A hydrolase enzyme that converts L-asparagine and water to L-aspartate and NH3. EC 3.5.1.1.
A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias.
A non-essential amino acid that is involved in the metabolic control of cell functions in nerve and brain tissue. It is biosynthesized from ASPARTIC ACID and AMMONIA by asparagine synthetase. (From Concise Encyclopedia Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3rd ed)
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are associated with plants as pathogens, saprophytes, or as constituents of the epiphytic flora.
Immunologically mediated adverse reactions to medicinal substances used legally or illegally.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of asparagine from ammonia and aspartic acid, in the presence of ATP. EC 6.3.1.1.
A chemical that acts as a dopamine beta-hydroxylase inhibitor. Its salts are agricultural fungicides. It is inferior to diethyldithiocarbamate as a chelating agent.
An experimental lymphocytic leukemia of mice.
A species ARTERIVIRUS, occurring in a number of transplantable mouse tumors. Infected mice have permanently elevated serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase.
A non-essential amino acid present abundantly throughout the body and is involved in many metabolic processes. It is synthesized from GLUTAMIC ACID and AMMONIA. It is the principal carrier of NITROGEN in the body and is an important energy source for many cells.
Glutaminase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamine to glutamate and ammonia, playing a crucial role in nitrogen metabolism and amino acid homeostasis within various tissues and cells, including the brain, kidney, and immune cells.
Forceful administration into a muscle of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the muscle and any tissue covering it.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of aspartic acid to ammonia and fumaric acid in plants and some microorganisms. EC 4.3.1.1.
Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.
Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
One of the non-essential amino acids commonly occurring in the L-form. It is found in animals and plants, especially in sugar cane and sugar beets. It may be a neurotransmitter.
A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)
Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.
An antitumor alkaloid isolated from VINCA ROSEA. (Merck, 11th ed.)

Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine concentrations after Escherichia coli asparaginase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. (1/487)

PURPOSE: The CNS is an important sanctuary site in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). CSF asparagine concentration reflects asparaginase systemic pharmacodynamics. We evaluated the time course of CSF asparagine depletion in children with ALL during and after a course of Escherichia coli asparaginase. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-one children (24 newly diagnosed and seven at relapse) received E coli asparaginase 10,000 IU/m2 intramuscularly three times weekly for six and nine doses, respectively, as part of multiagent induction chemotherapy. CSF asparagine levels were measured before, during, and after asparaginase dosing. RESULTS: The percentage of patients with undetectable (< 0.04 micromol/L) CSF asparagine was 3.2% (one of 31 patients) at baseline, 73.9% (17 of 23) during asparaginase therapy, and 56.3% (nine of 16) 1 to 5 days, 43.8% (seven of 16) 6 to 10 days, 20.0% (two of 10) 11 to 30 days and 0% (zero of 21) more than 30 days after asparaginase therapy. The proportion of patients with depleted CSF asparagine was higher during asparaginase therapy than at baseline (P < .001), 11 to 30 days (P = .003), and more than 30 days after asparaginase therapy (P < .001). Median CSF asparagine concentrations were 4.42 micromol/L before, less than 0.04 micromol/L during, and less than 0.04 micromol/L at 1 to 5 days, 1.63 micromol/L at 6 to 10 days, 1.70 micromol/L at 11 to 30 days, and 5.70 micromol/L at more than 30 days after asparaginase therapy, respectively. CSF depletion was more common in patients with low baseline CSF asparagine concentrations (P = .003). CONCLUSION: CSF asparagine concentrations are depleted by conventional doses of E coli asparaginase in the majority of patients, but they rebound once asparaginase therapy is completed.  (+info)

Long-term follow-up results of adult patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma treated with short-term, alternating non-cross-resistant chemotherapy: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study 8702. Lymphoma Study Group. (2/487)

BACKGROUND: Patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and those with lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL) have overlapping clinical and immunophenotypic features and they have been treated with the same or very similar chemotherapy regimens. The goal of this multi-institutional phase II trial was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of a short-term, six-drug chemotherapy regimen for adult patients with untreated ALL or LBL. METHODS: Forty-six eligible patients, 41 with ALL and five with LBL, were treated with a short-term (planned total therapy duration; 36-38 weeks), simplified chemotherapy program; two courses of VEPA-L (vincristine, cyclophosphamide, prednisolone, doxorubicin, I-asparaginase plus intrathecal methotrexate and prednisolone) followed by four courses of M-VEPA (methotrexate plus VEPA), without the traditional maintenance therapy using daily 6-mercaptopurine and weekly methotrexate. RESULTS: Thirty-six (78%; 95% confidence interval 64-89%) of the 46 eligible patients achieved complete remission (CR). Among the 36 patients who achieved CR, four (11%) died of treatment complications, 26 (72%) relapsed and six (17%) remain alive in continuous CR. The median survival for all 46 eligible patients is 14 months and the median disease-free survival (DFS) for the 36 patients who achieved CR is 11 months. The estimate of the proportion of survival at 7 years of all 46 eligible patients is 15% at a median follow-up time of 96 months and that of DFS of the 36 patients achieving CR is 17% at a median follow-up time of 93 months. Subgroup analysis showed that an elevated serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level, age of 30 years or older, the presence of B-symptom and T-cell phenotype were likely to be associated with shortened survival. Although the observed CR rate (78%) is within the range of satisfaction, the long-term survival rate (15%) is inferior to those of published programs incorporating maintenance therapy. CONCLUSIONS: A fraction of adult patients with ALL or LBL are curable with a short-term, six-drug chemotherapy regimen. However, this simplified therapy of shorter duration cannot be recommended.  (+info)

Fractionated cyclophosphamide added to the IVAP regimen (idarubicin-vincristine-L-asparaginase-prednisone) could lower the risk of primary refractory disease in T-lineage but not B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: first results from a phase II clinical study. (3/487)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: In a prior study, primary resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RES-ALL) was observed in 11 of 176 (6%) adult patients treated with a four drug regimen (IVAP), its incidence being higher in T-cell or Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome/BCR-ABL rearrangement positive ALL cases with a blast cell count >25x10(9)/L (RES-ALL rate 19%, p=0.04). Aiming to minimize this percentage of resistant disease, fractionated cyclophosphamide (f-CY) was then added to the IVAP regimen. DESIGN AND METHODS: Study 08-96 was a prospective, collaborative phase II trial carried out at eight general hospital centers specialized in the care of hematologic malignancies. Historical IVAP-treated patients served as a retrospective control group. All consecutive, untreated patients (>15 years) with a diagnosis of ALL or advanced-stage lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL) were eligible. RES-ALL was defined as the persistence of >5% ALL cells in the bone marrow 28-40 days after the start of the IVAP regimen (idarubicin 10 mg/m(2)/d on days 1 and 2; vincristine 2 mg on days 1, 8 and 15; L-asparaginase 6,000 U/m(2) on alternate days 3 6 from day 8; prednisone 60 mg/m(2)/d on days 1-21). In the new study, two f-CY schedules were sequentially adopted: CY 150 or 75 mg/m(2)/bd, given for 4 consecutive days before IVAP (f-CY 1200 or 600, expressing total CY dose in mg/m(2)). RESULTS: Eighty-eight patients were evaluable (age range 15-74 years, blast count 0-240x10(9)/L, 14 T-lineage, 74 B-lineage, 13 Ph/BCR-ABL+). The first 39 patients received the f-CY 1200 schedule, 22 patients received f-CY 600, and the last 27 patients were not given any f-CY. These changes were dictated by the results of interim analyses of the f-CY groups (RES-ALL rate not reduced, myelotoxicity increased). Altogether, compared with the historical IVAP and no f-CY groups, the incidence of RES-ALL was not decreased by the addition of f-CY 1200/600 in B-lineage ALL, regardless of Ph/BCR-ABL expression and blast count. However, none of 14 T-ALL cases in the new study had RES-ALL (8 in f-CY groups, 5 of whom with >25x10(9)/L blast cells), compared to 5/39 (13%, overall) or 4/21 (19%, with >25x10(9)/L blast cells) among the control cases. Owing to small sample size, this difference was not statistically significant. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary experience suggests that T-ALL may be more sensitive than B-lineage ALL to an early therapy including f-CY. The hypothesis could be tested in a larger clinical trial.  (+info)

