Trophozoites: Cells or feeding stage in the life cycle of sporozoan protozoa. In the malarial parasite, the trophozoite develops from the MEROZOITE and then splits into the SCHIZONT. Trophozoites that are left over from cell division can go on to form gametocytes.Entamoeba histolytica: A species of parasitic protozoa causing ENTAMOEBIASIS and amebic dysentery (DYSENTERY, AMEBIC). Characteristics include a single nucleus containing a small central karyosome and peripheral chromatin that is finely and regularly beaded.Giardia: A genus of flagellate intestinal EUKARYOTES parasitic in various vertebrates, including humans. Characteristics include the presence of four pairs of flagella arising from a complicated system of axonemes and cysts that are ellipsoidal to ovoidal in shape.Giardia lamblia: A species of parasitic EUKARYOTES that attaches itself to the intestinal mucosa and feeds on mucous secretions. The organism is roughly pear-shaped and motility is somewhat erratic, with a slow oscillation about the long axis.Giardiasis: An infection of the SMALL INTESTINE caused by the flagellated protozoan GIARDIA LAMBLIA. It is spread via contaminated food and water and by direct person-to-person contact.Acanthamoeba: A genus of free-living soil amoebae that produces no flagellate stage. Its organisms are pathogens for several infections in humans and have been found in the eye, bone, brain, and respiratory tract.Amebicides: Agents which are destructive to amebae, especially the parasitic species causing AMEBIASIS in man and animal.Amebiasis: Infection with any of various amebae. It is an asymptomatic carrier state in most individuals, but diseases ranging from chronic, mild diarrhea to fulminant dysentery may occur.Dysentery, Amebic: DYSENTERY caused by intestinal amebic infection, chiefly with ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA. This condition may be associated with amebic infection of the LIVER and other distant sites.Naegleria fowleri: A species of parasitic protozoa having both an ameboid and flagellate stage in its life cycle. Infection with this pathogen produces PRIMARY AMEBIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS.Entamoeba: A genus of ameboid protozoa characterized by the presence of beaded chromatin on the inner surface of the nuclear membrane. Its organisms are parasitic in invertebrates and vertebrates, including humans.Entamoebiasis: Infection with amoebae of the genus ENTAMOEBA. Infection with E. histolytica causes DYSENTERY, AMEBIC and LIVER ABSCESS, AMEBIC.Acanthamoeba Keratitis: Infection of the cornea by an ameboid protozoan which may cause corneal ulceration leading to blindness.Liver Abscess, Amebic: Single or multiple areas of PUS due to infection by any ameboid protozoa (AMEBIASIS). A common form is caused by the ingestion of ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA.Acanthamoeba castellanii: A species of free-living soil amoebae in the family Acanthamoebidae. It can cause ENCEPHALITIS and KERATITIS in humans.Protozoan Proteins: Proteins found in any species of protozoan.Plasmodium falciparum: A species of protozoa that is the causal agent of falciparum malaria (MALARIA, FALCIPARUM). It is most prevalent in the tropics and subtropics.Spores, Protozoan: A vegetative stage in the life cycle of sporozoan protozoa. It is characteristic of members of the phyla APICOMPLEXA and MICROSPORIDIA.Pneumocystis: A genus of ascomycetous FUNGI, family Pneumocystidaceae, order Pneumocystidales. It includes various host-specific species causing PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA in humans and other MAMMALS.Antigens, Protozoan: Any part or derivative of any protozoan that elicits immunity; malaria (Plasmodium) and trypanosome antigens are presently the most frequently encountered.Schizonts: Multinucleate cells or a stage in the development of sporozoan protozoa. It is exemplified by the life cycle of PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM in the MALARIA infection cycle.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Central Nervous System Protozoal Infections: Infections of the brain, spinal cord, or meninges by single celled organisms of the former subkingdom known as protozoa. The central nervous system may be the primary or secondary site of protozoal infection. These diseases may occur as OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS or arise in immunocompetent hosts.Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Parasitic Sensitivity Tests: Tests that demonstrate the relative effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents against specific parasites.DNA, Protozoan: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of protozoa.Genes, Protozoan: The functional hereditary units of protozoa.Contact Lens Solutions: Sterile solutions used to clean and disinfect contact lenses.Dientamoeba: A genus of minute EUKARYOTES that are characterized by the preponderance of binucleate over uninucleate forms, the presence of several distinct granules in the karyosome, and the lack of a cystic stage. It is parasitic in the large intestine of humans and certain monkeys.Naegleria: A free-living soil amoeba pathogenic to humans and animals. It occurs also in water and sewage. The most commonly found species in man is NAEGLERIA FOWLERI which is the pathogen for primary amebic meningoencephalitis in primates.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Antibodies, Protozoan: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.Dientamoebiasis: Gastrointestinal infection with organisms of the genus DIENTAMOEBA.Parasitology: The study of parasites and PARASITIC DISEASES.Amoeba: A genus of ameboid protozoa. Characteristics include a vesicular nucleus and the formation of several lodopodia, one of which is dominant at a given time. Reproduction occurs asexually by binary fission.Cysteine Proteases: A subclass of peptide hydrolases that depend on a CYSTEINE residue for their activity.Pneumonia, Pneumocystis: A pulmonary disease in humans occurring in immunodeficient or malnourished patients or infants, characterized by DYSPNEA, tachypnea, and HYPOXEMIA. Pneumocystis pneumonia is a frequently seen opportunistic infection in AIDS. It is caused by the fungus PNEUMOCYSTIS JIROVECII. The disease is also found in other MAMMALS where it is caused by related species of Pneumocystis.Gerbillinae: A subfamily of the Muridae consisting of several genera including Gerbillus, Rhombomys, Tatera, Meriones, and Psammomys.Antitrichomonal Agents: Agents used to treat trichomonas infections.Lobosea: A class of amoeboid EUKARYOTES that forms either filiform subpseudopodia or lobopodia. Characteristics include the absence of sorocarps, sporangia, or similar fruiting bodies. Lobosea were formerly members of the phylum Sarcomastigophora, subphylum Sarcodina, under the old five kingdom paradigm.Wheat Germ Agglutinins: Lectins purified from the germinating seeds of common wheat (Triticum vulgare); these bind to certain carbohydrate moieties on cell surface glycoproteins and are used to identify certain cell populations and inhibit or promote some immunological or physiological activities. There are at least two isoforms of this lectin.Protozoan Infections: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa.Antiprotozoal Agents: Substances that are destructive to protozoans.Adhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Metronidazole: A nitroimidazole used to treat AMEBIASIS; VAGINITIS; TRICHOMONAS INFECTIONS; GIARDIASIS; ANAEROBIC BACTERIA; and TREPONEMAL INFECTIONS. It has also been proposed as a radiation sensitizer for hypoxic cells. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985, p133), this substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck, 11th ed).Antimalarials: Agents used in the treatment of malaria. They are usually classified on the basis of their action against plasmodia at different stages in their life cycle in the human. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1585)RNA, Protozoan: Ribonucleic acid in protozoa having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Glutaral: One of the protein CROSS-LINKING REAGENTS that is used as a disinfectant for sterilization of heat-sensitive equipment and as a laboratory reagent, especially as a fixative.Protozoan Infections, Animal: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.Microscopy: The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.Lectins: Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.Chloroquine: The prototypical antimalarial agent with a mechanism that is not well understood. It has also been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and in the systemic therapy of amebic liver abscesses.BiguanidesPhagocytosis: The engulfing and degradation of microorganisms; other cells that are dead, dying, or pathogenic; and foreign particles by phagocytic cells (PHAGOCYTES).Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Eukaryota: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and ARCHAEA), also called Eukarya. These are organisms whose cells are enclosed in membranes and possess a nucleus. They comprise almost all multicellular and many unicellular organisms, and are traditionally divided into groups (sometimes called kingdoms) including ANIMALS; PLANTS; FUNGI; and various algae and other taxa that were previously part of the old kingdom Protista.