Abortion, Induced: Intentional removal of a fetus from the uterus by any of a number of techniques. (POPLINE, 1978)Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Veterinary Drugs: Drugs used by veterinarians in the treatment of animal diseases. The veterinarian's pharmacological armamentarium is the counterpart of drugs treating human diseases, with dosage and administration adjusted to the size, weight, disease, and idiosyncrasies of the species. In the United States most drugs are subject to federal regulations with special reference to the safety of drugs and residues in edible animal products.Abortion, Spontaneous: Expulsion of the product of FERTILIZATION before completing the term of GESTATION and without deliberate interference.Abortion, Veterinary: Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.Schools, Veterinary: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of veterinary medicine.Abortion, Criminal: Illegal termination of pregnancy.Pathology, Veterinary: The field of veterinary medicine concerned with the causes of and changes produced in the body by disease.Abortion, Therapeutic: Abortion induced to save the life or health of a pregnant woman. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Veterinarians: Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.Abortion Applicants: Individuals requesting induced abortions.Abortion, Missed: The retention in the UTERUS of a dead FETUS two months or more after its DEATH.Abortion, Septic: Any type of abortion, induced or spontaneous, that is associated with infection of the UTERUS and its appendages. It is characterized by FEVER, uterine tenderness, and foul discharge.Abortion, Habitual: Three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions.Legislation, Veterinary: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Abortion, Threatened: UTERINE BLEEDING from a GESTATION of less than 20 weeks without any CERVICAL DILATATION. It is characterized by vaginal bleeding, lower back discomfort, or midline pelvic cramping and a risk factor for MISCARRIAGE.Animal DiseasesAbortifacient Agents: Chemical substances that interrupt pregnancy after implantation.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Abortion, Incomplete: Premature loss of PREGNANCY in which not all the products of CONCEPTION have been expelled.Aborted Fetus: A mammalian fetus expelled by INDUCED ABORTION or SPONTANEOUS ABORTION.Abortifacient Agents, Steroidal: Steroidal compounds with abortifacient activity.Animal Technicians: Assistants to a veterinarian, biological or biomedical researcher, or other scientist who are engaged in the care and management of animals, and who are trained in basic principles of animal life processes and routine laboratory and animal health care procedures. (Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Abortion, Eugenic: Abortion performed because of possible fetal defects.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Misoprostol: A synthetic analog of natural prostaglandin E1. It produces a dose-related inhibition of gastric acid and pepsin secretion, and enhances mucosal resistance to injury. It is an effective anti-ulcer agent and also has oxytocic properties.Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal: Non-steroidal chemical compounds with abortifacient activity.Pregnancy, Unplanned: Unintended accidental pregnancy, including pregnancy resulting from failed contraceptive measures.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Pregnancy, Unwanted: Pregnancy, usually accidental, that is not desired by the parent or parents.Vacuum Curettage: Aspiration of the contents of the uterus with a vacuum curette.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Pregnancy Trimester, First: The beginning third of a human PREGNANCY, from the first day of the last normal menstrual period (MENSTRUATION) through the completion of 14 weeks (98 days) of gestation.Biography as Topic: A written account of a person's life and the branch of literature concerned with the lives of people. (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Drug Residues: Drugs and their metabolites which are found in the edible tissues and milk of animals after their medication with specific drugs. This term can also apply to drugs found in adipose tissue of humans after drug treatment.Anatomy, Veterinary: The study of the anatomical structures of animals.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Pregnant Women: Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Contraception: Prevention of CONCEPTION by blocking fertility temporarily, or permanently (STERILIZATION, REPRODUCTIVE). Common means of reversible contraception include NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING METHODS; CONTRACEPTIVE AGENTS; or CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES.Pets: Animals kept by humans for companionship and enjoyment, as opposed to DOMESTIC ANIMALS such as livestock or farm animals, which are kept for economic reasons.Sterilization, Reproductive: Procedures to block or remove all or part of the genital tract for the purpose of rendering individuals sterile, incapable of reproduction. Surgical sterilization procedures are the most commonly used. There are also sterilization procedures involving chemical or physical means.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Bonding, Human-Pet: The emotional attachment of individuals to PETS.Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Women's Rights: The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Neospora: A genus of protozoan parasites of the subclass COCCIDIA. Its species are parasitic in dogs, cattle, goats, and sheep, among others. N. caninum, a species that mainly infects dogs, is intracellular in neural and other cells of the body, multiplies by endodyogeny, has no parasitophorous vacuole, and has numerous rhoptries. It is known to cause lesions in many tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord as well as abortion in the expectant mother.Family Planning Services: Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Mifepristone: A progestational and glucocorticoid hormone antagonist. Its inhibition of progesterone induces bleeding during the luteal phase and in early pregnancy by releasing endogenous prostaglandins from the endometrium or decidua. As a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, the drug has been used to treat hypercortisolism in patients with nonpituitary CUSHING SYNDROME.Contraception Behavior: Behavior patterns of those practicing CONTRACEPTION.Reproductive Rights: Reproductive rights rest on the recognition of the basic right of all couples and individuals to decide freely and responsibly the number, spacing and timing of their children and to have the information and means to do so, and the right to attain the highest standard of sexual and reproductive health. They also include the right of all to make decisions concerning reproduction free of discrimination, coercion and violence.Birth Rate: The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.Dilatation and Curettage: Dilatation of the cervix uteri followed by a scraping of the endometrium with a curette.