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in children: results of treatment with LSA2-L2 protocol. (4/487)

The results obtained with very intensive treatment in previously untreated patients early in the disease are encouraging, and we hope will change the philosophy of most investigators that even in far advanced disease such as those with marrow metastases or multiple primary sites, one can still obtain complete regression at all tumour sites within 1 to 1 1/2 months from onset of therapy by combined treatment with multiple chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy to one or more sites.  (+info)

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: cyclical chemotherapy with three combinations of four drugs (COAP-POMP-CART regimen). (5/487)

Forty-two adults and children with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) were entered into a programme of chemotherapy in which three combinations, each of four drugs were administered in a predetermined cyclical rotation together with cranial irradiation and intrathecal injections of methotrexate. Forty-one patients (98%) entered remission and no patient developed neuroleukaemia. Relapse of ALL occurred in 10 patients, and three patients died during remission, while eight patients stopped treatment after two and a half years and have remained in remission for two to 26 months. Comparison of remission and survival experience in this mixed group of children and adults with the experience of children treated at Memphis and in the Medical Research Council's UKALL-I trial showed no significant differences. On the other hand, analysis by prognostic factors showed that neither age nor blast cell count at presentation had any adverse effect in patients treated in this study. No relapses occurred in nine patients with blast cell counts greater than 20 x 109/1 at presentation. This regimen is effective treatment for ALL and may be of special value in patients with poor prognoses. The regiment has not as yet proved superior for the treatment of children with ALL who do not have adverse prognostic features.  (+info)

Applications of synchrotron radiation to protein crystallography: preliminary results. (6/487)

X-ray diffraction photographs of protein single crystals have been obtained using synchrotron radiation produced by an electron-positron storage ring. The diffracted intensities observed with this unconventional source are a factor of at least 60 greater than those obtained with a sealed x-ray tube using the same crystal and instrumental parameters. Diffraction data have been collected by the precession method to higher resolution and using smaller protein crystals than would have been possible with a conventional source. The crystal decay rate in the synchrotron beam for several proteins appears to be substantially less than that observed with Ni-filtered Cu radiation. The tunable nature of the source (which allows selective optimization of anomalous contributions to the scattering factors) and the low angular divergence of the beam make the source very useful for single crystal protein diffraction studies.  (+info)

Hypersensitivity to tobacco antigen. (7/487)

A glycoprotein of molecular weight 18,000 was purified from saline extracts of cured tobacco leaves by ammonium sulfate fractionation, chromatography on Sephadex G-25 and continuous-flow preparative electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel. Twelve of 31 volunteers (6/15 smokers and 6/16 nonsmokers) exhibited immediate cutaneous hypersensitivity (wheal and flare reactions) when injected intracutaneously with 2 mug of this material. Immunochemically similar material was demonstrated in, and purified from, cigarette smoke condensate and cigarette smoke. The concentration in cigarette smoke condensate ("tar") was determined to be 1.8-3.6 mg/g. Antigenically crossreactive material was also demonstrated in eggplants, green peppers, potatoes, and tomatoes, which, like tobacco, are members of the family Solanaceae.  (+info)

Binding of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin to asparagine-linked complex and hybrid carbohydrates. (8/487)

Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin is a binary toxin composed of an enzymatic subunit (C2I) capable of ADP-ribosylating actin and a binding subunit (C2II) that is responsible for interaction with receptors on eukaryotic cells. Here we show that binding of C2 toxin depends on the presence of asparagine-linked carbohydrates. A recently identified Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant (Fritz, G., Schroeder, P., and Aktories, K. (1995) Infect. Immun. 63, 2334-2340) was found to be deficient in N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I. C2 sensitivity of this mutant was restored by transfection of an N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I cDNA. C2 toxin sensitivity was reduced after inhibition of alpha-mannosidase II. In contrast, Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants deficient in sialylated (Lec2) or galactosylated (Lec8) glycoconjugates showed an increase in toxin sensitivity compared with wild-type cells. Our results show that the GlcNAc residue linked beta-1,2 to the alpha-1,3-mannose of the asparagine-linked core structure is essential for C2II binding to Chinese hamster ovary cells.  (+info)

Asparaginase is a medication that is used in the treatment of certain types of cancer, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). It is an enzyme that breaks down the amino acid asparagine, which is a building block of proteins. Some cancer cells are unable to produce their own asparagine and rely on obtaining it from the bloodstream. By reducing the amount of asparagine in the blood, asparaginase can help to slow or stop the growth of these cancer cells.

Asparaginase is usually given as an injection into a muscle (intramuscularly) or into a vein (intravenously). It may be given alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. The specific dosage and duration of treatment will depend on the individual's medical history, the type and stage of cancer being treated, and how well the person tolerates the medication.

Like all medications, asparaginase can cause side effects. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and changes in liver function tests. Less common but more serious side effects may include allergic reactions, pancreatitis, and blood clotting problems. It is important for patients to discuss the potential risks and benefits of asparaginase with their healthcare provider before starting treatment.

Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma (previously known as Precursor T-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma) is a type of cancer that affects the early stages of T-cell development. It is a subtype of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is characterized by the overproduction of immature white blood cells called lymphoblasts in the bone marrow, blood, and other organs.

In Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma, these abnormal lymphoblasts accumulate primarily in the lymphoid tissues such as the thymus and lymph nodes, leading to the enlargement of these organs. This subtype is more aggressive than other forms of ALL and has a higher risk of spreading to the central nervous system (CNS).

The medical definition of Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma includes:

1. A malignant neoplasm of immature T-cell precursors, also known as lymphoblasts.
2. Characterized by the proliferation and accumulation of these abnormal cells in the bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissues such as the thymus and lymph nodes.
3. Often associated with chromosomal abnormalities, genetic mutations, or aberrant gene expression that contribute to its aggressive behavior and poor prognosis.
4. Typically presents with symptoms related to bone marrow failure (anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia), lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes), hepatosplenomegaly (enlarged liver and spleen), and potential CNS involvement.
5. Diagnosed through a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies, and laboratory tests, including bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, immunophenotyping, cytogenetic analysis, and molecular genetic testing.
6. Treated with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy regimens, often combined with radiation therapy and/or stem cell transplantation to achieve remission and improve survival outcomes.

Asparagine is an organic compound that is classified as a naturally occurring amino acid. It contains an amino group, a carboxylic acid group, and a side chain consisting of a single carbon atom bonded to a nitrogen atom, making it a neutral amino acid. Asparagine is encoded by the genetic codon AAU or AAC in the DNA sequence.