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Methyl Green: A tri-benzene-ammonium usually compounded with zinc chloride. It is used as a biological stain and for the dyeing and printing of textiles.Apicomplexa: A phylum of unicellular parasitic EUKARYOTES characterized by the presence of complex apical organelles generally consisting of a conoid that aids in penetrating host cells, rhoptries that possibly secrete a proteolytic enzyme, and subpellicular microtubules that may be related to motility.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Disinfectants: Substances used on inanimate objects that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. Disinfectants are classed as complete, destroying SPORES as well as vegetative forms of microorganisms, or incomplete, destroying only vegetative forms of the organisms. They are distinguished from ANTISEPTICS, which are local anti-infective agents used on humans and other animals. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Acetylgalactosamine: The N-acetyl derivative of galactosamine.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.RNA, Ribosomal, 18S: Constituent of the 40S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. 18S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis in eukaryotes.Malaria, Falciparum: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.Cytochalasins: 11- to 14-membered macrocyclic lactones with a fused isoindolone. Members with INDOLES attached at the C10 position are called chaetoglobosins. They are produced by various fungi. Some members interact with ACTIN and inhibit CYTOKINESIS.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Hemeproteins: Proteins that contain an iron-porphyrin, or heme, prosthetic group resembling that of hemoglobin. (From Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p480)Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Fetuins: A family of calcium-binding alpha-globulins that are synthesized in the LIVER and play an essential role in maintaining the solubility of CALCIUM in the BLOOD. In addition the fetuins contain aminoterminal cystatin domains and are classified as type 3 cystatins.Antigens, Surface: Antigens on surfaces of cells, including infectious or foreign cells or viruses. They are usually protein-containing groups on cell membranes or walls and may be isolated.Staining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Mebendazole: A benzimidazole that acts by interfering with CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM and inhibiting polymerization of MICROTUBULES.Antigenic Variation: Change in the surface ANTIGEN of a microorganism. There are two different types. One is a phenomenon, especially associated with INFLUENZA VIRUSES, where they undergo spontaneous variation both as slow antigenic drift and sudden emergence of new strains (antigenic shift). The second type is when certain PARASITES, especially trypanosomes, PLASMODIUM, and BORRELIA, survive the immune response of the host by changing the surface coat (antigen switching). (From Herbert et al., The Dictionary of Immunology, 4th ed)Disinfection: Rendering pathogens harmless through the use of heat, antiseptics, antibacterial agents, etc.Ericaceae: The heath plant family of the order Ericales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida that are generally shrubs or small trees. Leaves are alternate, simple, and leathery; flowers are symmetrical with a 4- or 5-parted corolla of partly fused petals.Parasites: Invertebrate organisms that live on or in another organism (the host), and benefit at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Plasmodium malariae: A protozoan parasite that occurs primarily in subtropical and temperate areas. It is the causal agent of quartan malaria. As the parasite grows it exhibits little ameboid activity.Plasmodium: A genus of protozoa that comprise the malaria parasites of mammals. Four species infect humans (although occasional infections with primate malarias may occur). These are PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; PLASMODIUM OVALE, and PLASMODIUM VIVAX. Species causing infection in vertebrates other than man include: PLASMODIUM BERGHEI; PLASMODIUM CHABAUDI; P. vinckei, and PLASMODIUM YOELII in rodents; P. brasilianum, PLASMODIUM CYNOMOLGI; and PLASMODIUM KNOWLESI in monkeys; and PLASMODIUM GALLINACEUM in chickens.