A genus of STARFISH in the family Asterinidae. They externally hold developing embryos (EMBRYO, NON-MAMMALIAN) among the spines below the oral surface.
Echinoderms having bodies of usually five radially disposed arms coalescing at the center.
A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.
The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of organisms which inhabit the OCEANS AND SEAS.
Small solar system planetary bodies including asteroids. Most asteroids are found within the gap lying between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.
Organisms that live in water.
A phylum of the most familiar marine invertebrates. Its class Stelleroidea contains two subclasses, the Asteroidea (the STARFISH or sea stars) and the Ophiuroidea (the brittle stars, also called basket stars and serpent stars). There are 1500 described species of STARFISH found throughout the world. The second class, Echinoidea, contains about 950 species of SEA URCHINS, heart urchins, and sand dollars. A third class, Holothuroidea, comprises about 900 echinoderms known as SEA CUCUMBERS. Echinoderms are used extensively in biological research. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp773-826)
Insoluble polymers of TYROSINE derivatives found in and causing darkness in skin (SKIN PIGMENTATION), hair, and feathers providing protection against SUNBURN induced by SUNLIGHT. CAROTENES contribute yellow and red coloration.
An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the reaction between L-tyrosine, L-dopa, and oxygen to yield L-dopa, dopaquinone, and water. It is a copper protein that acts also on catechols, catalyzing some of the same reactions as CATECHOL OXIDASE. EC 1.14.18.1.
Excessive pigmentation of the skin, usually as a result of increased epidermal or dermal melanin pigmentation, hypermelanosis. Hyperpigmentation can be localized or generalized. The condition may arise from exposure to light, chemicals or other substances, or from a primary metabolic imbalance.
An extensive order of basidiomycetous fungi whose fruiting bodies are commonly called mushrooms.
Substances used to obtain a lighter skin complexion or to treat HYPERPIGMENTATION disorders.
The MEDITERRANEAN SEA, the MEDITERRANEAN ISLANDS, and the countries bordering on the sea collectively.
Common name for perch-like fish of the family Cichlidae, belonging to the suborder Labroidei, order PERCIFORMES.
Technique that utilizes low-stringency polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with single primers of arbitrary sequence to generate strain-specific arrays of anonymous DNA fragments. RAPD technique may be used to determine taxonomic identity, assess kinship relationships, analyze mixed genome samples, and create specific probes.
An order of amoeboid EUKARYOTES characterized by reticulating pseudopods and a complex life cycle with an alternation of generations. Most are less than 1mm in size and found in marine or brackish water.
A genus of root and butt rot fungi in the family Tricholomataceae that produce rhizomorphs and are facultatively parasitic. Many species are pathogenic to trees causing Armillaria root disease.
An order of ascomycetous FUNGI which includes many economically important plant parasites as well as saprophytes.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
A plant species of the genus PINUS that contains isocupressic acid.
A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
An area of water mostly surrounded by land, usually smaller than a gulf, and affording access to the sea.
Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.
Monohydroxy derivatives of cyclohexanes that contain the general formula R-C6H11O. They have a camphorlike odor and are used in making soaps, insecticides, germicides, dry cleaning, and plasticizers.
Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.
A phylum of oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria comprised of unicellular to multicellular bacteria possessing CHLOROPHYLL a and carrying out oxygenic PHOTOSYNTHESIS. Cyanobacteria are the only known organisms capable of fixing both CARBON DIOXIDE (in the presence of light) and NITROGEN. Cell morphology can include nitrogen-fixing heterocysts and/or resting cells called akinetes. Formerly called blue-green algae, cyanobacteria were traditionally treated as ALGAE.
Removal of moisture from a substance (chemical, food, tissue, etc.).
The art or process of comparing photometrically the relative intensities of the light in different parts of the spectrum.
Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.
Determination of the spectra of ultraviolet absorption by specific molecules in gases or liquids, for example Cl2, SO2, NO2, CS2, ozone, mercury vapor, and various unsaturated compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The normal length of time of an organism's life.
A chemical system that functions to control the levels of specific ions in solution. When the level of hydrogen ion in solution is controlled the system is called a pH buffer.
The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.
A competitive nine-member team sport including softball.
Reproduction without fusion of two types of cells, mostly found in ALGAE; FUNGI; and PLANTS. Asexual reproduction occurs in several ways, such as budding, fission, or splitting from "parent" cells. Only few groups of ANIMALS reproduce asexually or unisexually (PARTHENOGENESIS).
Release of oil into the environment usually due to human activity.
A body of water located at the southeastern corner of North America. It is bordered by the states to the north of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas; by five Mexican states to the west: Tamaulipas, Veracruz, Tabasco, Campeche, Yucatan; and by Cuba to the southeast.
Transmission of live or pre-recorded audio or video content via connection or download from the INTERNET.
Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.
Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.
Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.

Fibrous component of the blastocoelic extracellular matrix shapes epithelia in concert with mesenchyme cells in starfish embryos. (1/18)

By using a monoclonal antibody (4H11 Mab), we have investigated morphogenetic functions of a fibrous component of the blastocoelic extracellular matrix in relation to cellular activities during early development of the starfish Asterina pectinifera. The 4H11 fibers fill the blastocoele from the late-cleavage to late-gastrula stage and contain the 370-kDa proteinaceous molecule secreted only by the epithelial cells. When 4H11 Mab is introduced into the blastocoele of blastulae, the embryos reveal three distinct morphological abnormalities after the mid-gastrula stage: (1) Distribution of mesenchyme cells confined near the tip of the archenteron, (2) swelling of the posterior ectoderm, and (3) suppressed growth of the mouth, esophagus, and coelomic pouches. These abnormalities occur together with alterations in the distribution of the 4H11 fibers. In embryos recovering from the effect of 4H11 Mab, the mesenchyme cells rearrange the 4H11 fibers. We propose that 4H11 fibers play direct roles in the morphogenesis of starfish embryos by providing a dynamic scaffold not only for the mesenchyme cells but also for the epithelial cells. Moreover, 4H11 fibers have a resist force from within, in concert with the mesenchyme cells, to counter the bulging force intrinsic to the epithelia and hold the epithelia in specific positions, once the positions have been decided.  (+info)

Centrosome destined to decay in starfish oocytes. (2/18)

In contrast to the somatic cell cycle, duplication of the centrioles does not occur in the second meiotic cycle. Previous studies have revealed that in starfish each of the two centrosomes in fully-grown immature oocytes consists of two centrioles with different destinies: one survives and retains its reproductive capacity, and the other is lost after completion of meiosis. In this study, we investigated whether this heterogeneity of the meiotic centrioles is already determined before the re-initiation of meiosis. We prepared a small fragment of immature oocyte containing the four centrioles and fused it electrically with a mature egg in order to transfer two sets of the premeiotic centrioles into the mature cytoplasm. Two asters were present in this conjugate, and in each of them only a single centriole was detected by electron microscopy. In the first mitosis of the conjugate artificially activated without sperm, two division poles formed, each of which doubled in each subsequent round of mitosis. These results indicate that only two of the four premeiotic centrioles survived in the mature cytoplasm and that they retained their reproductive capacity, which suggests that the heterogeneity of the maternal centrioles is determined well before re-initiation of meiosis, and that some factor in the mature cytoplasm is responsible for suppressing the reproductive capacity of the centrioles destined to decay.  (+info)

Complete mitochondrial genome sequences for Crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci and Acanthaster brevispinus. (3/18)