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Beginning of Human Life: The point at which religious ensoulment or PERSONHOOD is considered to begin.Falconiformes: An order of diurnal BIRDS of prey, including EAGLES; HAWKS; buzzards; vultures; and falcons.Pregnancy Trimester, Second: The middle third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 15th through the 28th completed week (99 to 196 days) of gestation.Goat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.Coccidiosis: Protozoan infection found in animals and man. It is caused by several different genera of COCCIDIA.Animals, LaboratoryPregnancy Trimesters: The three approximately equal periods of a normal human PREGNANCY. Each trimester is about three months or 13 to 14 weeks in duration depending on the designation of the first day of gestation.Parasitic Diseases, Animal: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Parental Notification: Reporting to parents or guardians about care to be provided to a minor (MINORS).Pregnancy in Adolescence: Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.Contraceptive Devices: Devices that diminish the likelihood of or prevent conception. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Uterine Hemorrhage: Bleeding from blood vessels in the UTERUS, sometimes manifested as vaginal bleeding.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.United StatesLife: The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Goats: Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Swine Diseases: Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.Staphylococcus intermedius: A species of gram-positive bacteria in the family STAPHYLOCOCCACEAE. It is a zoonotic organism and common commensal in dogs, but can cause disease in dogs and other animals. It also can be associated with human disease.Catholicism: The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Records as Topic: The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.Brucellosis: Infection caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA mainly involving the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. This condition is characterized by fever, weakness, malaise, and weight loss.Parity: The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.Laboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Illegitimacy: The state of birth outside of wedlock. It may refer to the offspring or the parents.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Judicial Role: The kind of action or activity proper to the judiciary, particularly its responsibility for decision making.Psittacosis: Infection with CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI (formerly Chlamydia psittaci), transmitted to humans by inhalation of dust-borne contaminated nasal secretions or excreta of infected BIRDS. This infection results in a febrile illness characterized by PNEUMONITIS and systemic manifestations.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Pregnancy, Ectopic: A potentially life-threatening condition in which EMBRYO IMPLANTATION occurs outside the cavity of the UTERUS. Most ectopic pregnancies (>96%) occur in the FALLOPIAN TUBES, known as TUBAL PREGNANCY. They can be in other locations, such as UTERINE CERVIX; OVARY; and abdominal cavity (PREGNANCY, ABDOMINAL).Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.DairyingXylazine: An adrenergic alpha-2 agonist used as a sedative, analgesic and centrally acting muscle relaxant in VETERINARY MEDICINE.Maternal Age: The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.Placenta Diseases: Pathological processes or abnormal functions of the PLACENTA.Gynecology: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with the physiology and disorders primarily of the female genital tract, as well as female endocrinology and reproductive physiology.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Helminthiasis, Animal: Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Ceremonial Behavior: A series of actions, sometimes symbolic actions which may be associated with a behavior pattern, and are often indispensable to its performance.Coxiella burnetii: A species of gram-negative bacteria that grows preferentially in the vacuoles of the host cell. It is the etiological agent of Q FEVER.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Chlamydophila psittaci: A genus of CHLAMYDOPHILA infecting primarily birds. It contains eight known serovars, some of which infect more than one type of host, including humans.Q Fever: An acute infectious disease caused by COXIELLA BURNETII. It is characterized by a sudden onset of FEVER; HEADACHE; malaise; and weakness. In humans, it is commonly contracted by inhalation of infected dusts derived from infected domestic animals (ANIMALS, DOMESTIC).Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Zolazepam: A pyrazolodiazepinone with pharmacological actions similar to ANTI-ANXIETY AGENTS. It is commonly used in combination with TILETAMINE to obtain immobilization and anesthesia in animals.Pregnancy Complications, Infectious: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Endometritis: Inflammation of the ENDOMETRIUM, usually caused by intrauterine infections. Endometritis is the most common cause of postpartum fever.Foot Rot: A disease of the horny parts and of the adjacent soft structures of the feet of cattle, swine, and sheep. It is usually caused by Corynebacterium pyogenes or Bacteroides nodosus (see DICHELOBACTER NODOSUS). It is also known as interdigital necrobacillosis. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 18th ed)Animal Population Groups: Animals grouped according to ecological, morphological or genetic populations.Marital Status: A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.Rift Valley Fever: An acute infection caused by the RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS, an RNA arthropod-borne virus, affecting domestic animals and humans. In animals, symptoms include HEPATITIS; abortion (ABORTION, VETERINARY); and DEATH. In humans, symptoms range from those of a flu-like disease to hemorrhagic fever, ENCEPHALITIS, or BLINDNESS.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Antiparasitic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Chlamydophila: A genus of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE comprising gram-negative non CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS-like species infecting vertebrates. Chlamydophila do not produce detectable quantities of glycogen. The type species is CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Congenital Abnormalities: Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.Tiletamine: Proposed anesthetic with possible anticonvulsant and sedative properties.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Protozoan Infections, Animal: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.Supreme Court Decisions: Decisions made by the United States Supreme Court.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Staphylococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Lameness, Animal: A departure from the normal gait in animals.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Pathology, Clinical: A subspecialty of pathology applied to the solution of clinical problems, especially the use of laboratory methods in clinical diagnosis. (Dorland, 28th ed.)Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Placenta: A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).BerlinSulfamethazine: A sulfanilamide anti-infective agent. It has a spectrum of antimicrobial action similar to other sulfonamides.Administration, Sublingual: Administration of a soluble dosage form by placement under the tongue.Arcanobacterium: A genus of facultatively anaerobic, gram-positive bacteria in the family ACTINOMYCETACEAE, order ACTINOMYCETALES. They are obligate parasites of the PHARYNX in humans and farm animals.Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Rift Valley fever virus: A mosquito-borne species of the PHLEBOVIRUS genus found in eastern, central, and southern Africa, producing massive hepatitis, abortion, and death in sheep, goats, cattle, and other animals. It also has caused disease in humans.Camelids, New World: Ruminant mammals of South America. They are related to camels.Intrauterine Devices: Contraceptive devices placed high in the uterine fundus.Veterinary Service, Military: A corps of the armed services concerned with animal medicine, the chief interest of which is the care of government-owned working dogs (as in the military police units), working horses (as in state funerals), and working military dolphins (as in undersea exploration and other activities). In the United States Army Veterinary Corps animal medicine overlaps and interconnects with biomedical research using laboratory research animals. A related activity is laboratory animal care. The Corps provides limited care for privately owned animals of military personnel through non-appropriated funds. Military service veterinarians in the United States Army must be graduates of accredited veterinary schools and must have a state license. (Telephone communication with Lt. Col. William Inskeep II, U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, October 4, 1994)Surgery, Veterinary: A board-certified specialty of VETERINARY MEDICINE, requiring at least four years of special education, training, and practice of veterinary surgery after graduation from veterinary school. In the written, oral, and practical examinations candidates may choose either large or small animal surgery. (From AVMA Directory, 43d ed, p278)Oxytetracycline: A TETRACYCLINE analog isolated from the actinomycete STREPTOMYCES rimosus and used in a wide variety of clinical conditions.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Human Characteristics: The fundamental dispositions and traits of humans. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Contraception, Postcoital: Means of postcoital intervention to avoid pregnancy, such as the administration of POSTCOITAL CONTRACEPTIVES to prevent FERTILIZATION of an egg or implantation of a fertilized egg (OVUM IMPLANTATION).Nebramycin: A complex of antibiotic substances produced by Streptomyces tenebrarius.Andrology: A scientific or medical discipline concerning the study of male reproductive biology, diseases of the male genital organs, and male infertility. Major areas of interest include ENDOCRINOLOGY; SPERMATOGENESIS; semen analysis; FERTILIZATION; CONTRACEPTION; and CRYOPRESERVATION.Conscience: The cognitive and affective processes which constitute an internalized moral governor over an individual's moral conduct.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Veterinary Sports Medicine: The field of veterinary medicine concerned with PHYSICAL FITNESS of animals in sports (horse racing, dog racing, etc.) and the diagnosis and treatment of sports injuries in animals.Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Reference Books, Medical: Books in the field of medicine intended primarily for consultation.Ivermectin: A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.Mastitis, Bovine: INFLAMMATION of the UDDER in cows.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Tick Control: Chemical, biological, or medical measures designed to prevent the spread of ticks or the concomitant infestations which result in tick-borne diseases. It includes the veterinary as well as the public health aspects of tick and mite control.DenmarkUterine Perforation: A hole or break through the wall of the UTERUS, usually made by the placement of an instrument or INTRAUTERINE DEVICES.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Ruminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Magnesium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain magnesium as an integral part of the molecule.Nurses, Male: Nurses of the male sex.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Laboratory Infection: Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.Administration, Intravaginal: The insertion of drugs into the vagina to treat local infections, neoplasms, or to induce labor. The dosage forms may include medicated pessaries, irrigation fluids, and suppositories.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Brucellosis, Bovine: A disease of cattle caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA leading to abortion in late pregnancy. BRUCELLA ABORTUS is the primary infective agent.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Tylosin: Macrolide antibiotic obtained from cultures of Streptomyces fradiae. The drug is effective against many microorganisms in animals but not in humans.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Tick Infestations: Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Internship, Nonmedical: Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.ItalyFatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Hip Dysplasia, Canine: A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.
Association, one member shall be a member of the Virginia Veterinary Medical Association, one member shall be a representative ... the regulation of abortion facilities never played a prominent role in the Board's work. The Board did regulate abortion ... It is playing a prominent role in abortion access issues. The board is appointed by the Governor for four-year terms. Members ... From 1991 to 2010, bills introduced into the Virginia General Assembly proposed to regulate outpatient abortion clinics, but ...
In the First World War he served as a Captain in the Royal Army Veterinary Corps. On demob he joined the Department of ... He is noted for the development of several important animal vaccines: Enzootic abortion in ewes; Braxy and Louping ill. His ... Dryerre, Henry; Greig, J. Russell (1925). "Milk Fever: Its Possible Association with Derangements in the Internal Secretions". ... He then began working in the Veterinary Department of the City of Glasgow. He self-financed a trip to Copenhagen to meet ...
Moran opposes abortion. He has cosponsored legislation to ban abortions after the 20th week of pregnancy. Moran opposes same- ... "Hays Veterinary Hospital , Our Staff". haysvethosp.com. Retrieved 2017-03-24. Biography at the Biographical Directory of the ... Moran has an "A" rating from the National Rifle Association (NRA) for his consistent support of pro-gun policies. The NRA ... Alex studied at Kansas State University and graduated from Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2016. " ...
He is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Florida Veterinary Medical Association, Florida Association of ... Carpenter, Zoë (22 January 2015). "Don't Be Fooled: Republicans Are Still as Extreme on Abortion as Ever". The Nation. ... Support the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act". Humane Society Veterinary Medicine Association. Retrieved July 8, 2014. "The ... Yoho coauthored the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act of 2014 (H.R. 1528; 113th Congress), a bill that would amend the ...
... abortion, duty of care, rights to refuse treatment). Veterinary ethics does not have such a strong interplay. It is rare to ... The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) regularly reviews and updates its principles of ethics. The AVMA Judicial ... They can be seen as the founders of the subject in veterinary ethics. Currently, most veterinary schools teach veterinary ... Veterinary ethics is a system of moral principles that apply values and judgements to the practice of veterinary medicine. As a ...
