Ascoviridae: A family of insect viruses causing disease in lepidopterous larvae, most commonly from species of the owlet moth family Noctuidae. There is one genus: Ascovirus.DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases: Enzymes that catalyze DNA template-directed extension of the 3'-end of an RNA strand one nucleotide at a time. They can initiate a chain de novo. In eukaryotes, three forms of the enzyme have been distinguished on the basis of sensitivity to alpha-amanitin, and the type of RNA synthesized. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992).Iridoviridae: A family of large icosahedral DNA viruses infecting insects and poikilothermic vertebrates. Genera include IRIDOVIRUS; RANAVIRUS; Chloriridovirus; Megalocytivirus; and Lymphocystivirus.Likelihood Functions: Functions constructed from a statistical model and a set of observed data which give the probability of that data for various values of the unknown model parameters. Those parameter values that maximize the probability are the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters.RNA Polymerase II: A DNA-dependent RNA polymerase present in bacterial, plant, and animal cells. It functions in the nucleoplasmic structure and transcribes DNA into RNA. It has different requirements for cations and salt than RNA polymerase I and is strongly inhibited by alpha-amanitin. EC 2.7.7.6.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Indigo Carmine: Indolesulfonic acid used as a dye in renal function testing for the detection of nitrates and chlorates, and in the testing of milk.BooksClassification: The systematic arrangement of entities in any field into categories classes based on common characteristics such as properties, morphology, subject matter, etc.Red Cross: International collective of humanitarian organizations led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, to provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Indonesia: A republic stretching from the Indian Ocean east to New Guinea, comprising six main islands: Java, Sumatra, Bali, Kalimantan (the Indonesian portion of the island of Borneo), Sulawesi (formerly known as the Celebes) and Irian Jaya (the western part of New Guinea). Its capital is Djakarta. The ethnic groups living there are largely Chinese, Arab, Eurasian, Indian, and Pakistani; 85% of the peoples are of the Islamic faith.BaltimoreMalaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Coronavirus: A genus of the family CORONAVIRIDAE which causes respiratory or gastrointestinal disease in a variety of vertebrates.Camels: Hoofed mammals with four legs, a big-lipped snout, and a humped back belonging to the family Camelidae.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Coronavirus Infections: Virus diseases caused by the CORONAVIRUS genus. Some specifics include transmissible enteritis of turkeys (ENTERITIS, TRANSMISSIBLE, OF TURKEYS); FELINE INFECTIOUS PERITONITIS; and transmissible gastroenteritis of swine (GASTROENTERITIS, TRANSMISSIBLE, OF SWINE).Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.DNA Viruses: Viruses whose nucleic acid is DNA.DNA, Single-Stranded: A single chain of deoxyribonucleotides that occurs in some bacteria and viruses. It usually exists as a covalently closed circle.DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent DNA polymerases found in bacteria, animal and plant cells. During the replication process, these enzymes catalyze the addition of deoxyribonucleotide residues to the end of a DNA strand in the presence of DNA as template-primer. They also possess exonuclease activity and therefore function in DNA repair.RNA Viruses: Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.Mimiviridae: A family of nucleocytoplasmic, large, double-stranded DNA viruses with extremely complex genomes.Phycodnaviridae: A family of DNA plant viruses that infect eukaryotic algae.Asfarviridae: A family of double-stranded DNA viruses containing one genus Asfivirus. It is the source of AFRICAN SWINE FEVER.Antarctic Regions: The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Oviposition: The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.Gryllidae: The family Gryllidae consists of the common house cricket, Acheta domesticus, which is used in neurological and physiological studies. Other genera include Gryllotalpa (mole cricket); Gryllus (field cricket); and Oecanthus (tree cricket).Moths: Insects of the suborder Heterocera of the order LEPIDOPTERA.Asclepias: A plant genus of the family ASCLEPIADACEAE. This is the true milkweed; APOCYNUM & EUPHORBIA hirta are rarely called milkweed. Asclepias asthmatica has been changed to TYLOPHORA.