In the human body, asparagine plays important roles in various biological processes, including serving as a building block for proteins and participating in the synthesis of other amino acids. It can also act as a neurotransmitter and is involved in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Asparagine can be found in many foods, particularly in high-protein sources such as meat, fish, eggs, and dairy products.

Erwinia is a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are primarily plant pathogens. They are part of the Enterobacteriaceae family and can be found in soil, water, and plant surfaces. Some species of Erwinia cause diseases in plants such as fireblight in apples and pears, soft rot in a wide range of vegetables, and bacterial leaf spot in ornamental plants. They can infect plants through wounds or natural openings and produce enzymes that break down plant tissues, causing decay and wilting.

It's worth noting that Erwinia species are not typically associated with human or animal diseases, except for a few cases where they have been reported to cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals.

Drug hypersensitivity is an abnormal immune response to a medication or its metabolites. It is a type of adverse drug reaction that occurs in susceptible individuals, characterized by the activation of the immune system leading to inflammation and tissue damage. This reaction can range from mild symptoms such as skin rashes, hives, and itching to more severe reactions like anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening.

Drug hypersensitivity reactions can be classified into two main types: immediate (or IgE-mediated) and delayed (or non-IgE-mediated). Immediate reactions occur within minutes to a few hours after taking the medication and are mediated by the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators from mast cells and basophils. Delayed reactions, on the other hand, can take several days to develop and are caused by T-cell activation and subsequent cytokine release.

Common drugs that can cause hypersensitivity reactions include antibiotics (such as penicillins and sulfonamides), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), monoclonal antibodies, and chemotherapeutic agents. It is important to note that previous exposure to a medication does not always guarantee the development of hypersensitivity reactions, as they can also occur after the first administration in some cases.

The diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity involves a thorough medical history, physical examination, and sometimes skin or laboratory tests. Treatment typically includes avoiding the offending medication and managing symptoms with antihistamines, corticosteroids, or other medications as needed. In severe cases, emergency medical care may be required to treat anaphylaxis or other life-threatening reactions.

Aspartate-ammonia ligase, also known as aspartate transcarbamylase or ATC, is an enzyme that catalyzes the first reaction in the synthesis of pyrimidines, which are essential components of nucleotides and nucleic acids. The reaction catalyzed by aspartate-ammonia ligase is the condensation of aspartate and ammonia to form N-carbamoyl-L-aspartate and releases ADP and Pi. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis, and its activity is tightly regulated in response to changes in cellular demand for nucleotides. Defects in aspartate-ammonia ligase have been implicated in several genetic disorders, including ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and citrullinemia.

Dimethyldithiocarbamate is a chemical compound with the formula (CH3)2NCS2-. It is a salt or ester of dimethyldithiocarbamic acid. This compound is used in various industrial and agricultural applications, such as a fungicide and a corrosion inhibitor.

In medical contexts, dimethyldithiocarbamate compounds have been studied for their potential therapeutic effects. For example, some derivatives of dimethyldithiocarbamate have been shown to have antioxidant properties and may help protect against oxidative stress in the body. Additionally, certain dimethyldithiocarbamate compounds have been investigated for their potential anti-inflammatory effects and may be useful in treating conditions associated with chronic inflammation.

However, it is important to note that dimethyldithiocarbamate compounds can also have toxic effects on the body, particularly at high doses. Therefore, they must be used carefully and under medical supervision if they are to be used for therapeutic purposes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Leukemia L5178" is not a recognized medical term or classification for leukemia. The World Health Organization (WHO) and other organizations have established specific classifications for different types of leukemias based on factors such as cell type, genetic mutations, and other characteristics. However, "L5178" does not appear in these classifications.

It's possible that "L5178" might refer to a specific research cell line used in scientific studies, but without more context, it's difficult to provide a precise definition. If you have more information about where you encountered this term, I may be able to provide a more accurate response.

Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV) is an RNA virus that primarily infects mice. It is a member of the family Arteriviridae and is unique to murine species. LDV infection results in a persistent, chronic viremia without causing any overt signs of disease in the host. However, it is associated with a significant increase in serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity due to virus-induced damage to infected cells.

The virus infects various tissues and cell types, including macrophages and hepatocytes, and establishes a persistent infection by evading the host's immune response. LDV has been widely used as a model system for studying viral pathogenesis, persistence, and immunosuppression in mice.

It is important to note that Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus is not known to infect humans or other primates, and it is primarily studied in the context of basic research on viral infections and the immune response.

Glutamine is defined as a conditionally essential amino acid in humans, which means that it can be produced by the body under normal circumstances, but may become essential during certain conditions such as stress, illness, or injury. It is the most abundant free amino acid found in the blood and in the muscles of the body.

Glutamine plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including protein synthesis, energy production, and acid-base balance. It serves as an important fuel source for cells in the intestines, immune system, and skeletal muscles. Glutamine has also been shown to have potential benefits in wound healing, gut function, and immunity, particularly during times of physiological stress or illness.

In summary, glutamine is a vital amino acid that plays a critical role in maintaining the health and function of various tissues and organs in the body.

Glutaminase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-glutamine, which is a type of amino acid, into glutamate and ammonia. This reaction is an essential part of nitrogen metabolism in many organisms, including humans. There are several forms of glutaminase found in different parts of the body, with varying properties and functions.

In humans, there are two major types of glutaminase: mitochondrial and cytosolic. Mitochondrial glutaminase is primarily found in the kidneys and brain, where it plays a crucial role in energy metabolism by converting glutamine into glutamate, which can then be further metabolized to produce ATP (adenosine triphosphate), a major source of cellular energy.

Cytosolic glutaminase, on the other hand, is found in many tissues throughout the body and is involved in various metabolic processes, including nucleotide synthesis and protein degradation.

Glutaminase activity has been implicated in several disease states, including cancer, where some tumors have been shown to have elevated levels of glutaminase expression, allowing them to use glutamine as a major source of energy and growth. Inhibitors of glutaminase are currently being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer.

"Intramuscular injections" refer to a medical procedure where a medication or vaccine is administered directly into the muscle tissue. This is typically done using a hypodermic needle and syringe, and the injection is usually given into one of the large muscles in the body, such as the deltoid (shoulder), vastus lateralis (thigh), or ventrogluteal (buttock) muscles.

Intramuscular injections are used for a variety of reasons, including to deliver medications that need to be absorbed slowly over time, to bypass stomach acid and improve absorption, or to ensure that the medication reaches the bloodstream quickly and directly. Common examples of medications delivered via intramuscular injection include certain vaccines, antibiotics, and pain relievers.

It is important to follow proper technique when administering intramuscular injections to minimize pain and reduce the risk of complications such as infection or injury to surrounding tissues. Proper site selection, needle length and gauge, and injection technique are all critical factors in ensuring a safe and effective intramuscular injection.

Aspartate ammonia-lyase is an enzyme that plays a role in the metabolism of certain amino acids. Its systematic name is L-aspartate ammonia-lyase (ADI), and it is also known as aspartase. This enzyme is responsible for catalyzing the conversion of L-aspartic acid to fumaric acid and ammonia.

L-aspartic acid + H2O → fumaric acid + NH3

Aspartate ammonia-lyase is found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, and plants. In bacteria, this enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of several essential amino acids. In plants, aspartate ammonia-lyase plays a role in the synthesis of certain aromatic compounds. The human body does not produce this enzyme, so it is not relevant to medical definitions in the context of human health and disease.

Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are a family of synthetic, water-soluble polymers with a wide range of molecular weights. They are commonly used in the medical field as excipients in pharmaceutical formulations due to their ability to improve drug solubility, stability, and bioavailability. PEGs can also be used as laxatives to treat constipation or as bowel cleansing agents prior to colonoscopy examinations. Additionally, some PEG-conjugated drugs have been developed for use in targeted cancer therapies.

In a medical context, PEGs are often referred to by their average molecular weight, such as PEG 300, PEG 400, PEG 1500, and so on. Higher molecular weight PEGs tend to be more viscous and have longer-lasting effects in the body.

It's worth noting that while PEGs are generally considered safe for use in medical applications, some people may experience allergic reactions or hypersensitivity to these compounds. Prolonged exposure to high molecular weight PEGs has also been linked to potential adverse effects, such as decreased fertility and developmental toxicity in animal studies. However, more research is needed to fully understand the long-term safety of PEGs in humans.

Antineoplastic agents are a class of drugs used to treat malignant neoplasms or cancer. These agents work by inhibiting the growth and proliferation of cancer cells, either by killing them or preventing their division and replication. Antineoplastic agents can be classified based on their mechanism of action, such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, topoisomerase inhibitors, mitotic inhibitors, and targeted therapy agents.

Alkylating agents work by adding alkyl groups to DNA, which can cause cross-linking of DNA strands and ultimately lead to cell death. Antimetabolites interfere with the metabolic processes necessary for DNA synthesis and replication, while topoisomerase inhibitors prevent the relaxation of supercoiled DNA during replication. Mitotic inhibitors disrupt the normal functioning of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for cell division. Targeted therapy agents are designed to target specific molecular abnormalities in cancer cells, such as mutated oncogenes or dysregulated signaling pathways.

It's important to note that antineoplastic agents can also affect normal cells and tissues, leading to various side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hair loss, and myelosuppression (suppression of bone marrow function). Therefore, the use of these drugs requires careful monitoring and management of their potential adverse effects.

Aspartic acid is an α-amino acid with the chemical formula HO2CCH(NH2)CO2H. It is one of the twenty standard amino acids, and it is a polar, negatively charged, and hydrophilic amino acid. In proteins, aspartic acid usually occurs in its ionized form, aspartate, which has a single negative charge.

Aspartic acid plays important roles in various biological processes, including metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, and energy production. It is also a key component of many enzymes and proteins, where it often contributes to the formation of ionic bonds and helps stabilize protein structure.

In addition to its role as a building block of proteins, aspartic acid is also used in the synthesis of other important biological molecules, such as nucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA. It is also a component of the dipeptide aspartame, an artificial sweetener that is widely used in food and beverages.

Like other amino acids, aspartic acid is essential for human health, but it cannot be synthesized by the body and must be obtained through the diet. Foods that are rich in aspartic acid include meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, eggs, legumes, and some fruits and vegetables.

Cytarabine is a chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of various types of cancer, including leukemias and lymphomas. Its chemical name is cytosine arabinoside, and it works by interfering with the DNA synthesis of cancer cells, which ultimately leads to their death.

Cytarabine is often used in combination with other chemotherapy drugs and may be administered through various routes, such as intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous injection, or orally. The specific dosage and duration of treatment will depend on the type and stage of cancer being treated, as well as the patient's overall health status.

Like all chemotherapy drugs, cytarabine can cause a range of side effects, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hair loss, and an increased risk of infection. It may also cause more serious side effects, such as damage to the liver, kidneys, or nervous system, and it is important for patients to be closely monitored during treatment to minimize these risks.

It's important to note that medical treatments should only be administered under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional, and this information should not be used as a substitute for medical advice.

Remission induction is a treatment approach in medicine, particularly in the field of oncology and hematology. It refers to the initial phase of therapy aimed at reducing or eliminating the signs and symptoms of active disease, such as cancer or autoimmune disorders. The primary goal of remission induction is to achieve a complete response (disappearance of all detectable signs of the disease) or a partial response (a decrease in the measurable extent of the disease). This phase of treatment is often intensive and may involve the use of multiple drugs or therapies, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or targeted therapy. After remission induction, patients may receive additional treatments to maintain the remission and prevent relapse, known as consolidation or maintenance therapy.

Vincristine is an antineoplastic agent, specifically a vinca alkaloid. It is derived from the Madagascar periwinkle plant (Catharanthus roseus). Vincristine binds to tubulin, a protein found in microtubules, and inhibits their polymerization, which results in disruption of mitotic spindles leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (programmed cell death). It is used in the treatment of various types of cancer including leukemias, lymphomas, and solid tumors. Common side effects include peripheral neuropathy, constipation, and alopecia.

