Acute conjunctival inflammation in the newborn, usually caused by maternal gonococcal infection. The causative agent is NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE. The baby's eyes are contaminated during passage through the birth canal.
Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A severe, sometimes fatal, disorder of adipose tissue occurring chiefly in preterm or debilitated infants suffering from an underlying illness and manifested by a diffuse, nonpitting induration of the affected tissue. The skin becomes cold, yellowish, mottled, and inflexible.
A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.
A silver salt with powerful germicidal activity. It has been used topically to prevent OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUM.
Conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, the transparent membrane that lines the inner surface of the eyelids and covers the white part of the eye, resulting in symptoms such as redness, swelling, itching, burning, discharge, and increased sensitivity to light.
A hypnotic and sedative with anticonvulsant effects. However, because of the hazards associated with its administration, its tendency to react with plastic, and the risks associated with its deterioration, it has largely been superseded by other agents. It is still occasionally used to control status epilepticus resistant to conventional treatment. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p608-9)
An iodinated polyvinyl polymer used as topical antiseptic in surgery and for skin and mucous membrane infections, also as aerosol. The iodine may be radiolabeled for research purposes.
An infection of the eyes characterized by the presence in conjunctival epithelial cells of inclusion bodies indistinguishable from those of trachoma. It is acquired by infants during birth and by adults from swimming pools. The etiological agent is CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS whose natural habitat appears to be the genito-urinary tract. Inclusion conjunctivitis is a less severe disease than trachoma and usually clears up spontaneously.
Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Deficient oxygenation of FETAL BLOOD.
A disorder characterized by a reduction of oxygen in the blood combined with reduced blood flow (ISCHEMIA) to the brain from a localized obstruction of a cerebral artery or from systemic hypoperfusion. Prolonged hypoxia-ischemia is associated with ISCHEMIC ATTACK, TRANSIENT; BRAIN INFARCTION; BRAIN EDEMA; COMA; and other conditions.

Platelet-activating factor mediates ischemia-induced leukocyte-endothelial adherence in newborn pig brain. (1/328)

The authors examined the involvement of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in mediating leukocyte adherence to brain postcapillary pial venules and altering blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability during basal conditions and during reoxygenation after asphyxia in newborn piglets. Intravital epifluorescence videomicroscopy, closed cranial windows, and labeling of leukocytes with rhodamine 6G allowed us to obtain serial measurements of adherent leukocytes within postcapillary venules. Blood-brain barrier breakdown was determined by optical measures of cortical extravascular fluorescence intensity after intravenous sodium fluorescein. Superfusion of PAF over the cortex induced a dose-dependent increase in leukocyte adherence to cerebral venules and leakage of fluorescein; with 1 micromol/L PAF, the magnitude of adherence and BBB breakdown was similar to that seen during reoxygenation after 9 minutes of asphyxia. Both adherence and loss of BBB integrity resulting from either exogenous PAF or asphyxia-reoxygenation could be significantly attenuated by intravenous administration of WEB 2086, a PAF receptor antagonist. Window superfusion of superoxide dismutase with PAF attenuated PAF-induced increases in adherence and associated fluorescein leakage. These findings indicate that PAF exhibits proinflammatory effects in piglet brain and that PAF contributes to leukocyte adherence and BBB breakdown after cerebral ischemia. These PAF effects are mediated by increases in superoxide radical generation.  (+info)

Intraosseous lines in preterm and full term neonates. (2/328)

AIM: To evaluate the use of intraosseous lines for rapid vascular access in primary resuscitation of preterm and full term neonates. METHODS: Thirty intraosseous lines were placed in 27 newborns, in whom conventional venous access had failed. RESULTS: All the neonates survived the resuscitation procedure, with no long term side effects. CONCLUSION: Intraosseous infusion is quick, safe, and effective in compromised neonates.  (+info)

Outcome of very severe birth asphyxia. (3/328)

The aim of this study was to establish the outcome of very severe birth asphyxia in a group of babies intensively resuscitated at birth. 48 infants, born between 1966 and 1971 inclusive, were selected; 15 were apparently stillborn and 33 had not established spontaneous respirations by 20 minutes after birth. One-half of them died, but 3 to 7 years later three-quarters of the survivors are apparently normal. Later handicap was associated with factors leading to prolonged partial intrapartum asphyxia, while acute periods of more complete asphyxia were not necessarily harmful.  (+info)

Amplitude integrated EEG 3 and 6 hours after birth in full term neonates with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. (4/328)

AIM: To assess the prognostic value of amplitude integrated EEG (aEEG) 3 and 6 hours after birth. METHODS: Seventy three term, asphyxiated infants were studied (from two different centres), using the Cerebral Function Monitor (CFM Lectromed). The different aEEG tracings were compared using pattern recognition (flat tracing mainly isoelectric (FT); continuous extremely low voltage (CLV); burst-suppression (BS); discontinuous normal voltage (DNV); continuous normal voltage (CNV)) with subsequent outcome. RESULTS: Sixty eight infants were followed up for more than 12 months (range 12 months to 6 years). Twenty one out of 68 infants (31%) showed a change in pattern from 3 to 6 hours, but this was only significant in five cases (24%). In three this changed from BS to CNV with a normal outcome. One infant showed a change in pattern from CNV to FT and had a major handicap at follow up. Another infant showed a change in pattern from DNV to BS, and developed a major handicap at follow up. The other 16 infants did not have any significant changes in pattern: 11 infants had CLV, BS, or FT at 3 and 6 hours and died (n = 9) in the neonatal period or developed a major handicap (n = 2). Five infants had a CNV or DNV pattern at 3 and 6 hours, with a normal outcome. The sensitivity and specificity of BS, together with FT and CLV, for poor outcome at 3 hours was 0.85 and 0.77, respectively; at 6 hours 0.91 and 0.86, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) was 78% and the negative predictive value (NPV) 84% 3 hours after birth. At 6 hours the PPV was 86% and the NPV was 91%. CONCLUSION: aEEG could be very useful for selecting those infants who might benefit from intervention after birth asphyxia.  (+info)

Measurement of the urinary lactate:creatinine ratio for the early identification of newborn infants at risk for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. (5/328)

