A genus of STARFISH in the family Asterinidae. They externally hold developing embryos (EMBRYO, NON-MAMMALIAN) among the spines below the oral surface.
Echinoderms having bodies of usually five radially disposed arms coalescing at the center.
"Panama" is not a recognized medical term or condition in healthcare and medicine. It might be a reference to a location, but it does not have a specific medical meaning in itself.
A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.

Fibrous component of the blastocoelic extracellular matrix shapes epithelia in concert with mesenchyme cells in starfish embryos. (1/18)

By using a monoclonal antibody (4H11 Mab), we have investigated morphogenetic functions of a fibrous component of the blastocoelic extracellular matrix in relation to cellular activities during early development of the starfish Asterina pectinifera. The 4H11 fibers fill the blastocoele from the late-cleavage to late-gastrula stage and contain the 370-kDa proteinaceous molecule secreted only by the epithelial cells. When 4H11 Mab is introduced into the blastocoele of blastulae, the embryos reveal three distinct morphological abnormalities after the mid-gastrula stage: (1) Distribution of mesenchyme cells confined near the tip of the archenteron, (2) swelling of the posterior ectoderm, and (3) suppressed growth of the mouth, esophagus, and coelomic pouches. These abnormalities occur together with alterations in the distribution of the 4H11 fibers. In embryos recovering from the effect of 4H11 Mab, the mesenchyme cells rearrange the 4H11 fibers. We propose that 4H11 fibers play direct roles in the morphogenesis of starfish embryos by providing a dynamic scaffold not only for the mesenchyme cells but also for the epithelial cells. Moreover, 4H11 fibers have a resist force from within, in concert with the mesenchyme cells, to counter the bulging force intrinsic to the epithelia and hold the epithelia in specific positions, once the positions have been decided.  (+info)

Centrosome destined to decay in starfish oocytes. (2/18)

In contrast to the somatic cell cycle, duplication of the centrioles does not occur in the second meiotic cycle. Previous studies have revealed that in starfish each of the two centrosomes in fully-grown immature oocytes consists of two centrioles with different destinies: one survives and retains its reproductive capacity, and the other is lost after completion of meiosis. In this study, we investigated whether this heterogeneity of the meiotic centrioles is already determined before the re-initiation of meiosis. We prepared a small fragment of immature oocyte containing the four centrioles and fused it electrically with a mature egg in order to transfer two sets of the premeiotic centrioles into the mature cytoplasm. Two asters were present in this conjugate, and in each of them only a single centriole was detected by electron microscopy. In the first mitosis of the conjugate artificially activated without sperm, two division poles formed, each of which doubled in each subsequent round of mitosis. These results indicate that only two of the four premeiotic centrioles survived in the mature cytoplasm and that they retained their reproductive capacity, which suggests that the heterogeneity of the maternal centrioles is determined well before re-initiation of meiosis, and that some factor in the mature cytoplasm is responsible for suppressing the reproductive capacity of the centrioles destined to decay.  (+info)

Complete mitochondrial genome sequences for Crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci and Acanthaster brevispinus. (3/18)

BACKGROUND: The crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci (L.), has been blamed for coral mortality in a large number of coral reef systems situated in the Indo-Pacific region. Because of its high fecundity and the long duration of the pelagic larval stage, the mechanism of outbreaks may be related to its meta-population dynamics, which should be examined by larval sampling and population genetic analysis. However, A. planci larvae have undistinguished morphological features compared with other asteroid larvae, hence it has been difficult to discriminate A. planci larvae in plankton samples without species-specific markers. Also, no tools are available to reveal the dispersal pathway of A. planci larvae. Therefore the development of highly polymorphic genetic markers has the potential to overcome these difficulties. To obtain genomic information for these purposes, the complete nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial genome of A. planci and its putative sibling species, A. brevispinus were determined and their characteristics discussed. RESULTS: The complete mtDNA of A. planci and A. brevispinus are 16,234 bp and 16,254 bp in size, respectively. These values fall within the length variation range reported for other metazoan mitochondrial genomes. They contain 13 proteins, 2 rRNA, and 22 tRNA genes and the putative control region in the same order as the asteroid, Asterina pectinifera. The A + T contents of A. planci and A. brevispinus on their L strands that encode the majority of protein-coding genes are 56.3% and 56.4% respectively and are lower than that of A. pectinifera (61.2%). The percent similarity of nucleotide sequences between A. planci and A. brevispinus is found to be highest in the CO2 and CO3 regions (both 90.6%) and lowest in ND2 gene (84.2%) among the 13 protein-coding genes. In the deduced putative amino acid sequences, CO1 is highly conserved (99.2%), and ATP8 apparently evolves faster any of the other protein-coding gene (85.2%). CONCLUSION: The gene arrangement, base composition, codon usage and tRNA structure of A. planci are similar to those of A. brevispinus. However, there are significant variations between A. planci and A. brevispinus. Complete mtDNA sequences are useful for the study of phylogeny, larval detection and population genetics.  (+info)