BACKGROUND: The crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci (L.), has been blamed for coral mortality in a large number of coral reef systems situated in the Indo-Pacific region. Because of its high fecundity and the long duration of the pelagic larval stage, the mechanism of outbreaks may be related to its meta-population dynamics, which should be examined by larval sampling and population genetic analysis. However, A. planci larvae have undistinguished morphological features compared with other asteroid larvae, hence it has been difficult to discriminate A. planci larvae in plankton samples without species-specific markers. Also, no tools are available to reveal the dispersal pathway of A. planci larvae. Therefore the development of highly polymorphic genetic markers has the potential to overcome these difficulties. To obtain genomic information for these purposes, the complete nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial genome of A. planci and its putative sibling species, A. brevispinus were determined and their characteristics discussed. RESULTS: The complete mtDNA of A. planci and A. brevispinus are 16,234 bp and 16,254 bp in size, respectively. These values fall within the length variation range reported for other metazoan mitochondrial genomes. They contain 13 proteins, 2 rRNA, and 22 tRNA genes and the putative control region in the same order as the asteroid, Asterina pectinifera. The A + T contents of A. planci and A. brevispinus on their L strands that encode the majority of protein-coding genes are 56.3% and 56.4% respectively and are lower than that of A. pectinifera (61.2%). The percent similarity of nucleotide sequences between A. planci and A. brevispinus is found to be highest in the CO2 and CO3 regions (both 90.6%) and lowest in ND2 gene (84.2%) among the 13 protein-coding genes. In the deduced putative amino acid sequences, CO1 is highly conserved (99.2%), and ATP8 apparently evolves faster any of the other protein-coding gene (85.2%). CONCLUSION: The gene arrangement, base composition, codon usage and tRNA structure of A. planci are similar to those of A. brevispinus. However, there are significant variations between A. planci and A. brevispinus. Complete mtDNA sequences are useful for the study of phylogeny, larval detection and population genetics.  (+info)

p90Rsk is required for G1 phase arrest in unfertilized starfish eggs. (4/18)

The cell cycle in oocytes generally arrests at a particular meiotic stage to await fertilization. This arrest occurs at metaphase of meiosis II (meta-II) in frog and mouse, and at G1 phase after completion of meiosis II in starfish. Despite this difference in the arrest phase, both arrests depend on the same Mos-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway, indicating that the difference relies on particular downstream effectors. Immediately downstream of MAPK, Rsk (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase, p90(Rsk)) is required for the frog meta-II arrest. However, the mouse meta-II arrest challenges this requirement, and no downstream effector has been identified in the starfish G1 arrest. To investigate the downstream effector of MAPK in the starfish G1 arrest, we used a neutralizing antibody against Rsk and a constitutively active form of Rsk. Rsk was activated downstream of the Mos-MAPK pathway during meiosis. In G1 eggs, inhibition of Rsk activity released the arrest and initiated DNA replication without fertilization. Conversely, maintenance of Rsk activity prevented DNA replication following fertilization. In early embryos, injection of Mos activated the MAPK-Rsk pathway, resulting in G1 arrest. Moreover, inhibition of Rsk activity during meiosis I led to parthenogenetic activation without meiosis II. We conclude that immediately downstream of MAPK, Rsk is necessary and sufficient for the starfish G1 arrest. Although CSF (cytostatic factor) was originally defined for meta-II arrest in frog eggs, we propose to distinguish ;G1-CSF' for starfish from ;meta-II-CSF' for frog and mouse. The present study thus reveals a novel role of Rsk for G1-CSF.  (+info)

Adaptations to benthic development: functional morphology of the attachment complex of the brachiolaria larva in the sea star Asterina gibbosa. (5/18)

The asteroid Asterina gibbosa lives all its life in close relation to the sea bottom. Indeed, this sea star possesses an entirely benthic, lecithotrophic development. The embryos adhere to the substratum due to particular properties of their jelly coat, and hatching occurs directly at the brachiolaria stage. Brachiolariae have a hypertrophied, bilobed attachment complex comprising two asymmetrical brachiolar arms and a central adhesive disc. This study aims at describing the ultrastructure of the attachment complex and possible adaptations, at the cellular level, to benthic development. Immediately after hatching, early brachiolariae attach by the arms. All along the anterior side of each arm, the epidermis encloses several cell types, such as secretory cells of two types (A and B), support cells, and sensory cells. Like their equivalents in planktotrophic larvae, type A and B secretory cells are presumably involved in a duo-glandular system in which the former are adhesive and the latter de-adhesive in function. Unlike what is observed in planktotrophic larvae, the sensory cells are unspecialized and presumably not involved in substratum testing. During the larval period, the brachiolar arms progressively increase in size and the adhesive disc becomes more prominent. At the onset of metamorphosis, brachiolariae cement themselves strongly to the substratum with the adhesive disc. The disc contains two main cell types, support cells and secretory cells, the latter being responsible for the cement release. During this metamorphosis, the brachiolar arms regress while post-metamorphic structures grow considerably, especially the tube feet, which take over the role of attachment to the substratum. The end of this period corresponds to the complete regression of the external larval structures, which also coincides with the opening of the mouth. This sequence of stages, each possessing its own adhesive strategy, is common to all asteroid species having a benthic development. In A. gibbosa, morphological adaptations to this mode of development include the hypertrophic growth of the attachment complex, its bilobed shape forming an almost completely adhesive sole, and the regression of the sensory equipment.  (+info)

Increase in multidrug transport activity is associated with oocyte maturation in sea stars. (6/18)

In this study, we report on the presence of efflux transporter activity before oocyte maturation in sea stars and its upregulation after maturation. This activity is similar to the multidrug resistance (MDR) activity mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters. In sea star oocytes the efflux activity, as measured by exclusion of calcein-am, increased two-fold 3 h post-maturation. Experiments using specific and non-specific dyes and inhibitors demonstrated that the increase in transporter activity involves an ABCB protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and an ABCC protein similar to the MDR-associated protein (MRP)-like transporters. Western blots using an antibody directed against mammalian P-gp recognized a 45 kDa protein in sea star oocytes that increased in abundance during maturation. An antibody directed against sea urchin ABCC proteins (MRP) recognized three proteins in immature oocytes and two in mature oocytes. Experiments using inhibitors suggest that translation and microtubule function are both required for post-maturation increases in transporter activity. Immunolabeling revealed translocation of stored ABCB proteins to the plasma cell membrane during maturation, and this translocation coincided with increased transport activity. These MDR transporters serve protective roles in oocytes and eggs, as demonstrated by sensitization of the oocytes to the maturation inhibitor, vinblastine, by MRP and PGP-specific transporter inhibitors.  (+info)

Caught in the evolutionary act: precise cis-regulatory basis of difference in the organization of gene networks of sea stars and sea urchins. (7/18)

The regulatory control of otxbeta1/2 in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and the sea star Asterina miniata provides an exceptional opportunity to determine the genomic basis of evolutionary change in gene regulatory network (GRN) architectures. Network perturbation analyses in both taxa show that Otx regulates the transcription factors gatae and krox/blimp1 and both of these transcription factors also feed back and regulate otx. The otx gene also autoregulates. This three way interaction is an example of a GRN kernel. It has been conserved for 500 million years since these two taxa last shared a common ancestor. Amid this high level of conservation we show here one significant regulatory change. Tbrain is required for correct otxbeta1/2 expression in the sea star but not in the sea urchin. In sea urchin, tbrain is not co-expressed with otxbeta1/2 and instead has an essential role in specification of the embryonic skeleton. Tbrain in these echinoderms is thus a perfect example of an orthologous gene co-opted for entirely different developmental processes. We isolate and test the sea star otxbeta1/2 cis-regulatory module and demonstrate functional binding sites for each of the predicted inputs, including Tbrain. We compare it to the logic processing operating in the sea urchin otxbeta1/2 cis-regulatory module and present an evolutionary scenario of the change in Tbrain dependence. Finally, inter-specific gene transfer experiments confirm this scenario and demonstrate evolution occurring at the level of sequence changes to the cis-regulatory module.  (+info)

Transfer of a large gene regulatory apparatus to a new developmental address in echinoid evolution. (8/18)