BACKGROUND: Newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia are prone to the development of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. There are no reliable methods for identifying infants at risk for this disorder. METHODS: We measured the ratio of lactate to creatinine in urine by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy within 6 hours and again 48 to 72 hours after birth in 58 normal infants and 40 infants with asphyxia. The results were correlated with the subsequent presence or absence of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. RESULTS: Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy did not develop in any of the normal newborns but did develop in 16 of the 40 newborns with asphyxia. Within six hours after birth, the mean (+/-SD) ratio of urinary lactate to creatinine was 16.75+/-27.38 in the infants who subsequently had hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, as compared with 0.09+/-0.02 in the normal infants (P<0.001) and 0.19+/-0.12 in the infants with asphyxia in whom hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy did not develop (P<0.001). A ratio of 0.64 or higher within six hours after birth had a sensitivity of 94 percent and a specificity of 100 percent for predicting the development of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The sensitivity and specificity of measurements obtained 48 to 72 hours after birth were much lower. The mean ratio of urinary lactate to creatinine was significantly higher in the infants who had adverse outcomes at one year (25.36+/-32.02) than in the infants with favorable outcomes (0.63+/-1.50) (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of the urinary lactate: creatinine ratio soon after birth may help identify infants at high risk for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.  (+info)

Abnormal cerebral haemodynamics in perinatally asphyxiated neonates related to outcome. (6/328)

AIM: To measure changes in cerebral haemodynamics during the first 24 hours of life following perinatal asphyxia, and relate them to outcome. METHODS: Cerebral blood volume (CBV), its response (CBVR) to changes in arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO(2)), and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in 27 term newborn infants with clinical and/or biochemical evidence consistent with perinatal asphyxia. RESULTS: Both CBF and CBV were higher on the first day of life in the infants with adverse outcomes, and a CBV outside the normal range had a sensitivity of 86% for predicting death or disability. The mean (SD) CBVR on the first day of life was 0.13 (0.12) ml/100 g/1/kPa, which, in 71% of infants, was below the lower 95% confidence limit for normal subjects. CONCLUSION: An increase in CBV on the first day of life is a sensitive predictor of adverse outcome. A reduction in CBVR is almost universally seen following asphyxia, but is not significantly correlated with severity of adverse outcome.  (+info)

Effects of the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX on outcome of newborn pigs after asphyxic cardiac arrest. (7/328)

In neonates, asphyxia is a common cause of neuronal injury and often results in seizures. The authors evaluated whether blockade of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors during asphyxia and early recovery with 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo-(F)-quinoxaline (NBQX) ameliorates neurologic deficit and histopathology in 1-week-old piglets. Anesthetized piglets were exposed to a sequence of 30 minutes of hypoxia, 5 minutes of room air ventilation, 7 minutes of airway occlusion, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Vehicle or NBQX was administered intravenously before asphyxia (30 mg/kg) and during the first 4 hours of recovery (15 mg/kg/h). Neuropathologic findings were evaluated at 96 hours of recovery by light microscopic and cytochrome oxidase histochemical study. Cardiac arrest occurred at 5 to 6 minutes of airway occlusion, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation restored spontaneous circulation independent of treatment modalities in about 2 to 3 minutes. Neurologic deficit over the 96-hour recovery period was not ameliorated by NBQX. Seizure activity began after 24 to 48 hours in 7 of 10 animals with vehicle and in 9 of 10 of animals with NBQX. In each group, four animals died in status epilepticus. Neuropathologic outcomes were not improved by NBQX. The density of remaining viable neurons was decreased in parietal cortex and putamen by NBQX treatment. Metabolic defects in cytochrome oxidase activity were worsened by NBQX treatment. Seizure activity during recovery was associated with reduced neuronal viability in neocortex and striatum in piglets from both groups that survived for 96 hours. This neonatal model of asphyxic cardiac arrest and resuscitation generates neurologic deficits, clinical seizure activity, and selective damage in regions of basal ganglia and sensorimotor cortex. In contrast to other studies in mature brain, AMPA receptor blockade with NBQX failed to protect against neurologic damage in the immature piglet and worsened postasphyxic histopathologic outcome in neocortex and putamen.  (+info)

Reproducibility and accuracy of MR imaging of the brain after severe birth asphyxia. (8/328)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: MR imaging of the brain can be used to detect cerebral damage after suspected hypoxic-ischemic injury. This study examines the reproducibility and accuracy of MR imaging soon after severe birth asphyxia. METHODS: During a 48-month period, full-term newborn neonates, who died within the first week as a result of severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, were included in the study if they had undergone early (<5 days old) MR imaging and postmortem neuropathologic studies. Two trained observers assessed reproducibility by examining multiple brain regions independently with current criteria and then defining and applying improved criteria. Accuracy of MR findings was tested by comparing the brain regions about which the two imaging raters agreed to those regions about which the two pathologists agreed. RESULTS: Eight neonates, with a median gestational age of 40 weeks (range, 38-40 weeks) and who suffered severe birth asphyxia, were included in the study. In the reproducibility study, MR imaging agreement was moderate when current criteria were used (k = .44). Using the improved criteria, agreement increased considerably (k = .62). Much of this improvement was due to limiting the analyses to the posterior limb of the internal capsule, thalamus, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and medulla. The posterior limb of the internal capsule was the most reliable region analyzed. MR imaging agreement was similar to that achieved by two experienced pathologists reviewing the histologic sections (k = .66). In the accuracy study, MR imaging abnormality was predictive of pathologic abnormality with a sensitivity of .79 and a positive predictive value of 1.0. The predictive value of a single MR imaging abnormality was .79 (95% confidence interval, .61-.96). CONCLUSION: Criteria that provide substantial reproducibility and accuracy for the interpretation of MR imaging findings very early after birth asphyxia can be derived.  (+info)

Ophthalmia Neonatorum is a medical term that refers to a conjunctivitis (inflammation of the conjunctiva) occurring in the first 28 days of life, often presenting with purulent discharge and redness of the eye. It can be caused by various microorganisms, including bacteria such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, or bacterial flora from the mother's birth canal or hospital environment. Immediate treatment is necessary to prevent potential blindness and other complications. Prophylaxis with erythromycin ointment is often recommended for all newborns.

Asphyxia neonatorum is a medical condition that refers to a newborn baby's lack of oxygen or difficulty breathing, which can lead to suffocation and serious complications. It is often caused by problems during the birthing process, such as umbilical cord compression or prolapse, placental abruption, or prolonged labor.

