Ophthalmia Neonatorum: Acute conjunctival inflammation in the newborn, usually caused by maternal gonococcal infection. The causative agent is NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE. The baby's eyes are contaminated during passage through the birth canal.Asphyxia Neonatorum: Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)Sclerema Neonatorum: A severe, sometimes fatal, disorder of adipose tissue occurring chiefly in preterm or debilitated infants suffering from an underlying illness and manifested by a diffuse, nonpitting induration of the affected tissue. The skin becomes cold, yellowish, mottled, and inflexible.Asphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Silver Nitrate: A silver salt with powerful germicidal activity. It has been used topically to prevent OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUM.ConjunctivitisParaldehyde: A hypnotic and sedative with anticonvulsant effects. However, because of the hazards associated with its administration, its tendency to react with plastic, and the risks associated with its deterioration, it has largely been superseded by other agents. It is still occasionally used to control status epilepticus resistant to conventional treatment. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p608-9)Povidone-Iodine: An iodinated polyvinyl polymer used as topical antiseptic in surgery and for skin and mucous membrane infections, also as aerosol. The iodine may be radiolabeled for research purposes.Conjunctivitis, Inclusion: An infection of the eyes characterized by the presence in conjunctival epithelial cells of inclusion bodies indistinguishable from those of trachoma. It is acquired by infants during birth and by adults from swimming pools. The etiological agent is CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS whose natural habitat appears to be the genito-urinary tract. Inclusion conjunctivitis is a less severe disease than trachoma and usually clears up spontaneously.Infant, Newborn, Diseases: Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Fetal Hypoxia: Deficient oxygenation of FETAL BLOOD.Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain: A disorder characterized by a reduction of oxygen in the blood combined with reduced blood flow (ISCHEMIA) to the brain from a localized obstruction of a cerebral artery or from systemic hypoperfusion. Prolonged hypoxia-ischemia is associated with ISCHEMIC ATTACK, TRANSIENT; BRAIN INFARCTION; BRAIN EDEMA; COMA; and other conditions.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Poly A: A group of adenine ribonucleotides in which the phosphate residues of each adenine ribonucleotide act as bridges in forming diester linkages between the ribose moieties.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Fagopyrum: A plant genus of the family POLYGONACEAE that is used as an EDIBLE GRAIN. Although the seeds are used as cereal, the plant is not one of the cereal grasses (POACEAE).Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.PakistanFamily Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Midwifery: The practice of assisting women in childbirth.Community Health Workers: Persons trained to assist professional health personnel in communicating with residents in the community concerning needs and availability of health services.Home Childbirth: Childbirth taking place in the home.AfghanistanClonidine: An imidazoline sympatholytic agent that stimulates ALPHA-2 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS and central IMIDAZOLINE RECEPTORS. It is commonly used in the management of HYPERTENSION.Dextroamphetamine: The d-form of AMPHETAMINE. It is a central nervous system stimulant and a sympathomimetic. It has also been used in the treatment of narcolepsy and of attention deficit disorders and hyperactivity in children. Dextroamphetamine has multiple mechanisms of action including blocking uptake of adrenergics and dopamine, stimulating release of monamines, and inhibiting monoamine oxidase. It is also a drug of abuse and a psychotomimetic.Guanfacine: A centrally acting antihypertensive agent with specificity towards ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Methylphenidate: A central nervous system stimulant used most commonly in the treatment of ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER in children and for NARCOLEPSY. Its mechanisms appear to be similar to those of DEXTROAMPHETAMINE. The d-isomer of this drug is referred to as DEXMETHYLPHENIDATE HYDROCHLORIDE.Hypothermia, Induced: Abnormally low BODY TEMPERATURE that is intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means. In humans, mild or moderate hypothermia has been used to reduce tissue damages, particularly after cardiac or spinal cord injuries and during subsequent surgeries.Rewarming: Application of heat to correct hypothermia, accidental or induced.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Cranial Fontanelles: Any of six membrane-covered openings between the CRANIAL SUTURES in the incompletely ossified skull of the fetus or newborn infant. The fontanelles normally close sometime after birth.Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Xenon: A noble gas with the atomic symbol Xe, atomic number 54, and atomic weight 131.30. It is found in the earth's atmosphere and has been used as an anesthetic.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Hypothermia: Lower than normal body temperature, especially in warm-blooded animals.Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Heart Rate, Fetal: The heart rate of the FETUS. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.Perinatal Mortality: Deaths occurring from the 28th week of GESTATION to the 28th day after birth in a given population.Hospitals, Maternity: Special hospitals which provide care to women during pregnancy and parturition.Masks: Devices that cover the nose and mouth to maintain aseptic conditions or to administer inhaled anesthetics or other gases. (UMDNS, 1999)Fetal Blood: Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.Health Level Seven: An American National Standards Institute-accredited organization working on specifications to support development and advancement of clinical and administrative standards for healthcare.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.ATP-Dependent Proteases: Proteases that contain proteolytic core domains and ATPase-containing regulatory domains. They are usually comprised of large multi-subunit assemblies. The domains can occur within a single peptide chain or on distinct subunits.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.

Platelet-activating factor mediates ischemia-induced leukocyte-endothelial adherence in newborn pig brain. (1/328)

The authors examined the involvement of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in mediating leukocyte adherence to brain postcapillary pial venules and altering blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability during basal conditions and during reoxygenation after asphyxia in newborn piglets. Intravital epifluorescence videomicroscopy, closed cranial windows, and labeling of leukocytes with rhodamine 6G allowed us to obtain serial measurements of adherent leukocytes within postcapillary venules. Blood-brain barrier breakdown was determined by optical measures of cortical extravascular fluorescence intensity after intravenous sodium fluorescein. Superfusion of PAF over the cortex induced a dose-dependent increase in leukocyte adherence to cerebral venules and leakage of fluorescein; with 1 micromol/L PAF, the magnitude of adherence and BBB breakdown was similar to that seen during reoxygenation after 9 minutes of asphyxia. Both adherence and loss of BBB integrity resulting from either exogenous PAF or asphyxia-reoxygenation could be significantly attenuated by intravenous administration of WEB 2086, a PAF receptor antagonist. Window superfusion of superoxide dismutase with PAF attenuated PAF-induced increases in adherence and associated fluorescein leakage. These findings indicate that PAF exhibits proinflammatory effects in piglet brain and that PAF contributes to leukocyte adherence and BBB breakdown after cerebral ischemia. These PAF effects are mediated by increases in superoxide radical generation.  (+info)

Intraosseous lines in preterm and full term neonates. (2/328)

AIM: To evaluate the use of intraosseous lines for rapid vascular access in primary resuscitation of preterm and full term neonates. METHODS: Thirty intraosseous lines were placed in 27 newborns, in whom conventional venous access had failed. RESULTS: All the neonates survived the resuscitation procedure, with no long term side effects. CONCLUSION: Intraosseous infusion is quick, safe, and effective in compromised neonates.  (+info)

Outcome of very severe birth asphyxia. (3/328)

The aim of this study was to establish the outcome of very severe birth asphyxia in a group of babies intensively resuscitated at birth. 48 infants, born between 1966 and 1971 inclusive, were selected; 15 were apparently stillborn and 33 had not established spontaneous respirations by 20 minutes after birth. One-half of them died, but 3 to 7 years later three-quarters of the survivors are apparently normal. Later handicap was associated with factors leading to prolonged partial intrapartum asphyxia, while acute periods of more complete asphyxia were not necessarily harmful.  (+info)

Amplitude integrated EEG 3 and 6 hours after birth in full term neonates with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. (4/328)

AIM: To assess the prognostic value of amplitude integrated EEG (aEEG) 3 and 6 hours after birth. METHODS: Seventy three term, asphyxiated infants were studied (from two different centres), using the Cerebral Function Monitor (CFM Lectromed). The different aEEG tracings were compared using pattern recognition (flat tracing mainly isoelectric (FT); continuous extremely low voltage (CLV); burst-suppression (BS); discontinuous normal voltage (DNV); continuous normal voltage (CNV)) with subsequent outcome. RESULTS: Sixty eight infants were followed up for more than 12 months (range 12 months to 6 years). Twenty one out of 68 infants (31%) showed a change in pattern from 3 to 6 hours, but this was only significant in five cases (24%). In three this changed from BS to CNV with a normal outcome. One infant showed a change in pattern from CNV to FT and had a major handicap at follow up. Another infant showed a change in pattern from DNV to BS, and developed a major handicap at follow up. The other 16 infants did not have any significant changes in pattern: 11 infants had CLV, BS, or FT at 3 and 6 hours and died (n = 9) in the neonatal period or developed a major handicap (n = 2). Five infants had a CNV or DNV pattern at 3 and 6 hours, with a normal outcome. The sensitivity and specificity of BS, together with FT and CLV, for poor outcome at 3 hours was 0.85 and 0.77, respectively; at 6 hours 0.91 and 0.86, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) was 78% and the negative predictive value (NPV) 84% 3 hours after birth. At 6 hours the PPV was 86% and the NPV was 91%. CONCLUSION: aEEG could be very useful for selecting those infants who might benefit from intervention after birth asphyxia.  (+info)

Measurement of the urinary lactate:creatinine ratio for the early identification of newborn infants at risk for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. (5/328)

BACKGROUND: Newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia are prone to the development of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. There are no reliable methods for identifying infants at risk for this disorder. METHODS: We measured the ratio of lactate to creatinine in urine by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy within 6 hours and again 48 to 72 hours after birth in 58 normal infants and 40 infants with asphyxia. The results were correlated with the subsequent presence or absence of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. RESULTS: Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy did not develop in any of the normal newborns but did develop in 16 of the 40 newborns with asphyxia. Within six hours after birth, the mean (+/-SD) ratio of urinary lactate to creatinine was 16.75+/-27.38 in the infants who subsequently had hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, as compared with 0.09+/-0.02 in the normal infants (P<0.001) and 0.19+/-0.12 in the infants with asphyxia in whom hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy did not develop (P<0.001). A ratio of 0.64 or higher within six hours after birth had a sensitivity of 94 percent and a specificity of 100 percent for predicting the development of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The sensitivity and specificity of measurements obtained 48 to 72 hours after birth were much lower. The mean ratio of urinary lactate to creatinine was significantly higher in the infants who had adverse outcomes at one year (25.36+/-32.02) than in the infants with favorable outcomes (0.63+/-1.50) (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of the urinary lactate: creatinine ratio soon after birth may help identify infants at high risk for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.  (+info)