... the Abortion Law Reform Association, was formed in 1936. In 1939 the Birkett Committee recommended a change to abortion laws ... or veterinary medicines. So-called "backstreet" abortionists were fairly common, although their bloody efforts could be fatal. ... Lobbying in the United Kingdom Abortion Abortion law Abortion debate Religion and abortion Bibliography Halsbury's Laws of ... 87% of abortions were performed at 12 weeks or less and 1.6% (or 2,914 abortions) occurred after 20 weeks. Abortion is free to ...
Alice Jenkins and Joan Malleson established the Abortion Law Reform Association as the first advocacy organisation for abortion ... or veterinary medicines. So-called 'backstreet' abortionists were fairly common, although their bloody efforts could be fatal. ... The association promoted access to abortion in the United Kingdom and campaigned for the elimination of legal obstacles. In its ... In Britain, the Abortion Law Reform Association continued its campaigning after the War, and this, combined with broad social ...
Support the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act". Humane Society Veterinary Medicine Association. Retrieved 8 July 2014. Mayes, ... The bill proposed imposing criminal penalties for giving abortions in special cases, notably when based on gender, race or ... A year later, the Schraders moved to Oregon, and Kurt opened the Clackamas County Veterinary Clinic in Oregon City, to begin ... In 2010, he received a 100% from American Public Health Association. He supports the Affordable Care Act. Schrader is the co- ...
Enzootic abortion in ewes is thought to cost the UK sheep industry £15 million a year and Johne's disease costs the UK cattle ... The association founded a research institute employing vets and scientists, and over the decades the scope of animal health ... Today, many of the veterinary medicines and vaccines that are routinely used on farms have been researched, developed or tested ... The Animal Diseases Research Association, now the registered charity the Moredun Foundation, was founded in 1920 by a group of ...
Blackburn DG, Flemming AF (2012). "Invasive implantation and intimate placental associations in a placentotrophic African ... rays and abortion: The prevalence of capture-induced parturition in elasmobranchs". Biological Conservation. 217: 11-27. doi: ... The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine Extension. 2012. Retrieved 2013-12-17. Kustritz, M. (2005). " ...
Bigalke, R. D. "The fourteen editors of the Journal of the South African Veterinary Association". Posthumus, P.J. "SA ... for his thesis titled "The carrier in bovine contagious abortion". Upon returning to South Africa, he was placed in charge of ... Member of the Council of the South African Veterinary Association (S.A.V.A.) 1937 - Awarded the Senior Captain Scott Medal for ... "The fourteen editors of the Journal of the South African Veterinary Association". [4] Robinson, E. M. "Botulism in the ...
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 225 (12): 1871-1876. doi:10.2460/javma.2004.225.1871. ISSN 0003-1488. ... Chessa G, Chisu V, Porcu R, Masala G (2014). "Molecular characterization of Toxoplasma gondii Type II in sheep abortion in ... Congenital toxoplasmosis is associated with fetal death and abortion, and in infants, it is associated with neurologic deficits ... There is a negative association between an infection with the parasite T. gondii and multiple sclerosis, therefore, researchers ...
A late-term abortion using Caesarean section procedures is termed a hysterotomy abortion and is very rarely performed. Self- ... 2016), "Association Between Cesarean Birth and Risk of Obesity in Offspring in Childhood, Adolescence, and Early Adulthood", ... Saunders Comprehensive Veterinary Dictionary, use caesarean, as do most British works. The online versions of the US-published ... According to the American Pregnancy Association, 90% of women who have undergone caesarean deliveries are candidates for VBAC. ...
The European Association of Urology recommends ciprofloxacin as an alternative regimen for the treatment of uncomplicated ... Widespread veterinary usage of the fluoroquinolones, particularly in Europe, has been implicated. Meanwhile, some Burkholderia ... spontaneous abortions, premature birth, or low birth weight. The label notes, however, that these studies are insufficient to ...
Shortly after returning to Switzerland, Meyer was offered a position as an assistant professor at the Veterinary School of the ... He also helped elucidating the transmission of the bacteria causing a contagious abortion disease of cattle and also infecting ... Meyer then convinced the National Canners Association to fund research and development of safe industrial processes. Owing to ... He received a doctorate of veterinary medicine in 1909 from the University of Zurich. - Later, in 1924, Meyer spent a ...
Association of the United States Army. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 October 2013. Retrieved 27 January 2013. ... Caldwell, Christopher (2007-07-22). "The Antiwar, Anti-Abortion, Anti-Drug-Enforcement-Administration, Anti-Medicare Candidacy ... Congressional Immigration Reform Caucus Liberty Caucus International Conservation Caucus Sportsmen's Caucus Veterinary Medicine ...
Venter M, Human S, van Niekerk S, Williams J, van Eeden C, Freeman F (August 2011). "Fatal neurologic disease and abortion in ... From statements by Orsolya Kutasi, DVM, of the Szent Istvan University, Hungary at the 2009 American Association of Equine ... Veterinary Microbiology. 166 (1-2): 11-21. doi:10.1016/j.vetmic.2013.04.026. Moon, Stephanie L.; Anderson, John R.; Kumagai, ... disease association and biogeography". J Gen Virol. 82 (8): 1867-1876. Cook S, Holmes EC (2006). "A multigene analysis of the ...
The apparently mistaken association of aminopterin with its use as a rodenticide likely dates back to a 1951 patent issued to ... Donald Smith, Dean of Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine, in a statement released on the same day. On March 27 ... Emerson D (August 1962). "Congenital malformation due to attempted abortion with aminopterin". Am J Obstet Gynecol. 84: 356-7. ... in high doses necessarily involving concomitant leucovorin rescue abortions in pregnant women Supralethal doses of aminopterin ...