Symptoms of asphyxia neonatorum may include bluish skin color (cyanosis), weak or absent breathing, poor muscle tone, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and a slow heart rate. In severe cases, it can lead to organ damage, developmental delays, or even death.

Prompt medical attention is necessary to diagnose and treat asphyxia neonatorum. Treatment may include oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, and medications to support the baby's heart function and blood pressure. In some cases, therapeutic hypothermia (cooling the body) may be used to reduce the risk of brain damage. Preventive measures such as proper prenatal care, timely delivery, and careful monitoring during labor and delivery can also help reduce the risk of asphyxia neonatorum.

Sclerema Neonatorum is a rare, but serious condition that primarily affects newborns and infants. It is characterized by extensive hardening (sclerosis) and thickening of the subcutaneous fat tissue, which gives the skin a wood-like or waxen appearance and texture. This process can occur quite rapidly, often within hours to days.

The exact cause of Sclerema Neonatorum is not fully understood, but it's more commonly seen in premature babies, those with low birth weight, and those who have serious underlying medical conditions such as sepsis, pneumonia, or meningitis. It's thought to be a result of an abnormal response of the body's immune system to these conditions.

The condition can be difficult to treat, and mortality rates are high, particularly if there are underlying severe illnesses. Treatment typically involves addressing any underlying infections, providing supportive care to maintain body temperature, nutrition, and hydration, and in some cases, the use of medications to help soften the affected tissue.

Asphyxia is a medical condition that occurs when there is insufficient oxygen supply or excessive carbon dioxide buildup in the body, leading to impaired respiration and oxygenation of organs. This can result in unconsciousness, damage to internal organs, and potentially death if not treated promptly.

Asphyxia can be caused by various factors such as strangulation, choking, smoke inhalation, chemical exposure, or drowning. Symptoms of asphyxia may include shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, cyanosis (bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes), rapid heartbeat, confusion, and eventually loss of consciousness.

Immediate medical attention is required for individuals experiencing symptoms of asphyxia. Treatment may involve providing supplemental oxygen, removing the source of obstruction or exposure to harmful substances, and supporting respiratory function with mechanical ventilation if necessary. Prevention measures include avoiding hazardous environments, using proper safety equipment, and seeking prompt medical attention in case of suspected asphyxiation.

Silver nitrate is defined as an inorganic compound with the chemical formula AgNO3. It is a white or colorless crystalline solid that is highly soluble in water. Silver nitrate is commonly used in medicine as a topical antiseptic and caustic, particularly for the treatment of wounds, ulcers, and warts. When applied to skin or mucous membranes, it can help to destroy bacteria, viruses, and fungi, and promote healing. However, it can also cause irritation and tissue damage if used inappropriately, so it should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, a thin, clear membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelids and the outer surface of the eye. The condition can cause redness, itching, burning, tearing, discomfort, and a gritty feeling in the eyes. It can also result in a discharge that can be clear, yellow, or greenish.

Conjunctivitis can have various causes, including bacterial or viral infections, allergies, irritants (such as smoke, chlorine, or contact lens solutions), and underlying medical conditions (like dry eye or autoimmune disorders). Treatment depends on the cause of the condition but may include antibiotics, antihistamines, anti-inflammatory medications, or warm compresses.

It is essential to maintain good hygiene practices, like washing hands frequently and avoiding touching or rubbing the eyes, to prevent spreading conjunctivitis to others. If you suspect you have conjunctivitis, it's recommended that you consult an eye care professional for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

Paraldehyde is not typically defined in the context of modern medical terminology. However, historically, it was used in medicine as a sedative and anticonvulsant. Paraldehyde is a chemical compound consisting of three molecules of acetaldehyde joined together, forming a cyclic structure. It has been used in the past to treat seizures and anxiety, but its use has largely been discontinued due to its adverse effects, such as unpleasant odor, gastric irritation, and potential for causing respiratory depression.

In modern medical terminology, paraldehyde is not commonly used or recognized. Instead, more modern and safer medications are employed to manage similar conditions.

Povidone-Iodine is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent, which is a complex of iodine with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). This complex allows for sustained release of iodine, providing persistent antimicrobial activity. It has been widely used in various clinical settings, including as a surgical scrub, wound disinfection, and skin preparation before invasive procedures. Povidone-Iodine is effective against bacteria, viruses, fungi, and spores. The mechanism of action involves the release of iodine ions, which oxidize cellular components and disrupt microbial membranes, leading to cell death.

Inclusion conjunctivitis is a type of bacterial conjunctivitis (inflammation of the conjunctiva) that is caused by specific types of bacteria, most commonly Chlamydia trachomatis. It is also known as trachoma, which is a leading infectious cause of blindness worldwide. The infection leads to the formation of small, inclusion-containing intracytoplasmic inclusions in the conjunctival epithelial cells, hence the name "inclusion conjunctivitis."

The symptoms of inclusion conjunctivitis include redness, irritation, and discharge from the eyes. It can also cause swelling of the lymph nodes near the ears. In severe cases, it can lead to scarring and damage to the cornea, potentially resulting in vision loss. The infection is typically spread through direct contact with eye or nose discharge from an infected person, and it can also be sexually transmitted.

Treatment for inclusion conjunctivitis usually involves antibiotics, such as azithromycin or doxycycline, to eliminate the bacteria causing the infection. It is important to complete the full course of treatment to ensure that the infection is fully cleared and to prevent recurrence. In addition, good hygiene practices, such as frequent handwashing and avoiding sharing personal items like towels and washcloths, can help prevent the spread of the infection.

A "newborn infant" refers to a baby in the first 28 days of life outside of the womb. This period is crucial for growth and development, but also poses unique challenges as the infant's immune system is not fully developed, making them more susceptible to various diseases.

"Newborn diseases" are health conditions that specifically affect newborn infants. These can be categorized into three main types:

1. Congenital disorders: These are conditions that are present at birth and may be inherited or caused by factors such as infection, exposure to harmful substances during pregnancy, or chromosomal abnormalities. Examples include Down syndrome, congenital heart defects, and spina bifida.