Abnormal cerebral haemodynamics in perinatally asphyxiated neonates related to outcome. (6/328)

AIM: To measure changes in cerebral haemodynamics during the first 24 hours of life following perinatal asphyxia, and relate them to outcome. METHODS: Cerebral blood volume (CBV), its response (CBVR) to changes in arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO(2)), and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in 27 term newborn infants with clinical and/or biochemical evidence consistent with perinatal asphyxia. RESULTS: Both CBF and CBV were higher on the first day of life in the infants with adverse outcomes, and a CBV outside the normal range had a sensitivity of 86% for predicting death or disability. The mean (SD) CBVR on the first day of life was 0.13 (0.12) ml/100 g/1/kPa, which, in 71% of infants, was below the lower 95% confidence limit for normal subjects. CONCLUSION: An increase in CBV on the first day of life is a sensitive predictor of adverse outcome. A reduction in CBVR is almost universally seen following asphyxia, but is not significantly correlated with severity of adverse outcome.  (+info)

Effects of the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX on outcome of newborn pigs after asphyxic cardiac arrest. (7/328)

In neonates, asphyxia is a common cause of neuronal injury and often results in seizures. The authors evaluated whether blockade of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors during asphyxia and early recovery with 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo-(F)-quinoxaline (NBQX) ameliorates neurologic deficit and histopathology in 1-week-old piglets. Anesthetized piglets were exposed to a sequence of 30 minutes of hypoxia, 5 minutes of room air ventilation, 7 minutes of airway occlusion, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Vehicle or NBQX was administered intravenously before asphyxia (30 mg/kg) and during the first 4 hours of recovery (15 mg/kg/h). Neuropathologic findings were evaluated at 96 hours of recovery by light microscopic and cytochrome oxidase histochemical study. Cardiac arrest occurred at 5 to 6 minutes of airway occlusion, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation restored spontaneous circulation independent of treatment modalities in about 2 to 3 minutes. Neurologic deficit over the 96-hour recovery period was not ameliorated by NBQX. Seizure activity began after 24 to 48 hours in 7 of 10 animals with vehicle and in 9 of 10 of animals with NBQX. In each group, four animals died in status epilepticus. Neuropathologic outcomes were not improved by NBQX. The density of remaining viable neurons was decreased in parietal cortex and putamen by NBQX treatment. Metabolic defects in cytochrome oxidase activity were worsened by NBQX treatment. Seizure activity during recovery was associated with reduced neuronal viability in neocortex and striatum in piglets from both groups that survived for 96 hours. This neonatal model of asphyxic cardiac arrest and resuscitation generates neurologic deficits, clinical seizure activity, and selective damage in regions of basal ganglia and sensorimotor cortex. In contrast to other studies in mature brain, AMPA receptor blockade with NBQX failed to protect against neurologic damage in the immature piglet and worsened postasphyxic histopathologic outcome in neocortex and putamen.  (+info)

Reproducibility and accuracy of MR imaging of the brain after severe birth asphyxia. (8/328)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: MR imaging of the brain can be used to detect cerebral damage after suspected hypoxic-ischemic injury. This study examines the reproducibility and accuracy of MR imaging soon after severe birth asphyxia. METHODS: During a 48-month period, full-term newborn neonates, who died within the first week as a result of severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, were included in the study if they had undergone early (<5 days old) MR imaging and postmortem neuropathologic studies. Two trained observers assessed reproducibility by examining multiple brain regions independently with current criteria and then defining and applying improved criteria. Accuracy of MR findings was tested by comparing the brain regions about which the two imaging raters agreed to those regions about which the two pathologists agreed. RESULTS: Eight neonates, with a median gestational age of 40 weeks (range, 38-40 weeks) and who suffered severe birth asphyxia, were included in the study. In the reproducibility study, MR imaging agreement was moderate when current criteria were used (k = .44). Using the improved criteria, agreement increased considerably (k = .62). Much of this improvement was due to limiting the analyses to the posterior limb of the internal capsule, thalamus, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and medulla. The posterior limb of the internal capsule was the most reliable region analyzed. MR imaging agreement was similar to that achieved by two experienced pathologists reviewing the histologic sections (k = .66). In the accuracy study, MR imaging abnormality was predictive of pathologic abnormality with a sensitivity of .79 and a positive predictive value of 1.0. The predictive value of a single MR imaging abnormality was .79 (95% confidence interval, .61-.96). CONCLUSION: Criteria that provide substantial reproducibility and accuracy for the interpretation of MR imaging findings very early after birth asphyxia can be derived.  (+info)