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In Asian countries, women are concerned with skin whitening as having whiter skin is often seen to be a superior standard of beauty (25). As a number of women worry about skin pigmentation, effective agents for the improvement of hyperpigmentation have been researched for skin whitening products (26). These foregoing attributes prompted the present hypothesis that a marine natural product might be valuable as a cosmetic component to improve the appearance of hyperpigmentation. We intended in this study to find new whitening materials from A. pectinifera, a marine organism that would also have significance insofar as we would obtain bioactive materials by using starfish which would be discarded after collection from the sea. Therefore, we investigated the potential whitening effect of A. pectinifera extracts (80-MAP, He-AP, EA-AP and En-AP) and also demonstrated the effect of each extract on melanin biosynthesis through tyrosinase activity which is a standard model for assessing regulators of ...
Mah, C. (2010). Asterina cepheus (Müller & Troschel, 1842). In: Mah, C.L. (2017). World Asteroidea database. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=213129 on 2017-12- ...
ABSTRACT: The starfish Asterina burtoni is a Lessepsian colonizer which penetrated the Mediterranean Sea from the Red Sea. Populations of A. burtoni are found under rocks and stones in shallow waters along the northern Israeli and southern Lebanese Mediterranean coasts. In the Red Sea, A. burtoni is found in 2 forms, a pentamerous form with 5 equal arms that reproduces sexually, and a pluriradiate form with 3 to 8 arms of unequal length that reproduces both sexually and by fission. In the Mediterranean Sea only the pluriradiate fissiparous form is found. Only male gonads were observed in Mediterranean populations, suggesting reproduction by fission only. It is possible that the successful colonization of the Mediterranean by A. burtoni was mainly due to rapid proliferation by fissiparity. In the present study we used the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method to address this question. Genetic diversity was determined within and between different pluriradiate populations from the ...
The order Asterinales comprises a single family, Asterinaceae. In this study, types or specimens of 41 genera of Asterinaceae are re-examined and re-described and illustrated by micrographs. Seventeen genera, namely Asterina (type genus), Asterinella, Asterotexis, Batistinula, Cirsosia, Echidnodella, Halbania, Lembosia, Meliolaster, Parasterinopsis, Platypeltella, Prillieuxina, Schenckiella (=Allothyrium), Trichasterina, Trichopeltospora, Uleothyrium and Vizellopsis, are maintained within Asterinaceae. Echidnodes, Lembosiella, Lembosina, Morenoina, and Thyriopsis are transferred to Aulographaceae based on morphological and molecular characteristics. Anariste is transferred to Micropeltidaceae, while Lembosiopsis is transferred to Mycosphaerellaceae. Placoasterella and Placosoma are morphologically close to taxa in Parmulariaceae, where they are transferred. Aulographina is placed in Teratosphaeriaceae, while Asterodothis, Asterinema, Dothidasteromella, Leveillella, Petrakina and Stephanotheca ...
MASTL (microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like), more commonly known as Greatwall (GWL), has been proposed as a novel cancer therapy target. GWL plays a crucial role in mitotic progression, via its known substrates ENSA/ARPP19, which when phosphorylated inactivate PP2A/B55 phosphatase. When over-expressed in breast cancer, GWL induces oncogenic properties such as transformation and invasiveness. Conversely, down-regulation of GWL selectively sensitises tumour cells to chemotherapy. Here we describe the rst structure of the GWL minimal kinase domain and development of a small-molecule inhibitor GKI-1 (Greatwall Kinase Inhibitor-1). In vitro, GKI-1 inhibits full-length human GWL, and shows cellular e cacy. Treatment of HeLa cells with GKI-1 reduces ENSA/ARPP19 phosphorylation levels, such that they are comparable to those obtained by siRNA depletion of GWL; resulting in a decrease in mitotic events, mitotic arrest/cell death and cytokinesis failure. Furthermore, GKI-1 will be a useful ...
To recover tara cDNAs, relevant λC5 and λC13 genomic fragments were used to probe a cDNA library from 8- to 12-hr embryos (see materials and methods). Among 30 positive clones recovered, insert sizes ranged from 0.9 to 4.3 kb. Restriction mapping and partial sequence analysis indicated that all of the cDNA inserts had similar 3′ extremities, ending in an A-rich region with oligoadenylated tails. However, two classes of 5′ extremities (α and β) were detected among the longest cDNAs. All but one cDNA insert shared a common 5′ region of the β-class and differed only in length. The longest of these β-type inserts, C16, contained a sequence of 4000 bp (Figure 3). The complete sequence of the single α-type clone (C12) was 4316 bp, again in reasonable agreement with a fully polyadenylated mRNA of ~4500 nucleotides (nt) detected by Northern blots. C12 was identical to C16 for most of its length, sharing a long open reading frame of 2724 bp (see Figures 2B and 3). However, C12 and C16 ...
Throughout history the British Atlantic has often been depicted as a series of well-ordered colonial ports that functioned as nodes of Atlantic shipping, where orderliness reflected the effectiveness of the regulatory apparatus constructed to contain Atlantic commerce. Colonial ports were governable places where British vessels, and only British vessels, were to deliver English goods in exchange for colonial produce. Yet behind these sanitized depictions lay another story, one about the porousness of commercial regulation, the informality and persistent illegality of exchanges in the British Empire, and the endurance of a culture of cross-national cooperation in the Atlantic that had been forged in the first decades of European settlement and still resonated a century later.. In Empire at the Periphery, Christian J. Koot examines the networks that connected British settlers in New York and the Caribbean and Dutch traders in the Netherlands and in the Dutch colonies in North America and the ...
Theoretical foundations and a global overview of the known protein structures; induced conformational changes upon protein-protein association; regulatory apparatus of pp60c-Src protein; protein dynamics and NMR relaxation; structure, dynamics and func
If you are talking about the current thread with the boost in old drugs as one example, Ill tell you, and I know this because my husband works directly with industry regulations, that the situation in question was created by the government regulatory apparatus. In their effort to create the safe drug environment demanded by consumers (and petty bureaucrats looking to justify their own desk jobs), they created the set of drug validation rules being used by the companies in question ...
How cells coordinate growth and division is key for size homeostasis. Phosphorylation by G1-CDK of Whi5/Rb inhibitors of SBF/E2F transcription factors triggers irreversible S-phase entry in yeast and metazoans, but why this occurs at a given cell size is not fully understood. We show that the yeast Rim15-Igo1,2 pathway, orthologous to Gwl-Arpp19/ENSA, is up-regulated in early G1 and helps promoting START by preventing PP2ACdc55 to dephosphorylate Whi5. RIM15 overexpression lowers cell size while IGO1,2 deletion delays START in cells with low CDK activity. Deletion of WHI5, CDC55 and ectopic CLN2 expression suppress the START delay of igo1,2 cells. Rim15 activity increases after cells switch from fermentation to respiration, where Igo1,2 contribute to chromosome maintenance. Interestingly Cln3-Cdk1 also inhibits Rim15 activity, which enables homeostatic control of Whi5 phosphorylation and cell cycle entry. We propose that Rim15/Gwl regulation of PP2A plays a hitherto unappreciated role in cell ...
We are investigating how mammalian cells process information about intra- and extracellular cues through their intra-cellular signalling and gene-regulatory networks, how these networks dysfunction in disease and how these networks can be modulated by drugs. We are an interdisciplinary team of experimentalists and theoreticians and utilise mathematical models and theoretical concepts as well as quantitative and high throuput experimental approaches to analyse signalling and gene expression. ...
We are investigating how mammalian cells process information about intra- and extracellular cues through their intra-cellular signalling and gene-regulatory networks, how these networks dysfunction in disease and how these networks can be modulated by drugs. We are an interdisciplinary team of experimentalists and theoreticians and utilise mathematical models and theoretical concepts as well as quantitative and high throuput experimental approaches to analyse signalling and gene expression. ...
Video articles in JoVE about genetic processes include A Method for Microinjection of Patiria minata Zygotes, Nuclear Transfer into Mouse Oocytes, Genomic MRI - a Public Resource for Studying Sequence Patterns within Genomic DNA, Genetic Crosses.