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Erythrocyte Membrane: The semi-permeable outer structure of a red blood cell. It is known as a red cell 'ghost' after HEMOLYSIS.Trichomonas vaginalis: A species of TRICHOMONAS that produces a refractory vaginal discharge in females, as well as bladder and urethral infections in males.Azure Stains: PHENOTHIAZINES with an amino group at the 3-position that are green crystals or powder. They are used as biological stains.Cysteine Endopeptidases: ENDOPEPTIDASES which have a cysteine involved in the catalytic process. This group of enzymes is inactivated by CYSTEINE PROTEINASE INHIBITORS such as CYSTATINS and SULFHYDRYL REAGENTS.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Genome, Protozoan: The complete genetic complement contained in a set of CHROMOSOMES in a protozoan.Meningoencephalitis: An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.Oocysts: Zygote-containing cysts of sporozoan protozoa. Further development in an oocyst produces small individual infective organisms called SPOROZOITES. Then, depending on the genus, the entire oocyst is called a sporocyst or the oocyst contains multiple sporocysts encapsulating the sporozoites.Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic: Infections of the INTESTINES with PARASITES, commonly involving PARASITIC WORMS. Infections with roundworms (NEMATODE INFECTIONS) and tapeworms (CESTODE INFECTIONS) are also known as HELMINTHIASIS.Galactose: An aldohexose that occurs naturally in the D-form in lactose, cerebrosides, gangliosides, and mucoproteins. Deficiency of galactosyl-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALACTOSE-1-PHOSPHATE URIDYL-TRANSFERASE DEFICIENCY DISEASE) causes an error in galactose metabolism called GALACTOSEMIA, resulting in elevations of galactose in the blood.Plasmodium yoelii: A species of PLASMODIUM causing malaria in rodents.Inhibitory Concentration 50: The concentration of a compound needed to reduce population growth of organisms, including eukaryotic cells, by 50% in vitro. Though often expressed to denote in vitro antibacterial activity, it is also used as a benchmark for cytotoxicity to eukaryotic cells in culture.
The length of the asexual cycle is 24 hours. Trophozoites: Ring forms are unusual. The trophozoite is usually irregular in ... Asexual replication appears to occur in three ways: (1) by repeated binary fission of the chromatin with eventual splitting of ...
... species have two life cycle stages: a trophozoite, and a cyst. The trophozoite is the heterotrophic feeding stage ... Sappinia species also undergo asexual reproduction, as described by Nägler in 1908. First the two nuclei divide, and two pairs ... showed necrotizing hemorrhagic inflammation containing trophozoite amoebae. The trophozoites were between 40-60 mm in diameter ... Nägler stated that first the pairs of nuclei in each trophozoite fuse, and then the cells fuse together in the cyst. The amoeba ...
... the trophozoite undergoes asexual replication through longitudinal binary fission. The resulting trophozoites and cysts then ... While the trophozoites may be found in the faeces, only the cysts are capable of surviving outside of the host. Distinguishing ... The trophozoite form of Giardia was first observed in 1681 by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek in his own diarrhea stools. The genus was ... Giardia trophozoites absorb their nutrients from the lumen of the small intestine, and are anaerobes. If the organism is split ...
There may be several rounds of asexual reproduction. At some point smaller merozoites are formed. These are of two sizes one ... Within the lobster the trophozoites are vermicular in form similar those of the gregarines. These enter an entrocyte, divide ... Duboscq in 1909 The specific name is derived from the appearance of the trophozoites which possesses aspects of both the ...
... it also kills asexual trophozoites of P. vivax in blood, but not of P. falciparum. Because of its action against gametocytes, ...
In some species, the sporozoites and trophozoites are capable of asexual replication - a process called schizogony or merogony ... The intestinal trophozoites are similar in morphology to the infective sporozoites. In all species two mature trophozoites ... The sporozoites emerge within the host cell, begin to feed and develop into larger trophozoites. ... often distributed near the cell periphery Apical complex is present in both the sporozoite and trophozoite stages Trophozoites ...
In some species, the sporozoites and trophozoites are capable of asexual replication - a process called schizogony or merogony ... Trophozoites have a large and conspicuous nucleus and nucleolus. They inhabit extracellular body cavities of invertebrates such ... In all species, two mature trophozoites eventually pair up in a process known as syzygy and develop into gamonts. During syzygy ... They possess intestinal trophozoites similar in morphology to the infective sporozoites. Phylogenetic analysis suggests this ...