The aim was to estimate the global numbers of intrapartum stillbirths and intrapartum-related neonatal deaths in 2000. Results indicate that: (1) intrapartum stillbirths are a huge and invisible problem, but are potentially preventable; and (2) intrapartum-related neonatal deaths account for almost 10% of deaths in children under 5 years old. ...
Background and Aim: Arterial duct in term infants is closed 96 h after birth in normal conditions. In some cases, especially in preterm infants, this duct is not closed after birth, which is called patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). This disease, if left untreated, leads to depressed respiratory capacity and shunt in preterm infants. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of oral acetaminophen and ibuprofen on PDA closure in preterm infants. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 50 infants with a gestational age of , 37 weeks with PDA, confirmed by echocardiography and clinical symptoms, were selected and randomly divided into two groups of 25. One group was orally given acetaminophen at 10 mg/kg body weight (BW) every 6 h for 72 h, and another group received ibuprofen at 10 mg/kg BW on the 1st day and then 5 mg/kg on the 2nd and 3rd days. Before and after the intervention, infants were examined for possible side effects using echocardiography. Results: According to the results ...
The study hypothesis is that: Following perinatal asphyxia treatment with a combination of hypothermia and inhaled xenon preserves cerebral metabolism and structure. Following informed parental consent, infants that continue to require endotracheal tube ventilation following resuscitation will be randomised to treatment with hypothermia only or hypothermia and xenon. All infants in both groups will be treated with hypothermia for 72 hours started within 6 hours of delivery and infants allocated to hypothermia and xenon will also receive 30% xenon (balanced with oxygen and air) for 24 hours through a purpose designed delivery system. Structured neurological examination will be done daily during the 1st week after birth and at discharge. MRS and MRI will be performed once between 4-10 days of age. MRS/MRI data analysis will be by investigators blinded to the allocated intervention ...
This is a multicentre prospective randomised controlled trial to determine whether a reduction of body temperature by 3-4°C following perinatal asphyxia improves survival without neurodevelopmental disability.. Full term infants will be randomised within 6 hours of birth to either a control group with the rectal temperature kept at 37 ± 0.2°C or to whole body cooling with the rectal temperature kept at 33.5 ± 0.5°C for 72 hours followed by slow rewarming.. The outcome will be assessed at 18 months of age by survival and neurological and neurodevelopmental testing.. Eligibility criteria:. Term infants less than 6 hours after birth with moderate or severe perinatal asphyxia (a combination of clinical and EEG criteria).. Exclusion criteria:. Infants expected to be 6 hours of age at the time of randomisation or infants with major congenital abnormalities.. Intervention:. Intensive care with whole body cooling versus intensive care without whole body cooling (babies are cooled to 33.5°C for 72 ...
BACKGROUND:. Perinatal asphyxia is an important cause of mortality and permanent neurological and developmental deficit. Early and accurate diagnosis would help to establish the likely prognosis and may also help in determining the most appropriate treatment. Studies in experimental animal models suggest that a protein called Hsp70 may be a good and potentially useful marker of cellular stress that may be clinically useful in determining the presence of neonatal asphyxia.. OBJECTIVES:. Regarding the importance of early and accurate diagnosis of asphyxia, we conducted this study, which is the first investigation of the comparison of the serum Hsp70 antigen level between asphyxiated and healthy infants.. PATIENTS AND METHODS:. In this observational study, the serum concentrations of Hsp70 antigen were compared between neonates suffering from perinatal asphyxia (n = 50) and normal neonates (n = 51). The inclusion criteria for the cases were neonates who had reached term and had at least two ...
Acute perinatal asphyxia impairs non-spatial memory and alters motor coordination in adult male rats. Simola, Nicola; Bustamante, Diego; Pinna, Annalisa; Pontis, Silvia; Morales, Paola; Morelli, Micaela; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario // Experimental Brain Research;Mar2008, Vol. 185 Issue 4, p595 A large body of clinical evidence suggests a possible association between perinatal asphyxia and the onset of early, as well as long-term, neurological and psychiatric disorders including cognitive deficits. The present study investigated cognitive and motor function modifications in a well... ...
Question - Can an online doctor suggest any treatment or medicines for mildly retarded due to neonatal asphyxia with iron deficiency ?. Ask a Doctor about Blood transfusion, Ask a General & Family Physician
This population-based cross-sectional study by Mori et al. presents routinely collected national data from England and Wales to provide estimates of intrapartum-related perinatal mortality rates for booked home births. Intrapartum-related perinatal mortality is a narrowing of the definition of perinatal mortality to exclude deaths from causes other than intrapartum asphyxia, anoxia, or trauma. Although rates of perinatal mortality are more commonly used in studies, the authors use IPPM as a way to reflect the safety of home birth as the location for intrapartum events.. ...
All infants with severe post-asphyxial HIE had evidence of dysfunction of at least one organ/system in addition to the central nervous system. This conforms with the criteria of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists2 and Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada,1 but not with some published reports of organ/system dysfunction in neonates with asphyxia of variable severity.7,8,11,12 The variability in the reported incidence of MOD may be explained by (a) the selection criteria for studies of MOD-at the mild end of the spectrum are cases of "intrapartum asphyxia" with or without HIE during the neonatal period,7,11,12 whereas at the severe end of the spectrum are known cases of cerebral palsy attributed to intrapartum asphyxia8-and (b) the differences in the definition of MOD with respect to the number of organs included in its definition, the definition of "organ/system" (for example, kidneys, hypocalcaemia), and the definition of dysfunction of each ...
Learn more about Perinatal Asphyxia at West Hills Hospital DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ....
Background: During the past two decades there has been a sustained decline in child mortality; however, neonatal mortality has remained stagnant. Each year approximately 4 million babies are born asphyxiated resulting in 2 million neonatal deaths and intrapartum stillbirths. Almost all neonatal deaths occur in developing countries, where the majority is delivered at homes with negligible antenatal care and poor perinatal services. Objectives: To identify socio-demographic and clinical risk factors associated with birth asphyxia in Matiari District of Sindh Province, Pakistan. Method: A matched case control study was conducted in Matiari District with 246 cases and 492 controls. Newborn deaths with birth asphyxia diagnosed through verbal autopsy accreditation during 2005 and 2006 were taken as cases. Controls were the live births during the same period, matched on area of residence, gender and age. Result: The factors found to be associated with birth asphyxia mortality in Matiari District of Sindh
Acknowledgements. We are grateful to Gary Darmstadt for input on the scope of the study and for reviewing the manuscript, and Anne Tinker (Save the Children Federation, USA) for support. We thank Simon Cousens for assistance in analysing the VR data and the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group based in Child and Adolescent Health at WHO for critical review of the methods. We appreciate the help given by Kate Wilczynska-Ketende with literature searches. We thank Doris Ma Fat, Colin Mathers and Mie Inoue for providing data related to the WHO mortality database. We acknowledge the following for supplying unpublished data sets: Adult Morbidity and Mortality Project, Ministry of Health, United Republic of Tanzania, particularly Philip Setel, Dave Whiting and Yusuf Hemed; Ana Maria Aguilar (BASICS II, Bolivia); Zulfiqar Bhutta (Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan); Fariyal Fikree (Population Council, New York, USA); Professor Henry Perry (Future Generations, Franklin West, Virginia, USA, ...
R. J. Tozer1, N. Aladangady1,2. 1Neonatal Unit, Homerton University Hospital, London; 2Barts and The London Queen Marys School of Medicine, London. Introduction: Severe birth asphyxia is associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcome and withdrawal of intensive care is appropriate in certain situations. We report reactions of the parents of two severely asphyxiated infants to withdrawal of intensive care.. Case 1: A male infant born at 41 weeks gestation by emergency caesarean section because of fetal bradycardia. Uterine rupture was found at operation with the baby in the abdominal cavity. His condition was very poor at birth, APGAR scores 11, 35, 310; cord pH was 6.6. Heart rate improved rapidly with ventilation but he failed to develop spontaneous respiration. He was grossly hypotonic and developed seizures within 2 h, cerebral function monitoring showed a flat trace. Withdrawal was recommended but initially refused by his black, African, Catholic parents on religious grounds. After ...
Aim: To determine the prevalence and independent relationship between hearing loss and risk factors in a representative neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) population. Methods: Automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) hearing screening has been introduced since 1998 in the Dutch NICUs. After a second AABR failure, diagnostic ABR was used to establish diagnosis of hearing loss. Newborns who died before the age of 3 months were excluded. In the present study only the NICU infants who were born with a gestational age ,30 weeks and/or a birth weight ,1000 g between October 1, 1998 and January 1, 2002 were included. Risk factors included in the study were familial hearing loss, in utero infections, craniofacial anomalies, birth weight ,1500g, hyperbilirubinemia, ototoxic medications, cerebral complications, severe birth asphyxia, assisted ventilation ≥5 days and syndromes. Results: A nationwide cohort of 2186 newborns were included. Mean gestational age was 28.5 weeks (SD 1.6) and mean birth ...
Birth asphyxia is a condition in which a baby cant breathe properly after birth. If birth asphyxia is not immediately addressed...
Of the three million neonatal deaths which occurred globally in 2012, 779,000 took place in India. In India, perinatal asphyxia contributes to 20% of neonatal mortality (NMR) and 50% of early neonatal mortality (ENM) - 400 children losing their lives daily - a major public health problem. Asphyxia can result in coma, irregular breathing, absence of neonatal reflexes, dilated pupils, irregular heart rates, and seizures which can lead to brain cell dysfunction, injury, and death if untreated. Most seriously, asphyxia can cause injury to the central nervous system. This injury is termed Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE ...
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Azzopardi et al (1) report the experience of introducing total body cooling as a standard form of therapy for infants with moderate or severe perinatal asphyxia. It is notable that this publication includes only one level 2 neonatal intensive care unit of the 25 units providing data for the TOBY register (Royal Cornwall Hospital, Truro). The Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital (also a level 2 unit) has since joined the TOBY register having participated in the TOBY trial. Part of the success in recruitment to the TOBY trial was due to the trial being rolled out to many more units in the second phase of the trial (2). The Peninsula Neonatal Network level 3 unit at Derriford Hospital in Plymouth participated in this trial as did the two level 2 units in Exeter and Truro. All the units were very well supported by training days set up at the units by the TOBY trial investigators. In the Peninsula Neonatal Network this system of care has continued and total body cooling is provided at the three units that ...