The crustose coralline alga Lithothamnium pseudosorum induces high rates of settlement and metamorphosis of larvae of the coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci). In cases where crustose coralline algae (CCA) induce metamorphosis of marine invertebrate larvae it is normally assumed that the inductive molecules are produced by the alga, but an alternative is that they originate from bacteria on the plant surface. Bioassays using shards of L. pseudosorum treated with several antibiotics, whereby some shards were reinfected with bacteria from the alga, showed that if bacteria populations are depleted then settlement and metamorphosis of larvae of A. planci are inhibited. This demonstrates that bacteria are necessary for induction and suggests that morphogenic substances are produced by bacteria on the surface of the alga and not directly by the alga itself. However, surface bacteria are not inductive if they are isolated from soluble algal compounds, suggesting either that they ...
Despite the presence of numerous sharp poisonous spines, adult crown-of-thorns starfish (CoTS) are vulnerable to predation, though the importance and rates of predation are generally unknown. This study explores variation in the incidence and severity of injuries for Acanthaster cf. solaris from Australias Great Barrier Reef. The major cause of such injuries is presumed to be sub-lethal predation such that the incidence of injuries may provide a proxy for overall predation and mortality rates. A total of 3846 Acanthaster cf. solaris were sampled across 19 reefs, of which 1955 (50.83%) were injured. Both the incidence and severity of injuries decreased with increasing body size. For small CoTS (<125 mm total diameter) >60% of individuals had injuries, and a mean 20.7% of arms (±2.9 SE) were affected. By comparison, <30% of large (>450 mm total diameter) CoTS had injuries, and, among those, only 8.3% of arms (±1.7 SE) were injured. The incidence of injuries varied greatly among reefs but
Outbreaks of the destructive coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci, present a considerable threat to coral reefs worldwide, and mitigat
Full paper, video, gifs and still images available. Details below. Dr Frederieke Kroon looking at a crown-of-thorns starfish on the Great Barrier Reef. Credit: D.Westcott/CSIRO Crown-of-thorns starfish are on the menu for many more fish species than previously suspected, an investigation using fish poo and gut goo reve
A sea stars anus is in the center of the top side, or the aboral surface of the animal. A circular madreporite is located just off center on the aboral surface, and this madreporite is a critical part of the circulation system of the sea star. Instead of a circulatory system, a sea star has a water vascular system, and the madreporite acts as a trap door through which water can move in and out in a controlled manner. The mouth of a sea star is located in the center of its underneath or oral surface. Open furrows containing tube feet extend from the mouth along the length of each leg.. Sea stars do not have eyes, but they have eyespots that can detect light at the tip of each arm. Interestingly, scientific studies have shown some species of sea stars move toward light while others move away from the light. Neurosensory cells which are sensitive to both touch and chemical tastes cover the surface of a sea star and are particularly dense in the suckers of the tube feet. Many species of sea stars ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Mesenchyme cells can function to induce epithelial cell proliferation in starfish embryos. AU - Hamanaka, Gen. AU - Matsumoto, Midori. AU - Imoto, Masaya. AU - Kaneko, Hiroyuki. PY - 2010/3. Y1 - 2010/3. N2 - Here, we show that mesenchyme cells have a novel morphogenetic function in epithelial cell proliferation in starfish embryos. Blastula embryos were injected with pure populations of mesenchyme cells and the total cell numbers in the treated embryos were subsequently determined at different developmental stages. When a total of 40-50 mesenchyme cells was injected, total cells numbers in mid-gastrula embryos and 3-day-old bipinnaria larvae increased significantly (by 1.3-fold) compared with controls, with no indication of any mitotic activity in the injected mesenchyme cells. However, injection of more than 150 mesenchyme cells failed to induce proliferation of the epithelial cells and, moreover, interfered with normal morphogenesis. These developmental abnormalities occurred ...
Minimum depth from Ref. 81548. Cryptic on coral areas and reef patches (Ref. 78188). On a reef slope (Ref. 97449). Feeds on hard corals, soft corals, encrusting organisms, algae, gorgonians and cannibalistic on other Acanthaster planci (Ref. 78188). Life cycle: Eggs hatch into planktonic larvae, grow into algal and coral feeding juveniles, and later into fully grown adults (Ref. 83567). Also Ref. 113703. Spawning period in the Southern Hemisphere is from November to January while in the Northern Hemisphere, May to August. Spawning duration is about 30 minutes. Aggregation and synchronization during spawning is triggered by pheromone but is only effective over short distances (Ref. 78188). ...
Scientists have taken a major step towards understanding how and why deadly plagues of coral-eating crown-of-thorns seastar (COTS) break out across the Great Barrier Reef, thanks to novel research...
Although a great deal is known about molecular motors that drive movement of the eukaryotic flagellum, little is known about mechanisms that regulate/coordinate flagellar beat (Cosson, 1996). Our results demonstrate that trypanin is required for directional cell motility in T. brucei. EM studies revealed that the unusual cell motility defect of trypanin(−) mutants results from uncoupling of the flagellar apparatus from the subpellicular cytoskeleton. The punctate distribution of trypanin along the cell body side of the paraflagellar rod (Fig. 5) supports the interpretation that trypanin is part of the attachment complex that connects the flagellum to the subpellicular cytoskeleton. Our data further indicate that this flagellum attachment complex has two components, a cytoskeletal component, of which trypanin is a part, and a membrane component that operates even in the absence of trypanin and stabilizes the direct cytoskeleton connection (Balber, 1990; Hemphill et al., 1991). The only other ...
A new video from Oregon Sea Grant (OSG), Sea Star Health: Using Blood Work to Identify Sick Sea Stars, reveals how OSG and Oregon State University created the first-ever blood panel for ochre sea stars to use as a baseline for detecting sick ones. The tool could help aquarists treat them before they succumb to Sea Star Wasting Syndrome, which causes their limbs to fall off.. The cause of the syndrome, which was first seen in the Pacific Northwest in 2013, is unknown. OSU veterinary student Heather Renee Srch-Thaden created the blood panel under the guidance of Dr. Tim Miller-Morgan, an aquatic veterinarian with OSG Extension, and Dr. Susan Tornquist, dean of OSUs College of Veterinary Medicine.. The video was filmed at OSUs Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, where the public can touch and learn about sea stars in a tidepool exhibit at the HMSC Visitor Center. It was filmed and edited by OSG videographer Vanessa Cholewczynski, with photos by Tim Miller-Morgan and Heather Renee ...
Staff scientist Dana Murray reports on a mysterious disease hitting West Coast tidal zones:. Missing limbs … melting masses of flesh … gooey lesions overtaking the entire body.. No, its not the stuff of a sci-fi horror movie. Rather, its a troubling series of misfortunes befalling sea stars along the Pacific coast of North America. This winter, divers and tidepoolers are encountering numerous sea stars with white lesions that eventually decompose body tissue into a goo-like blob.. These keystone predators are victims of sea star wasting disease, a fast-moving infectious disease that has occurred along our coast for decades, but not at the recent widespread level. Reports of disintegrating sea stars have come from as far north as Anchorage, Alaska, to our shores along Palos Verdes, and down south to La Jolla.. Scientists first described the symptoms in 1978, and several outbreaks have occurred since. Warmer water temperatures led to massive sea star die-offs in Southern California in ...
National Geographic, Sep 15, 2015: The massacre of sea stars along the West Coast continues, although the pace has slowed because so many already have died… Some areas have seen up to a 90 percent decline in their populations… Scientists [are] investigating why this disease… is now rampaging through 19 species of sea stars… In some of the locations hit early on with this wasting disease, [Pete Raimondi, a marine ecologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz] and colleagues are already starting to see a shift in the animal community. In tidepools, where there used to be a mix of organisms including sea stars, scientists are now seeing mussels dominating… in the Pacific Northwest, sea stars have either gotten smaller in body size, or they are big, with few in the mid-size range, says Drew Harvell, a marine ecologist at Cornell University.. National Geographic transcript, Sep 15, 2015: Ben Miner, marine biologist at Western Washington Univ.: From Mexico all the way to Alaska, ...
Shown above, is Acanthaster planci-the infamous Crown-of-Thorns starfish which attacks and devours primarily shallow-water tropical hard coral (i.e., scleractinian). While the above species has grown to plague proportions-it is an important member of the coral-reef ecosystem. As it is likely these deep-sea corallivores are ALSO likely to be... So, how did this whole process begin? As with many things...it started with me identifying a starfish... ...