In human medicine, pyometra (also a veterinary condition of significance) is regarded as a form of chronic endometritis seen in ... March 2002). "Association between Mycoplasma genitalium and acute endometritis". Lancet. 359 (9308): 765-6. doi:10.1016/S0140- ... The organisms most often isolated are believed to be because of compromised abortions, delivery, medical instrumentation, and ...
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 229 (9): 1442-6. doi:10.2460/javma.229.9.1442. PMID 17078806. Johnson, ... FHV-1 can also cause abortion in pregnant queens, usually at the sixth week of gestation, although this may be due to systemic ... Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 227 (4): 579-85. doi:10.2460/javma.2005.227.579. PMID 16117066. "Feline ... Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 207 (5): 599-603. PMID 7649774. Holland, Jessica L.; Outerbridge, ...
"Isolation of a filterable agent causing arteritis of horses and abortion by mares; its differentiation from the equine abortion ... William Gorgas and his war with the mosquito". Canadian Medical Association Journal. 141 (6): 596-7, 599. PMC 1451363 . PMID ... Zacks MA, Paessler S (January 2010). "Encephalitic alphaviruses". Veterinary Microbiology. 140 (3-4): 281-6. doi:10.1016/j. ... Carlos Finlay and yellow fever". Canadian Medical Association Journal. 141 (11): 1126. PMC 1451274 . PMID 2684378. Litsios S ( ...
Several randomized controlled trials have reported no association between Doppler exposure and birth weight, Apgar scores, and ... though indications of other abnormalities can lead to a decision regarding abortion. Perhaps the most common such test uses a ... but still higher than the 30-80 milliwatts per square cm range of the Statison V veterinary LIPUS device. Doppler ...
"Pereira LA, Loomis D, Conceicao GM, Braga AL, Arcas RM, Kishi HS: Association between air pollution and intrauterine mortality ... Marasti 61, 71331 Bucharest 32, Romania (2) National Institute of Veterinary Medicine Pasteur, Calea Giulesti 333, Bucharest, ... Toxic abortion is a medical phenomenon of spontaneous abortion, miscarriage, or stillbirth caused by toxins in the environment ... "toxic abortion, gastro-enteritis and abortion with dystrophic and haemorrhagic lesions of the foetus." Cadmium has been ...
Close contact with sheep who have recently given birth can lead to clamydiosis, or enzootic abortion, in pregnant women, as ... Taenia solium infection is one of the neglected tropical diseases with public health and veterinary concern in endemic regions ... The recommendations, developed in conjunction with the National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, include ... Conservation medicine Cross-species transmission Emerging infectious disease Foodborne illness Wildlife disease Veterinary ...
... is a well-recognized cause of abortions in ruminants and pets. C. burnetii infection in dairy cattle has been well ... Association of Schools of Public Health. 53 (52): 2259-82. doi:10.2307/4582746. ISSN 0094-6214. JSTOR 4582746 - via JSTOR. ( ... "At risk" occupations include: Veterinary personnel Stockyard workers Farmers Sheep shearers Animal transporters Laboratory ... For instance, in a study published in 2008, a significant association has been shown between the seropositivity of herds and ...
Veterinary Medicine. 1914. Archived from the original on 12 March 2017.. *^ Radostits OM, Gay CC, Hinchcliff KW, Constable PD ( ... and an association between the use of anti-inflammatory medications in the third trimester and adverse effects to the ... with most pregnancies ending in abortion or miscarriage. Approximately 160 babies were born with birth defects due to maternal ... White DS (1917). A Text-book of the Principles and Practice of Veterinary Medicine. Lea & Febiger. p. 258.. ...
... abortions with still borns and mummified young. Treatments and disease risks including weight and populations are revised in ... Disgnosis & Management of Abortion. Disgnosis & Management of Abortion. Matt Colston BM & S, CertSHP, MRCVS. on behalf of Sheep ... In November 2013, Matt joined Novartis Animal Health as a Veterinary Technical Advisor to the Farm Animal Team, and ... abortions with still borns and mummified young. Treatments and disease risks including weight and populations are revised in ...
Animal rights, anti-abortion, eco-terrorism, quasi-charity terrorism. American Veterinary Medical Association ... International Association for the Study of Organized Crime. *Jamestown Foundation, Tangled Webs: Terrorist and Organized Crime ... American Bar Association Report: U.S. Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (Apr. 2001) (PDF 276 Kb.) ...
Copyright © 2017 British Veterinary Association. All rights reserved.. 京ICP备15042040号-3 ... These are among matters discussed in the Veterinary Laboratories Agencys (vlas) disease surveillance report for England and ...
Copyright © 2017 British Veterinary Association. All rights reserved.. 京ICP备15042040号-3 ...
Mycoplasmas in Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) : identification and association with abortion ... 1123-1130, Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation, Columbia, Mo., C1. journal The foraging range of Little Penguins ( ...
99) depicted a strong association between loss of chromatin integrity and poor implantation or spontaneous abortion. Therefore ... Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Extremadura, Spain. The editor and reviewers affiliations are the latest ... Shen H, Ong C. Detection of oxidative DNA damage in human sperm and its association with sperm function and male infertility. ... Shamsi MB, Venkatesh S, Pathak D, Deka D, Dada R. Sperm DNA damage & oxidative stress in recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). ...
Outbreaks of Canine Abortions Caused by Brucella canis in Okinawa Prefecture. Masanao MATAYOSHI, Noboru YAFUSO, Wakako TAKAGI, ... Edited and published by : Japan Veterinary Medical Association Produced and listed by : KATO BUNMEISHA PRINTING Co., LTD ... From September 2005 to January 2006, 16 canine abortions at approximately 50 days of gestation occurredcontinuously at two ... Journal of the Japanese Veterinary Medical Association * Journal of the Japan Veterinary Medical Association ...