p90Rsk is required for G1 phase arrest in unfertilized starfish eggs. (4/18)

The cell cycle in oocytes generally arrests at a particular meiotic stage to await fertilization. This arrest occurs at metaphase of meiosis II (meta-II) in frog and mouse, and at G1 phase after completion of meiosis II in starfish. Despite this difference in the arrest phase, both arrests depend on the same Mos-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway, indicating that the difference relies on particular downstream effectors. Immediately downstream of MAPK, Rsk (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase, p90(Rsk)) is required for the frog meta-II arrest. However, the mouse meta-II arrest challenges this requirement, and no downstream effector has been identified in the starfish G1 arrest. To investigate the downstream effector of MAPK in the starfish G1 arrest, we used a neutralizing antibody against Rsk and a constitutively active form of Rsk. Rsk was activated downstream of the Mos-MAPK pathway during meiosis. In G1 eggs, inhibition of Rsk activity released the arrest and initiated DNA replication without fertilization. Conversely, maintenance of Rsk activity prevented DNA replication following fertilization. In early embryos, injection of Mos activated the MAPK-Rsk pathway, resulting in G1 arrest. Moreover, inhibition of Rsk activity during meiosis I led to parthenogenetic activation without meiosis II. We conclude that immediately downstream of MAPK, Rsk is necessary and sufficient for the starfish G1 arrest. Although CSF (cytostatic factor) was originally defined for meta-II arrest in frog eggs, we propose to distinguish ;G1-CSF' for starfish from ;meta-II-CSF' for frog and mouse. The present study thus reveals a novel role of Rsk for G1-CSF.  (+info)

Adaptations to benthic development: functional morphology of the attachment complex of the brachiolaria larva in the sea star Asterina gibbosa. (5/18)

The asteroid Asterina gibbosa lives all its life in close relation to the sea bottom. Indeed, this sea star possesses an entirely benthic, lecithotrophic development. The embryos adhere to the substratum due to particular properties of their jelly coat, and hatching occurs directly at the brachiolaria stage. Brachiolariae have a hypertrophied, bilobed attachment complex comprising two asymmetrical brachiolar arms and a central adhesive disc. This study aims at describing the ultrastructure of the attachment complex and possible adaptations, at the cellular level, to benthic development. Immediately after hatching, early brachiolariae attach by the arms. All along the anterior side of each arm, the epidermis encloses several cell types, such as secretory cells of two types (A and B), support cells, and sensory cells. Like their equivalents in planktotrophic larvae, type A and B secretory cells are presumably involved in a duo-glandular system in which the former are adhesive and the latter de-adhesive in function. Unlike what is observed in planktotrophic larvae, the sensory cells are unspecialized and presumably not involved in substratum testing. During the larval period, the brachiolar arms progressively increase in size and the adhesive disc becomes more prominent. At the onset of metamorphosis, brachiolariae cement themselves strongly to the substratum with the adhesive disc. The disc contains two main cell types, support cells and secretory cells, the latter being responsible for the cement release. During this metamorphosis, the brachiolar arms regress while post-metamorphic structures grow considerably, especially the tube feet, which take over the role of attachment to the substratum. The end of this period corresponds to the complete regression of the external larval structures, which also coincides with the opening of the mouth. This sequence of stages, each possessing its own adhesive strategy, is common to all asteroid species having a benthic development. In A. gibbosa, morphological adaptations to this mode of development include the hypertrophic growth of the attachment complex, its bilobed shape forming an almost completely adhesive sole, and the regression of the sensory equipment.  (+info)