Shown above, is Acanthaster planci-the infamous Crown-of-Thorns starfish which attacks and devours primarily shallow-water tropical hard coral (i.e., scleractinian). While the above species has grown to plague proportions-it is an important member of the coral-reef ecosystem. As it is likely these deep-sea corallivores are ALSO likely to be... So, how did this whole process begin? As with many things...it started with me identifying a starfish... ...
Stock Photo of Northern Pacific Sea Star tubed feet. High Quality Northern Pacific Sea Star Images and Gloss Prints are available from Oceanwide Images Stock Photo Library.
Sea Star House, Ao Nang from 37 $ (22.Mar) Instant hotel booking. Sea Star House is indeed a pleasant and relaxing place to enjoy your holiday. You can be assured of a warm welcome and excellent service from the frie...
The name momiji is short for momiji-hitode or momoji-gai. As you know, hitode is the most common use of the Japanese word to indicate sea stars. The word gai or kai means shellfish in Japanese. Our remote ancestors considered that the sea star was one of the groups of seashells. The Japanese common names of sea stars have hitode in most of the species, or momiji in some groups. For example, we can see the word momiji in some astropectinid sea stars and goniasterid sea stars such as Pseudarchaster parelii (aka-momiji: red sea star ...
During the late 1960s and 1970s, massive herds of poisonous crown-of-thorns starfish suddenly began to infest coral reef communities around the world, leaving in their wake devastation comparable to a burnt-out rainforest.
There was a man who was walking along a sandy beach where thousands of sea stars had been washed up on the shore. He noticed a boy picking the sea star one by one and throwing them back into the ocean. The man observed the boy for a few minutes and then asked what he was doing. The boy replied that the sun was up and the tide was going out. Thus he was returning the sea star to the sea, otherwise they would die. The man asked how saving a few, when so many were doomed would make any difference whatsover? The boy picked up a sea star and threw it back into the ocean and said, it made a difference to that one. The man left the boy and went home, deep in thought about what the boy had said. He soon returned to the beach and spent the rest of the day helping the boy throw sea star into the sea. ~ Loren Eiseley ...
A yellow elastic fibrous mucoprotein that is the major protein of elastic structures such as blood vessels. (2) A protein found with collagen in the dermis that is responsible for giving structure to your skin and organs. Protein similar in structure to collagen and is chief constituent of elastic fibers embedded in extracellular matrix. The fibrous components form an elastic network to uniformly maintain the resilience and elastic properties to local tissue requirements. ...
This invention includes malleable, biodegradable, fibrous compositions for application to a tissue site in order to promote or facilitate new tissue growth. One aspect of this invention is a fibrous component that provides unique mechanical and physical properties. The invention may be created by providing a vessel containing a slurry, said slurry comprising a plurality of natural or synthetic polymer fibers and at least one suspension fluid, wherein the polymer fibers are substantially evenly dispersed and randomly oriented throughout the volume of the suspension fluid; applying a force, e.g., centrifugal, to said vessel containing said slurry, whereupon said force serves to cause said polymer fibers to migrate through the suspension fluid and amass at a furthest extent of the vessel, forming a polymer material, with said polymer material comprising polymer fibers of sufficient length and sufficiently viscous, interlaced, or interlocked to retard dissociation of said polymer fibers.
The present invention is directed to an essentially binder free cleaning and/or sanitizing nonwoven article including a cationic fibrous component for cleaning a surface, to be utilized with a sanitizing solution without depleting the solutions effectiveness. The cationic cleaning or sanitizing article of the present invention is particularly engineered to be stored in a quaternary amine sanitizing solution over an extended period of time while maintaining at least the minimum required FDA ppm of the sanitizing solution.
The anaerobic biodigestion process occurs as a result of the action of different microorganisms on organic matter, which transforms complex organic substances into more simple molecules, stabilizing the organic matter and producing biofertilizer and biogas (Amorim et al., 2004). Many factors can affect this process, including the composition of the substrate to be digested, which is closely related to the diets fed to animals. The mineral and nitrogen contents and the different types of carbohydrates in the diets affect the amount and quality of feces produced, and can therefore alter biogas production (Orrico et al., 2007).. Considering the carbohydrates present in diets fed to pigs, starch is totally digested in the pigs small and large intestine, whereas the fibrous component of the feedstuffs is partially degraded in the large intestine, and the portion not completely digested is, most likely, excreted (Wang et al., 2002). In phase 3 diets of this research, the calculated values of total ...
Buy Biorb Sea Star to add color to your Biorb fish tank for a colorful decoration. Or shop for other Biorb decorations and products from the largest Biorb and Biube supplier in the U.S.
By Jay T. Cullen Note that the video above was shot on May 8, 2015, set to Debussys Clair de Lune, by the YouTube user NorthOlbo who makes wonderful pieces about the British Columbian coast. Check him out. The purpose of this more visual post is to report on a recent trip my students and…
Daug paprasčiau uiti, žeminti ir įžeidinėti kolegą, pavaldinį, kai to nedraudžia šalies įstatymai. Nuolatinį žeminimą Lietuvoje patiria ne tik dirbantys privačiuose, bet ir valstybiniuose sektoriuose. Tačiau užkirsti kelią valstybinėje įstaigoje kaip savo namuose besielgiančiam viršesniam valdininkui - tiesioginių teisinių priemonių nėra. Apie mobingą, kitai psichologinį ar net fizinė terorą kalbamės su docente dr. Jolita Vveinhard.
Daug paprasčiau uiti, žeminti ir įžeidinėti kolegą, pavaldinį, kai to nedraudžia šalies įstatymai. Nuolatinį žeminimą Lietuvoje patiria ne tik dirbantys privačiuose, bet ir valstybiniuose sektoriuose. Tačiau užkirsti kelią valstybinėje įstaigoje kaip savo namuose besielgiančiam viršesniam valdininkui - tiesioginių teisinių priemonių nėra. Apie mobingą, kitai psichologinį ar net fizinė terorą kalbamės su docente dr. Jolita Vveinhard.
A starfish makes a good pet if the owner is willing to spend enough time attending to its needs. This type of marine animal typically needs more care and maintenance than the average aquarium...
Key employees are sensitive barometers of future organizational health. Starfish play the same role in our oceans. Can we learn from them?
BLUFFTON (AP) - A father wearing his sons baseball cap and classmates with shirts bearing pictures of a fallen friend were among those who gathered Monday night to remember five college baseball players killed in a bus wreck. Players who survived carried candles, lighting one for each of their Bluffton University teammates who died in Atlanta along with their bus driver and his wife.. The Bluffton Beavers baseball team was headed to Sarasota, Florida, on March 2nd to play in a double header with Eastern Mennonite University. Then they were headed to Fort Myers to participate in the Gene Cusic Classic tournament. Atlanta Police spokesman Joe Cobb said the driver apparently mistook an exit lane for part of a carpool lane, and drove up the ramp until he hit an intersection. The bus went off the overpass, and tumbled over a fence and guard rail, landing on its left side.. Hundreds of people packed Founders Hall on the Bluffton University campus for the memorial service, and an overflow audience ...
No-take marine reserves where fishing is banned can have benefits that extend beyond the exploited fishes they are specifically designed to protect, according to new evidence from Australias Great Barrier Reef reported in the July 22nd issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. Researchers have found that outbreaks of large, predatory crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci), which can devastate coral reefs, occur less often in protected zones, although they dont yet know exactly why.. The geographic range of A. planci includes the most biodiverse as well as some of the most threatened reefs on earth, said Hugh Sweatman of the Australian Institute of Marine Science. This study provides an additional argument for establishment of effective marine protected areas across the range, as refuges from exploitation and other threats and as sources for recolonization of damaged reefs to increase ecological resilience.. The crown-of-thorns starfish in question have up to 20 arms ...