Methods 20 preterm lambs (80-90% GE) were used. Lambs were randomly assigned to receive intravenous WIN55212-2 (100 or 0.01 μg/kg) or not (sham) after hypoxic-ischaemic injury induced by partial cord clamping. A non-injured group was used as control. Carotid blood flow, systemic arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR) and gas exchange were measured at fetal point, at the end of hypoxic-ischaemic injury and during neonatal life. Analysis of variance, p,0.05. ...
Director of the CDC, Dr Tom Frieden said today: There is no longer any doubt that Zika causes microcephaly. The defect causes babies to be born with abnormally small heads and brain damage.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday the time has come to drop the squishy language previously used to describe the Zika virus.
Getting the right treatment for birth asphyxia as soon as possible can help reduce the damaging effects of an interruption to your babys oxygen supply.
Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology. The journal welcomes submissions related to the medical, surgical, pathological, biochemical, and physiological aspects of these subject areas.
Perinatal asphyxia resulting in hypoxia-ischemia (HI)-related brain injury leads to severe, life-long morbidities in thousands of neonates and children born in the U.S. each year (Ferriero, 2004; Nelson and Lynch, 2004; Drobyshevsky et al., 2007; Hill and Fitch, 2012). The physical, emotional, and economic toll taken by these adverse early childhood events is incalculable. Interestingly, clinical studies indicate that male neonate brains are more susceptible to the effects of perinatal asphyxia (Vannucci and Hurn, 2009; Hill and Fitch, 2012) resulting in greater long-term cognitive deficits compared with females with comparable brain injury (Marlow et al., 2005; Tioseco et al., 2006; Hill and Fitch, 2012). In addition, males show increased risk for brain-based developmental disorders including learning disabilities and cerebral palsy compared with females (Donders and Hoffman, 2002; Rutter et al., 2003). The relative resistance of female neonatal brain to adverse consequences of HI suggests that ...
Overview of Birth Defects What is a birth defect? A birth defect is a health problem or physical change, which is present in a baby at the time he/she is born. Birth defects may be very mild, where the baby looks and acts like any other baby, or birth defects may be very severe, where you can immediately tell there is a health problem present. Some of the severe birth defects can be life threatening, where a baby may only live a few months, or may die at a young age (in their teens, for example). Birt...
Scientists are always trying to identify the next threat before it reaches epidemic or pandemic proportions. Both humans and diseases are constantly changing, so its a bit like trying to hit a moving target from a moving car.. "Were trying to predict really, really rare events from not much information, which I think is going to fail," Dr Geoghegan said - and history agrees.. For example, scientists discovered the Zika virus in Uganda way back in 1947, and yet there was an outbreak on the other side of the world, in Brazil, two years ago.. The disease is spread by mosquitoes, and can cause severe birth defects in babies if the mother is bitten while pregnant.. Similarly, the Ebola virus was discovered in 1976 in South Sudan, but it claimed a reported 11,315 lives in west Africa three years ago.. It is highly infectious and spreads through transmission of bodily fluids, causing a gruesome death as the whole body haemorrhages.. Still other diseases emerge totally out of the blue.. One example is ...
Scientists are always trying to identify the next threat before it reaches epidemic or pandemic proportions. Both humans and diseases are constantly changing, so its a bit like trying to hit a moving target from a moving car.. "Were trying to predict really, really rare events from not much information, which I think is going to fail," Dr Geoghegan said - and history agrees.. For example, scientists discovered the Zika virus in Uganda way back in 1947, and yet there was an outbreak on the other side of the world, in Brazil, two years ago.. The disease is spread by mosquitoes, and can cause severe birth defects in babies if the mother is bitten while pregnant.. Similarly, the Ebola virus was discovered in 1976 in South Sudan, but it claimed a reported 11,315 lives in west Africa three years ago.. It is highly infectious and spreads through transmission of bodily fluids, causing a gruesome death as the whole body haemorrhages.. Still other diseases emerge totally out of the blue.. One example is ...
The Zika virus that has spread to more than 50 countries is no longer considered an international public health emergency, the World Health Organization declared Friday. But the change in designation does not represent a downgrading of Zikas importance, officials said. The WHO labeled Zika an international emergency in February primarily to understand what was causing the "extraordinary clustering" of microcephaly cases in Brazil, the epicenter of the outbreak, said David Heymann, who chairs the expert panel that made the recommendation. When the emergency was declared, he said, researchers had not yet proven that the mosquito-borne virus causes the severe birth defect characterized by an abnormally small head and underdeveloped brain. Studies have since established the link between Zika and microcephaly. Now, the best way to tackle the virus and its serious complications is for the WHO to manage "this significant and enduring public health challenge" within the organization, Heymann said. That ...
Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); bizarre, aggressive, or violent behavior; bowel pain; chest pain or pounding in the chest; dark urine; depression; difficult or painful swallowing; difficulty moving; excessive thirst or urination; fainting; fast heartbeat; fever; fractured or weak bones; hearing problems or ringing in the ears; increased pressure in the brain (pressure in the eye; nausea; vision changes; vomiting); joint or back pain; leg swelling; muscle weakness with or without pain; nausea; new or worsening heartburn; rectal bleeding; red patches or bruises on the legs; shortness of breath; seizures; severe birth defects; severe diarrhea; severe headache; skin infection; slurred speech; stomach pain or tenderness; stroke; stunted growth in children; sun sensitivity; swelling of the pancreas (fever; increased heartbeat; nausea; stomach tenderness; vomiting); swollen glands; thoughts of suicide; ...
In particular, young women who could become pregnant, pregnant women and couples considering pregnancy need to be cautious because Zika virus can cause severe birth defects. Couples planning pregnancy when either partner has been exposed to Zika virus should speak with a health care provider about a safe time to try to get pregnant. A health care provider can also provide information on the most effective contraceptive methods. Pregnant women are urged to avoid travel to areas with known Zika transmission if at all possible. If travel is necessary, it is extremely important to take steps to prevent mosquito bites ...
The last time I went to my rheumatologist was back in September and he told me that he wanted to put me on a new (to me) medicine because my RA was becoming much more aggressive and he wanted to try and stop the joint destruction. I was so miserable and in so much pain that at that point I was ready to try anything (except the TNF/biologic drugs), then he told me that I would have to prevent pregnancy. That I would have to make sure that there was no way that I would become pregnant while I was on it. I heard things like: "It is a Teratogen. Fetal mortality. Severe birth defects. End any accidental pregnancy. Long processes & more drugs to remove it from your system. Monthly blood tests. Liver tests." Then he said, "But, youre a woman in your 40s. Women in their 40s arent usually looking to get pregnant ...
GENEVA The World Health Organization (WHO) called on Wednesday for $56 million to combat the Zika virus, a disease that has been linked to severe birth defects in Brazil and has spread to 39 countries. The funds sought would be used until June to fast-track vaccines, carry out diagnostics and research into how the mosquito-borne virus spreads, as well as virus control, the WHO said.
Zika infection during pregnancy has been linked to severe birth defects. If you are pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant, it is important to be aware of the risks associated with the virus.
B-Complex 100 may help provide energy production and stress relief. It is a balanced complete formula containing 8 essential vitamins that make up the B complex. The timed release formula allows the gradual release of the vitamins over 6 to 8 hours allowing the body to digest the vitamins more effectively B vitamins play a very important role in mood, cardiovascular health, cancer prevention and immunity. Folic Acid and other B vitamins seem even more of a wonder drug than anyone suspected. Already known to prevent severe birth defects and heart attacks, they may also ward off broken bones from osteoporosis, two major studies suggest. B vitamins are known to reduce levels of homocysteine, an amino acid already linked, at high levels, to an increased risk of heart attacks, strokes and Alzheimers disease.
Cloned-animal meat will NOT be labelled. Ignoring the scientific evidence that cloning poses serious risks to animal welfare, including severe birth defects, painful disease, and premature death, the FDA is close to permitting cloned foods onto our grocer
Soldiers will be making house-to-house visits to spread awareness of the mosquito-borne virus. Brazil is deploying more than 200,000 soldiers to battle the Zika virus, which is believed to cause severe birth defects, the health ministry announced Wednesday. The troops will make house-to-house visits to spread awareness of the mosquito-borne virus, handing out leaflets…
Doctors help you with trusted information about Pimples in Acne: Dr. Charlap on toxic exposure maternal acne medications: A couple of the most well-known fetal reactions to antibiotics: permanent staining of the teeth, with use of tetracyclines, and severe birth defects associated with isotretinoin.
When I felt a contraction, I was told to push for 10 seconds, so I did... & again, & again... Then the next contraction, as I was pushing the dr & nurse could see my babys head coming. I was getting excited & hoped I wouldnt be pushing for long. But the next contraction felt different... it felt weaker, but I pushed anyway, & after that set the contraction didnt stop, it kind of lingered on, although not as strong as a normal one. It just felt weird. My nurse looked confused as she watched the monitor. The dr & nurse could no longer see the babys head. So the next (still kind of strange feeling) contraction came,and the nurse seemed confused if it was a contraction or not, but it seemed like it was... they told me to push harder, but the head was gone, so the dr had me roll over to lay on my right side, then my left side... & afterwards the dr felt inside & could not feel the babys head at all. She kept feeling around & the nurse said, What do you feel? The dr said, .....Its an ...
2.0 - January 15, 2014 - More controls. More background pattern options. Added a slew of google font faces you can choose in the control panel. Separate body and header font chooser. Choose to have the image panels scroll with the page for better image containment.. 1.7 - December 30, 2013 - fixed layout tool column issue (.first).. 1.6 - December 19, 2013 - Added custom 404 and login pages. 1.5.2 - June 19, 2013 - Reduced size of included images for panels. 1.5.1 - June 6, 2013 - Added ability and custom block to easily build a one page site. Updated icon, thumbnail. Installs new attribute.. 1.0 - May 28, 2013 - Initial code. ...
1 x A4 sheet. Can be die cut to create a shimmery background pattern i.e. die cut lots of flowers/snowflakes then stick onto the background of a card, scrapbook page, vase or glassware to create an effective background of shimmery die cut shapes.. The sparkly sheet can also be stuck onto the material you want to die cut first. This will create a shimmer effect over the initial choice of card, leather, balsa wood, decorative paper, etc.. Stamping : stamp and colour the image. Tim to size. Then cover with the sparkly sheet to give an overall shimmer.. ...