Increase in multidrug transport activity is associated with oocyte maturation in sea stars. (6/18)

In this study, we report on the presence of efflux transporter activity before oocyte maturation in sea stars and its upregulation after maturation. This activity is similar to the multidrug resistance (MDR) activity mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters. In sea star oocytes the efflux activity, as measured by exclusion of calcein-am, increased two-fold 3 h post-maturation. Experiments using specific and non-specific dyes and inhibitors demonstrated that the increase in transporter activity involves an ABCB protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and an ABCC protein similar to the MDR-associated protein (MRP)-like transporters. Western blots using an antibody directed against mammalian P-gp recognized a 45 kDa protein in sea star oocytes that increased in abundance during maturation. An antibody directed against sea urchin ABCC proteins (MRP) recognized three proteins in immature oocytes and two in mature oocytes. Experiments using inhibitors suggest that translation and microtubule function are both required for post-maturation increases in transporter activity. Immunolabeling revealed translocation of stored ABCB proteins to the plasma cell membrane during maturation, and this translocation coincided with increased transport activity. These MDR transporters serve protective roles in oocytes and eggs, as demonstrated by sensitization of the oocytes to the maturation inhibitor, vinblastine, by MRP and PGP-specific transporter inhibitors.  (+info)

Caught in the evolutionary act: precise cis-regulatory basis of difference in the organization of gene networks of sea stars and sea urchins. (7/18)

The regulatory control of otxbeta1/2 in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and the sea star Asterina miniata provides an exceptional opportunity to determine the genomic basis of evolutionary change in gene regulatory network (GRN) architectures. Network perturbation analyses in both taxa show that Otx regulates the transcription factors gatae and krox/blimp1 and both of these transcription factors also feed back and regulate otx. The otx gene also autoregulates. This three way interaction is an example of a GRN kernel. It has been conserved for 500 million years since these two taxa last shared a common ancestor. Amid this high level of conservation we show here one significant regulatory change. Tbrain is required for correct otxbeta1/2 expression in the sea star but not in the sea urchin. In sea urchin, tbrain is not co-expressed with otxbeta1/2 and instead has an essential role in specification of the embryonic skeleton. Tbrain in these echinoderms is thus a perfect example of an orthologous gene co-opted for entirely different developmental processes. We isolate and test the sea star otxbeta1/2 cis-regulatory module and demonstrate functional binding sites for each of the predicted inputs, including Tbrain. We compare it to the logic processing operating in the sea urchin otxbeta1/2 cis-regulatory module and present an evolutionary scenario of the change in Tbrain dependence. Finally, inter-specific gene transfer experiments confirm this scenario and demonstrate evolution occurring at the level of sequence changes to the cis-regulatory module.  (+info)

Transfer of a large gene regulatory apparatus to a new developmental address in echinoid evolution. (8/18)

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"Asterina" is a term that refers to a genus of starfish-like echinoderms, specifically belonging to the family Asterinidae. These marine animals are characterized by their small size and pentagonal or radial symmetry. They are typically found in shallow waters of various parts of the world and play an important role in the marine ecosystem as scavengers and predators.

It is worth noting that "Asterina" is not a medical term, but rather a scientific name used in the field of marine biology.

I believe you may be mistakenly using the term "starfish" to refer to a medical condition. If so, the correct term is likely " asterixis," which is a medical sign characterized by rapid, rhythmic flapping or tremulous movements of the hands when they are extended and the wrist is dorsiflexed (held with the back of the hand facing upwards). This is often seen in people with certain neurological conditions such as liver failure or certain types of poisoning.

However, if you are indeed referring to the marine animal commonly known as a "starfish," there isn't a specific medical definition for it. Starfish, also known as sea stars, are marine animals belonging to the class Asteroidea in the phylum Echinodermata. They have a distinctive shape with five or more arms radiating from a central disc, and they move slowly along the ocean floor using their tube feet. Some species of starfish have the ability to regenerate lost body parts, including entire limbs or even their central disc.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Panama" is not a medical term. It is a country located in Central America, known for its famous canal and diverse wildlife. If you have any questions about medical terms or conditions, I would be happy to help answer those!