The sea star mortality was so sudden and unprecedented that biologists were unprepared and short on resources, says coauthor Kevin Lafferty, a USGS parasite specialist who led the statistical analysis for the new study. Lots of people were scrambling to learn what was going on. Ian Hewson at Cornell started having interesting findings with densovirus, so he and Drew Harvell [Cornell] helped pull together a team of interested scientists to contribute to the effort.. Sea star die-offs have been observed in past decades, but none were at this geographic scale. Since June 2013, Sea Star Wasting Disease cases have been reported from Baja California all the way to southern Alaska. As many as 20 sea star species have been affected.. To pinpoint the suspected biological agent, Cornell researchers devised a laboratory experiment using sunflower sea stars (Pycnopodia helianthoides) that showed symptoms of Sea Star Wasting Disease. Tissue samples were removed from sick animals, minced and blended in ...
Sea star wasting disease has devastated intertidal populations of these animals on the West coast from Mexico to Alaska. But what about sea stars that live below the low tide line, mostly out of sight? An analysis of data collected by divers in the Salish Sea shows severe impacts on some species, especially the sunflower sea star, Pycnopodia helianthoides.
The most widely known echinoderm is the sea star, or starfish. But the echinoderm phylum also includes sea urchins, sea lilies and brittle stars. The echinoderms are very well known, but most people actually dont know what category to put them in! The Crinoidea class contains sea lilies and feather stars. These delicate creatures are very beautiful, with several arms stretching out from the center. Echinoderms dont have a head, instead they appear to be groups of legs tied together at the middle! Sea stars are widely known due to their famous shape. It is a common belief that they all have five legs, but that is actually not the case. The Eleven-armed Sea Star has, you guessed it, eleven legs. Regardless, sea stars can be spotted on rocks, sand, mud or reefs. They come in a variety of colors, and sizes. Sea stars have some very weird characteristics. First of all, they invert their stomachs to feed on molluscs and other invertebrates. Secondly, they can grow back any legs they may lose ...
Arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play an important role in the function of many organ systems. Abnormality in the contractile and/or regulatory apparatus of smooth muscle is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disease conditions such as hypertension, coronary and cerebral vasospasm, miscarriage, and erectile dysfunction. VSMCs in vivo show remarkable plasticity once they need to adapt to changes in environments, such as new development of vasculature and remodeling after vascular injury or during vascular diseases like arteriosclerosis (Owens, 1995). These arterial cells undergo rapid changes in shape and functional property from non-proliferative and contractile to proliferative and mobile phenotype.. Agonist stimulation of VSMCs induces phosphorylation of the 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin (MLC), which increases actin-activated myosin ATPase activity and contraction (Hartshorne, 1987; Somlyo and Somlyo, 2003). MLC phosphorylation is governed by the opposing ...
Slugs Limax valentianus were hatched and cultured at our laboratory. For dissection, the slug (0.5-1.0 gm) was anesthetized by injection of Mg2+ buffer solution that contained the following (in mm): 60 MgCl2, 5 glucose, and 5 HEPES, pH 7.6, into the body cavity. The circumesophageal ganglia were isolated and further dissected in a dish filled with Mg2+buffer. The cerebral ganglion was isolated from the other ganglia, and the sheath covering the PC was removed with fine forceps. All recordings were made at room temperature (20-24°C).. The saline solution used for the recordings contained the following (in mm): 70 NaCl, 2 KCl, 4.9 CaCl2, 4.7 MgCl2, 5 glucose, and 5 HEPES, pH 7.6. Drugs were bath applied to the ganglion, which was placed in a chamber (∼0.2 ml in volume) that was continuously perfused. Because ibotenate is the only agonist known to activate the GluClR in Limax PC neurons (Watanabe et al., 1999), different batches of ibotenic acid from three suppliers (Sigma, St. Louis, MO; ...
Just in the last two weeks, purple ochre sea stars along the Oregon Coast have been hit especially hard by sea star wasting syndrome - an illness causing these marine creatures to literally disintegrate - threatening the entire population and local ecosystem.
Starfish, crown of thorns, and sea stars are bottom dwellers that live in the subtropics and tropics; human injury occurs from the spine and the venom injected from the spine.
VANCOUVER - There was once a galaxy of sunflower sea stars in the Salish Sea off the British Columbia and Washington state coasts, but a new study says their near disappearance from the...
The mysterious syndrome that decimated the sea star population around Vancouver last September has been spotted by divers on the east coast of Vancouver Island, but experts at the Vancouver Aquarium s...
Specific wiring of gene-regulatory networks is likely to underlie much of the phenotypic difference between species, but the extent of lineage-specific regulatory architecture remains poorly understood. The essential vertebrate transcriptional repressor REST (RE1-Silencing Transcription Factor) targets many neural genes during development of the preimplantation embryo and the central nervous system, through its cognate DNA motif, the RE1 (Repressor Element 1). Here we present a comparative genomic analysis of REST recruitment in multiple species by integrating both sequence and experimental data. We use an accurate, experimentally validated Position-Specific Scoring Matrix method to identify REST binding sites in multiply aligned vertebrate genomes, allowing us to infer the evolutionary origin of each of 1,298 human RE1 elements. We validate these findings using experimental data of REST binding across the whole genomes of human and mouse. We show that one-third of human RE1s are unique to ...
Specific wiring of gene-regulatory networks is likely to underlie much of the phenotypic difference between species, but the extent of lineage-specific regulatory architecture remains poorly understood. The essential vertebrate transcriptional repressor REST (RE1-Silencing Transcription Factor) targets many neural genes during development of the preimplantation embryo and the central nervous system, through its cognate DNA motif, the RE1 (Repressor Element 1). Here we present a comparative genomic analysis of REST recruitment in multiple species by integrating both sequence and experimental data. We use an accurate, experimentally validated Position-Specific Scoring Matrix method to identify REST binding sites in multiply aligned vertebrate genomes, allowing us to infer the evolutionary origin of each of 1,298 human RE1 elements. We validate these findings using experimental data of REST binding across the whole genomes of human and mouse. We show that one-third of human RE1s are unique to ...
Heart function and failure are controlled by complex signaling and gene-regulatory networks that are just beginning to be mapped. Our lab combines computational modeling and high-throughput experiments to discover molecular networks and drugs that control cardiac remodeling and regeneration. Our experimental approaches include high-throughput microscopy and -omic profiling of primary and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes. Our computational approaches include large-scale regulatory network modeling and bioinformatic analysis of -omic data. Specific focus areas include ...
I pursue starfish related adventure around the world with a critical eye and an appreciation for weirdness. Support has been courtesy of the National Science Foundation but the views and opinions presented herein are mine and do not reflect the opinions of them or any affiliated institutions. Need to hire an invertebrate zoologist/marine biologist? Please contact me ...
Ophi wants to be a real star: a space star. The problem is, he is a sea star and not a blazing star -- which may just be the right thing to be after all! Join Ophi in his poetic quest to travel to outer space and cry for him when his dream is crushed. But is it really that bad? Sea stars have hidden talents that rock stars dont! Written in verse, with colourful illustrations ...
Scientists say the larvae flap tiny hairs to create liquid vortices that can either draw food in or help propel them through the water.
Starfish are dying by the millions up and down the West Coast, leading scientists to warn of the possibility of localized extinction of some species. As the disease spreads, researchers may be zeroing in on a link between warming waters and the rising starfish body count.
Researchers from the St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital have created a database which could aid Type 1 diabetes diagnosis and treatment, as well as cancer immunotherapy.
Here you are, minding your own business, and you come across a sea star (marine biologists will stab you in the hand with a fork for calling it a starfish). An orangy-white, five-armed rather unremarkable fellow, you might think. And you would be so, soooo wrong. Luidia sarsi turns sexual reproduction upside down. You might think: mammy-sea star, […]. ...
Have yet to catch my breath (or read the comments thread sparked by Independent George) - but have just read a rave review of Starfish Advocacy & wanted to get it posted pronto ...