2. Infectious diseases: Newborn infants are particularly vulnerable to infections due to their immature immune systems. Common infectious diseases in newborns include sepsis (bloodstream infection), pneumonia, and meningitis. These can be acquired from the mother during pregnancy or childbirth, or from the environment after birth.

3. Developmental disorders: These are conditions that affect the normal growth and development of the newborn infant. Examples include cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, and vision or hearing impairments.

It is important to note that many newborn diseases can be prevented or treated with appropriate medical care, including prenatal care, proper hygiene practices, and timely vaccinations. Regular check-ups and monitoring of the newborn's health by a healthcare provider are essential for early detection and management of any potential health issues.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Fetal hypoxia is a medical condition that refers to a reduced level of oxygen supply to the fetus. This can occur due to various reasons, such as maternal health problems, complications during pregnancy or delivery, or issues with the placenta. Prolonged fetal hypoxia can lead to serious complications, including brain damage and even fetal death. It is important for healthcare providers to closely monitor fetal oxygen levels during pregnancy and delivery to ensure the well-being of the fetus.

Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain refers to a condition characterized by a reduced supply of oxygen (hypoxia) and blood flow (ischemia) to the brain. This can lead to serious damage or death of brain cells, depending on the severity and duration of the hypoxic-ischemic event.

Hypoxia occurs when there is insufficient oxygen available to meet the metabolic needs of the brain tissue. Ischemia results from a decrease in blood flow, which can be caused by various factors such as cardiac arrest, stroke, or severe respiratory distress. When both hypoxia and ischemia occur together, they can have a synergistic effect, leading to more severe brain damage.

Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia can result in neurological deficits, cognitive impairment, and physical disabilities, depending on the area of the brain affected. Treatment typically focuses on addressing the underlying cause of the hypoxia-ischemia and providing supportive care to minimize secondary damage. In some cases, therapeutic hypothermia may be used to reduce metabolic demands and protect vulnerable brain tissue.

