactions. (fedup.com.au)
  • In general, this salicylate produces the same adverse reactions as ASPIRIN, but there is less occult gastrointestinal bleeding. (bioportfolio.com)
  • are major cyclooxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid produced during allergic reactions including asthma. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Use of carisoprodol, aspirin, and codeine tablets is not recommended in children younger than 12 years of age. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Carisoprodol, aspirin, and codeine combination tablets should not be used to relieve pain after surgery to remove tonsils or adenoids in any children. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of carisoprodol, aspirin, and codeine tablets in the elderly. (mayoclinic.org)