After invasion, the sporozoites develop into trophozoites, then into schizonts, where they undergo several rounds of asexual ... During the endogenous phase, several rounds of asexual reproduction, or schizogony take place, after which the sexual ...
Trophozoites develop into schizonts which contain multiple merozoites. After a minimum of one week, the sexual stage begins ... Upon rupture of the schizonts, the merozoites are released, invade new epithelial cells, and continue the cycle of asexual ...
This suggests that the trophozoites of the preceding asexual generation were already committed to either sexual development or ... Gametocytes of P. falciparum have been shown to exhibit a different pattern of gene expression than asexual stages, which is ... These gamete precursors are quite distinct from their asexual blood stage counterparts and this is reflected in their distinct ... In P. falciparum, gametocytes are produced from asexual stages. All the gametocytes produced from one sexually committed ...
Sexual and asexual reproduction are present in life cycle of all species. Each zygote normally forms an oocyst wall within ... Multiple mitotic divisions (schizogony) also occur during merogony of the feeding stages (trophozoites) and during gametogony. ...
Trophozoites: The cytoplasm is compact, staining a deep blue while the nucleus stains deep red. Pigment is dark and made up of ... The asexual cycle is 48 hours in length Ring forms: These measure about 3 micrometres in diameter and double chromatin bodies ... Older trophozoites are compact, rounded or oval and display very little amoeboidity. The vacuole may be diminished or lost. ...
The trophozoite stage is separated from erythrocyte by a single membrane. This distinguishes them from other blood parasites ... They divide by binary fission and as sporozoan parasites they possess sexual and asexual phases (sexual reproduction occurs in ...
... species have two life cycle stages: a trophozoite, and a cyst.[2] The trophozoite is the heterotrophic feeding stage ... Sappinia species also undergo asexual reproduction, as described by Nägler in 1908. First the two nuclei divide, and two pairs ... showed necrotizing hemorrhagic inflammation containing trophozoite amoebae.[5] The trophozoites were between 40-60 mm in ... 2009) first used PCR primers and TaqMan probes to detect if the trophozoites did in fact belong to Sappinia, and to rule out ...
While it is feeding and growing, the cell is known as a trophozoite. This trophozoite is the cell that begins the process of ... This is an asexual reproductive process found primarily in parasitic protists. The parasitic, infectious cell that infects a ...
... ring stage trophozoites. The trophozoites act as an intermediate stage, from which two forms can be formed. The trophozoites ... these sporozoites mature and divide by asexual reproduction into schizonts. Schizonts are structures that contain thousands of ...
Pf-YARS is expressed in all asexual parasite stages (rings, trophozoites and schizonts) and is exported to the host erythrocyte ...
Summary: Merozoite → trophozoite → schizont → merozoites. Epidemiology[edit]. P. knowlesi infection is normally considered a ... Asexual cycle of the parasite in humans and its natural host macaque is about 24 hours.[2][3][4] Hence the disease may be ... Life cycle: merozoite → trophozoites → schizont → merozoite. These stages of Plasmodium knowlesi are microscopically ... Elongated trophozoites stretching across the erythrocyte, called band forms, are sometimes observed. Schizonts will typically ...
A trophozoite (G. trophē, nourishment + zōon, animal) is the activated, intracellular feeding stage in the apicomplexan life ... Sporogony is a type of sexual and asexual reproduction. It involves karyogamy, the formation of a zygote, which is followed by ... After infecting a host cell, a trophozoite (see glossary below) increases in size while repeatedly replicating its nucleus and ... Endogeny is a process of asexual reproduction, favoured by parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii. It involves an unusual process ...
Uni-nucleated trophozoites convert into cysts in a process called encystation. The number of nuclei in the cyst varies from 1 ... Biron D, Libros P, Sagi D, Mirelman D, Moses E (2001). "Asexual reproduction: 'Midwives' assist dividing amoebae". Nature. 410 ... The trophozoite (feeding-dividing form) is approximately 10-20 μm in diameter and feeds primarily on bacteria. It divides by ... Studies of E. invadens found that, during the conversion from the tetraploid uninucleate trophozoite to the tetranucleate cyst ...