5th edition 1976 ISBN 978-0-07-070977-5 with Robert F. Pitts: Asphyxia neonatorum: Its relation to the fetal blood, circulation ... Ranck, James B.; Windle, William F. (1959). "Brain damage in the monkey, Macaca mulatta, by asphyxia neonatorum". Experimental ... See trigeminal nerve.) Windle, W.F.; Becker, R.F. (1943). "Asphyxia neonatorum". American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology ... as editor with E. Harold Hinman: Neurological and Psychological Deficits of Asphyxia Neonatorum. 1958. ASIN B000IA6HEK. Windle ...
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(00)93508-6. Moncrieff, Alan (1935). "Respiratory Failure Including So-Called Asphyxia Neonatorum". The ... Respiratory Failure including So-called Asphyxia Neonatorum 1936 Robert Alexander McCance, Medical problems in mineral ...
Little WJ (1966). "On the influence of abnormal parturition, difficult labours, premature birth, and asphyxia neonatorum, on ... The fetal sheep asphyxia model also suggests a six-hour window post asphyxia in which hypothermia will have greatest benefit. ... Craniocerebral hypothermia in the prevention and combined therapy of cerebral pathology in infants with asphyxia neonatorum]". ... The effects of fetal asphyxia on the developing brain in sheep are dependent on gestational age with near term fetuses showing ...
In most cases, if surgery is unsuccessful, severe asphyxia results in the death of the neonate, on average two days after birth ... surgical correction is required to allow for a relatively temporary survival of the neonate. Tracheal intubation is proven to ...
... meningitis Asherman's syndrome Ashman phenomenon Aspartylglycosaminuria Aspergillosis Asperger syndrome Asphyxia neonatorum ...
While HIE is associated in most cases with oxygen deprivation in the neonate due to birth asphyxia, it can occur in all age ... Some of these may also be toxic or narcotic, others are just asphyxiant. Some are recognisable by smell, others are odourless. ... Asphyxia - Severely deficient supply of oxygen Cerebral hypoxia - Oxygen shortage of the brain Erotic asphyxiation - ... In the United States, intrauterine hypoxia and birth asphyxia were listed together as the tenth leading cause of neonatal death ...
While HIE is associated in most cases with oxygen deprivation in the neonate due to birth asphyxia, it can occur in all age ...
768 Intrauterine hypoxia and birth asphyxia 768.3 Fetal distress, during labor, in infant 768.5 Birth asphyxia, severe 768.9 ... and temperature regulation of fetus and newborn 778.0 Hydrops fetalis not due to isoimmunization 778.1 Sclerema neonatorum ... Birth asphyxia, unspec. 769 Respiratory distress syndrome 770 Other respiratory conditions of fetus and newborn 770.1 Meconium ... cytomegalovirus infection 771.2 Other congenital infections specific to the perinatal period 771.3 Tetanus neonatorum 771.4 ...
He has published papers in Pediatrics, Pediatric Research, Biology of the Neonate, Critical Care Medicine, Pediatric Critical ... with Ola Didrik Saugstad in research on secondary brain injury in newborn infants as a result of perinatal asphyxia and ... Biology of the Neonate. 82 (3): 197-206. doi:10.1159/000063613. PMID 12373071. S2CID 25527292. Solås, AB; Kutzsche, S; Vinje, M ... Biology of the Neonate. 76 (3): 153-167. doi:10.1159/000014155. PMID 10460953. S2CID 37786756. Meberg, A; Kutzsche, S; Schøyen ...
A low score on the one-minute mark may show that the neonate requires medical attention, but does not necessarily indicate a ... Preterm infants may receive a lower score in these categories due to lack of maturity rather than asphyxia. Other factors that ... Inappropriately using the Apgar score has led to errors in diagnosing asphyxia. Various studies have shown that the Apgar score ... may be involved in the Apgar scoring of a neonate. The test is generally done at one and five minutes after birth and may be ...
MRI has proven valuable for defining brain injury in the neonate, but animal models are still needed to identify causative ... Recent clinical trials show that therapeutic intervention by brain cooling beginning up to six hours after perinatal asphyxia ... Spontaneous aortic arch thrombosis in a neonate. Heart, 81, 560 Sandberg, D. I., Lamberti-Pasculli, M., Drake, J.M., Humphreys ...
Perinatal asphyxia is the medical condition resulting from deprivation of oxygen to a newborn infant that lasts long enough ... Caesarean section is the removal of the neonate through a surgical incision in the abdomen, rather than through vaginal birth. ... Complications in the baby include lack of oxygen at birth(birth asphyxia), birth trauma, and prematurity. The most prominent ... and to delay neonate procedures for at least one to two hours or until the baby has had its first breastfeeding. A vaginal ...
... occurs when the neonate's blood glucose level is less than the newborn's body requirements for factors ... perinatal asphyxia, severe infection, sclerosis, neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, etc., especially in premature babies, ... The biggest nursing concern for a neonate experiencing hypoglycemia is the physical assessment to potentially find the cause. ... the effects resulting from the hypoglycemic episode depend on the length of the hypoglycemic episode and how low the neonate's ...
Brouillette, R.T.; Marzocchi, M. (1994). "Diaphragm pacing: clinical and experimental results". Biology of the Neonate. 65 (3-4 ... Hufeland, C.W. (1783). Usum uis electriciae in asphyxia experimentis illustratum. Dissertatio inauguralis medica sistens. ... who in 1783 proposed that such a technique could be applied as a treatment for asphyxia.: 545-549 French neurologist Duchenne ...
Fetal death Neonatal sepsis Perinatal death Asphyxia Early onset neonatal sepsis Septic shock Neonatal pneumonia Infant ... Ericson JE, Laughon MM (March 2015). "Chorioamnionitis: implications for the neonate". Clinics in Perinatology. 42 (1): 155-65 ... it shortens the hospital stay for the mother and the neonate. There is currently not enough evidence to dictate how long ...
In rare cases, uncorrected asynclitism can lead to neonatal asphyxia, in which the child does not receive enough oxygen oxygen ... Following any medical procedure to alter the occiput position or any assisted vaginal delivery, monitoring of the neonate is ...
India has 3-tier system based on weight and gestational age of neonate. Neonates weighing more than 1800 grams or having ... Besides prematurity and extreme low birth-weight, common diseases cared for in a NICU include perinatal asphyxia, major birth ... An incubator (or isolette or humidicrib) is an apparatus used to maintain environmental conditions suitable for a neonate ( ... became the first major publication to deal with the care of the neonate. Another factor that contributed to the development of ...
The perinatal brain injury occurring as a result of birth asphyxia, manifesting within 48 hours of birth, is a form of hypoxic ... Oxygen deprivation in the fetus and neonate have been implicated as either a primary or as a contributing risk factor in ... Treatment of infants with birth asphyxia by lowering the core body temperature is now known to be an effective therapy to ... There has long been a debate over whether newborn infants with birth asphyxia should be resuscitated with 100% oxygen or normal ...
As a result of low oxygen levels, infants with PPHN are at an increased risk of developing complications, such as asphyxia, ... Graves ED, Redmond CR, Arensman RM (March 1988). "Persistent pulmonary hypertension in the neonate". Chest. 93 (3): 638-41. doi ... To help with diagnosis, the clinician can watch out for predisposing factors, such as: birth asphyxia, meconium aspiration, use ...