National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians. Compendium of veterinary standard precautions, zoonotic disease ... Ill animals, animals known to be infected with a pathogen, and animals from herds with a recent history of abortion or diarrhea ... and the American Veterinary Medical Association. The material in this report originated in the Coordinating Center for ... National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc., Committee Co-Chairpersons: Jeffrey B. Bender, DVM, MS, DACVPM ...
American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Public Health and Regulatory Veterinary Medicine, Schaumburg, Illinois; ... Ill animals, animals known to be infected with a pathogen, and animals from herds with a recent history of abortion or diarrhea ... National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians. Compendium of veterinary standard precautions, zoonotic disease ... This report has been endorsed by CDC, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and the American Veterinary Medical ...
Listeria is also a common veterinary pathogen, being associated with abortion and encephalitis in sheep and cattle. It can be ... American Medical Association, Association of Professors of Medicine, Infectious Diseases Society of America, Oklahoma State ... Joseph F John, Jr, MD, FACP, FIDSA, FSHEA is a member of the following medical societies: Charleston County Medical Association ... 2] The microorganism has gained recognition because of its association with epidemic gastroenteritis. In 1997, an outbreak of ...
Identification and association with abortion, Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation 23(6), 1123-1130. https://doi.org ... Journal of the South African Veterinary Association versión On-line ISSN 2224-9435. versión impresa ISSN 1019-9128. J. S. Afr. ... Patronek, G.J. & Slavinski, S.A., 2009, Animal bites, Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 234(3), 336-345 ... IIIDepartment of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South ...
1b EHV-1 Equine Vaccine Zoetis Animal Health Abortion EHV , Vaccines , Equine ... A killed virus to protect pregnant mares against abortion caused by rhinopneumonits. Contains two strains of EHV-1, increasing ... Safe.Pharmacy online veterinary pharmacy services. Valley Vet Pharmacy has earned accreditation through the National ... Association of Boards of Pharmacy® (NABP®).. Valley Vet Pharmacy successfully completed the rigorous accreditation process by ...
Jack E. J. (1968). "Salmonella abortion in sheep", Veterinary Annual, 12, 57-63. ... Association of DnaK and GroEL with Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella Abortusovis. International Journal of Veterinary ... The association of DnaK and GroEL molecular chaperones with the stress response induced by antibiotics has been mentioned for ... Cite this Article as: Luminita Monica Vanghele, Maria Ionescu, Handan Coste and Elena Ganea (2016), " Association of DnaK and ...
2003). Results of a new serologic test suggest an association of Waddlia chondrophila with bovine abortion. J. Vet. Diagn. ... Veterinary Microbiology 85, 285 - 292.. Kocan, K. M., Crawford, T. B., Dilbeck, P. M., Evermann, J. F. & McGuire, T. C. (1990 ... chondrophila and bovine abortion (p,0.00001). However, a PCR-based study of the incidence of chlamydia-related abortions in ... Veterinary Microbiology 75, 100 - 126. [Review article].. Everett, K. D. E., Hornung, L. J. & Andersen, A. A. (1999). Rapid ...
Possible scenarios will be perioperative use, respiratory disease, contagious abortion, and footrot in ruminants. Sponsored by ... She seeks to address challenges that arise in human and animal interactions, partnering with veterinary medical associations ... She seeks to address challenges that arise in human and animal interactions, partnering with veterinary medical associations ... "Proposed service fee increases for veterinary drugs will cause problems" New Updates to the Veterinary Resource Binder - April ...
Possible scenarios will be perioperative use, respiratory disease, contagious abortion, and footrot in ruminants. ... Veterinary Forensics: The Basics. Veterinary Forensics: The Basics. Companion Animal. Sep 8/18, 10:30 am - 11:20 am. East Room ... She seeks to address challenges that arise in human and animal interactions, partnering with veterinary medical associations ... Veterinary Forensics: Forensic Necropsy. Veterinary Forensics: Forensic Necropsy. Companion Animal. Sep 8/18, 11:30 am - 12:20 ...
Methods The investigation was a retrospective cohort study among all the female members of the Finnish Veterinary Association ( ... Conclusions The results suggest that the veterinarians had an increased risk of spontaneous abortion in the 1970s, but not in ... The risk of spontaneous abortion among the veterinarians was compared with that of all other Finnish women and other upper- ... Results The risk of spontaneous abortion was 10.5% for the veterinarians. In the 1970s, practicing veterinarians had an ...
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association 80:229-232 [ Links ]. 16. Nuru S, Dennis S M 1976 Abortion and reproductive ... Journal of the South African Veterinary Association versão On-line ISSN 2224-9435. versão impressa ISSN 1019-9128. J. S. Afr. ... Journal of the South African Veterinary Association 59:139-140 [ Links ]. 20. Reinhardt G, Riedemann S, Ernst S, Aguilar M, ... 3. Campero C M, Moore D P, Oseon A C, Cipolla A L. Odriozola E 2003 Aetiology of bovine abortion in Argentina. Veterinary ...
Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation : official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory ... A 12-year retrospective study of equine abortion in Michigan. Article Title:. ... Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.. Author:. Wise, J.K.. View in NALs Catalog:. IND91011457. Format:. ... Medical and veterinary entomology.. Author:. Esterhuizen, J.. View in NALs Catalog:. IND43771339. Format:. Article. ...