Increasing levels of YLLs might reflect outcomes from conditions that required high levels of care but for which effective treatments remain elusive, potentially lifting costs to health systems. The Global Burden of Disease 2016 Study provided an assessment of cause-specific mortality for 264 causes in 195 locations from 1980 to 2016.. Deaths from noncommunicable diseases represented 72.3% of all deaths in 2016, with 19.3% of deaths in that year occurring from CMNN diseases.. In 2016, the three leading global causes of death in children under five were lower respiratory infections, neonatal preterm birth complications and neonatal encephalopathy because of birth asphyxia and trauma.. Between 1990 and 2016, a shift toward deaths at older ages occurred, with a 178% increase in deaths in ages 90 and 94 years and a 210% increase in deaths older than age 95 years.. The 10 leading causes by rates of age-standardized YLL declined from 2006 to 2016; the median annualized rate of change for all other ...
In low-income countries, nearly 4 in every 10 deaths are among children under 15 years, and only 2 in every 10 deaths are among people aged 70 years and older. People predominantly die of infectious diseases: lower respiratory infections, HIV/AIDS, diarrhoeal diseases, malaria and tuberculosis collectively account for almost one third of all deaths in these countries. Complications of childbirth due to prematurity, and birth asphyxia and birth trauma are among the leading causes of death, claiming the lives of many newborns and infants ...
Fetal life occurs in a relatively hypoxic environment. During normal pregnancy, several compensatory mechanisms secure fetal oxygenation and wellbeing. In complicated pregnancies, however, intrauterine hypoxia predisposes the fetus to growth restriction, stillbirth, neurodevelopmental sequelae such as cognitive dysfunction and cerebral palsy (CP), and adverse long-term health impacts. Impairment of respiratory gas exchange-during either pregnancy or delivery-leads to tissue hypoxia, and, if prolonged, to metabolic acidosis and asphyxia. Worldwide, such asphyxia, diagnosed at birth, annually accounts for a million neonatal deaths. Furthermore, neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) originating from perinatal asphyxia may lead to a variety of neurodevelopmental impairments. Therapeutic neuroprotective interventions such as hypothermia have significantly improved the prognosis of severe neonatal encephalopathy. Increased risk for intrauterine fetal hypoxia and perinatal asphyxia occur in ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Reduction in cerebral blood flow volume in infants complicated with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy resulting in cerebral palsy. AU - Fukuda, Sumio. AU - Mizuno, Keisuke. AU - Kawai, Satomi. AU - Kakita, Hiroki. AU - Goto, Tatenobu. AU - Hussein, Mohamed Hamed. AU - Daoud, Ghada A.. AU - Ito, Tetsuya. AU - Kato, Ineko. AU - Suzuki, Satoshi. AU - Togari, Hajime. PY - 2008/4/1. Y1 - 2008/4/1. N2 - Hypoxic ischemic brain can result in cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and learning disabilities in surviving children. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the cerebral blood flow volume in infants complicated with brain damage after the birth. Nine term infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and 41 normal term infants were studied. Four infants with HIE suffered from CP or mental retardation, and the other five infants exhibited normal neurodevelopment. The mean blood flow velocity and diameter of the internal carotid artery and the vertebral artery were measured for 28 ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Servo controlled versus manual cooling methods in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. AU - Buchiboyina, Ashok. AU - Ma, Eric. AU - Yip, Andrew. AU - Wagh, Deepika. AU - Tan, Jason. AU - McMichael, Judy. AU - Bulsara, Max K.. AU - Rao, Shripada. PY - 2017/9/1. Y1 - 2017/9/1. N2 - Background Therapeutic hypothermia is known to improve outcomes in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). There are no studies that have compared servo controlled cooling (SCC) versus manually controlled cooling (MCC) methods in HIE. Aim To compare the outcomes of SCC versus MCC in neonates with HIE. Methods and outcome measures Between Jan 2008 and May 2011, MCC with cool-gel packs was used to achieve rectal temperatures of 33.5 to 34.5 °C in our units. Subsequently, we changed to SCC to achieve rectal temperatures of 33 to 34 °C. 105 neonates received SCC whereas 95 received MCC. Retrospective study with multivariate analysis was conducted comparing thermoregulation (primary ...
To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [| 46.8 mg/dL (2.6 mmol/L)] and hyperglycaemia [| 150 mg/dL (8.3 mmol/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy,
Purpose : We demonstrate use of bedside eye imaging to detect severity of retinal abnormalities in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). In prior neurodevelopmental research retinal findings on OCT were linked to brain injury and poor outcomes in preterm infants. We hypothesize that retinal injury will reflect patterns and severity of brain injury due to HIE. Methods : We used a hand-held, bedside, non-contact spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) imaging system (Envisu 2300, Bioptigen, North Carolina) under a protocol approved by Duke Institutional Review Board and after obtaining consent from a parent/guardian. All infants were imaged without pharmacologic dilation. Eligible preterm and term infants with HIE were imaged within 24 hours of hypothermia initiation (cooling), 72 hours after birth (re-warming), 5 days (time of magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI)) and weekly thereafter until discharged depending on the systemic stability of the infant. We compared retinal ...
Learn more about Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy at Grand Strand Medical Center DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Learn more about Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy at Colleton Medical Center DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Learn more about Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy at Medical City Dallas DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Ann Marie Looney is a HRB funded PhD student working within the Neonatal Brain Research Group, Cork University Maternity Hospital. She graduated with a BSc (Hons) Neuroscience, University College Cork in 2009 and was awarded her Master of Science in 2012 for a joint project between the Department of Paediatric and Child Health and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology through the Anu Research Centre, Cork University Maternity Hospital. Focusing on Neonatal Asphyxia and Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy, this project examined the feasibility of using placental biopsies to obtain a potential biomarker for the condition.. Ann Marie is currently working in the area of detection and validation of potential cord blood Biomarkers for Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy, through the BiHIvE 2 project. Her PhD has a specific focus on the miRNA profile of cord blood from the asphyxiated neonate ...
Compressive asphyxia (also called chest compression) is mechanically limiting expansion of the lungs by compressing the torso, hence interfering with breathing. Compressive asphyxia occurs when the chest or abdomen is compressed posteriorly.[7] "Traumatic asphyxia" or "crush asphyxia" usually refers to compressive asphyxia resulting from being crushed or pinned under a large weight or force. An example of traumatic asphyxia includes cases where an individual has been using a car-jack to repair a car from below, and is crushed under the weight of the vehicle.[5] Pythons, anacondas, and other constrictor snakes kill through compressive asphyxia. In cases of co-sleeping ("overlay"), the weight of an adult or large child may compress an infants chest, preventing proper expansion of the chest. Risk factors include large or obese adults, parental fatigue or impairment (sedation by drugs or alcohol) of the co-sleeping adult and a small shared sleeping space (for example, both adult and infant sharing ...
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Brain injury in premature infants, especially periventricular leukomalacia, is an important cause of neurological disabilities. Inflammation contributes to the development of perinatal brain injury, but the essential mediators leading to brain injury in early life remain largely unknown. Neonates have reduced capacity for mounting conventional αβT-cell responses. However γδT-cells are already functionally competent during early development and are important in early life immunity. We investigated the potential contribution of γδT-cells to preterm brain injury by using postmortem brains from human preterm infants with periventricular leukomalacia and two animal models of preterm brain injury-the hypoxic-ischemic mouse model and a fetal sheep asphyxia model ...
A case report is given on a child with severe subcutaneous fat necrosis following perinatal asphyxia. After the administration of 2×2.5 mgm of vitamin D at the age of two weeks the child developed...
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... On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible diseases from either several symptoms or a full patient history. A similarity measure between symptoms and diseases is provided.
Every year, 3 million babies die on the day of birth. The vast majority of these deaths occur in the poorest countries. If their mothers had received better care during birth, most babies would have survived.. At Mnazi Mmoja Hospital, an East African referral hospital, the PartoMa study shows that use of locally developed guidelines helps birth attendants to deliver better quality of care, which has led to improved survival at birth.. At the hospital studied, resources are scarce. Each birth attendant assists four to six birthing women simultaneously, and many have less than 1 year of professional experience. International guidelines are available, but they are often unachievable and seldom applied.. The PartoMa guidelines were developed in close collaboration with the birth attendants and approved by seven international experts. The result is an 8-page pocket booklet providing locally achievable and simple decision support for care during birth.. Use of the PartoMa guidelines began in February ...
TY - CHAP. T1 - Neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral palsy. AU - Costantine, Maged. AU - DAlton, Mary E.. AU - Hankins, Gary. PY - 2012/1/4. Y1 - 2012/1/4. N2 - The incidence of cerebral palsy is 1-2 per 1000 births and has remained unchanged over the last 40 years. The occurrence of cerebral palsy is independent of either geographic or economic boundaries. It has also been remarkably resistant to eradication by the introduction of technology such as electronic fetal heart rate monitoring or the increase in cesarean delivery rates. Indeed, the great hope of electronic fetal heart rate monitoring was that intrapartum asphyxia would be promptly identified, delivery rapidly achieved, and neurologic injury of the infant averted. This would in fact parallel the thought processes advanced by the orthopedic surgeon Little, over a century ago, who taught that virtually all cerebral palsy was caused by intrapartum events, whether deprivation of oxygen, trauma, or the combination of the two. ...
Around one in every 1,000 newborn babies in the UK dies or suffers severe brain damage, often with devastating consequences, due to birth asphyxia - thats 700 babies every year.3 The problem also causes an estimated 250 stillbirths.4. Birth asphyxia is in fact a major cause of death and illness in babies and children worldwide. The World Health Organisation estimates it is the fifth largest cause of death in children under five.5. Birth asphyxia can result from a variety of things during childbirth, including problems with the placenta or umbilical cord. Immediately after birth, it can be caused by an obstruction in the airways.. "If a baby develops birth asphyxia during childbirth, then his or her life is in immediate danger," explains Dr Ma. "Sadly, many babies are stillborn or die soon after birth. Babies who survive can develop life-long disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, learning disabilities, deafness and epilepsy, which can severely affect quality of life for these babies and their ...