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In enzymology, a glutamin-(asparagin-)ase (EC 3.5.1.38) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction L-glutamine + H2O ... and properties of Achromobacteraceae glutaminase-asparaginase with antitumor activity". J. Biol. Chem. 247 (1): 84-90. PMID ...
... at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Portal: ... N4-(beta-N-acetylglucosaminyl)-L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.26, aspartylglucosylamine deaspartylase, aspartylglucosylaminase, ...
Flammulina velutipes creates asparaginase. Plinabulin is a fungal isolate derivative currently being researched for anticancer ...
Coli L-asparaginase in man". Cancer. 25 (2): 253-278. doi:10.1002/1097-0142(197002)25:2. 3.0.CO;2-U. PMID 4905153. S2CID ...
L-asparaginase is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the ASRGL1 gene. The ASRGL1 protein consists of 308 amino acids and is ... "Entrez Gene: ASRGL1 asparaginase like 1". Li, Wenzong; Cantor, Jason R.; Yogesha, S. D.; Yang, Shirley; Chantranupong, Lynne; ... The ASRGL1 enzyme has both L-asparaginase and beta-aspartyl peptidase activity and may be involved in the production of L- ... Bush LA, Herr JC, Wolkowicz M, Sherman NE, Shore A, Flickinger CJ (2002). "A novel asparaginase-like protein is a sperm ...
ERWINAZE- asparaginase injection, powder, lyophilized, for solution drug label/data at DailyMed from U.S. National Library of ... Anonymous (2012). "Asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi (erwinaze) for all". Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics. 54 (1388): ... Most noble of its contributions is an enzyme, asparaginase, being used in conjunction with other chemotherapeutic agents for ... coli derived asparaginase Elspar or pegaspargase (Oncaspar). Secondly, with a strong governmental push towards increasing ...
Jerebzoff-Quintin, Simonne; Jerebzoff, Stephan (1985). "L-Asparaginase activity in Leptosphaeria michotii. Isolation and ... "Crystal Structure and Allosteric Regulation of the Cytoplasmic Escherichia coli l-Asparaginase I". Journal of Molecular Biology ...
Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia (2017-03-01). "Asparaginase pharmacology: challenges still to be faced". Cancer Chemotherapy and ...
Shrivastava A, Khan AA, Shrivastav A, Jain SK, Singhal PK (2012). "Kinetic studies of L-asparaginase from Penicillium digitatum ... Penicillium is a potential source of the leukemia medicine asparaginase. Some countries have approved beta-glucan fungal ...
For children with low-risk ALL, standard therapy usually consists of three drugs (prednisone, L-asparaginase, and vincristine) ... other drug plans may include L-asparaginase or cyclophosphamide. ...
"Selective apoptosis of natural killer-cell tumours by l-asparaginase". British Journal of Haematology. 130 (6): 860-868. doi: ...
"Solid-State Fermentation vs Submerged Fermentation for the Production of l-Asparaginase". Advances in Food and Nutrition ...
Bacillus is utilized in the production of the chemotherapy medicine L-asparaginase. Bacillus subtilis is utilized in the ... a bacterium used to produce the chemotherapy medicine asparaginase Fungal isolates Medicinal molds Sponge isolates Streptomyces ...
... has been used in conjunction with phenol red to monitor the fungal asparaginase enzyme activity with phenol ... ISBN 978-0-470-40753-0. "Isolation and screening of L-asparaginase free of glutaminase and urease from fungal sp". researchgate ... Dhale, Mohan (July 2014). "A comparative rapid and sensitive method to screen l-asparaginase producing fungi". Journal of ...
Kavitha, A; Vijayalakshmi, M (2009). "Optimization and purification of L-asparaginase produced by Streptomyces tendae TK-VL_333 ...
FraE is specific for F-Asn and cannot function as a general periplasmic asparaginase like ansB. fraA encodes a transporter of ... fraE encodes the periplasmic fructose-asparaginase FraE that removes ammonia from F-Asn to form fructose-aspartate (F-Asp). ... Mutations in fraE do not prevent F-Asn utilization due to redundancy conferred by the ansB gene that codes for the asparaginase ... an asparaginase homolog, contributes to fructose-asparagine but not asparagine utilization". Journal of Bacteriology. 199 (22 ...
... who noted that genes associated with asparaginase sensitivity failed to score in their genome-wide screen of asparaginase- ... 2019) used this method to identify a synthetic lethal interaction between the chemotherapy drug asparaginase and two genes in ... April 2019). "Synthetic Lethality of Wnt Pathway Activation and Asparaginase in Drug-Resistant Acute Leukemias". Cancer Cell. ...
... is a modified version of the enzyme asparaginase which has undergone PEGylation. It works by breaking down the ...
The first enzyme studied under artificial cell encapsulation was asparaginase for the treatment of lymphosarcoma in mice. This ... "The in vivo effects of semipermeable microcapsules containing L-asparaginase on 6C3HED lymphosarcoma". Nature. 229 (5280): 117- ...
The most common treatment is a combination of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin. Other ...
1994). "Hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis and other complications of L-asparaginase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia". J ... L-asparaginase, and antipsychotics. The acute administration of stimulants such as amphetamines typically produces ...
... asparagin)ase". Biochemistry International. 12 (3): 413-20. PMID 3707592. (Articles with short description, Short description ...
This can be discouraged by heating at a lower temperature, adding asparaginase, or injecting carbon dioxide. In the cooking ...
Insolubilization of L-Asparaginase by covalent attachment to nylon tubing (Ph.D.). The University of Texas at Austin. OCLC ... Allison, James Patrick (1973). Studies on bacterial asparaginases: I. Isolation and characterization of a tumor inhibitory ...
In reaction that is the reverse of its biosynthesis, asparagine is hydrolyzed to aspartate by asparaginase. Aspartate then ...
As a result, L-asparaginase is a common chemotherapy drug utilized in the treatment of ALL and may have applications in other ... For example, in mouse models, 24 hours after exposure to L-asparaginase, tumors resistant to the depletion responded with 5- to ... However, the opposite effect is visible in cases of asparaginase resistant cancers. In these resistant cancers, the effect of ... It has been further demonstrated in mouse model systems that repeated subculturing of L-asparaginase sensitive tumor cells in ...
SurEstructural domain has a similar topology to the N-terminal protein domain of the glutaminase/asparaginase family. The C- ...
Gentille C, Qin Q, Barbieri A, Ravi PS, Iyer S (2017). "Use of PEG-asparaginase in monomorphic epitheliotropic intestinal T- ...
N(4)-(beta-N-acetylglucosaminyl)-L-asparaginase is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the AGA gene. Aspartylglucosaminidase ...
Asparaginase is an enzyme that is used as a medication and in food manufacturing. As a medication, L-asparaginase is used to ... The most common use of asparaginases is as a processing aid in the manufacture of food. Asparaginases are used as a food ... These participants had developed allergy to another type of asparaginase (E.coli based long acting asparaginase). The trial was ... February 2016). "Activity and Toxicity of Intravenous Erwinia Asparaginase Following Allergy to E. coli-Derived Asparaginase in ...
Asparaginase Erwinia Chrysanthemi Injection: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Before taking asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi,. *tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to asparaginase erwinia ... asparaginase [Elspar] or pegaspargase [Oncaspar]). Asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi is an enzyme that interferes with natural ... Asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi comes as a powder to be added to fluid and injected into a muscle by a doctor or nurse in a ...
Asparaginase is an enzyme that breaks down extracellular asparagine into aspartic acid and ammonia. Depletion of extracellular ... This review discusses the incidence of asparaginase-related adverse events, compares available asparaginase formulations with ... Asparaginase is an enzyme that breaks down extracellular asparagine into aspartic acid and ammonia. Depletion of extracellular ... Asparaginase therapy is an essential component of the treatment protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The effect of ...
The enzyme L-Asparaginase destroys asparagine outside the cells forcing the cells to rely completely on what they can produce ... Asparaginase is normally derived from E. coli bacteria. With the loss of the commercial product Elspar®, a product derived from ... L-asparaginase is an enzyme produced by bacteria. It is inherently a foreign protein and as such can produce an anaphylactic ... The enzyme L-Asparaginase destroys asparagine outside the cells forcing the cells to rely completely on what they can produce ...
Searching News Database: asparaginase HSMN NewsFeed - 17 Feb 2020. PharmaMar and Jazz Pharmaceuticals Announce FDA Acceptance ...
