Physician Assistants: Health professionals who practice medicine as members of a team with their supervising physicians. They deliver a broad range of medical and surgical services to diverse populations in rural and urban settings. Duties may include physical exams, diagnosis and treatment of disease, interpretation of tests, assist in surgery, and prescribe medications. (from http://www.aapa.orglabout-pas accessed 2114/2011)Dental Assistants: Individuals who assist the dentist or the dental hygienist.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Nurses' Aides: Allied health personnel who assist the professional nurse in routine duties.Job Description: Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.Computers, Handheld: A type of MICROCOMPUTER, sometimes called a personal digital assistant, that is very small and portable and fitting in a hand. They are convenient to use in clinical and other field situations for quick data management. They usually require docking with MICROCOMPUTERS for updates.Ophthalmic Assistants: Persons academically trained to care for patients with eye diseases or structural defects of the eye, under the supervision of an ophthalmologist.Pediatric Assistants: Persons academically trained to provide medical care, under the supervision of a physician, to infants and children.Nursing, Team: Coordination of nursing services by various nursing care personnel under the leadership of a professional nurse. The team may consist of a professional nurse, nurses' aides, and the practical nurse.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Nurse Practitioners: Nurses who are specially trained to assume an expanded role in providing medical care under the supervision of a physician.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Pharmacists' Aides: Persons who perform certain functions under the supervision of the pharmacist.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Employee Performance Appraisal: The assessment of the functioning of an employee in relation to work.Personnel Turnover: A change or shift in personnel due to reorganization, resignation, or discharge.Job Application: Process of applying for employment. It includes written application for employment or personal appearance.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Burnout, Professional: An excessive stress reaction to one's occupational or professional environment. It is manifested by feelings of emotional and physical exhaustion coupled with a sense of frustration and failure.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Nursing Staff: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in an organized facility, institution, or agency.Physical Therapist Assistants: Persons who, under the supervision of licensed PHYSICAL THERAPISTS, provide patient treatment using various PHYSICAL THERAPY THECHNIQUES.Moving and Lifting Patients: Moving or repositioning patients within their beds, from bed to bed, bed to chair, or otherwise from one posture or surface to another.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Home Health Aides: Persons who assist ill, elderly, or disabled persons in the home, carrying out personal care and housekeeping tasks. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms. 2d ed, p202)United StatesPersonnel Management: Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Nursing, Supervisory: Administration of nursing services for one or more clinical units.Inservice Training: On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.Personnel Loyalty: Dedication or commitment shown by employees to organizations or institutions where they work.Work: Productive or purposeful activities.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Occupational Injuries: Injuries sustained from incidents in the course of work-related activities.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Nurse Midwives: Professional nurses who have received postgraduate training in midwifery.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Delegation, Professional: The process of assigning duties to a subordinate with lesser qualifications.Personnel Delegation: To entrust to the care or management of another, to transfer or to assign tasks within an organizational or administrative unit or structureClinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Legislation, Nursing: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of nursing, proposed for enactment by a legislative body.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Northwestern United States: The geographic area of the northwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Health Facility Environment: Physical surroundings or conditions of a hospital or other health facility and influence of these factors on patients and staff.Dental Staff: Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Role: The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.Gloves, Surgical: Gloves, usually rubber, worn by surgeons, examining physicians, dentists, and other health personnel for the mutual protection of personnel and patient.Unemployment: The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.Attitude to Computers: The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Nursing: The field of nursing care concerned with the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.Knowledge of Results (Psychology): A principle that learning is facilitated when the learner receives immediate evaluation of learning performance. The concept also hypothesizes that learning is facilitated when the learner is promptly informed whether a response is correct, and, if incorrect, of the direction of error.Optometry: The professional practice of primary eye and vision care that includes the measurement of visual refractive power and the correction of visual defects with lenses or glasses.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Back Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the posterior part of the trunk. It includes injuries to the muscles of the back.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Organizational Culture: Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values, which are subject to change, are reflected in the day to day management of the organization.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Job Syndrome: Primary immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by recurrent infections and hyperimmunoglobulinemia E. Most cases are sporadic. Of the rare familial forms, the dominantly inherited subtype has additional connective tissue, dental and skeletal involvement that the recessive type does not share.Patient Escort Service: A special service provided by volunteers to accompany patients who need help in moving about the health facility.Expert Systems: Computer programs based on knowledge developed from consultation with experts on a problem, and the processing and/or formalizing of this knowledge using these programs in such a manner that the problems may be solved.Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Reference Books, Medical: Books in the field of medicine intended primarily for consultation.Rehabilitation: Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.Nursing Methodology Research: Research carried out by nurses concerning techniques and methods to implement projects and to document information, including methods of interviewing patients, collecting data, and forming inferences. The concept includes exploration of methodological issues such as human subjectivity and human experience.Education, Nursing, Associate: A two-year program in nursing education in a community or junior college leading to an A.D. (Associate Degree). Graduates of this program are eligible for state examination for licensure as RN (Registered Nurse).GermanyRural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Microcomputers: Small computers using LSI (large-scale integration) microprocessor chips as the CPU (central processing unit) and semiconductor memories for compact, inexpensive storage of program instructions and data. They are smaller and less expensive than minicomputers and are usually built into a dedicated system where they are optimized for a particular application. "Microprocessor" may refer to just the CPU or the entire microcomputer.Work Schedule Tolerance: Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.Telecommunications: Transmission of information over distances via electronic means.Time Management: Planning and control of time to improve efficiency and effectiveness.