"MiraCradle - Neonate Cooler". miracradle.com. Phase Change Material (PCM) Based Energy Storage Materials and Global Application ... treatment of birth asphyxia Human body cooling under bulky clothing or costumes. Waste heat recovery Off-peak power utilization ...
Low birth weight increases the risk for perinatal mortality (death shortly after birth), asphyxia, hypothermia, polycythemia, ... is universally dismal and that resuscitative efforts should not be undertaken when a neonate is born at this point in pregnancy ... "Motor competence at birth is limited in the human neonate. The voluntary control of movement develops and matures during a ...
Neonatal toxic shock-like exanthematous disease Nocardiosis Noma neonatorum North Asian tick typhus Ophthalmia neonatorum Oroya ... Soot tattoo Subcutaneous emphysema Sucking blister Sunburn Surfer's knots Tattoo Tennis toe Thermal burn Traumatic asphyxia ... acne neonatorum, neonatal cephalic pustulosis) Occupational acne Oil acne Ocular rosacea (ophthalmic rosacea, ophthalmorosacea ... lentigines neonatorum) Trichrome vitiligo Vagabond's leukomelanoderma Vasospastic macule Vitiligo Vitiligo ponctué Vogt- ...
5th edition 1976 ISBN 978-0-07-070977-5 with Robert F. Pitts: Asphyxia neonatorum: Its relation to the fetal blood, circulation ... Ranck, James B.; Windle, William F. (1959). "Brain damage in the monkey, Macaca mulatta, by asphyxia neonatorum". Experimental ... See trigeminal nerve.) Windle, W.F.; Becker, R.F. (1943). "Asphyxia neonatorum". American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology ... as editor with E. Harold Hinman: Neurological and Psychological Deficits of Asphyxia Neonatorum. 1958. ASIN B000IA6HEK. Windle ...
Available evidence shows adverse sequelae do not follow perinatal asphyxia unless encephalopathy is part of the neonatal ... Asphyxia Neonatorum / complications* * Asphyxia Neonatorum / epidemiology * Brain Ischemia / complications* * Brain Ischemia / ... Long-term follow-up of term neonates with perinatal asphyxia Clin Perinatol. 1993 Jun;20(2):483-500. ... Most survivors of perinatal asphyxia do not have adverse sequelae, and later cognitive development has been shown to be similar ...
Asphyxia neonatorum.. Dose. Tincture, to third potency. Laurocerasus water, two to five drop doses. ...
Also in apparent death and asphyxia of newborns (asphyxia neonatorum).. The main idea of Carbo vegetabilis is lack of oxygen ... It may be indicated in asphyxia neonatorum and icterus neonatorum, especially when the newborn has lost a great many of blood. ... asphyxia neonatorum. *specific remedy for removing the too violent action of very many drugs whether unsuitably employed or ... For apparent death, think of Antimonium tartaricum when there is (white) asphyxia and the newborn is breathless, pale, cyanotic ...
Bilateral choanal atresia presents at birth as asphyxia neonatorum. Due to the fact that neonates are obligate nasal breathers ...
Asphyxia Neonatorum. *Laryngeal Masks. What is already known on this topic?. *. Birth asphyxia contributes to almost 1 million ... Objective Mortality rates from birth asphyxia in low-income countries remain high. Face mask ventilation (FMV) performed by ... Each year, intrapartum-related complications (birth asphyxia) result in 1.2 million stillbirths, 700 000 term newborn deaths ... resuscitation could prevent a large proportion of these deaths and improve the outcomes of neonates surviving asphyxia.3 5 6 ...
B, Neonate with severe birth asphyxia, aged 2 days. No high signal from myelin in the posterior limb of the internal capsule ... Barkovich A. MR and CT evaluation of profound neonatal and infantile asphyxia. . AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 1992;13:959-972. ... Reproducibility and Accuracy of MR Imaging of the Brain after Severe Birth Asphyxia. Phillipe Jouvet, Francis M. Cowan, Philip ... Prediction of neuromotor outcome in perinatal asphyxia. Evaluation of MR scoring systems. . AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 1998;19:143- ...
Prematurity is accompanied by a host of medical complications including asphyxia, neonatorum, intracranial hemorrhage, ...
... "birth asphyxia," and "asphyxia neonatorum." Snowball searching added literature referenced in key papers. The review for ... Kumar R: Effectiveness of training traditional birth attendants for management of asphyxia neonatorum using resuscitation ... "Asphyxia" specific mortality was reported for four studies, with the effect ranging from 61-70% reduction [5, 53-55]. However, ... The term "birth asphyxia" is no longer recommended for epidemiological use [25-27], especially for cause-of-death attribution, ...
Myers RE (1975) Fetal asphyxia due to umbilical cord compression. Metabolic and brain pathologic consequences. Biol Neonate 26 ... Raju TN (1992) Some animal models for the study of perinatal asphyxia. Biol Neonate 62: 202-214. ...
"On the Influence of Abnormal Parturition, Difficult Labors, Premature Birth, and Asphyxia Neonatorum, on the Mental and ... and Asphyxia Neonatorum, on the Mental and Physical Condition of the Child, Especially in Relation to Deformities," hereafter " ...
Neurological and psychological deficits from asphyxia neonatorum Cite CITE. Title : Neurological and psychological deficits ... Windle, William F. "Neurological and psychological deficits from asphyxia neonatorum" 72, no. 7 (1957). Windle, William F. " ... Windle, William F. (1957). Neurological and psychological deficits from asphyxia neonatorum. 72(7). ... "Neurological and psychological deficits from asphyxia neonatorum" vol. 72, no. 7, 1957. Export RIS Citation Information.. ...
Furthermore, although cooling of the neonate results in improved neurological outcomes for a small proportion of treated ... The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the multi-organ effects of intrapartum asphyxia, with ... The aim of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of the multi-organ effects of intrapartum asphyxia, with ... Although the majority of research is directed toward reducing the brain injury that results from intrapartum birth asphyxia, ...
Asphyxia neonatorum From NCATS Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center File Formats Help:. How do I view different file ...
Beckers film in the collection is: Asphyxia Neonatorum; Experimental Study in the Guinea Pig ...
Asphyxia neonatorum.. Fever.-Coldness; chills and heat alternate. Thirst, with dry mouth in afternoon. ...
do not confuse with ASPHYXIA NEONATORUM. Allowable Qualifiers:. BL blood. CF cerebrospinal fluid. CI chemically induced. CL ...
Useful for children at birth who are pale, breathless and gasping; prevents asphyxia neonatorum. Most ailments seem to come on ...
Neu J: The myth of asphyxia and hypoxia-ischemia as primary causes of necrotizing enterocolitis. Biol Neonate 2005;87:97-98. ... Murgas Torrazza R, Neu J: The developing intestinal microbiome and its relationship to health and disease in the neonate. J ... a neonate with a very distended abdomen and complex ascites lacks bowel gas and radiographs suggest considerable fluid in the ...
8. Antimonium tartaricum - Asphyxia neonatorum.. 9. Podophyllum - Prolapse of uterus.. 10. Calcaria carb - Hydrocephalus. ... 2. Asphaxia neonatorum - Antim tart and Carbo veg. 3. Uterine prolapse - Murex and Lilium Tig. 4. Hydramnious - Apocyanum and ... 1. Argentum nitricum and Nitric acid in Ophthalmia neonatorum.. 2. Bryonia and Silicea in Mastitis.. 3. Sepia and Secale cor in ... What is APGAR score? Indication of Laurocerous and Antim Tart in Asphyxia. neonatoram.. III. Short Answers: (10X2=20). 1. ...
AsphyxiaNeonatorum;BloodGasAnalysis;CerebralPalsy;DefensiveMedicine;Female;FetalBlood;GreatBritain;Humans;Infant,Newborn; ...
Dr W-J.LITTLE : On the influence of abnormal parturition, difficult labor, premature birth, and asphyxia neonatorum on the ... Dr P.GRUENWALD : Asphyxia, trauma and shock at birth.. 1 janvier 1950 ...