The Eimeriorina-the largest suborder in this phylum-the lifecycle involves both sexual and asexual stages. The asexual stages ... In the typical gregarine lifecycle, a trophozoite develops within a host cell into a schizont. This then divides into a number ... The trophozoite parasitises erythrocytes or other tissues in the vertebrate host. Microgametes and macrogametes are always ... Some trophozoites enlarge and become macrogamete, whereas others divide repeatedly to form microgametes (anisogamy). The ...
Within the red blood cells, the merozoites grow first to a ring-shaped form and then to a larger form called a trophozoite. ... The genus Plasmodium consists of all eukaryotes in the phylum Apicomplexa that both undergo the asexual replication process of ... Trophozoites then mature to schizonts which divide several times to produce new merozoites. The infected red blood cell ... Based on the presence of the pigment hemozoin and the method of asexual reproduction, the order is further split into four ...
By the early 1980s, it was established that when the parasite (both the trophozoite and schizont forms) enters the blood stream ... from the intraerythrocytic asexual parasite to the cytoplasmic face of the host cell membrane". The Journal of Cell Biology. ... These knobs are easily identified as conspicuous bumps on the infected RBCs from the early trophozoite stage onward. The ... They undergo structural development inside the RBCs, becoming trophozoites and schizonts. It is during this period that ...
The Eimeriorina-the largest suborder in this phylum-the lifecycle involves both sexual and asexual stages. The asexual stages ... In the typical gregarine lifecycle, a trophozoite develops within a host cell into a schizont. This then divides into a number ... Some trophozoites enlarge and become macrogamete, whereas others divide repeatedly to form microgametes (anisogamy). The ... The trophozoite parasitises erythrocytes or other tissues in the vertebrate host. Microgametes and macrogametes are always ...
Asexual Life Cycle Stage Mature trophozoite Source PHIL_2725_lores.jpg Source Collection Public Health Image Library (Centers ... Plasmodium parasites in the erythrocytic stages: left, P. chabaudi in early trophozoite "ring" stage; P. vivax in trophozoite ... Left: P. vivax in early trophozoite ring stage. Center: P. vivax, schizont stage. Right: P. falciparum, mature ... Exoerythrocytic stage, in which the sporozoite undergoes multiple rounds of asexual divisions (merogony or schizongony) and ...
Maurers clefts can be seen in P. falciparum infections containing older ring-form trophozoites and asexual stages. Maurers ... Ring-form trophozoites of P. knowlesi in a thin blood smear.. Early ring-form trophozoites (rings) of P. knowlesi are similar ... Older, developing trophozoites of P. knowlesi in a thin blood smear.. In developing trophozoites of P. knowlesi, band forms may ... Trophozoites of P. malariae in a thick blood smear.. In developing trophozoites of P. malariae, chromatin is rounded or streaky ...
the parasites undergo asexual multiplication in the erythrocytes (erythrocytic schizogony ). Merozoites infect red blood cells ... The ring stage trophozoites mature into schizonts, which rupture releasing merozoites . Some parasites differentiate into ... Schizont and ring-form trophozoite of P. knowlesi in a thin blood smear. ...
Asexual malaria trophozoites were determined according to previous methods [34]. Complete blood counts were performed using a ...
Band form of trophozoite (typical for P. malariae) Image Use This media file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution ... One suggestion (Valkiunas 2005) is that malaria parasite" be restricted to species with asexual replication in the vertebrate ... Rapid growth of trophozoites ends through the formation of meronts. Members of the genus Leucocytozoon depart from the general ... Within erythrocytes, trophozoites of Plasmodium and Haemoproteus are localized in the parasitophorous vacuole and absorb host ...
The length of the asexual cycle is 24 hours. Trophozoites: Ring forms are unusual. The trophozoite is usually irregular in ... Asexual replication appears to occur in three ways: (1) by repeated binary fission of the chromatin with eventual splitting of ...