Autism spectrum disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social deficits (social communication and social interaction) and restricted repetitive patterns of behavior, interests and activities. The cause and development of autism spectrum disorder is not completely understood by the medical community.
Excitotoxic mechanisms in the neuron and astrocyte. In the neuron, glutamate is released from the pre-synaptic terminal into the synaptic cleft. The glutamate
Incidence of Birth Asphyxia as Seen in Central Hospital and GN Childrens Clinic both in Warri Niger Delta of Nigeria: An Eight Year Retrospective Review
Få Birth Asphyxia and the Brain af Steven M Donn som bog på engelsk - 9780879934996 - Bøger rummer alle sider af livet. Læs Lyt Lev blandt millioner af bøger på Saxo.com.
The authors had previously found flaws in resuscitation after severe neonatal asphyxia in cases selected on the grounds of suspected malpractice and financial compensation claims. The aim of the present study was to evaluate neonatal resuscitation in
TY - JOUR. T1 - Incidence and prediction of outcome in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in Japan. AU - Hayakawa, Masahiro. AU - Ito, Yushi. AU - Saito, Shigeru. AU - Mitsuda, Nobuaki. AU - Hosono, Sigeharu. AU - Yoda, Hitoshi. AU - Cho, Kazutoshi. AU - Otsuki, Katsufumi. AU - Ibara, Satoshi. AU - Terui, Katsuo. AU - Masumoto, Kouji. AU - Murakoshi, Takeshi. AU - Nakai, Akihito. AU - Tanaka, Mamoru. AU - Nakamura, Tomohiko. PY - 2014. Y1 - 2014. N2 - Background Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is one of the most critical pathologic conditions in neonatal medicine due to the potential for neurological deficits in later life. We investigated the incidence of term infants with moderate or severe HIE in Japan and identified prognostic risk factors for poor outcome in HIE. Methods Data on 227 infants diagnosed with moderate or severe HIE and born between January and December 2008 were collected via nationwide surveys from 263 responding hospitals. Using logistic regression, we examined the ...
Here we present the results of our study and give the review of the literature data concerning the role of free radicals, selenium and zinc ions in childrens epilepsy and febrile seizures. Newborns and infants are at the high risk of oxidative stress and are very susceptible to imbalance between antioxidants and free radical generation system. During the phase of ischaemia and reperfusion of perinatal asphyxia, the activity of membrane Na+/K+-ATP-ase is impaired. This leads to persistent membrane depolarisation and glutamate (major excitotoxic agent) release. In 25% cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HJE) cerebral palsy is diagnosed. In this condition the epilepsy coexists with cerebral palsy in 15% to 40% of cases. We have shown that the blood selenium concentration is decreased in the group of children with epilepsy treated with carbamazepine in comparison to the control group treated with valproate. This results in impairment of the oxidants and antioxidants balance. This results are ...
BACKGROUND: As the global under-five mortality rate declines, an increasing percentage is attributable to early neonatal mortality. A quarter of early neonatal deaths are due to perinatal asphyxia. However, neonatal resuscitation (NR) simulation training in low-resource settings, where the majority of neonatal deaths occur, has achieved variable success. In Bihar, India, the poorest region in South Asia, there is tremendous need for a new approach to reducing neonatal morality. METHODS: This analysis aims to assess the impact of a novel in-situ simulation training program, developed by PRONTO International and implemented in collaboration with CARE India, on NR skills of nurses in Bihar ...
Compressive asphyxia (also called chest compression) is the mechanical limitation of the expansion of the lungs by compressing the torso, hence interfering with breathing. Compressive asphyxia occurs when the chest or abdomen is compressed posteriorly.[4] In accidents, the term traumatic asphyxia or crush asphyxia is usually used to describe compressive asphyxia resulting from being crushed or pinned under a large weight or force. An example of traumatic asphyxia includes cases in which an individual has been using a car-jack to repair a car from below, only to be crushed under the weight of the vehicle.[3] Pythons, anacondas, and other constrictor snakes kill through compressive asphyxia.. In fatal crowd disasters, contrary to popular belief, it is not the blunt trauma from trampling that causes the large part of the deaths, but rather the compressive asphyxia from being crushed against the crowd. In confined spaces, people push and lean against each other; evidence from bent steel railings in ...
Title:Biochemical Markers for Brain Injury Monitoring in Children with or without Congenital Heart Diseases. VOLUME: 14 ISSUE: 1. Author(s):Raul Abella, Alessandro Varrica, Angela Satriano, Guido Tettamanti, Gabriele Pelissero, Antonio D.W. Gavilanes, Luc J. Zimmermann, Hans J. Vles, Maria C. Strozzi, Francesca R. Pluchinotta and Diego Gazzolo. Affiliation:Dept. of Maternal Fetal and Neonatal Medicine C. Arrigo Childrens Hospital Spalto Marengo 46, I-15100 Alessandria, Italy.. Keywords:Activin A, adrenomedullin, biomarkers, brain damage, cardiac disease, congenital disease, CPB, S100B.. Abstract:Perinatal asphyxia (PA) still constitutes a common complication involving a large number of infants with or without congenital heart diseases (CHD). PA affects 0.2-0.6% of full-term neonates, 20% of which suffer mortal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, and among survivors 25% exhibit permanent consequences at neuropsychological level. Each year, about one third of 1000 live births underwent to surgical ...
Papers pp 1549,1544. Neonatal encephalopathy is a significant problem. The United States collaborative perinatal project studied 39 000 infants born with birth weights greater than 2500 g and found that 70% of the infants who showed early neonatal depression and encephalopathy died or were disabled.1 For many years it was accepted that fetal asphyxia during labour was the major cause of both neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral palsy. However, the evidence for this is surprisingly thin. Diagnosis of cerebral hypoxia-ischaemia during labour is difficult and is usually inferred from non-specific signs, such as low Apgar scores or seizures observed after delivery. More precise assessment using specialist technologies like magnetic resonance is possible but not widely available,2 and a working diagnosis of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy may sometimes be applied with less than irrefutable proof of its presence. Nevertheless, several large studies have been unable to show significant perinatal ...
A pilot case-control study was done to collect data on whether susceptibility to newborn encephalopathy and neonatal seizures is influenced by the degree of maternal-fetal sharing of HLA antigens. Cases included 13 infants with moderate or severe newborn encephalopathy and seven infants with neonatal seizures but no other signs of encephalopathy. Controls were neurologically normal infants matched to cases by date of birth, sex, race, and payment status. Infants and their mothers were typed for HLA-A, -B, -DR, and -DQ antigens. The observed frequency of sharing of maternal antigens was greater than expected (ie, 0.5) for cases compared to controls at the HLA-B, -DR, and -DQ loci but not for HLA-A. The risk of neurologic problems in the neonatal period was increased 6.3 times when there was more than one match at the HLA-DR or -DQ locus. Placental abnormalities were noted at delivery only among cases, and the mean placental weight in cases was 598 g versus 695 g in controls. Further studies with sample
Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a limitation of oxygen and blood flow around the time of birth. Learn more about HIEs causes, treatments and more.
Screening for hearing is now mandatory in many states in the United States; in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, a full-scale hearing test is preferable because of an increased incidence o... more
Selective neuronal necrosis is the most common pattern of injury observed in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and is characterized by neuronal necrosis selective to areas with higher energy demands. Th... more
Introduction Asphyxia in modern English is another term for suffocation, the failure of respiratory gas exchange. In the fetus, this suffocation occurs because of a failure of gas exchange between the fetal blood in the placenta and the maternal uterine blood perfusing the placenta. The effect of asphyxia is a lowering of tissue oxygen…
Among full-term newborns with moderate or severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy -- damage to cells in the central nervous system from inadequate oxygen -- receiving deeper or longer duration cooling did not reduce risk of neonatal intensive care unit death, compared to usual care, according to a study in the Dec. 24/31 issue of JAMA.
Birth Defects What is a birth defect? A "birth defect" is a health problem or physical change, which is present in a baby at the time he/she is born. Birth defects may be very mild, where the baby looks and acts like any other baby, or birth defects may be very severe, where you can immediately tell there is a health problem present. Some of the severe birth defects can be life threatening, where a baby may only live a few months, or may die at a young age (in their teens, for example). Birth defects ar ...
If left untreated or not monitored correctly, preeclampsia can cause very serious risks for the mother and severe birth injury for the baby.
Many philosophers have grappled with the issue of whether or not abortion and infanticide carry the same moral implications, discussing what constitutes the "right to life." Joseph Fletcher, founder of "situational ethics" and a euthanasia proponent, proposed that infanticide be permitted in cases of severe birth defects. He considered infanticide, in certain cases, a logical extension of abortion.. Peter Singer, an Australian humanist and philosopher, holds that the right to physical integrity is grounded in a beings ability to suffer, and the right to life is grounded in-among other things-the ability to plan and anticipate ones future. Since the unborn, infants, and severely disabled people lack the latter (but not the former) ability, he states that abortion, painless infanticide, and euthanasia can be justified in certain special circumstances, for instance a severely disabled infant whose life would cause suffering both to himself and to his parents.. Michael Tooley, author of the ...
Legal action against GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), makers of the anti-nausea drug Zofran continues to build, as more women allege their use of the drug during pregnancy resulted in their babies being born with severe birth defects. Further research is needed to prove a direct link between Zofran use and birth defects, but many women believe the […]. ...
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Zika infections in pregnant women have been shown to cause microcephaly-a severe birth defect in which the head and brain are undersized-as well as other brain abnormalities. The connection between Zika and microcephaly first came to light last fall in Brazil, which has since confirmed more than 1,800 cases of microcephaly. In adults, Zika infections have also been linked to a rare neurological syndrome known as Guillain-Barre, as well as other neurological disorders.. Steves Take: Zikas back in the news. Thats right. Its not going away, which our lawmakers seem to think it will if they just ignore it long enough. More on Congress later.. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports over 16,000 cases of the virus in the United States and its territories as of August 31, 2016. While the vast majority of the reported cases are associated with travel to areas outside the United States, 56 people have recently acquired the virus from mosquitoes in southern Florida.. As if thats ...