Submitted to: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Publication Type: Review Article Publication Acceptance ... It is a major cause of abortion in dairy cattle, particularly in California. Until recently, transmission from mother to fetus ...
Thus, along with other journals, a record of scientific veterinary knowledge is established for current use and reference ... in South Africa and elsewhere in the world with current scientific information across the full spectrum of veterinary science. ... However, transplacental infection can occur and lead to abortion, malformations and stillborn lambs, calves and goat kids. ... Journal of the South African Veterinary Association - latest Issue. * Navigate this Journal ...
Preventive Veterinary Medicine" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of ... Serostatus and association with reproductive disorders in dairy cattle, ... Infection of seronegative cattle with BHV-1 leads to abortion, retention of fetal membranes, increased service per conception, ... Bovine herpesvirus-1 in three major milk sheds of Ethiopia: Serostatus and association with... Sibhat, Berhanu; Ayelet, Gelagay ...
The current retrospective study examined data on bovine abortion submissions from 5 veterinary diagnostic laboratories from ... is 1 of several viruses considered to be causal agents of bovine abortion. ... to evaluate if there was an association between farm history of vaccination against BoHV-1 and BoHV-1-positive abortion ... An evaluation of the prevalence of Bovine herpesvirus 1 abortions based on diagnostic submissions to five U.S.-based veterinary ...
... abortion, and death within 48 to 72 hours. Subcutaneous swelling and edema, usually involving the ventral aspect of the neck ( ... This information has been prepared as a service by the American Veterinary Medical Association. Redistribution is acceptable, ... Veterinary Leadership Conference The Veterinary Leadership Conference draws veterinarians from across the U.S. for education ... Veterinary student Tools to help you transition to your new veterinary career ...
  • Several leading hospitals have approved lethal injections of potassium chloride as standard procedure in late-term abortions following the court's upholding a ban on the partial-birth abortion procedure. (studentnewsdaily.com)
  • Bovine brucellosis is a contagious, bacterial and economically important disease which causes late term abortions and subsequently retention of placenta in bovines. (ijlr.org)
  • Mare reproductive loss syndrome, which historically can cause late-term abortions, early-term fetal losses, pericarditis (heart problems), unilateral endophthalmitis (problem in only one eye), hyphema (blood in the eye) in foals, mouth ulcers and laminitis was first seen in Kentucky and surrounding states (and as far north as Canada) in 2001, with a reduced incidence in 2002. (walkinghorsereport.com)
  • In 2001, there were 516 late-term abortions and 2,998 early fetal losses in Kentucky's Thoroughbred industry alone. (walkinghorsereport.com)
  • MRLS was first recognized as an outbreak of fetal deaths, foals born weak, and late-term abortions in Kentucky the first weekend in May of 2001, but the outbreak was traced back to April 23 of that year. (bloodhorse.com)
  • with 4 normal cows, 3 cases of endometritis, one case of uterine prolapse, one case of premature birth accompanied with the retained placenta, and one case of abortion followed by follicular cyst. (go.jp)
  • Brucella melitensis primarily affects the reproductive tract of sheep and goats, and B. melitensis infection is characterized by abortion, retained placenta and, to a lesser extent, impaired fertility. (au-ibar.org)
  • The large economic losses related to neosporosis in dairy cattle are due to reproductive failure that follows infection, including abortion, retained placenta, return to estrus, and increased calving intervals. (scielo.br)
  • The present study demonstrates that severe lesions in the placenta are associated with abortion and stillbirth in caprine neosporosis and the placental alterations are likely involved in abortion pathogenesis. (pvb.com.br)
  • Attempts are also under way to complete a textbook on emerging and epidemic fungal infection by the end of 2017 and the Atlas of Veterinary Pathogenic Fungi by 2020. (deepdyve.com)
  • 0.05) odds of clinical reproductive disorders including abortion, retained fetal membranes, stillbirth, birth of weak calf and metritis compared to seronegative cows. (deepdyve.com)
  • In bitches treated after 20 days of gestation, abortion is accompanied by the physiological signs of parturition: fetal expulsion, vaginal discharge, reduced appetite, restlessness and mammary congestion. (viovet.co.uk)
  • Forty seven Holstein-Friesian cows were referred to the Azabu University Veterinary Hospital as serious cases with the displaced abomasum. (go.jp)
  • Wisconsin - Veterinarians in the rural Midwest were warned of a possible new trend - teen-aged girls reportedly taking veterinary medications meant to induce abortion in cows to perform their own abortions. (anabolicminds.com)
  • An understanding of differences in the risk of abortion due to infection by Neospora caninum in cows and the various effects of the disease, such as a decline in milk production, transmission rates, and premature culling, is of fundamental importance to model the cost associated with the disease. (scielo.br)
  • They then characterized it by partially sequencing three of its genes and named it "Pajaroellobacter abortibovis," recognizing the Pajaroello tick that carries the bacterium as well as its abortion-inducing impact on infected cows and their fetuses. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • If the bacteria that cause foothill abortion are transmitted to cows by a tick bite or experimental injection, they don't cause an inflammatory response - probably in part because the bacteria replicate so slowly," Stott said. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • Abortions have become an increasing threat for pregnant cows and producers can reduce this risk by using inactivated vaccines in breeding animals. (progressivecattle.com)
  • While many members of this group are being increasingly used in daily veterinary practice for the benefit of animals, the one most commonly used at this time is among the earliest discovered - sulphanilamide, which is very widely employed in the treatment of a form of contagious streptococcal mastitis in cows which is responsible for considerable injury to the mammary glands and a consequent great loss of milk for the community. (animalresearch.info)
  • She cites research from top veterinary immunology researcher Dr. Ronald D. Schultz that shows how a round of core vaccines when they are puppies can protect most dogs for many years, if not for life. (naturalnews.com)