Multiplies in GI tract by sexual & asexual reproduction. - Sporozoites trophozoites merozoites oocysts. - Shed in ... Vegetative form (trophozoites) & infectious form (cysts). - Ingested cysts transport to small intestines to become trophozoites ... Infectious cysts are ingested, become trophozoites, & multiply in the duodenum. - Symptoms start within 1-3 weeks & resolve 1-4 ... Sporozoites invade enterocytes under brush border & trophozoites (inflammation). - Symptoms start 1 week later & persist ...
... it also kills asexual trophozoites of P. vivax in blood, but not of P. falciparum.[11] Because of its action against ...
The parasite takes up nutrients and undergoes asexual replication during the trophic phase. Some of the trophozoites will ... E. histolytica trophozoites have an amorphous shape and are generally 15-30 µm in diameter. The trophozoites move by extending ... As an alternative to asexual replication trophozoites can also encyst. The factors responsible for the induction of encystation ... The trophozoites of E. coli can be difficult to distinguish from E. histolytica/dispar since there is some overlap in the size ...
haploid trophozoites (which are a hallmark of the asexual, proliferative phase of its lifecycle) ... Cysts are produced during the reproductive stage due to the conjugation of trophozoites, while trophic forms prevail in lungs ...
Sappinia species have two life cycle stages: a trophozoite, and a cyst. The trophozoite is the heterotrophic feeding stage ... Sappinia species also undergo asexual reproduction, as described by Nägler in 1908. First the two nuclei divide, and two pairs ... showed necrotizing hemorrhagic inflammation containing trophozoite amoebae. The trophozoites were between 40-60 mm in diameter ... Nägler stated that first the pairs of nuclei in each trophozoite fuse, and then the cells fuse together in the cyst. The amoeba ...
A composite panel of asexual stages cultivated in sheep erythrocytes from these sporozoites is presented (F); developmental ... stages are indicated by letters (D, dividing stages; M, free merozoites; S, schizont-like form; T, trophozoite). Scale bars = 5 ... EU1 sporozoites isolated from tick salivary glands and of subsequent asexual development in erythrocytes. Sporozoites were ...
Here, they become trophozoites, and asexual multiplication (schizogony) produces merozoites that invade previously uninfected ...
Sappinia species have two life cycle stages: a trophozoite, and a cyst.[2] The trophozoite is the heterotrophic feeding stage ... Sappinia species also undergo asexual reproduction, as described by Nägler in 1908. First the two nuclei divide, and two pairs ... showed necrotizing hemorrhagic inflammation containing trophozoite amoebae.[5] The trophozoites were between 40-60 mm in ... 2009) first used PCR primers and TaqMan probes to detect if the trophozoites did in fact belong to Sappinia, and to rule out ...
Asexual replication results in the production of a large number of sporozoites, which are released into the body cavity of the ... The merozoites invade erythrocites and become enlarged ring-shaped trophozoites. In this stage the cells ingest the host ... Inside the hosts liver cell the Plasmodium cell undergoes asexual replication. The products of this replication, called ...
A schizont reproduces by SCHIZOGONY producing multiple trophozoites or merozoites.. schizont. the asexual reproductive stage in ... A sporozoan trophozoite (vegetative form) that reproduces by schizogony, producing a varied number of daughter trophozoites or ... A sporozoan trophozoite (vegetative form) that reproduces by schizogony, producing a varied number of daughter trophozoites or ... Examination of Giemsa-stained thin blood films showed 10% young trophozoites, 45% growing trophozoites, 40% schizonts, and 5% ...
The asexual life-cycle consists of cysts or trophozoites. Transmission is direct with no intermediate host involvement. Usually ... Trophozoites with typical features of B. coli were also seen in the Papanicolaou stain (Fig. 5). ... Microscopic examination of wet preparations of the bronchial lavage fluid showed numerous ciliated B. coli trophozoites with a ... RESULTS: Diagnosis was made by bronchial biopsy and lavage, which showed numerous trophozoites compatible with B. coli with a ...