It is important to remain aware of the symptoms of Zika and practice all precautions to guard against infection. Zika symptoms are usually mild and include fever, rash and conjunctivitis (red eyes), and joint pain, lasting several days to a week. Zika can also be transmitted sexually. While severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon and death is rare, the CDC has linked Zika to severe birth defects and there is currently no vaccine to prevent or medicine to treat Zika Virus Infection.. ...
Neural tube defects affect about 4000 pregnancies each year and are thus among the most common of severe birth defects. Prenatal diagnosis can now detect about 70% of neural tube defects but the tests produce many false positives, so the question is under what circumstances should they be recommended.
Zika virus - which may cause severe birth defects - could be a bigger threat to global health than the Ebola epidemic that killed more than 11,000 people in
Helpful, trusted answers from doctors: Dr. Livingston on maternal serum screening: Most women elect to have an msafp since it screens for neural tube defects, which can be very severe birth defects. The test is only done in the second trimester of pregnancy. Some women elect not to have the test.
There are now 2,441 <"http://www.yourlawyer.com/topics/overview/Accutane-Side-Effects-Inflammatory-Bowel-Disease-Colitis-Crohns-Disease-Lawyer-Lawsuit-Attorney">Accutane inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) lawsuits pending in a New Jersey mass tort litigation that began five years ago. Over the fall, more than 800 lawsuits were filed in the Accutane litigation, and it is expected that more cases will be filed in the future.. Approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) in 1982, Accutane has been the subject of controversy for years. It first garnered attention in the late eighties for causing severe birth defects. It has also been known to cause psychiatric problems, and has been linked to hundreds of cases of suicide in the United States. Accutane has also been associated with problems of the liver, kidneys, central nervous system, and pancreas, as well as the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and auto-immune systems.. In 2009, Roche decided to stop marketing Accutane for economic reasons. In ...
Miraculous Madeline needs your help today! Maddies Special Equipment Wishes - Hi, I am Maddie I didnt have a good start to life. Born on 12th May 2013, I suffered a brain injury during birth due to lack of oxygen, the technical term for my condition is Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy or HIE. When I was born I was very poorly and wasnt expected to live past a few days ....
Seizures are a sign of brain dysfunction and have a variety of causes including hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), hyponatremia (low sodium), hypocalcemia (low calcium), infections, trauma, and malformations of the structures of the brain. Seizures originate with abnormal hyper-synchronous electrical discharges from the cortical neuronal network in the brain. These electrical discharges lead to an interruption in the usual brain generated electrical signals that result in an abrupt change in a persons behavior. Seizures that are due to perinatal asphyxia/hypoxia do not usually begin right at birth but, often are manifest within 24 to 48 hours following the birth. Seizures in newborns are often not full-blown and the symptoms can be very subtle. These seizures in newborns tend to be generalized but, may be partially complex or focal in distribution.. Classifications of Seizures Classifications of seizures are usually based on the clinical symptomatology and on electro-encephalogram (EEG) reports. ...
Neonatal Resuscitation (NRP) - Continuing Education at The Michener Institute. Course for healthcare workers to resuscitate newborn babies.
Neonatal Resuscitation Baby has been discontinued as of December 31, 2014. Some parts and accessories will be available through December 31, 2019 ...
Freyrs regulatory services in India for Neonatal Resuscitation Table span across registration, notification and classification as per CDSCO regulations to meet market entry requirements and fast track approvals for Covid-19 emergencies.
Heres a brief summary of the 2010 Guidelines from Circulation for Neonatal Resuscitation, Part 15 with an assist from Amal Mattus EMCast (love that ...
NIH Funding Opportunities and Notices in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts: Studies in Neonatal Resuscitation (R03) PAR-11-223. NICHD
Dr Tamara Keith, a paediatrician in London, gives an expert overview of the process of neonatal resuscitation. For more medical revision podcasts chec...
Asphyxia of newborns is the inability of a child with signs of live birth to breathe immediately after birth. Gas exchange in the lungs does not occur. In simple terms, asphyxia of newborns is suffocation. Most of these newborns are accompanied by this condition. Read the rest of this entry » ...
a condition in which insufficient or no oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged on a ventilatory basis; caused by choking or drowning or electric shock or poison gas. ...
After five years of lackluster profits, Harris Corp. is ready to shine, according to Maria Sbrilli, a stock analyst for Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. Inc., a New York brokerage.Extensive
This article has not been published so far. If you are a doctor and want to share your article here we publish it under your name. We appreciate your contribution to make PediaCalls! progress more. Send your article to [email protected] Please dont hesitate to contact us.. ...
"RESPIRATORY FAILURE INCLUDING SO-CALLED ASPHYXIA NEONATORUM". The Lancet. Retrieved 2012-09-11. Widdowson, EM (1995). "Robert ... Respiratory Failure Including So-called Asphyxia Neonatorum 1936 Robert Alexander McCance, Medical problems in mineral ...
1966). "On the influence of abnormal parturition, difficult labours, premature birth, and asphyxia neonatorum, on the mental ... The fetal sheep asphyxia model also suggests a six-hour window post asphyxia in which hypothermia will have greatest benefit. ... "Craniocerebral hypothermia in the prevention and combined therapy of cerebral pathology in infants with asphyxia neonatorum". ... The effects of fetal asphyxia on the developing brain in sheep are dependent on gestational age with near term fetuses showing ...
... meningitis Asherman's syndrome Ashman phenomenon Aspartylglycosaminuria Aspergillosis Asperger syndrome Asphyxia neonatorum ...
While HIE is associated in most cases with oxygen deprivation in the neonate due to birth asphyxia, it can occur in all age ... Orozco-Gutierrez A, Rojas-Cerda L, Estrada RM, Gil-Rosales C (December 2010). "Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of asphyxia ... which have a role in reperfusion injury after asphyxia. Research by Ola Didrik Saugstad and others led to new international ...
Asphyxia neonatorum, School of Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town. ... Perinatal asphyxia, neonatal asphyxia or birth asphyxia is the medical condition resulting from deprivation of oxygen to a ... Perinatal asphyxia happens in 2 to 10 per 1000 newborns that are born at term, and more for those that are born prematurely. ... Extreme degrees of asphyxia can cause cardiac arrest and death. If resuscitation is successful, the infant is usually ...
... N. Monitoring the Sick Neonate. In Manual of Neonatal Care .1st edition.Ed. Mondkar and Pejaver,Prism Books.2004 ... New edition.Ed: S.Rekha ( 2009). Karthik Nagesh N. "Perinatal Asphyxia in High Risk Newborn" editors .Nair and Jain. Jaypee ... Karthik Nagesh N.Ventilatory Therapy in the Neonate-Current Concepts and newer modalities. Perinatology,1999. First published ... Bros.2008 Sameera.P.,Karthik Nagesh N .Pharmacokinetics in the Neonate. Jl Neonatology 2007; Jan-Mar. Singhi AK, Krishna Kumar ...
While HIE is associated in most cases with oxygen deprivation in the neonate due to birth asphyxia, it can occur in all age ... which have a role in reperfusion injury after asphyxia.[26] Research by Ola Didrik Saugstad and others led to new international ... "Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of asphyxia in two newborn infants". Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine. 40 (4): 218-20. PMID ...
768) Intrauterine hypoxia and birth asphyxia (768.3) Fetal distress, during labor, in infant (768.5) Birth asphyxia, severe ( ... Sclerema neonatorum (778.2) Cold injury syndrome of newborn (778.3) Other hypothermia of newborn (778.4) Other disturbances of ... 768.9) Birth asphyxia, unspec. (769) Respiratory distress syndrome (770) Other respiratory conditions of fetus and newborn ( ... Tetanus neonatorum (771.4) Omphalitis of the newborn (771.5) Neonatal infective mastitis (771.6) Neonatal conjunctivitis and ...
Neonate. 82 (3): 197-206. doi:10.1159/000063613. PMID 12373071. Solås, AB; Kutzsche, S; Vinje, M; Saugstad, OD (2001). " ... with Ola Didrik Saugstad in research on secondary brain injury in newborn infants as a result of perinatal asphyxia and ... Neonate. 76 (3): 153-167. doi:10.1159/000014155. PMID 10460953. Meberg, A; Kutzsche, S; Schøyen, R (1987). "Konjunktivitt i ... He has published papers in Pediatrics, Pediatric Research, Biology of the Neonate, Critical Care Medicine, Pediatric Critical ...
... is a transient or temporary condition of decreased blood sugar or hypoglycemia in a neonate. Temporary ... Those infants that have an increased risk of developing hypoglycemia shortly after birth are: preterm asphyxia cold stress ...
MRI has proven valuable for defining brain injury in the neonate, but animal models are still needed to identify causative ... Recent clinical trials show that therapeutic intervention by brain cooling beginning up to 6 hours after perinatal asphyxia ... Spontaneous aortic arch thrombosis in a neonate. Heart, 81, 560 Sandberg, D. I., Lamberti-Pasculli, M., Drake, J.M., Humphreys ...
Brouillette, R.T.; Marzocchi, M. (1994). "Diaphragm pacing: clinical and experimental results". Biology of the Neonate. 65 (3-4 ... Hufeland, C.W. (1783). Usum uis electriciae in asphyxia experimentis illustratum. Dissertatio inauguralis medica sistens. ... who in 1783 proposed that such a technique could be applied as a treatment for asphyxia. French neurologist Duchenne de ...
Graves ED, Redmond CR, Arensman RM (March 1988). "Persistent pulmonary hypertension in the neonate". Chest. 93 (3): 638-41. doi ... developing countries where the frequency and mortality of PPHN is likely to be much higher due to higher incidence of asphyxia ...
Ophthalmia neonatorum due to gonococci (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) typically manifests in the first five days post birth and is ... Corneal involvement (rare) may occur in herpes simplex ophthalmia neonatorum.. Time of onset[edit]. Chemical causes: Right ... Neonatal conjunctivitis, also known as ophthalmia neonatorum, is a form of conjunctivitis and a type of neonatal infection ... Many different bacteria and viruses can cause conjunctivitis in the neonate. The two most common causes are N. gonorrheae and ...
The exact cause is unclear.[1] Risk factors include congenital heart disease, birth asphyxia, exchange transfusion, and ... Sonographic and radiographic imaging features of the neonate with necrotizing enterocolitis: correlating findings with outcomes ... Preterm birth, congenital heart disease, birth asphyxia, exchange transfusion, prolonged rupture of membranes[1]. ...
If the injury occurs at age early enough to affect development (e.g. as a neonate or infant), it often leaves the patient with ...
Sclerema neonatorum. Nervous system. *Perinatal asphyxia. *Periventricular leukomalacia. Musculoskeletal. *Gray baby syndrome ...
Sclerema neonatorum. Nervous system. *Perinatal asphyxia. *Periventricular leukomalacia. Musculoskeletal. *Gray baby syndrome ...
"Rational use of phototherapy in the treatment of physiologic jaundice neonatorum" (PDF). Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences ...
Sclerema neonatorum. Nervous system. *Perinatal asphyxia. *Periventricular leukomalacia. Musculoskeletal. *Gray baby syndrome ...
After delivery bilirubin is no longer cleared (via the placenta) from the neonate's blood and the symptoms of jaundice ( ... Like other forms of severe neonatal jaundice, there is the possibility of the neonate developing acute or chronic kernicterus, ...
Sclerema neonatorum. Nervous system. *Perinatal asphyxia. *Periventricular leukomalacia. Musculoskeletal. *Gray baby syndrome ...