We showed that asparaginase is rapidly cleared from the serum by liver-, spleen-, and bone marrow-resident phagocytic cells. As ... In Vivo Imaging of Antileukemic Drug Asparaginase Reveals a Rapid Macrophage-Mediated Clearance from the Bone Marrow J Nucl Med ... The antileukemic drug asparaginase, a key component in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acts by depleting ... Methods: In vivo localization of 111In-labeled Escherichia coli asparaginase was performed in C57BL/6 mice by both small-animal ...
... which is the enzyme l-asparaginase encapsulated in red blood cells as added to gemcitabine or FOLFIRINOX treatment regimens for ... It was later found that the causative factor in the serum was the enzyme asparaginase. Since that time, l-asparaginase has ... The Enzyme Returns: L-asparaginase encased in red blood cells for pancreatic cancer. By pancreatica , Published May 29, 2017 ... L-asparaginase is an interesting drug agent from a number of standpoints. Asparagine is a non-essential amino acid that plays ...
Asparagine is an especially important amino acid for lymphatic cancer cells and asparaginase is able to destroy it in a way ... L-Asparaginase is a helpful chemotherapy agent, especially in the treatment of lymphatic cancers. ... L-asparaginase is an enzyme produced by bacteria. It is inherently a foreign protein and as such, can produce an anaphylactic ... Asparaginase is normally derived from E. coli bacteria. With the loss of the commercial product Elspar®, a product derived from ...
Asparagine is an especially important amino acid for lymphatic cancer cells and asparaginase is able to destroy it in a way ... L-Asparaginase is a helpful chemotherapy agent, especially in the treatment of lymphatic cancers. ... L-asparaginase is an enzyme produced by bacteria. It is inherently a foreign protein and as such can produce an anaphylactic ... Asparaginase is normally derived from E. coli bacteria. With the loss of the commercial product Elspar®, a product derived from ...
L-Asparaginase is a vital cancer treatment drug that hinders cancer cell growth by breaking down asparagine, an essential amino ... L-asparaginase is known for its high efficacy in treating ALL (Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia), particularly in children, and ... L-Asparaginase acts by depleting the asparagine levels, thereby disrupting the cancer cells ability to produce proteins and ...
... asparaginase Government Tender,procurement of asparaginase,Tender for asparaginase,asparaginase Tenders in India,asparaginase ... Asparaginase Tenders in India. Explore the latest information on asparaginase Tenders on National Tenders. We provide the ... active tender list for Private Tenders, Public Tenders, Online Tenders, Business Tenders, Government Tenders, and asparaginase ...
Custom*: Escolha a quantidade desejada de forma personalizada, desde que seja acima de 250 KU. Exemplo: 275 KU ...
Recombinant Asparaginase CAS UENA-0231 For substrate-product: catalyze asparagine to aspartate; indications: acute ... You are here: Home / Products / Jiangsu Watson Bio Ltd / Enzyme / Recombinant Asparaginase CAS UENA-0231 ... Recombinant Asparaginase CAS UENA-0231 June 29, 2022. /in Enzyme, Enzyme, Jiangsu Watson Bio Ltd, Products, Ulcho Biochemical ... Specifications and Other Information of Our Recombinant Asparaginase CAS UENA-0231. Identification Methods. HNMR, HPLC ...
Asparaginase (Erwinia) published on Jun 2018 by American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. ...
Asparaginase belongs to class of medications called antineoplastic agents. Asparaginase is an enzyme that interferes with ... Be the first to review "Bionase Asparaginase 5000IU" Cancel reply. Your rating. Rate…. Perfect. Good. Average. Not that bad. ...
Types of Asparaginase Therapy. There are currently 3 formulations of asparaginase therapy available in the United States, which ... Erwinia asparaginase after allergy to E. coli asparaginase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Pediatr Blood Cancer ... Escherichia coli (E coli)-derived L-asparaginase (Elspar; LASP) is an asparaginase preparation that was historically used ... Activity and toxicity of intravenous Erwinia asparaginase following allergy to E. coli-derived asparaginase in children and ...
Title: Development of Human Asparaginase for Cancer Therapy. Principal Investigator: Arnon Lavie. Location: Chicago, IL. ...
Peg L Asparaginase) is a prescription drug used to treat blood cancer (Acute lymphocytic leukemia) and Hodgkins disease. It ... Be the first to review "Hamsyl - Peg L Asparaginase Inj" Cancel reply. Your email address will not be published. Required ... Hamsyl 3750 IU (Peg L Asparaginase) is a prescription drug used to treat blood cancer (Acute lymphocytic leukemia) and ...
Asparaginase, Liquid. Acrylaway® L. Acrylaway® L for liquid processes reduces acrylamide levels by up to 95%. It doesnt affect ... How asparaginases reduce acrylamide. Starchy foods usually contain the amino acid asparagine. In the Maillard reaction, ... Asparaginases convert asparagine into another common amino acid, aspartic acid. That means it cant be converted into ... Asparaginases convert asparagine into another common amino acid, aspartic acid. That means the asparagine cant convert into ...
L-asparaginases have an acknowledge role in food and pharmaceutical industries. Accordingly, efforts to produce highly ... asparaginase and provide its biochemical and structural characterization. The results obtained suggest the potential of the ... efficient, selective and stable L-asparaginases are currently underway. One of the strategies used to fulfill this goal ...
L-Asparaginase converts L-asparagine to L-aspartic acid and causes cancer cells to starve. The main idea of the current study ... L-Asparaginase converts L-asparagine to L-aspartic acid and causes cancer cells to starve. The main idea of the current study ... Improvement of biochemical properties of asparaginase by immobilization on cysteine functionalized magnetic Fe3O4@Au NPs. ... Montazeri, A. R., Maghami, P., Ghourchian, H., & Moghimi, H. (2022). Improvement of biochemical properties of asparaginase by ...
Purification and properties of a highly potent antitumor glutaminase-asparaginase from Pseudomonas 7Z. journal, April 1976 * ... Inhibition of mouse retroviral disease by bioactive glutaminase-asparaginase journal, February 1991 * Roberts, J.; McGregor, W ...
Home / PharmacognJ Vol 14, Issue 6 (Suppl), Nov-Dec, 2022 / Risk Factors for Hepatotoxicity From L-Asparaginase Chemotherapy In ... Two of them were excluded due to allergic reaction and enable to continue the L-asparaginase chemotherapy. Thirty of them were ... Risk Factors for Hepatotoxicity From L-Asparaginase Chemotherapy In Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Primary tabs. * ... Introduction: L-asparaginase chemotherapy often causes hepatotoxicity and affects complete remission in pediatric acute ...
Kiyota, H. (1995). Estimation of L-Glutaminase and L-Asparaginase Activities in Soils by the Indophenol Method. Soil Science ... Estimation of L-Glutaminase and L-Asparaginase Activities in Soils by the Indophenol Method. / Kiyota, Hiromasa. In: Soil ... Kiyota, H 1995, Estimation of L-Glutaminase and L-Asparaginase Activities in Soils by the Indophenol Method, Soil Science and ... Estimation of L-Glutaminase and L-Asparaginase Activities in Soils by the Indophenol Method. Soil Science and Plant Nutrition. ...
... PubMed, SCI, Scopus, ... Asparaginase antibody and asparaginase activity in children with higher-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Childrens Cancer ... L-Asparaginase (ASNase; EC 3.5.1.1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-asparagine to L-aspartic acid and ammonia. ... L-Asparaginase (ASNase; EC 3.5.1.1.) is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-asparagine to L-aspartic acid and ammonia ...
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above. ...
Detailed drug Information for Oncovin. Includes common brand names, drug descriptions, warnings, side effects and dosing information.
If you are using this medicine for a long time, tell your doctor about any extra stress or anxiety in your life, including other health concerns and emotional stress. Your dose of this medicine might need to be changed for a short time while you have extra stress. Using too much of this medicine or using it for a long time may increase your risk of having adrenal gland problems. Talk to your doctor right away if you have more than one of these symptoms while you are using this medicine: blurred vision, dizziness or fainting, a fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeat, increased thirst or urination, irritability, or unusual tiredness or weakness. This medicine may cause you to get more infections than usual. Avoid people who are sick or have infections and wash your hands often. If you are exposed to chickenpox or measles, tell your doctor right away. If you start to have a fever, chills, sore throat, or any other sign of an infection, call your doctor right away. Check with your doctor right away ...