Dr W-J.LITTLE : On the influence of abnormal parturition, difficult labor, premature birth, and asphyxia neonatorum on the ... Dr P.GRUENWALD : Asphyxia, trauma and shock at birth.. 1 janvier 1950 ...
The aim of this study is to know the correlation between severity of preeclampsia and asphyxia neonatorum in Negara General ... Data, such as maternal age, parity, mode of delivery, severity of preeclampsia and asphyxia neonatorum, were collected from ... Conclusion: Mode of delivery and severity of preeclampsia is associated with asphyxia neonatorum. Early identification and ... A bivariate analysis showed the prevalence of asphyxia neonatorum was significantly higher in assisted-delivery (PR=2,541, p= ...
Tags: 2020, Adolescent, Adult, Asphyxia Neonatorum/*therapy, Checklist, Clinical Competence, Cross-sectional Studies, Desalew A ... Worldwide, four million neonate deaths happen annually, and birth asphyxia accounts for one million deaths. Improving… ... BACKGROUND: Neonatal resuscitation is a life-saving intervention for birth asphyxia, a leading cause of neonatal mortality. ...
... as well as the adverse outcomes of fetus/neonate, such as intrauterine fetal death, neonatal asphyxia, amniotic fluid pollution ... ICP group had significantly higher incidence rates of neonatal asphyxia, AFⅢ, and SGA than the HBV infection group ( χ 2 =5.448 ...
Originally produced as an infant blade for use in asphyxia neonatorum- this pattern is now available in two sizes extending its ... Originally produced as an infant blade for use in asphyxia neonatorum- this pattern is now available in two sizes extending its ...
The major neonatal problems of the small-for-date neonate (hypoglycemia, birth asphyxia, hypothermia, pulmonary disease, ...
Asphyxia Neonatorum, Birthing Centers, Community Networks, Decision Making, Developing Countries, Expert Testimony, Female, ... Setting research priorities to reduce almost one million deaths from birth asphyxia by 2015. ... Setting research priorities to reduce almost one million deaths from birth asphyxia by 2015. ...
  • Available evidence shows adverse sequelae do not follow perinatal asphyxia unless encephalopathy is part of the neonatal clinical presentation. (nih.gov)
  • Most survivors of perinatal asphyxia do not have adverse sequelae, and later cognitive development has been shown to be similar to normative data. (nih.gov)
  • Ellis M, Manandhar DS, Manandhar N, Wyatt J, Balam AJ, Costello AM. Stillbirths and neonatal encephalopathy in kathmandu, Nepal: an estimate of the contribution of birth asphyxia to perinatal mortality in low income urban population. (ijcmph.com)
  • Mbweza E. Risk factors for perinatal asphyxia at queen eliza beth central hospital, Malawi. (ijcmph.com)
  • Complications include perinatal asphyxia, meconium aspiration, polycythemia. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Cord blood mononuclear cells prevent neuronal apoptosis in response to perinatal asphyxia in the newborn lamb. (umassmed.edu)
  • Systemic and transdermal melatonin administration prevents neuropathology in response to perinatal asphyxia in newborn lambs. (umassmed.edu)
  • Melatonin augments the neuroprotective effects of hypothermia in lambs following perinatal asphyxia. (umassmed.edu)
  • Eight neonates, with a median gestational age of 40 weeks (range, 38−40 weeks) and who suffered severe birth asphyxia, were included in the study. (ajnr.org)
  • The aim of this study therefore was to examine the reproducibility of MR images obtained from a group of neonates soon after birth asphyxia and to compare MR imaging appearances with neuropathologic findings. (ajnr.org)
  • Although the majority of research is directed toward reducing the brain injury that results from intrapartum birth asphyxia, the multi-organ injury observed in surviving neonates is of equal importance. (frontiersin.org)
  • Furthermore, we reviewed the current treatments available for neonates who have undergone intrapartum asphyxia, and highlight the emergence of maternal dietary creatine supplementation as a preventative therapy, which has been shown to provide multi-organ protection from birth asphyxia-induced injury in our preclinical studies. (frontiersin.org)
  • This was a retrospective hospital based analysis of data in neonates with birth asphyxia admitted during the period February 2010 to January 2011. (ijcmph.com)
  • How to cite (IEEE): N. N. Agustina, and M. S. Kosim, "The Association between Asphyxia and Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β Levels in Neonates," Journal of Biomedicine and Translational Research , vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 51-55, Aug. 2021. (undip.ac.id)
  • How to cite (Vancouver): Agustina NN, Kosim MS. The Association between Asphyxia and Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β Levels in Neonates. (undip.ac.id)
  • It can cause morbidity and mortality in neonates.Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β are inflammatory cytokines produced by neuronal cells in early response to brain injury due to asphyxia. (undip.ac.id)
  • Objective: To determine theassociation between asphyxia and serumIL-6 and IL-1β levelsin neonates. (undip.ac.id)
  • Methods: Across-sectional study was conducted on neonates diagnosed with moderate to severe asphyxia who hospitalized atthe Dr. Kariadi General Hospital Semarang Indonesia from December 2013 to May 2014. (undip.ac.id)
  • Conclusion: There was association between asphyxia and IL-6 and IL-1β levelsin neonates.IL-6 and IL-1β levelswere increased in neonates with moderate and severe asphyxia, with extend of increase was significant higherin the later. (undip.ac.id)
  • Each year, intrapartum-related complications (birth asphyxia) result in 1.2 million stillbirths, 700 000 term newborn deaths and an estimated 1.2 million babies developing neonatal encephalopathy (previously called hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy). (bmj.com)
  • Each year 814,000 neonatal deaths result from intrapartum-related events in term babies (previously "birth asphyxia") and 1.03 million from complications of prematurity. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The unpredictable nature of the many obstetric complications that contribute to intrapartum asphyxia, in addition to the multi-organ damage associated with intrapartum oxygen deprivation ( 11 ), presents a unique set of challenges to clinical and research professionals in their endeavor to implement effective treatments for intrapartum asphyxia. (frontiersin.org)
  • They emphasize the importance of detailed prenatal investigation as most important in preventing prenatal asphyxia and consequent complications. (nel.edu)
  • Ophthalmia Neonatorum" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (wakehealth.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Ophthalmia Neonatorum" by people in this website by year, and whether "Ophthalmia Neonatorum" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (wakehealth.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Ophthalmia Neonatorum" by people in Profiles. (wakehealth.edu)
  • BACKGROUND: Neonatal resuscitation is a life-saving intervention for birth asphyxia, a leading cause of neonatal mortality. (omeka.net)
  • Birth asphyxia is the third leading cause of neonatal deaths in developing countries. (ijcmph.com)
  • Despite the advent of hypothermia therapy for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), treatment options following asphyxia at birth remain limited, particularly in low-resource settings where the incidence of birth asphyxia is highest. (frontiersin.org)
  • Bilateral choanal atresia presents at birth as asphyxia neonatorum. (scirp.org)
  • Objective Mortality rates from birth asphyxia in low-income countries remain high. (bmj.com)
  • Birth asphyxia contributes to almost 1 million neonatal deaths. (bmj.com)