India has 3-tier system based on weight and gestational age of neonate. Neonates weighing more than 1800 grams or having ... Besides prematurity and extreme low birth-weight, common diseases cared for in a NICU include perinatal asphyxia, major birth ... An incubator (or isolette) is an apparatus used to maintain environmental conditions suitable for a neonate (newborn baby). It ... became the first major publication to deal with the care of the neonate. Another factor that contributed to the development of ...
The perinatal brain injury occurring as a result of birth asphyxia, manifesting within 48 hours of birth, is a form of hypoxic ... Oxygen deprivation in the fetus and neonate have been implicated as either a primary or as a contributing risk factor in ... Treatment of infants suffering birth asphyxia by lowering the core body temperature is now known to be an effective therapy to ... There has long been a debate over whether newborn infants with birth asphyxia should be resuscitated with 100% oxygen or normal ...
Such asphyxia may be deliberate with use of a suicide bag. Accidental death has occurred in cases where concentrations of ... Hypoxia is also a serious consequence of preterm birth in the neonate. The main cause for this is that the lungs of the human ... Asphyxia Autoerotic hypoxia or erotic asphyxiation, intentional restriction of oxygen to the brain for sexual arousal Cerebral ... A similar problem exists when inhaling certain odorless asphyxiant gases. These produce a hypoxic breathing gas which can ...
Low birth weight increases risk for perinatal mortality (death shortly after birth), asphyxia, hypothermia, polycythemia, ... is universally dismal and that resuscitative efforts should not be undertaken when a neonate is born at this point in pregnancy ... "Motor competance at birth is limited in the human neonate. The voluntary control of movement develops and matures during a ...
The over-all incidence of asphyxia neonatorum as well as that for the various complications of pregnancy and modes of delivery ... Keyword(s) : Asphyxia neonatorum, Distribution, Incidence, Maternal age and Paediatrics * Accreditation : Department of Higher ... oa South African Medical Journal - Asphyxia neonatorum - incidence in Cape Town * Navigate this Journal ... The over-all incidence of asphyxia neonatorum as well as that for the various complications of pregnancy and modes of delivery ...
... On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible diseases from either several symptoms or ...
"Asphyxia Neonatorum" by people in this website by year, and whether "Asphyxia Neonatorum" was a major or minor topic of these ... "Asphyxia Neonatorum" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Asphyxia Neonatorum" by people in Profiles. ... Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more general than "Asphyxia Neonatorum". ...
Myocardial changes in neonates dying of asphyxia neonatorum.. Authors: Bhunia, B C. Basu, K. Batabyal, S K. Khatwa, S P. Sanyal ... Myocardial changes in neonates dying of asphyxia neonatorum. Indian Journal of Pathology & Microbiology. 1992 Oct; 35(4): 308- ... In rest 3 cases, myocardial damage was not overt though there was evidence of asphyxia and evidence of myocardial damage in the ... did not correspond well with the extent of asphyxia and the survival period. ...
... information resources and questions answered by our Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Specialists for Asphyxia neonatorum ... ClinicalTrials.gov lists trials that are related to Asphyxia neonatorum. Click on the link to go to ClinicalTrials.gov to read ...
Asphyxia Neonatorum Br Med J 1956; 1 :1046 (Published 05 May 1956) ... Anaesthesia and Apnoea Neonatorum after Caesarean Section Br Med J 1956; 1 :1048 (Published 05 May 1956) ... Anaesthesia and Apnoea Neonatorum after Caesarean Section Br Med J 1956; 1 :1048 (Published 05 May 1956) ... Anaesthesia and Apnoea Neonatorum after Caesarean Section Br Med J 1956; 1 :1048 (Published 05 May 1956) ...
ASPHYXIA NEONATORUM TREATED BY ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF THE PHRENIC NERVE. CROSS, K. W.; ROBERTS, P. W. ...
Asphyxia. Asphyxia Neonatorum. Infection. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome. Inflammation. Pathologic Processes. Body ... Birth Asphyxia Very Low Birth Weight Baby Neonatal Sepsis Behavioral: Intervention Behavioral: Control ... Cause specific mortality rates (due to birth asphyxia,neonatal sepsis and low birth weight) [ Time Frame: two years ]. ... enhanced training of LHWs and TBAs in the early recognition and management of birth asphyxia, serious newborn infections and ...
Asphyxia Neonatorum. *Drug: Fentanyl. *Drug: Fentanyl and clonidine. Observational. *Region Skane. *Lund University ...
Asphyxia Neonatorum. Seizures. Hypoxia. Hypothermia. Brain Diseases. Asphyxia. Epilepsy. Central Nervous System Diseases. ... TOBY (TOtal Body hYpothermia): a Study of Treatment for Perinatal Asphyxia. This study has been completed. ... Term infants less than 6 hours after birth with moderate or severe perinatal asphyxia (a combination of clinical and EEG ... C following perinatal asphyxia improves survival without neurodevelopmental disability. ...
Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Asphyxia Neonatorum U.S. FDA Resources ...
Asphyxia Neonatorum. Birth Weight. Asphyxia. Body Weight. Signs and Symptoms. Infection. Systemic Inflammatory Response ... Birth Asphyxia Very Low Birth Weight Baby Neonatal Sepsis Behavioral: Intervention Behavioral: Control Not Applicable ... To develop and implement intervention packages for TBAs and LHWs to reduce the burden of birth asphyxia, sepsis and low birth ... To improve case recognition and management of birth asphyxia, sepsis and LBW by primary care health care providers (in both the ...
birth asphyxia. Asphyxia Neonatorum. neonatal. hypoxic. ischemic. encephalopathy. HIE. neonatal encephalopathy. hypothermia, ... of this study is to determine whether head cooling with mild systemic hypothermia in term infants following perinatal asphyxia ...
Asphyxia. Asphyxia Neonatorum. Body Temperature Changes. Signs and Symptoms. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System ... Neuroprotective Effects of Hypothermia Combined With Inhaled Xenon Following Perinatal Asphyxia. Resource links provided by NLM ... Neuroprotective Effects of Hypothermia Combined With Inhaled Xenon Following Perinatal Asphyxia (TOBYXe). This study has been ... The study hypothesis is that: Following perinatal asphyxia treatment with a combination of hypothermia and inhaled xenon ...
Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Asphyxia Neonatorum U.S. FDA Resources ...
Asphyxia Neonatorum. Asphyxia. Respiratory Insufficiency. Perinatal Death. Death. Pathologic Processes. Wounds and Injuries. ... Fetal Heart Rate Abnormalities Respiratory Depression Birth Asphyxia Neonatal Resuscitation Device: Fetoscope, Fetal heart rate ...
Asphyxia neonatorum, : its relation to the fetal blood, circulation and respiration, and its effects upon the brain Resource ... Asphyxia neonatorum, : its relation to the fetal blood, circulation and respiration, and its effects upon the brain. Title ... The instance Asphyxia neonatorum, : its relation to the fetal blood, circulation and respiration, and its effects upon the ... Context of Asphyxia neonatorum, : its relation to the fetal blood, circulation and respiration, and its effects upon the brain ...
asphyxia neonatorum. *asphyxia - birth. trichomoniasis. *trichomonas infection. urethritis. *non-gonococcal urethritis. - elite ...
Asphyxia Neonatorum. Cause of Death. Family Planning Services. Female. Humans. Infant Mortality*. Infant, Low Birth Weight. ... The commonest cause of death was birth asphyxia (30% of perinatal deaths or 10.4/1000 births). Careful analysis of the asphyxia ... Even though there is still scope for improvement, especially in the prevention of birth asphyxia, the perinatal mortality rate ... The commonest cause of death in Vanuatu was birth asphyxia, with prematurity, unexplained stillbirth and major congenital ...
Asphyxia neonatorum. Apathy or easily annoyed; wants to be let alone. Peevish, whining and moaning. Clings to attendants. ...
Keywords : Infant, newborn; Hypoxia, brain; Hypothermia; Asphyxia neonatorum; Magnetic resonance imaging. · abstract in ... Thirty-five patients with perinatal asphyxia undergoing body cooling between May 2009 and November 2012 were evaluated. ...
Asphyxia neonatorum ; pale and breathless ; cord still pulsates. Nightly asthma, with whizzing and rattling during expiration, ...
Key words: Infant, newborn; Hypoxia, brain; Hypothermia; Asphyxia neonatorum; Magnetic resonance imaging ... Perinatal asphyxia consists of decreased metabolic and nutritional intake from mother to fetus, thereby causing low fetal ... The development and severity of motor deficits due to perinatal asphyxia correlate with the pattern of brain injury seen on MRI ... The laboratory tests indicative of perinatal asphyxia comprised gas analysis (pH and base excess, BE) on samples collected from ...
Asphyxia Neonatorum / mortality. Cause of Death*. Cohort Studies. Eclampsia / mortality. Female. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Male ... Unexplained asphyxia Unexplained asphyxia includes intrapartum related stillbirths and intrapartum related neonatal deaths, and ... Unexplained asphyxia: Intrapartum death, deaths occur , 4 hrs after birth and cases with Apgar score ,7 at 5 min, where the ... asphyxia is not explained, clinical diagnosis Hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) or severe birth asphyxia where Apgar score ...
Asphyxia Neonatorum / epidemiology * Cohort Studies * Early Diagnosis * Female * Humans * Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain / ...
  • No specific foetal heart rate pattern that can accurately predict subsequent neurological impairment, and a low Apgar score is not by itself an indication of intrapartum asphyxia. (hkmj.org)
  • An infant suffering severe perinatal asphyxia usually has poor color (cyanosis), perfusion, responsiveness, muscle tone, and respiratory effort, as reflected in a low 5 minute Apgar score. (wikipedia.org)
  • The instance Asphyxia neonatorum, : its relation to the fetal blood, circulation and respiration, and its effects upon the brain represents a material embodiment of a distinct intellectual or artistic creation found in College of Physicians of Philadelphia . (collegeofphysicians.org)
  • The reflex, activated by asphyxia, consists of shunting blood from the skin and splanchnic area to the heart, adrenals, and brain, ostensibly to protect these vital organs from hypoxic-ischaemic injury. (bmj.com)
  • 3, 4- 6 Thus, it is likely that each neonate with clinically detectable heart or brain dysfunction resulting from intrapartum asphyxia would have activated the diving reflex for long enough to cause dysfunction of one or more non-essential organs, particularly kidney and liver. (bmj.com)
  • One important cause of hypoglycemia is asphyxia, during which glucose is rapidly metabolized anaerobically to minimize cellular energy depletion in all tissues, including brain. (aappublications.org)
  • while fetuses prior to the last third of development experience more extended tolerance of asphyxia with maximal effects on the growing mid-brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The development and severity of motor deficits due to perinatal asphyxia correlate with the pattern of brain injury seen on MRI. (magnetoffon.info)
  • Asphyxia Neonatorum" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (rush.edu)
  • Clinicians caring for women during labor must have an understanding of the pathophysiology of intrauterine asphyxia as well as an awareness of the capabilities and limitations of available intrapartum fetal assessment tools to diagnose intrauterine fetal asphyxia or predict neurologic outcome. (medscape.com)
  • It has been demonstrated that high concentrations of oxygen lead to generation of oxygen free radicals, which have a role in reperfusion injury after asphyxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies in experimental animal models suggest that a protein called Hsp70 may be a good and potentially useful marker of cellular stress that may be clinically useful in determining the presence of neonatal asphyxia. (sussex.ac.uk)
  • Group 1 comprised 35 consecutive term babies with perinatal asphyxia transferred from maternity hospitals to a level 3 neonatal intensive care unit at a paediatric hospital (Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Western Australia). (bmj.com)