Hi Starfish - firstly, really, what is normal?? Some one said to me when I had DD#1 that Normal is as unique as you are - so I took that
Asterina ellisii Sacc. & P. Syd. 1899 Atractobolus ellisiella (Rehm) Kuntze 1898 Bactridium ellisii Berk. 1874 Bipolaris ...
Y. Achituv (1969). "Studies on the Reproduction and Distribution of Asterina burtoni Gray 1840 and Asterina wega Perrier 1869 ( ... A second species was named Asterina wega and this name was used to describe a separate multi armed form which reproduced by ... Aquilonastra burtoni was originally named Asterina burtoni by John Edward Gray from specimens collected by a Mr John Burton in ... Yair Achituv; E. Sher (1991). "Sexual Reproduction and Fission in the Sea Star Asterina Burtoni from the Mediterranean Coast of ...
In literature, this species is often referred to Asterina pectinifera; the accepted name is now Patiria pectinifera. Patiria ... Davydov, P. V.; Shubravyi, O. I.; Vassetzky, S. G. (1990). "The Starfish Asterina pectinifera". Animal Species for ... Asterina pectinifera" (PDF). Journal of Embryology and Experimental Morphology. 94: 47-60. PMID 3760763. Mita, Masatoshi (25 ... "Effects of sediment type and food abundance on the vertical distribution of the starfish Asterina pectinifera" (PDF). Marine ...
The genus of this species has transitioned back and forth between Asterina and Patiria since its inclusion in Fisher's 1911 ... However, recent revisions based on molecular systematics have constrained Asterina and identified Patiria as a complex of three ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "Asterina miniata". www.wallawalla.edu. Archived from the original on 23 May 2010. ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "Bat Star: Asterina miniata". northislandexplorer.com. Archived from the original on 21 ...
1897) - Note on some new species of the genus Asterina. The standard author abbreviation Gaillard is used to indicate this ... Note sur quelques espéces nouvelles du genre Asterina. Bulletin de la Société Mycologique de France 13: 179-181. ( ...
Boedijnopeziza S.Ito & S.Imai (1937) Asterina boedijniana Hansf. (1954) Ceramothyrium boedijnii Bat., Nascim. & Cif. (1962) ...
Recent analyses suggest Paxillosida may be a sister taxon of Asterina. The order is divided into these families: family ...
A new species and four new records of Asterina from Kenya. Nova Hedwigia 62: 147-150. Mibey, R.K.; J.O. Kokwaro & D.M. Mukunya ...
Bat stars (Asterina miniatus) are the most prevalent predators of eggs. Fish do not eat them, although they will nip at eggs ...
The fungal species Asterina systema-solare, Episphaerella banksiae and Lincostromea banksiae have been recorded on the leaves. ...
... tiny sea stars such as Asterina, snails, and worms. To achieve maximum biological filtration through uptake of nutrients by ...
Asterina Hymenochaete Lachnocladium Lembosia Microsphaera Phyllactinia Sphaerotheca Uncinula The standard author abbreviation ...
Linckia guildingi Linckia multiflora Nardoa galatheae Ophidiaster cribrarius Metrodira subulata Anseropoda rosacea Asterina ...
Protected species include the Starfish species Asterina stellifera, Astropecten brasiliensis, Astropecten marginatus, ...
Anseropoda placenta Asterina gibbosa (starlet cushion star) Asterina phylactica Porania pulvillus Crossaster papposus (common ...
... a custard apple Asterina lutea, a sea star Asura lutea, a New Guinean moth Autochloris lutea, an owlet moth This disambiguation ...
... asterina (bioluminescent) M. atrata M. brunneospinosa M. cahaya (bioluminescent) M. californiensis M. capillaripes M. ...
... may refer to: Asterina (starfish), a starfish genus in the family Asterinidae Asterina (fungus), a fungus genus in the ...
... is one of thirty species of small bat star in the genus Asterina. It is mainly found on the east coast of ... This explains why Asterina can be found living with less than five arms. Asterian sea stars also reproduce through dispersal of ... It is known that other Asterina species deposit up to 1000 eggs in a specific location in the process of reproduction. They ... Geographical implications of seasonal reproduction in the bat star Asterina stellifera Elsevier, Journal of Sea Research Volume ...
... may live for six years or more. The eggs of Asterina gibbosa are laid in a mass and glued to the substrate by ... Asterina gibbosa is a protandric hermaphrodite. This means that it is born a male and later changes sex and becomes a female. ... Asterina gibbosa, commonly known as the starlet cushion star, is a species of starfish in the family Asterinidae. It is native ... Asterina gibbosa is a pentagonal starfish with short blunt arms and an inflated appearance. The aboral (upper) surface is ...
... is a species of agaric fungus in the family Mycenaceae. It is found in São Paulo state, Brazil, where it grows ... Mycena asterina in Index Fungorum v t e. ...
Mycena asterina. Desjardin, Capelari & Stevani Yes Yes SA [26] Mycena cahaya. A.L.C.Chew & Desjardin Yes Yes Malaysia [27] ...
Asterina gibbosa) ter gosjenoga zvezda (Anseropoda placenta), iz reda Spinulosida ognjenordeča zvezda (Echinaster sepositus) ...
Asterina systema-solare, Botryosphaeria banksiae, a species of Cladosporium, Cooksonomyces banksiae, Dimerium banksiae, ...
Asterina cepheus (Valenciennes) in Ludwig (1899).Asterina cephea Valenciennes in Decary (1924).Asterina cephea (Müller & ... Asterina cepheus var. iranica Mortensen, 1940 accepted as Aquilonastra iranica (Mortensen, 1940). ... Treated as a subspecie of Asterina burtoni in James & Pearse (1969). Sometimes erroneously referred to as A. cephea. ... Asterina iranica Mortensen, 1940) Mortensen, T. (1940). Echinoderms from the Iranian Gulf. Asteroidea, Ophiuroidea, and ...
The inhibitory activity (IC50) of mushroom tyrosinase on Asterina pectinifera extracts in mushroom tyrosinase. ... The inhibitory activity (IC50) of mushroom tyrosinase on Asterina pectinifera extracts in mushroom tyrosinase. ... Jo WS, Choi YJ, Kim HJ, Nam BH, Lee GA, Seo SY, Lee SW and Jeong MH: Methanolic extract of Asterina pectinifera inhibits LPS- ... Inhibitory effects of Asterina pectinifera extracts on melanin biosynthesis through tyrosinase activity. *Authors: *Min-Ho ...
Asterina burtoni (Asteroidea; Echinodermata) in the Mediterranean and the Red Sea: Does asexual reproduction facilitate ... ABSTRACT: The starfish Asterina burtoni is a Lessepsian colonizer which penetrated the Mediterranean Sea from the Red Sea. ...
Asterina ; Asterinaceae ; Aulographaceae ; Lembosiaceae morphology type species taxonomy 英文摘要: The order Asterinales comprises ... Seventeen genera, namely Asterina (type genus), Asterinella, Asterotexis, Batistinula, Cirsosia, Echidnodella, Halbania, ... Aphanopeltis, Asterolibertia, Neostomella, Placoasterina, and Symphaster are synonyms of Asterina based on morphology, while ...
Asterina may refer to: Asterina (starfish), a starfish genus in the family Asterinidae Asterina (fungus), a fungus genus in the ...
Asterina stellifera is one of thirty species of small bat star in the genus Asterina. It is mainly found on the east coast of ... This explains why Asterina can be found living with less than five arms. Asterian sea stars also reproduce through dispersal of ... It is known that other Asterina species deposit up to 1000 eggs in a specific location in the process of reproduction. They ... Geographical implications of seasonal reproduction in the bat star Asterina stellifera Elsevier, Journal of Sea Research Volume ...
Three key species were included and epitypified, namely Asterina melastomatis, which is the type species for the type genus of ...
We investigated the effect of protein extract of Asterina pectinifera on the activity of 4 enzymes that may play a role in ... Asterina pectinifera Cyclooxygenase-2 GlutathioneS-transferase Ornithine decarboxylase Quinone reductase This is a preview of ... We investigated the effect of protein extract ofAsterina pectinifera on the activity of 4 enzymes that may play a role in ... Kishimura, H., and Hayashi, K., Isolation and characteristics of trypsin from pyloric ceca of the starfishAsterina pectinifera. ...
Defense system by mesenchyme cells in bipinnaria larvae of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera. / Furukawa, Ryohei; Takahashi, ... Defense system by mesenchyme cells in bipinnaria larvae of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera. Developmental and Comparative ... Defense system by mesenchyme cells in bipinnaria larvae of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera. In: Developmental and ... title = "Defense system by mesenchyme cells in bipinnaria larvae of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera", ...
Mycena asterina. Desjardin, Capelari & Stevani Yes Yes SA [26] Mycena cahaya. A.L.C.Chew & Desjardin Yes Yes Malaysia [27] ...
Blackberry Plant - Asterina. Despatch from October 2020 1 x 2 Litre Potted Plant £17.99 ...
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... and asterina-330 against ABTS radicals are drastically decreased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 in a monotonic manner, though sufficient ... and asterina-330, which consist of an aminocyclohexene imine structure [53,54]. Furthermore, the radical scavenging activity of ...
Chapter 11, which contains the normal tables for the starfish Asterina pectinifera, was written specially for this edi- tion, ...
Asterina miniata. Bat stars come in a variety of colors: red, orange, yellow, green, brown and purple. Growing up to 8 inches ...