We determined the sensitivity of tumor cells to L-asparaginases, as well the effect L-asparaginases on cell growth rate, ... Abakumova O.Yu., Podobed O.V., Karalkin P.A., Kondakova L.I., Sokolov N.N. (2013) Antitumor activity of L-asparaginase from ... We have not found ECAR LANS L-asparaginase effect on normal human fibroblasts growth ability and we had come to conclusion that ... Keywords: L-asparaginase, tumor cells, cytotoxicity, synthesis of protein and DNA, apoptosis, Erwinia carotovora. ...
keywords = "Asparaginase, Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Hyperglycemia, Pancreatitis",. author = "Hsu, {Yu Juei} and Chen, {Yeu Chin} ... Diabetic ketoacidosis and persistent hyperglycemia as long-term complications of L-asparaginase-induced pancreatitis. / Hsu, Yu ... Diabetic ketoacidosis and persistent hyperglycemia as long-term complications of L-asparaginase-induced pancreatitis. Chinese ... Diabetic ketoacidosis and persistent hyperglycemia as long-term complications of L-asparaginase-induced pancreatitis. In: ...
  • As a medication, L-asparaginase is used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL). (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common side effects of asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi (recombinant) when given in combination with chemotherapy for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoblastic lymphoma are abnormal liver tests, nausea, muscle and bone pain, and fatigue. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the primary concerns in acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment is the occurrence of adverse events (AEs) associated with asparaginase therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asparaginase therapy is an essential component of the treatment protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. (nih.gov)
  • This review discusses the incidence of asparaginase-related adverse events, compares available asparaginase formulations with respect to the emergence of certain toxicities, and considers management strategies for these toxicities in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. (nih.gov)
  • The antileukemic drug asparaginase, a key component in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acts by depleting asparagine from the blood. (nih.gov)
  • Since that time, l-asparaginase has emerged as a stalwart in the treatment especially of blood tumors with under-expressed asparagine synthetase, most notably acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). (pancreatica.org)
  • L-asparaginase chemotherapy often causes hepatotoxicity and affects complete remission in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). (phcogj.com)
  • Introduction: Asparaginase is an indispensable drug in treating childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). (deu.edu.tr)
  • Introduction: L-asparaginase (ASNase) depletes L-asparagine and causes the death of leukemic cells, making it a mainstay for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). (ewha.ac.kr)
  • This is the first study to report L. scottii as a source of glutaminase-activity free L-asparaginase, an acute lymphoblastic leukemia drug feature suitable for the treatment of asparagine synthetase negative cancer cells. (edu.pe)
  • IL16 and factor V gene variations are associated with asparaginase-related thrombosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. (cdc.gov)
  • Asparaginase is an enzyme that is used as a medication and in food manufacturing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi is an enzyme that interferes with natural substances necessary for cancer cell growth. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Asparaginase is an enzyme that breaks down extracellular asparagine into aspartic acid and ammonia. (nih.gov)
  • The enzyme L-Asparaginase destroys asparagine outside the cells forcing the cells to rely completely on what they can produce on their own. (marvistavet.com)
  • L-asparaginase is an enzyme produced by bacteria. (marvistavet.com)
  • L-asparaginase may interfere with blood clotting, may raise blood sugar levels, may raise liver enzyme blood tests, and may cause liver disease in some patients. (marvistavet.com)
  • In late March 2017, the French biotech firm Erytech presented results of a IIb clinical trial of eryaspase (trade name: GRASPA) which is the enzyme l-asparaginase encapsulated in red blood cells as added to gemcitabine or FOLFIRINOX treatment regimens for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas), versus these standard therapies alone. (pancreatica.org)
  • It was later found that the causative factor in the serum was the enzyme asparaginase. (pancreatica.org)
  • are intriguing and carry the effect of resurrecting the enzyme l-asparaginase, now as a potential part of a chemotherapy regimen for advanced pancreatic cancer. (pancreatica.org)
  • Asparaginase is an enzyme that interferes with natural processes necessary for cancer cell growth, thereby killing or stopping the growth of cancer cells. (heethealthcare.com)
  • Similar to PEGASP, calaspargase pegol (CALASP) is a PEGylated asparaginase with the same E coli -derived enzyme and polyethylene glycol moiety found in PEGASP. (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • We have not found ECAR LANS L-asparaginase effect on normal human fibroblasts growth ability and we had come to conclusion that enzyme cytotoxcisity related only with asparagine deficiency. (msk.ru)
  • Identification and Structural Analysis of an l-Asparaginase Enzyme from Guinea Pig with Putative Tumor Cell Killing Properties. (expasy.org)
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had pancreatitis (swelling of the pancreas), blood clots, or severe bleeding, especially if these happened during treatment with asparaginase (Elspar) or pegaspargase (Oncaspar). (medlineplus.gov)
  • The primary trade names for l-asparaginase in the U.S. are Elspar and Kidrolase. (pancreatica.org)
  • Indicated as part of a multiagent chemotherapeutic regimen as a substitute for asparaginase (Elspar), which was discontinued by the manufacturer in August 2012. (medscape.com)
  • In vivo localization of 111 In-labeled Escherichia coli asparaginase was performed in C57BL/6 mice by both small-animal SPECT/CT and ex vivo biodistribution studies. (nih.gov)
  • We have studied dose- and time-dependent antitumor and cytotoxic effects of Erwinia carotovora L-asparaginase (ECAR LANS) and Escherichia coli L-asparaginase (MEDAC) on human leukemic cells and human and animal solid tumor cells. (msk.ru)
  • Methods: The study population included newly diagnosed adult Korean ALL patients who received VPDL induction therapy consisting of vincristine, prednisolone, daunorubicin, and Escherichia coli L-asparaginase between 2004 and 2021. (ewha.ac.kr)
  • Production of L-asparaginase by recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in culture. (usp.br)
  • In 1963, asparaginase (ASNase) was identified as an effective antileukemic agent, and subsequent efforts were made to isolate it from bacterial sources and scale up production for clinical trials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within this context, L-asparaginase (ASNase) obtained from yeast species has been poorly studied. (edu.pe)
  • Asparaginase works by breaking down the amino acid known as asparagine without which the cancer cells cannot make protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • L-asparaginase works by exploiting the unusually high requirement tumor cells have for the amino acid "asparagine. (marvistavet.com)
  • When L-asparaginase destroys asparagine, ammonia is a by-product. (marvistavet.com)
  • Solid tumors that also tend to show low levels of asparagine synthetase (and thus, which may be promising targets for asparaginase) include ovarian and pancreatic cancers. (pancreatica.org)
  • Interestingly, the survival advantage obtained regardless of asparagine synthetase expression level (AS), though the researchers noted that the AS may be prognostic in pancreatic cancer treated by asparaginase, promising further study. (pancreatica.org)
  • L-Asparaginase acts by depleting the asparagine levels, thereby disrupting the cancer cells' ability to produce proteins and inhibits their growth, leading to cancer cell death. (sanzymebiologics.com)
  • The administration of asparaginase deprives the leukemia cells of asparagine, resulting in leukemic cell death. (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • Asparaginases convert asparagine into another common amino acid, aspartic acid. (novozymes.com)
  • L-Asparaginase converts L-asparagine to L-aspartic acid and causes cancer cells to starve. (irost.ir)
  • Evaluation of leukemic cell number after treatment with L-asparaginases for 24, 48 and 72 h demonstrated that asparagine deficiency did not kill cells but stopped normal cell division and had no effect on protein and DNA synthesis. (msk.ru)
  • Asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi comes as a powder to be added to fluid and injected into a muscle by a doctor or nurse in a medical facility. (medlineplus.gov)