Ascomycota is a phylum in the kingdom Fungi, also known as sac fungi. This group includes both unicellular and multicellular organisms, such as yeasts, mold species, and morel mushrooms. Ascomycetes are characterized by their reproductive structures called ascus, which contain typically eight haploid spores produced sexually through a process called ascogony. Some members of this phylum have significant ecological and economic importance, as they can be decomposers, mutualistic symbionts, or plant pathogens causing various diseases. Examples include the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea, and morel mushroom Morchella esculenta.

... may refer to: Asterina (starfish), a starfish genus in the family Asterinidae Asterina (fungus), a fungus genus in the ...
... is a species of fungus in the family Asterinaceae, first described by Marie Leonore Farr in 1987. It was ... originally found on the leaves of Dilleniaceae species in Brazil, South America, "Asterina stipitipodia M.L.Farr, 1987". www. ...
... is one of thirty species of small bat star in the genus Asterina. It is mainly found on the east coast of ... Asterina stellifera feeds on macroalgae, bryozoans, tunicates, polyps, and biofilm as well as different types of kelp. Asterina ... Asterina stellifera was also used to explore the structure of the mucous granules in the tube feet of sea stars. It was found ... This explains why Asterina can be found living with less than five arms. Asterian sea stars also reproduce through dispersal of ...
Asterina adeniicola Asterina advenula Asterina canthiigena Asterina ceropegiae Asterina champereiicola Asterina congesta ... Asterina glyptopetali Asterina guaranitica Asterina gymnemae Asterina hainanensis Asterina hederae Asterina himantia Asterina ... Asterina hyptidicola Asterina indecora Asterina jahnii Asterina jasmini Asterina lauracearum Asterina lawsoniae Asterina ... Asterina rhodomyrti Asterina sarcandrae Asterina sawadai Asterina schimae Asterina schlegeliae Asterina scleropyri Asterina ...
... , habitas.org.uk, accessed 31 August 2008 Barnes, Morvan (200). "Asterina phylactica". Marine Life ... The species was formally described in 1979 and is very similar to Asterina gibbosa. Asterina phylactica is a pentagonal ... Asterina phylactica feeds on the film of bacteria and diatoms that exists on the surface of rocks. To do this it everts its ... Asterina phylactica is a species of sea star. It can be found in geographically widespread sites around the British Isles and ...
... may live for six years or more. The eggs of Asterina gibbosa are laid in a mass and glued to the substrate by ... Asterina gibbosa is a protandric hermaphrodite. This means that it is born a male and later changes sex and becomes a female. ... Asterina gibbosa, commonly known as the starlet cushion star, is a species of starfish in the family Asterinidae. It is native ... Asterina gibbosa is a pentagonal starfish with short blunt arms and an inflated appearance. The aboral (upper) surface is ...
... is a species of agaric fungus in the family Mycenaceae. It is found in São Paulo state, Brazil, where it grows ... Mycena asterina in Index Fungorum v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles with ' ...
... is a species of pentagonal starfish in the family Asterinidae. The holotype was collected at Cape Agulhas, ... Mah, C.L. (2021). "Asterina hoensonae O'Loughlin, 2009". WoRMS. World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2 December 2021. v ...
... , commonly known as the seagrass asterina, is a species of starfish in the family Asterinidae. It is native to ... Asterina pancerii appears to be a rare species, but this may be because it is seldom noticed because of its small size and ... Asterina pancerii is a very small starfish, seldom exceeding 1 cm (0.4 in) in diameter. It is pentagonal with five short, broad ... Asterina pancerii is endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. It is most common on the Mediterranean coasts of Spain, France and Italy ...