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.House Calls: Visits to the patient's home by professional personnel for the purpose of diagnosis and/or treatment.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Speech Recognition Software: Software capable of recognizing dictation and transcribing the spoken words into written text.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Medical Staff: Professional medical personnel who provide care to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Practice Management, Dental: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a dental practice.Sick Leave: An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Office Management: Planning, organizing, and administering activities in an office.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Safety Management: The development of systems to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences in an institutional setting. The concept includes prevention or reduction of adverse events or incidents involving employees, patients, or facilities. Examples include plans to reduce injuries from falls or plans for fire safety to promote a safe institutional environment.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Radiologic Health: Health concerns associated with the effects of radiation on the environment and on public and personal health.Nurse Anesthetists: Professional nurses who have completed postgraduate training in the administration of anesthetics and who function under the responsibility of the operating surgeon.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Nurse's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in nursing related to provision of services including diagnosis and treatment.Point-of-Care Systems: Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Women, Working: Women who are engaged in gainful activities usually outside the home.Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.Vacuum Curettage: Aspiration of the contents of the uterus with a vacuum curette.VermontDietary Services: Services provided by dietitians or nutritionists to meet the nutritional needs of individuals, including consultation with other professional personnel.Telemedicine: Delivery of health services via remote telecommunications. This includes interactive consultative and diagnostic services.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Medical Informatics Computing: Precise procedural mathematical and logical operations utilized in the study of medical information pertaining to health care.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Community Integration: Policies and programs which ensure that DISPLACED PERSONS and chronic illnesses receive the support and SOCIAL SERVICES needed to live in their communities.Modems: Equipment that sends digital information over telephone lines. The term Modem is a short form of the phrase modulator-demodulator.DenmarkJapanRehabilitation, Vocational: Training of the mentally or physically disabled in work skills so they may be returned to regular employment utilizing these skills.Geriatric Nursing: Nursing care of the aged patient given in the home, the hospital, or special institutions such as nursing homes, psychiatric institutions, etc.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Community Health Workers: Persons trained to assist professional health personnel in communicating with residents in the community concerning needs and availability of health services.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Health Facility Size: The physical space or dimensions of a facility. Size may be indicated by bed capacity.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Personnel Downsizing: Reducing staff to cut costs or to achieve greater efficiency.Helping Behavior: Behaviors associated with the giving of assistance or aid to individuals.Mercury Poisoning, Nervous System: Neurologic disorders associated with exposure to inorganic and organic forms of MERCURY. Acute intoxication may be associated with gastrointestinal disturbances, mental status changes, and PARAPARESIS. Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury usually occurs in industrial workers, and manifests as mental confusion, prominent behavioral changes (including psychosis), DYSKINESIAS, and NEURITIS. Alkyl mercury poisoning may occur through ingestion of contaminated seafood or grain, and its characteristic features include POLYNEUROPATHY; ATAXIA; vision loss; NYSTAGMUS, PATHOLOGIC; and DEAFNESS. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch20, pp10-15)Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Economics, Nursing: Economic aspects of the nursing profession.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Economics, Dental: Economic aspects of the dental profession and dental care.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Cellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.Students, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Bites, Human: Bites inflicted by humans.Dental Technicians: Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.Quality Improvement: The attainment or process of attaining a new level of performance or quality.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.CaliforniaSoftware: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Organizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.Codes of Ethics: Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.Obstetric Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the pregnant woman for conditions associated with pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. It does not include surgery of the newborn infant.Retirement: The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.Veterinarians: Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.KansasDental Prophylaxis: Treatment for the prevention of periodontal diseases or other dental diseases by the cleaning of the teeth in the dental office using the procedures of DENTAL SCALING and DENTAL POLISHING. The treatment may include plaque detection, removal of supra- and subgingival plaque and calculus, application of caries-preventing agents, checking of restorations and prostheses and correcting overhanging margins and proximal contours of restorations, and checking for signs of food impaction.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Remote Consultation: Consultation via remote telecommunications, generally for the purpose of diagnosis or treatment of a patient at a site remote from the patient or primary physician.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Semantic Differential: Analysis of word concepts by the association of polar adjectives, e.g., good-bad, with the concept, father. The adjectives are usually scaled in 7 steps. The subject's placement of the concept on the adjectival scale indicates the connotative meaning of the concept.Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Musculoskeletal System: The MUSCLES, bones (BONE AND BONES), and CARTILAGE of the body.Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Abortion, Incomplete: Premature loss of PREGNANCY in which not all the products of CONCEPTION have been expelled.Physical Therapy Specialty: The auxiliary health profession which makes use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction of anatomic or physiological origin.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Film Dosimetry: Use of a device (film badge) for measuring exposure of individuals to radiation. It is usually made of metal, plastic, or paper and loaded with one or more pieces of x-ray film.WashingtonSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
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