  • Criteria that provide substantial reproducibility and accuracy for the interpretation of MR imaging findings very early after birth asphyxia can be derived. (ajnr.org)
  • Birth asphyxia is a significant global health problem, responsible for ~1.2 million neonatal deaths each year worldwide. (frontiersin.org)
  • Furthermore, although cooling of the neonate results in improved neurological outcomes for a small proportion of treated infants, it does not provide any benefit to the other organ systems affected by asphyxia at birth. (frontiersin.org)
  • The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the multi-organ effects of intrapartum asphyxia, with particular reference to the findings from our laboratory using the precocial spiny mouse to model birth asphyxia. (frontiersin.org)
  • This cheap and effective nutritional supplement may be the key to reducing birth asphyxia-induced death and disability, particularly in low-resource settings where current treatments are unavailable. (frontiersin.org)
  • The prevalence of birth asphyxia was 71,2% in this study. (isainsmedis.id)
  • Worldwide, four million neonate deaths happen annually, and birth asphyxia accounts for one million deaths. (omeka.net)
  • Setting research priorities to reduce almost one million deaths from birth asphyxia by 2015. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Risk Factors for Neonatal Mortality due to Birth Asphyxia in Southern Nepal: A Prospective, Community-based Cohort Study. (ijcmph.com)
  • Birth asphyxia in developing countries: current status and public health implications. (ijcmph.com)
  • Bang AT, Bang RA, Baitule SB, Reddy HM, Deshmukh MD. Management of birth asphyxia in home deliveries in rural Gadchiroli: the effect of two types of birth attendants and of resuscitating with mouth-to-mouth, tube-mask or bag-mask. (ijcmph.com)
  • Infants of women with GDM are more often large for gestational age (LGA) and more likely to suffer from asphyxia, birth trauma, jaundice and hypoglycemia. (skemman.is)
  • and IL-1β}, abstract = { Background: Neonatal asphyxia is a respiratory failure during and just after birth. (undip.ac.id)
  • If the mother gives birth with the assistance of a matron (not in a health care structure) the investigator is notified as soon as possible, for the collection of medical information from the matron concerning the birth and the neonate. (cdc.gov)
  • Predicting the severity of birth asphyxia-related brain injury in newborn infants is a difficult task. (newbornjournal.org)
  • Cord blood gas parameters are particularly important because, despite all the progress in fetal monitoring, the time gap between the onset of fetal heart rate (FHR) abnormalities and birth asphyxia-related brain injury has remained difficult to predict. (newbornjournal.org)
  • Dr. Satyan Lakshminrusimha's research interests are focused on pulmonary transition at birth and disorders of pulmonary transition such as birth asphyxia and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. (ucdavis.edu)
  • A newborn infant, or neonate, is a child under 28 days of age. (who.int)
  • http://www.who.int/maternal_child_ adolescent/ documents/who_rht_msm_981/en/1998. (ijcmph.com)
  • Although it is a global issue, recent evaluations of the incidence of intrapartum asphyxia in high income countries, where adequate obstetric care is available during the peripartum period, have incidences ranging from 4.3 to 8.5% of term live births ( 9 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • The aim of the study was to measure the incidence of GDM in Iceland and its effect on the pregnancy, delivery and the neonate. (skemman.is)
  • Intrapartum asphyxia results in a burden of 42 million disability years (DALYs). (frontiersin.org)
  • Despite the burden of intrapartum-related neonatal deaths and morbidities, research investment into intrapartum asphyxia and associated morbidities remains low, potentially due to it being a condition that is most prevalent in low resource settings. (frontiersin.org)
  • however, in the sick neonate these methods are less reliable. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The mean Apgar score was 8 with 62/91.2% of the babies presenting a normal Apgar score, 5/7.3% slight asphyxia and 1/1.5% moderate asphyxia. (bvsalud.org)
  • Drugs - Prenatal exposure with transplacental transfer to the neonate of various drugs (narcotics, beta-blockers). (uihc.org)
  • No significant difference between moderate and severe asphyxia neonatesin term ofsex, birthweight,type of delivery, neonate's mother age, gestational age, and parity. (undip.ac.id)
  • Large-for-Gestational-Age Neonate Predicts a 2.5-Fold Increased Odds of Neonatal Hypoglycemia in Women with Type 1 Diabetes. (medscape.com)
  • Levels of IL-6 and IL-1β levels wereincreased significantly in both moderate and severe asphyxiagroups, and the levels were significant higher in the severe asphyxia than that of in the moderate, p =0.003 and p =0.007, respectively. (undip.ac.id)
  • Dr. Bautista's research is focused on impaired gut motility and intestinal adaptation in the setting of prematurity and surgical diseases affecting the small and large intestine of the neonate. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Clinical interests include intestinal injury in the extreme premature population, including NEC and SIP, and surgical diseases affecting the neonate including but not limited to short gut syndrome, gastroschisis, intestinal atresias and related disorders. (ucdavis.edu)
  • The aim of this study is to know the correlation between severity of preeclampsia and asphyxia neonatorum in Negara General Hospital on January 2019-January 2020. (isainsmedis.id)
  • Mode of delivery and severity of preeclampsia is associated with asphyxia neonatorum. (isainsmedis.id)
  • Detection and assessment of brain injury in the growth-restricted fetus and neonate. (umassmed.edu)
  • Transient hyperammonemia of the neonate (THAN) is an abnormal condition characterized by increase of the ammonia blood levels (above 110 μ mol/L in term infants and above 150 μ mol/L in preterm infants) and do not associated with inborn errors of metabolism. (neonatology-nmo.ru)
  • Early identification and proper antepartum management were essential to prevent asphyxia neonatorum in mother with risk factors. (isainsmedis.id)
  • The neonate is examined by a health care worker who checks the presence of risk factors for infection (Section 3). (cdc.gov)
  • The e-CRFm is completed at the time of the delivery if the mother has not already been pre-included, and the neonate is thus recruited at the time of delivery. (cdc.gov)
  • [ 4 ] This possible role of bilirubin in early protection against oxidative injury, coupled with identification of multiple neonatal mechanisms to preserve and potentiate bilirubin production, has led to speculation about an as-yet-unrecognized beneficial role for bilirubin in the human neonate. (medscape.com)
  • However, their role in neonatal asphyxiais remain elusive. (undip.ac.id)
  • She is particularly interested in the role of mechanosensitive cation channel, Piezo1, in gut maturation and regulation of intestinal processes in specific gastrointestinal pathologies affecting the neonate. (ucdavis.edu)
  • There is an impairment of blood flow to placenta vascularization which lead to tissue hypoxia and increase the chance to develop asphyxia neonatorum. (isainsmedis.id)
  • If the neonate dies before the arrival of the investigator, the e-CRFc is completed and a verbal autopsy is carried out by the investigator with the matron and, if possible, the mother or a relative. (cdc.gov)
  • By experimental neurology on kittens, guinea pigs, and monkeys, he and his colleagues created a basis for prevention and treatment of childbirth asphyxia in newborns. (wikipedia.org)