Asterina fimbriata Perrier, 1875 Asterina gibbosa (Pennant, 1777) Asterina gracilispina Clark, 1923 Asterina hoensonae ... 2018 Asterina pancerii (Gasco, 1876) Asterina phylactica Emson & Crump, 1979 Asterina pusilla Perrier, 1875 Asterina pygmaea ... 1875 Asterina stellaris Perrier, 1875 Asterina stellifera (Möbius, 1859) Asterina stellifera obtusa Leipoldt, 1895 Asterina ... O'Loughlin, 2009 Asterina krausii Gray, 1840 Asterina lorioli Kœhler, 1910 Asterina martinbarriosi López-Márquez, Acevedo, ...
2006) Asterina adenostemmatis A.K. Kar & S.N. Ghosh (1987) Asterina advenula Syd. (1927) Asterina aemula Syd. (1927) Asterina ... 1932) Asterina phenacis Syd. (1927) Asterina phlogacanthi A.K. Kar & S.N. Ghosh (1987) Asterina phoebes Syd. (1927) Asterina ... 1913) Asterina euryae B. Song (2004) Asterina excoecariae Doidge (1920) Asterina fagarae H.S. Yates (1918) Asterina fawcettii R ... 1945) Asterina thylachii Mibey (1997) Asterina tinosporae Hansf. (1954) Asterina toddalae A.K. Kar & S.N. Ghosh (1987) Asterina ...
"Asterina miniata". www.wallawalla.edu. Archived from the original on 23 May 2010. Retrieved 22 November 2009. "Bat star, Kelp ... "Bat Star: Asterina miniata". northislandexplorer.com. Archived from the original on 21 November 2009. Retrieved 22 November ... The genus of this species has transitioned back and forth between Asterina and Patiria since its inclusion in Fisher's 1911 ... However, recent revisions based on molecular systematics have constrained Asterina and identified Patiria as a complex of three ...
Asterina, Lev., has two-celled hyaline spores (Hyalodidymae). Asterella, Sacc, has two-celled brown spores (Phaeodidymae). ...
Asterina wingfieldii Hosag., N.P.Balakr. & Goos (1996); Catenulostroma wingfieldii Crous (2008); and Gondwanamyces wingfieldii ...
Asterina ellisii Sacc. & P. Syd. 1899 Atractobolus ellisiella (Rehm) Kuntze 1898 Bactridium ellisii Berk. 1874 Bipolaris ...
Y. Achituv (1969). "Studies on the Reproduction and Distribution of Asterina burtoni Gray 1840 and Asterina wega Perrier 1869 ( ... A second species was named Asterina wega and this name was used to describe a separate multi armed form which reproduced by ... Aquilonastra burtoni was originally named Asterina burtoni by John Edward Gray from specimens collected by a Mr John Burton in ... Yair Achituv; E. Sher (1991). "Sexual Reproduction and Fission in the Sea Star Asterina Burtoni from the Mediterranean Coast of ...
1905 Asterina clausenicola Doidge 1920 Asterina combreti Syd. & P. Syd. 1910 Asterina combreti var. kutuensis v. Hohn* Asterina ... Cooke 1880 Asterina crotonicola Doidge 1922 Asterina crotoniensis R.W. Ryan 1939 Asterina delicata Doidge 1920 Asterina ... Cooke 1880 Asterina myriadea Cooke 1882 Asterina natalensis Doidge 1920 Asterina natalitia Doidge 1942 Asterina nodosa Doidge ... 1938 Asterina balansae var. africana Theiss.* Asterina bosmanae Doidge 1942 Asterina bottomleyae Doidge 1942 Asterina capensis ...
1910 accepted as Asterina Lév., (1845) Englerulaster gymnosporiae (Henn.) Theiss. 1918 accepted as Englera gymnosporiae (Henn ...
Edward, Thomas (1859). "Asterina gibbosa on the coast of Banffshire". The Zoologist. 3rd series, vol 1 (3, March): 109. and ... "Asterina gibbosa on the coast of Banffshire" and about the "Bearded Tit and Hawfinch in Aberdeenshire." Smiles (1876), p. v. ...
Goos (1996) = Asterina lepianthis A. meliosmae I. Hino & Katum. (1961) = Asterostomella tosaensis A. meliosmicola Hosag., M.P. ... 1910) = Asterina solanicola Asterinaceae A. epiphylla var. gallica Bourdot & Galzin (1911) = Asterostomella epiphylla A. ... Goos (1996) = Asterostomella meliosmigena A. veronicae G. Arnaud (1918) = Asterina veronicae Lumbsch TH, Huhndorf SM. (December ... which is similar to Asterina. After Speg. had formed the genus in 1886. Several later authors added new species to ...
1920) = Asterina elaeagni A. flexuosa (G. Winter) Theiss. (1912) = Prillieuxina flexuosa A. gmelinae (Sacc.) Trotter (1926) = ... 1914) = Asterina ramuligera A. rhaphiostylidis S. Hughes (1953) = Prillieuxina rhaphiostylidis A. saginata Syd. & P. Syd. (1917 ... 1912) = Asterina sublibera A. systema-solare (Massee) Theiss. (1912) = Dothidasteromella systema-solare A. tetracerae Hansf. ( ... 1912) = Prillieuxina winteriana A. woodiana Doidge (1920) = Asterina woodiana' Lumbsch TH, Huhndorf SM. (December 2007). " ...