Marine systems can use Aiptasia sea anemones, Asterina starfish and Caulerpa algae. ...
Asterina starfish? MelnSteveC 03/11/2018 05:20 PM. by Jazeel55 3. 262. ...
Asterina gibbosa. Cushion starfish Odontaster validus. Antarctic sea star Echinus esculentus. European edible sea urchin ...
Sugita, M., 1979a, Studies on the glucosphingolipids of the starfish Asterina pectinifera, 2. Isolation and characterization of ... Studies on the glycosphingolipids of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera, 3. Isolation and structural studies of two novel ...
To launch this brand new podcast series, Naked Oceans ventures beneath the waves to investigate the impacts of oil spills on the marine environment. We hunt down the hidden world of microbes in Louisiana wetlands, trace the fingerprint of oil in the open oceans, and discuss the likely fallout from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. And 14 years on, we meet
A. Rifai, N. Asterina, R. Hidayani / Kota Kita, 2016. Decentralisation has provided the opportunity for the participatory model ...
Archaster Babies?....Or Asterina? (11/1/04) Believe it or not, MORE Archaster craziness! Anthony, you are a patient man for ... Looks more like an Asterina to me. These common hitchhiker mini stars seldom exceed 1 cm in diameter. Look at some pix on our ... Related Articles: Sand-Sifting Stars, Asterina Stars, An Introduction to the Echinoderms: The Sea Stars, Sea Urchins, Sea ... Asterina Stars, Chocolate Chip Stars, Crown of Thorns Stars, Fromia Stars, Linckia Stars, Linckia Stars 2, ...
Asterina pancerii. Centrostephanus. longispinus (Riccio di mare a spine. lunghe). Paracentrotus lividus ( Riccio di mare di ...
Asterina miniata. When two bat stars bump into each other they begin a slow-motion arm wrestling match. Each sea star tries to ...
Asterina species... and yes, I have read the GARF info. I do not believe it is accurate., I had been in the SPS end of things ... do check out my take on Asterina and other sea stars in the recent article on reefkeeping.com from a couple of months ago. Best ...
Anti-inflammatory effect of the extract from fermented Asterina pectinifera with Cordyceps militaris mycelia in LPS-induced ... Fermented Asterina pectinifera with Cordyceps militaris Mycelia Induced Apoptosis in B16F10 Melanoma Cells. ...
Asterina pectinifera (MÜLLER & TROSCHEL) 52. Asterina gibbosa (PENNANT) 54. Asterina batheri (GOTO) 65. Asterina minor (HAYASHI ... Asterina pseudoexigua pacifica (HAYASHI) 72. Porania pulvillus (O. F. MÜLLER) 72. Odontaster validus (KOEHLER) 76. Acanthaster ...
Genus Asterina Nardo, 1834. » Species Asterina fimbriata Perrier, 1875. » Species Asterina gibbosa (Pennant, 1777). » Variety ... Species Asterina pusilla Perrier, 1875. » Species Asterina pygmaea Verrill, 1878. » Species Asterina squamata Perrier, 1875. » ... Species Asterina hoensonae OLoughlin, 2009. » Species Asterina krausii Gray, 1840. » Species Asterina lorioli Koehler, 1910. ... Species Asterina stellifera (Möbius, 1859). » Subspecies Asterina stellifera obtusa Leipoldt, 1895. » Species Asterina vicentae ...
echinoderm; gene regulation; Asterina miniata; cis regulation; Delta. Issue or Number:. 49. ...
The sea star Asterina pectinifera causes deep-layer sloughing in Lithophyllum yessoense (Corallinales, Rhodophyta) ...
Figure 1: External morphology of the sea star Asterina gibbosa and of its tube feet. (A) Image of a living ad... ... Figure 2: Fine structure of the tube feet of Asterina gibbosa observed in light microscopy (A,B) and TEM (C-H... ... Figure 6: Lectin labelling of tube foot sections in Asterina gibbosa with (A1,A2) Con A, (B1,B2) Jacalin, (C1... ... The structural and chemical basis of temporary adhesion in the sea star Asterina gibbosa *Birgit Lengerer, ...
  • The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-melanogenic effect of Asterina pectinifera (A. pectinifera) extracts by cell-free mushroom tyrosinase assay, cellular tyrosinase assay, melanin content assay and the analysis of related protein expression in melan-a cells. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • In addition, the enzyme extract (En-AP) of A. pectinifera, to which protease was added, was processed. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • EA-AP and En-AP among A. pectinifera extracts showed strong inhibitory activity against the cell-free mushroom tyrosinase activity. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • The overall results suggest that EA-AP and En-AP among A. pectinifera extracts may be promising candidates for the treatment of hyperpigmentation disorder and useful for self-tanning cosmetic products. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • We investigated the effect of protein extract of Asterina pectinifera on the activity of 4 enzymes that may play a role in adenocarcinoma of the colon: quinone reductase (QR), glutathione S -transferase (GST), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. (springer.com)
  • Kishimura, H., and Hayashi, K., Isolation and characteristics of trypsin from pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterina pectinifera . (springer.com)
  • Animal Species for Developmental Studies: The Starfish Asterina pectinifera. (wikipedia.org)
  • Effects of sediment type and food abundance on the vertical distribution of the starfish Asterina pectinifera" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Reconstruction of bipinnaria larvae from dissociated embryonic cells of the starfish, Asterina pectinifera" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Chapter 11, which contains the normal tables for the starfish Asterina pectinifera, was written specially for this edi- tion, which is the invertebrate section of the revised and augmented translation of Ob"ekty Biologii Razvitiya published in Russian in 1975 as a volume in the series of monographs Problemy Biologii Razyitiya (Problems of Developmental Biology) by Nauka Publishers, Moscow. (springer.com)
  • Anti-inflammatory effect of the extract from fermented Asterina pectinifera with Cordyceps militaris mycelia in LPS-induced RAW264.7 macrophages. (nih.gov)
  • Publications] S.Ikegami: 'Effect of okadaic acid on embryonic development of the starfish,Asterina pectinifera' Agri.Biol.Chem. (nii.ac.jp)
  • In this study, the new antimicrobial peptide was isolated from the liver of starfish, Asterina pectinifera . (kcsnet.or.kr)
  • q and Gβ were identified in follicle cells of starfish Asterina pectinifera. (elsevier.com)
  • In previous work, we compared GRN architectures for early specification of endomesoderm in a sea star, Asterina miniata , and a sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus ( 6 ). (pnas.org)
  • Asterina miniata from California. (mterasaki.us)
  • Asterina stellifera is one of thirty species of small bat star in the genus Asterina. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is known that other Asterina species deposit up to 1000 eggs in a specific location in the process of reproduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, two species of sea stars, the leather star (Dermasterias imbricate) and the bat star (Asterina miniara), remain unaffected by the disease, and the reason is unknown. (martlet.ca)
  • I know that the fauna in the tank is varied, I have lots of the asterina stars, limpets, and copepods on the glass, amphipods on/in the rock and various worms in the sand, including at least two different species of bristle worms, one red and the other a pale green with white setae. (marinebreeder.org)
  • Geographical implications of seasonal reproduction in the bat star Asterina stellifera Elsevier, Journal of Sea Research Volume 85, January 2014, Pages 222-232 Pablo E. Merettaa, Tamara Rubilarb, Maximiliano Cledóna, C. Renato, R. Venturac. (wikipedia.org)
  • because the one on the right really sort of looks like an asterina star. (fishlore.com)
  • Lol I just looked up what an asterina star was. (fishlore.com)
  • In the action of EA-AP and En-AP on melanogenesis, they reduced the expression of melanogenic genes and proteins including tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1) and dopachrome tautomerase (Dct). (spandidos-publications.com)
  • These results showed that EA-AP and En-AP inhibited melanogenesis by reducing tyrosinase activity and melanin production via subsequent downregulation of tyrosinase-related proteins. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • After putting some Asterina starfish in the Kelp Forest where they don't belong, Splash, Ripple, and Tidy must get rid of them before the starfish eat all of the kelp. (azpm.org)
  • Valvatida (class Stelleroidea, subclass Asteroidea) An order of starfish most of which have suckers on their tube feet, marginal plates, and pax Source for information on Valvatida: A … Orden Valvatida Perrier, 1884 Familia Asterodiscididae Rowe, 1977 Paulia horrida Gray 1840 Material examinado: 1 especimen (CZM-62) R = 84 mm, recolectado en Punta Sal (03[grados]56'32"S - 80[grados]56'46,3"O) a 33 m de profundidad. (dariapolichetti.com)
  • 1], The order encompasses both tiny species, which are only a few millimetres in diameter, like those in the genus Asterina, and species which can reach up to 75 cm, such as species in the genus Thromidia. (dariapolichetti.com)
  • available online at https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/8812483 page(s): 90 [details] original description (of Asterina (Nepanthia) Gray, 1840 ) Gray, J.E. (1840). (marinespecies.org)