  • But these days, veterinary experts who specialize in studying immunology - and how vaccines work to fight off viral infections like BVD - are more excited than ever to talk about disease prevention. (progressivecattle.com)
  • While brucellosis is a well-known infectious cause of abortions, other less well known pathogens may also cause abortions or infertility. (scielo.org.za)
  • Abortions may be idiopathic or may be due to either non-infectious causes like hormonal or metabolic abnormalities, nutritional deficiencies, trauma and toxicities or infectious causes which include bacteria (brucellosis, listeriosis), fungus (aspergillosis) and viruses (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine virus diarrhea) (Yaegaer, 1993). (ijlr.org)
  • It's not a regulated drug that needs to be locked up, either, says May, and many veterinary clinics in the Midwest employ teens. (anabolicminds.com)
  • If you need to use a stall at shows, on racetracks, at veterinary hospitals or clinics, etc. always muzzle the horse to prevent her from licking/sniffing walls that may be contaminated with the herpes virus. (equisearch.com)
  • The Board did regulate abortion clinics from 1981 until 1984, when Governor Chuck Robb ordered an end to the regulation of outpatient clinics. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1991 to 2010, bills introduced into the Virginia General Assembly proposed to regulate outpatient abortion clinics, but they failed to be enacted. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2010, Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli issued a non-binding legal opinion that would allow the Board to regulate outpatient abortion clinics as if they were hospital facilities called "ambulatory surgical centers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 2011 session of the General Assembly expanded the Board's power to regulate clinics which provide five or more first-trimester abortions per month and required the Board to issue regulations within 280 days. (wikipedia.org)
  • Veterinary Clinics of North America - Food Animal Practice , 32 (2), 443-463. (edu.au)
  • Jordan sums up the issue when she says: "My experience in veterinary clinics shows that about 15% of most clinics' income is from vaccines … and then another 65% is spent addressing the vaccine-induced diseases that result. (naturalnews.com)
  • Some southwest Ohio veterinary clinics reported cases where they suspected pet owners of shopping for pet prescriptions before they should have run out or claiming to have lost the paperwork. (daytondailynews.com)
  • We're aware that people are sometimes asking for drugs for their dogs that they are abusing themselves," said Dr. John Talmadge of the Bigger Road Veterinary Clinics in Springboro and Kettering. (daytondailynews.com)
  • The study looked at 730 cases from the UMN Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory with a positive sample for PCV3, received between Feb 2016 and Jan 2018. (umnswinenews.com)
  • The early and accurate detection of the specific pathogen involved in infections that result in abortion and infertility is essential so that efficacious interventions can be implemented. (scielo.org.za)
  • Her studies, which are primarily in the horse, address fundamental questions that aim to result in the development of novel therapies to treat and clincially manage conditions of equine pregnancy and infertility (e.g. abortion). (rvc.ac.uk)
  • Direct losses are associated with an animal having a disease whose consequences may be immediately visible (e.g. death, abortion) or latent (e.g. reduced fertility). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Her interest in research begun as a veterinary student during which time she spent two summers in the U.S.A in the laboratories of Professor Douglas Antczak (Cornell University) and Dr. Craig Altier (North Carolina State University) working on projects in the fields of equine genomics and reproduction. (rvc.ac.uk)
  • Vaccination for Equine Herpes is a sound and wise investment when you consider the losses suffered in either of the Abortion or Central Ner- vous syndromes. (yudu.com)
  • Whilst this information is provided by experts, we advise that users seek veterinary advice where appropriate and check OIE manuals for recent changes to regulations, diagnostic tests, vaccines and treatments. (au-ibar.org)
  • This is a most unusual bug, a 'Ripley's Believe It or Not' bacterium, and the tick that carries it is equally bizarre," said veterinary immunologist Jeffrey Stott, who has led the effort to develop a preventive vaccine for the malady that western ranchers know all too well as "foothill abortion disease. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • Ranchers in California and neighboring states have struggled with foothill abortion disease at least as far back as the 1940s. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • It was carried out in the form of a questionnaire survey of all graduates from Australian veterinary schools from 1960 to 2000. (ilo.org)
  • An abortion represents a loss of expected additional milk and meat, wastes breeding time and results in additional costs due to the special diet and care required for pregnant animals. (scielo.org.za)
  • The BVD/MD virus infects the developing foetus and is capable of causing abortions in pregnant animals. (scielo.org.za)
  • Guidelines to reduce risks for disease from animals in health-care and veterinary facilities and from service animals (e.g., guide dogs) have been developed ( 2--5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Animals culled to control abortion-causing infections need to be replaced. (scielo.org.za)
  • For example, there were positive associations with rural life and exposure to the breeding of farm animals, and in addition, work in a dusty environment, such as on fields, gardens, stables and construction sites were also connected to high seroprevalence. (aaem.pl)
  • Differences in the risk of abortion between seropositive and seronegative animals were calculated through a meta-analysis of previous data from several Brazilian states, and an increase of 10.04% (0.091 to 0.118) in the specific risk was identified. (scielo.br)
  • It is only possible today to refer to a few of the many instances in which animals have benefited and are daily benefiting as a result of this great team-work and combined efforts of chemists, pharmacologists, bacteriologists, veterinary surgeons and others. (animalresearch.info)
  • Close association of W. chondrophila reticulate bodies with host cell mitochondria [Fig. gave rise to the species name. (chlamydiae.com)
  • The membership has been open to any with a scientific interest in fungi affecting animal species, understanding a veterinary disease problem, development of animal models of human fungal disease. (deepdyve.com)