1885) = Asterina guaranitica Asterinaceae S. humiriae Henn. (1905) = Prillieuxina humiriae Asterinaceae S. ilicina Syd. & P. ... 1904) = Asterina marmellensis Asterinaceae S. megas var. macrospora Starbäck (1904) = Seynesia megas S. melastomataceae Henn. ( ... 1885) = Asterina balansae Asterinaceae S. brachystoma Rehm (1898) = Parasterina brachystoma Asterinaceae S. brasiliensis Speg ... 1904) = Asterina submegas Asterinaceae Burkhardt, Lotte (2022). Eine Enzyklopädie zu eponymischen Pflanzennamen [Encyclopedia ...
Isipinga Doidge 1921 accepted as Asterina Lév., (1845) Isipinga areolata Doidge 1921 accepted as Symphaster areolata (Doidge) ...
1897) - Note on some new species of the genus Asterina. The standard author abbreviation Gaillard is used to indicate this ... Note sur quelques espéces nouvelles du genre Asterina. Bulletin de la Société Mycologique de France 13: 179-181. ( ...
In literature, this species is often referred to Asterina pectinifera; the accepted name is now Patiria pectinifera. Patiria ... Davydov, P. V.; Shubravyi, O. I.; Vassetzky, S. G. (1990). "The starfish Asterina pectinifera (Müller et Troschel, 1842)". ... Asterina pectinifera" (PDF). Journal of Embryology and Experimental Morphology. 94: 47-60. PMID 3760763. Mita, Masatoshi (25 ... "Effects of sediment type and food abundance on the vertical distribution of the starfish Asterina pectinifera" (PDF). Marine ...
Boedijnopeziza S.Ito & S.Imai (1937) Asterina boedijniana Hansf. (1954) Ceramothyrium boedijnii Bat., Nascim. & Cif. (1962) ...
Asterina pectinifera, used as a model organism for this purpose, is resilient and easy to breed and maintain in the laboratory ... Crump, R. G.; Emson, R. H. (1983). "The natural history, life history and ecology of the two British species of Asterina" (PDF ... Protandrous individuals of species like Asterina gibbosa start life as males before changing sex into females as they grow ... doi:10.1016/0022-0981(89)90164-0. Achituv, Y.; Sher, E. (1991). "Sexual reproduction and fission in the sea star Asterina ...
Asterina quarta, Asterinaceae P. ramuligera (Syd. & P. Syd.) R.W. Ryan (1939) = Asterina ramuligera, Asterinaceae P. santiriae ... Asterina woodiana, Asterinaceae Lumbsch TH, Huhndorf SM. (December 2007). "Outline of Ascomycota - 2007". Myconet. Chicago, USA ... Asterina antioquensis, Asterinaceae P. burchelliae (Doidge) R.W. Ryan (1939) = Asterolibertia burchelliae, Asterinaceae P. ...
Recent analyses suggest Paxillosida may be a sister taxon of Asterina. The order is divided into these families: family ...
A new species and four new records of Asterina from Kenya. Nova Hedwigia 62: 147-150. Mibey, R.K.; J.O. Kokwaro & D.M. Mukunya ...
Asterina may refer to: Asterina (starfish), a starfish genus in the family Asterinidae Asterina (fungus), a fungus genus in the ...
Asterina (Nepanthia) maculata (Gray, 1840). Accessed at: https://marinespecies.org/Asteroidea/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=934997 ...
... After letting the asterinas grow to plague proportions, I had to step in. Some of them grew to the ...
Home › News › Asterina Stars News - Asterina Stars. How to Identify and Get Rid of the Top 7 Reef Pests. ... Tags: Acropora Eating Flat Worms, Acropora Eating Red Bugs, AEFW, Aiptasia, Aiptasia Anemone, Asterina Star, Asterina Starfish ... How to get rid of Asterina Star Fish, How to get rid of Bristle Worms, How to get rid of Flatworms, How to get rid of Mojanos, ... Asterina Stars, Bristle Worms, Brown Flatworm, Brown Flatworms, Coral Dip, Coral Dips, Coral Eating Flat Worms, Coral Eating ...
Distribution pattern of β-catenin during the early embryogenesis of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera.. Author Miyawaki K, ... Distribution pattern of β-catenin during the early embryogenesis of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera. ...
Asterina Starfish. Starfish. Asterinidae. Asterina gibbosa. These little guys have gotten sort of a mixed review as far as ... General info about Asterina Starfish. These little guys have gotten sort of a mixed review as far as their "reef-safeness" is ...