Following entry, parasites mature into trophozoites that freely move in the cytoplasm. Asexual replication yields four ... B. microti trophozoites often appear as rings with a pale blue cytoplasm and one or two red chromatic dots. Rings are ... B. microti rings may be mistaken for Plasmodium falciparum early stage trophozoites, but malaria can be ruled out by travel ...
Sporozoites enter the hepatocytes and form schizonts, which are also asexual forms. Schizonts undergo a process of maturation ... The parasite successively passes through the stages of trophozoite and schizont, ultimately giving rise to several merozoites. ... The bite of an infected mosquito introduces asexual forms of the parasite, called sporozoites, into the bloodstream. ... Merozoites enter the erythrocytes and initiate another asexual reproductive cycle, known as erythrocytic schizogony. ...
Sporozoites, intra-erythrocytic ringforms and trophozoites (until at least 15 h after invasion) are haploid and non- ... DNA synthesis in Plasmodium berghei during asexual and sexual development Mol Biochem Parasitol. 1986 Aug;20(2):173-82. doi: ... Sporozoites, intra-erythrocytic ringforms and trophozoites (until at least 15 h after invasion) are haploid and non- ...
The asexual parasites possessed acristate mitochrondria and were surrounded by a single-membraned pellicle in addition to a ... However, occasionally trophozoites had slender cytoplasmic protrusions. Ingestion of host cell cytoplasm occurred cytostomally ... microscopic study of Plasmodium ovale in humans supplied information on the fine structure of erythrocytic trophozoites, ... The asexual parasites possessed acristate mitochrondria and were surrounded by a single-membraned pellicle in addition to a ...
Two patterns of pigmentation were observed in the trophozoite-containing samples: 48 (57%) contained trophozoites in which no ... falciparum is not required during the asexual multiplication cycle. Pigment accumulation may be triggered later in infection, ... Eighty-four samples contained trophozoites (ring forms) only and 11 samples contained gametocytes and trophozoites. ... Patterns of Pigment Accumulation in Plasmodium Falciparum Trophozoites in Peripheral Blood Samples Author: G. A. Jamjoom ...
The trophozoites develop into Type 1 meronts[1] that contain 8 daughter cells.[9] These daughter cells are Type 1 merozoites, ... The life cycle of Cryptosporidium parvum consists of an asexual stage and a sexual stage.[1] After being ingested the oocysts ... From there they become trophozoites that reproduce asexually by multiple fission, a process known as schizogony. ...
The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper ... trophozoites; lane 4 (L4), late trophozoites; lane 5 (L5), schizonts. Representative images of each stage of asexual ... early trophozoites; D. late trophozoites; E. schizonts. Parasite DNA was stained with Hoechst. Scale bar is 5 μm. ... Expression of the putative P. falciparum copper transporter (PF14_0369) in synchronized asexual parasites. Asexual P. ...
Summary: Merozoite → trophozoite → schizont → merozoites. Epidemiology[edit]. P. knowlesi infection is normally considered a ... Asexual cycle of the parasite in humans and its natural host macaque is about 24 hours.[2][3][4] Hence the disease may be ... Life cycle: merozoite → trophozoites → schizont → merozoite. These stages of Plasmodium knowlesi are microscopically ... Elongated trophozoites stretching across the erythrocyte, called band forms, are sometimes observed. Schizonts will typically ...
  • For hemozoin synthesis at the ring stage, the ring-infected erythrocytes were hemolyzed immediately, whereas for synthesis at the trophozoite stage, the aliquots of concentrated rings were incubated for 20 hr before they were hemolyzed. (aspetjournals.org)
  • It's almost as if the infected red blood cell is a 'trophy' for the trophozoites. (study.com)
  • We find that the terminology used to describe the various manifestations of asexual apicomplexan cell division emphasizes either the number of offspring or site of budding, which are not directly comparable features and has led to confusion in the literature. (frontiersin.org)