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi powder. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Your doctor probably will not want you to receive asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi . (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you become pregnant while receiving asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi, call your doctor. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you miss an appointment to receive a dose of asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi, call your doctor right away. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi may cause side effects. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your body's response to asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi. (medlineplus.gov)
  • 2 Patients can receive asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi (ERWASP), as a 25,000 -IU/m 2 dose, administered IV over 1 hour every other day or IM on a Monday/Wednesday/Friday schedule for 2 consecutive weeks (6 doses replace 1 dose of PEGASP). (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • Asparaginase belongs to class of medications called antineoplastic agents. (heethealthcare.com)
  • Toxicity of vincristine another chemotherapy agent, may be more likely if vincristine and L-asparaginase are given at the same time. (marvistavet.com)
  • Second remission induction rates for vincristine and prednisone alone (VP) and vincristine, L‐asparaginase, and prednisone (VLP) are compared for children with acute lymphocytic leukemia. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • In 2011, the first Erwinia asparaginase agent (Erwinaze), also called crisantaspase, was approved by the FDA as an alternative to E coli asparaginase. (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • Analysis of prognostic factors of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma treated with pegaspargase/L-asparaginase: a multicenter retrospective study]. (bvsalud.org)
  • To explore the prognostic factors of extracellular NK/ T cell lymphoma (ENKTL) treated with pegaspargase/L- asparaginase . (bvsalud.org)
  • Gender , CA stage, ECOG PS score, HGB, and EB virus DNA are prognostic factors for ENKTL patients treated with pegaspargase/L- asparaginase . (bvsalud.org)
  • The neutralization of asparaginase activity, known as silent inactivation, may also occur, with or without signs of hypersensitivity. (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • LASP) is an asparaginase preparation that was historically used beginning in the 1970s and is associated with high immunogenicity and increased hypersensitivity reactions. (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • It is also indicated for use in patients with hypersensitivity to native forms of L-asparaginase. (medscape.com)
  • L-asparaginase and methotrexate work against each other and should be administered at least 48 hours apart. (marvistavet.com)
  • 5 Failure to receive the entire prescribed course of asparaginase therapy has been associated with poorer outcomes and higher rates of relapse in pediatric leukemia. (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • Hamsyl 3750 IU (Peg L Asparaginase) is a prescription drug used to treat blood cancer (Acute lymphocytic leukemia) and Hodgkin's disease. (mbapharmaceuticals.com)
  • The main efficacy outcome measure was demonstration of the achievement and maintenance of nadir serum asparaginase activity (NSAA) above the level of 0.1 U/mL. (wikipedia.org)
  • We determined the sensitivity of tumor cells to L-asparaginases, as well the effect L-asparaginases on cell growth rate, protein and DNA synthesis per se and with addition of different cytostatics. (msk.ru)
  • The data obtained demonstrated that ECAR LANS L-asparaginase suppressed growth of all tested solid tumor cells. (msk.ru)
  • Asparaginase is normally derived from E. coli bacteria. (marvistavet.com)
  • 2,5,6 E coli -derived LASP has a short half-life (8-30 hours), which requires a frequent administration schedule (3 times per week) to maintain adequate asparaginase activity. (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • At the same time, cells treatment with L-asparaginase and doxorubicin combination leaded to increase of apoptotypical cell number to 60% for MCF7 cells, to 40% for Jurkat cells and to 99% for HL-60 cells. (msk.ru)
  • The effect of asparaginase on protein synthesis may result in a number of toxicities, including thrombosis, pancreatitis, hyperglycemia, and hepatotoxicity. (nih.gov)
  • Since the 1970s, asparaginase therapy has been an integral component in the treatment of ALL. (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • There are currently 3 formulations of asparaginase therapy available in the United States, which differ based on bacterial source and pharmacokinetic properties. (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • Clodronate-mediated depletion of phagocytic cells markedly prolonged the serum half-life of asparaginase in vivo and decreased drug uptake in these macrophage-rich organs. (nih.gov)
  • We showed that asparaginase is rapidly cleared from the serum by liver-, spleen-, and bone marrow-resident phagocytic cells. (nih.gov)
  • 2,4,5,8 PEGASP achieves greater asparaginase activity levels and can be administered either intramuscularly (IM) or intravenously (IV). (theoncologypharmacist.com)
  • and asparaginase intramuscularly (IM) on days 3, 5, and 7 and then 3 times a week for 9 doses (during days 8-21). (knowcancer.com)
  • The use of L-asparaginase has been associated with pancreatitis . (marvistavet.com)
  • Anaphylactic reactions to L-asparaginase are much more common in dogs than in cats. (marvistavet.com)
  • Here, we explored the in vivo biodistribution of radiolabeled asparaginase, using a combination of imaging and biochemical techniques, and provide evidence for tissue-specific clearance mechanisms, which could reduce the effectiveness of the drug at these specific sites. (nih.gov)
  • Improvement of biochemical properties of asparaginase by immobilization on cysteine functionalized magnetic Fe3O4@Au NPs', Microbiology, Metabolites and Biotechnology , 5(1), pp. 23-32. (irost.ir)
  • This study aims to investigate the risk factors that affect the incidence of hepatotoxicity caused by L-asparaginase chemotherapy in ALL children. (phcogj.com)
  • Two risk factors had a significant influence on the occurrence of hepatotoxicity due to L-asparaginase chemotherapy including age and hypoalbuminemia (p=0.045, p=0.028). (phcogj.com)
  • Two of them were excluded due to allergic reaction and enable to continue the L-asparaginase chemotherapy. (phcogj.com)
  • The safety evaluation of JZP-458 in the phase I clinical trial demonstrated a safety profile comparable to that of other asparaginases. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, despite these earlier findings, Dr. Daniel Von Hoff in his concluding keynote speech as President of the American Association of Clinical Research in year 2000 in San Francisco, pointed out that l-asparaginase was a potential intriguing agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. (pancreatica.org)
  • On a personal note, the author of this Pancreatica Blog entry was involved in an early study of l-asparaginase in guinea pigs as a first-year medical student working with colleagues at the Ellis Fischel Cancer Center in Columbia, Missouri. (pancreatica.org)
  • Cytofluorometric study of solid and leukemic cells demonstrated that the treatment with L-asparaginase for 72 h did not change cell cycle phase distribution and did not increase the number of apoptotic cells. (msk.ru)
  • We have excluded apoptosis as main reason for tumor cell death after asparaginase treatment because multi resistant Jurkat/A4 cells have been asparaginase sensitive. (msk.ru)
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and pancreatic pseudocysts are rare complications following treatment of hematological malignancies with L-asparaginase (L-asp). (tmu.edu.tw)
  • In vivo imaging and biodistribution studies showed a rapid accumulation of asparaginase in macrophage-rich tissues such as the liver, spleen, and in particular bone marrow. (nih.gov)
  • The inclusion criteria included ALL children aged 1-18 years, undergoing ALL Induction phase chemotherapy based on the 2018 Indonesian Children's ALL protocol as evidenced by bone marrow aspiration, receiving L-asparaginase chemotherapy, and obtaining written consent from parents or guardians. (phcogj.com)
  • The conclusion was that l-asparaginase "seems to have no value in advanced pancreatic carcinoma. (pancreatica.org)
  • L-asparaginase is an interesting drug agent from a number of standpoints. (pancreatica.org)
  • Immunohistochemistry and in vitro binding assays confirmed the involvement of macrophagelike cells in the uptake of asparaginase. (nih.gov)
  • Crystal structure of L-asparaginase I from Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. (berkeley.edu)
  • We identified the activity of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B in macrophages as a rate-limiting factor in degrading asparaginase both in vitro and in vivo. (nih.gov)
  • Prednisolone tends to raise blood sugar levels to a greater extent when used in combination with L-asparaginase. (marvistavet.com)