Having collected Asterina sp. in this fashion, you may want to see if anyone in your local vicinity requires Asterina sp. to ... They will rapidly consume an infestation of Asterina sp., with many hobbyists reporting that there are no more visible Asterina ... Public Enemy Number Two: Asterina sp. Starfish. There is a pretty good chance that, like Aiptasia, we will all encounter ... Aiptasia, Asterina sp. and red flatworms are all easily dealt with, both biologically or manually, and I hope the previous ...
Asterina starfish, despite their small size, are a significant marine biodiversity case study due to their diverse adaptations ... Q2: Where are Asterina starfish found?. The Asterina class of starfish is widespread over the seas, particularly along the ... Q3: How do Asterina starfish reproduce?. Sexual reproduction occurs in Asterina starfish, with both sexes dispersing eggs and ... Q4: Can Asterina starfish regenerate lost limbs?. Asterina starfishes do, in fact, have the ability to regrow severed ...
Wnt, Frizzled, and sFRP gene expression patterns during gastrulation in the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera. In: Gene ... Wnt, Frizzled, and sFRP gene expression patterns during gastrulation in the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera. / Kawai, ... title = "Wnt, Frizzled, and sFRP gene expression patterns during gastrulation in the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera", ... Wnt, Frizzled, and sFRP gene expression patterns during gastrulation in the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera. ...
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title = "A relaxin-like peptide purified from radial nerves induces oocyte maturation and ovulation in the starfish, Asterina ... T1 - A relaxin-like peptide purified from radial nerves induces oocyte maturation and ovulation in the starfish, Asterina ... A relaxin-like peptide purified from radial nerves induces oocyte maturation and ovulation in the starfish, Asterina ... A relaxin-like peptide purified from radial nerves induces oocyte maturation and ovulation in the starfish, Asterina ...
Asterina anomala Taxon lists:. Current Australian list: Commercial species list: Standard Fish Names List: ...
A. Rifai, N. Asterina, R. Hidayani / Kota Kita, 2016. Decentralisation has provided the opportunity for the participatory model ...
Asterina miniata. When two bat stars bump into each other they begin a slow-motion arm wrestling match. Each sea star tries to ...
Asterina miniata. When two bat stars bump into each other they begin a slow-motion arm wrestling match. Each sea star tries to ...
Asterina], Ethelinda [Athelina], Athena▲ [Athina, ..], Aubrey [Aubrianna, ..], Audriana [Audrianna, ..] 6. Audrina - Bellona ...
Asterina (b f 1916 Merry Moment) , Cetus (b f 1924 Joculator) , Ann Venus (ch f 1942 Lord Quez) , Sharvene (gr f 1954 ...
Hos arten Asterina gibbosa blir alle født som hanner. Når hannene når en viss størrelse slutter den å produsere sperm, men ...
This pic shows the asterina and dolabrifera sea slug hitchhikers and some of the beginner corals i introduced to "test the ...
... and Asterina pectinifera. Acrosome reaction assays indicate that the acrosome reaction can be induced across species within ... and Asterina pectinifera. Acrosome reaction assays indicate that the acrosome reaction can be induced across species within ...
Jang, H.R.; Jeon, H.G.; Moon, D.H. Sorption of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd from a Contaminated Aqueous Solution Using Starfish (Asterina ...
Initiation of DNA replication cycle in fertilized eggs of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera. Nomura, A., Maruyama, Y.K., ...
Genus Asterina Asterina anomala H. L. Clark, 1921 Provider:. Lee, Kun-Hsuan ...
Asterina pectinifera mitochondrion. 16260 bp. 6/16/98. Ateline herpesvirus 3. 108409 bp. 12/9/98. ...
2009) A relaxin-like peptide purified from radial nerves induces oocyte maturation and ovulation in the starfish, asterina ...
thailandica, Arthrinium paraphaeospermum, Arundellina typhae, Aspergillus koreanus, Asterina cynometrae, Bertiella ellipsoidea ...
However, a more problematic predatory sea star is the small sea star of the genus Asterina, introduced to many reef aquariums ...
Asterina. Asterina starfish may look cute and exciting to a new hobbyist discovering it in their tank. However, these tiny dime ...
... we cloned and sequenced dnmt1 and dnmt3 cDNAs of the starfish Asterina pectinifera. Since the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus ...
  • Asterina may refer to: Asterina (starfish), a starfish genus in the family Asterinidae Asterina (fungus), a fungus genus in the family Asterinaceae This disambiguation page lists articles about distinct genera with the same name. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ones we'll look at first are the common, small starfish that hitchhike into our systems known as Asterina sp. (reefkeeping.com)
  • To provide insight into the ancestral mechanism regulating deuterostome gastrulation, we identified the gene expression patterns of Wnt, Frizzled (Fz), and secreted frizzled-related protein (sFRP) family genes, which play a role in the initial stage of the Wnt pathway, in starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera embryos using whole mount in situ hybridization. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Here, we purified GSS of starfish, Asterina pectinifera, from radial nerves and determined its amino acid sequence. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Asterina starfish may look cute and exciting to a new hobbyist discovering it in their tank. (algaebarn.com)
  • The Asterina sea star is not a member of the starfish family but they are commonly confused with starfish in the aquarium keeping hobby. (pawfectpawprint.com)
  • They methodically move through the tank and consume asterina starfish. (algaebarn.com)
  • This poster print features fine art illustrations of various species of starfish and seastars Species featured: BAT STAR (Asterina miniata) BLUE SEA STAR (Linckia laevigata) COLEMAN'S NIPPLED STAR (Gomophia sp. (inkart.net)
  • link to Asterina Starfish. (aquariumbreeder.com)
  • Asterina Starfish. (aquariumbreeder.com)
  • What is Asterina starfish? (aquariumbreeder.com)
  • Asterina gibbosa, small starfish, entire specimen carefully stained and w.m. for general study prepared microscope slide. (inds.co.uk)
  • Microinjection of pertussis toxin (PTX) inhibited 1-MA-induced GVBD in Asterina pectinifera and Asterina (Patiria) miniata. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Asterina miniata and Mediaster aequalis have obvious plates (ossicles) on the aboral surface. (eopugetsound.org)
  • Six species of sea stars were used in this study: Asterias amurensis, Asterias rubens, Asterias forbesi, Aphelasterias japonica, Distolasterias nipon, and Asterina pectinifera. (lookformedical.com)
  • Asterina gibbosa, stages of development w.m. (inds.co.uk)
  • Asterina gibbosa, stages of development w.m. prepared microscope slide. (inds.co.uk)
  • At this point it should be said that there are many different species of Asterina sp. (reefkeeping.com)
  • suddenly become crazed coral killers, so chances are, if you have not experienced coral loss, you likely will not - at least not until another potentially carnivorous strain or species of Asterina sp. (reefkeeping.com)
  • There is a pretty good chance that, like Aiptasia , we will all encounter Asterina sp. (reefkeeping.com)
  • Asterina sea stars are not predatory like the six rayed seastar but they do have the ability to reproduce asexually. (pawfectpawprint.com)
  • On the other hand, there are seasoned aquarists who have lived with Asterina sp. (reefkeeping.com)
  • while sympatric species such as Asterina spp. (vin.com)
  • One of our key pieces this season: the ASTERINA necklace with a big gold-plated sea star pendant hanging on a long shiny satin cord in midnight blue and with freshwater pearls at the ends. (telawave.de)
  • Helps scoop Asterina star fish off your glass. (printed3d.parts)
  • I also had bad asterina stars that were eating my zoanthids that I knew the hyper salinity would help cut down. (saltwaterfish.com)