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Drosophilidae: A family of the order DIPTERA. These flies are generally found around decaying vegetation and fruit. Several species, because of their short life span, giant salivary gland chromosomes, and ease of culturing, have been used extensively in studies of heredity.Serpins: A family of serine proteinase inhibitors which are similar in amino acid sequence and mechanism of inhibition, but differ in their specificity toward proteolytic enzymes. This family includes alpha 1-antitrypsin, angiotensinogen, ovalbumin, antiplasmin, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, thyroxine-binding protein, complement 1 inactivators, antithrombin III, heparin cofactor II, plasminogen inactivators, gene Y protein, placental plasminogen activator inhibitor, and barley Z protein. Some members of the serpin family may be substrates rather than inhibitors of SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES, and some serpins occur in plants where their function is not known.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Genome, Insect: The genetic complement of an insect (INSECTS) as represented in its DNA.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.FloridaPhylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Archaeal Viruses: Viruses whose hosts are in the domain ARCHAEA.Chemistry, Analytic: The branch of chemistry dealing with detection (qualitative) and determination (quantitative) of substances. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Metagenomics: The genomic analysis of assemblages of organisms.Salivary Gland Calculi: Calculi occurring in a salivary gland. Most salivary gland calculi occur in the submandibular gland, but can also occur in the parotid gland and in the sublingual and minor salivary glands.Circoviridae: A family of very small viruses containing circular, single-stranded DNA and possessing no envelope. The modes of transmission are not known.Avihepadnavirus: A genus of HEPADNAVIRIDAE infecting birds but rarely causing clinical problems. Transmission is predominantly vertical. HEPATITIS B VIRUS, DUCK is the type species.Encephalitis Virus, Eastern Equine: A species of ALPHAVIRUS causing encephalomyelitis in Equidae and humans. The virus ranges along the Atlantic seaboard of the United States and Canada and as far south as the Caribbean, Mexico, and parts of Central and South America. Infections in horses show a mortality of up to 90 percent and in humans as high as 80 percent in epidemics.Rift Valley fever virus: A mosquito-borne species of the PHLEBOVIRUS genus found in eastern, central, and southern Africa, producing massive hepatitis, abortion, and death in sheep, goats, cattle, and other animals. It also has caused disease in humans.Rift Valley Fever: An acute infection caused by the RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS, an RNA arthropod-borne virus, affecting domestic animals and humans. In animals, symptoms include HEPATITIS; abortion (ABORTION, VETERINARY); and DEATH. In humans, symptoms range from those of a flu-like disease to hemorrhagic fever, ENCEPHALITIS, or BLINDNESS.Norwalk virus: The type species in the genus NOROVIRUS, first isolated in 1968 from the stools of school children in Norwalk, Ohio, who were suffering from GASTROENTERITIS. The virions are non-enveloped spherical particles containing a single protein. Multiple strains are named after the places where outbreaks have occurred.Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Insect Viruses: Viruses infecting insects, the largest family being BACULOVIRIDAE.Wasps: Any of numerous winged hymenopterous insects of social as well as solitary habits and having formidable stings.GermanyEndogenous Retroviruses: Retroviruses that have integrated into the germline (PROVIRUSES) that have lost infectious capability but retained the capability to transpose.Retroviridae: Family of RNA viruses that infects birds and mammals and encodes the enzyme reverse transcriptase. The family contains seven genera: DELTARETROVIRUS; LENTIVIRUS; RETROVIRUSES TYPE B, MAMMALIAN; ALPHARETROVIRUS; GAMMARETROVIRUS; RETROVIRUSES TYPE D; and SPUMAVIRUS. A key feature of retrovirus biology is the synthesis of a DNA copy of the genome which is integrated into cellular DNA. After integration it is sometimes not expressed but maintained in a latent state (PROVIRUSES).Terminal Repeat Sequences: Nucleotide sequences repeated on both the 5' and 3' ends of a sequence under consideration. For example, the hallmarks of a transposon are that it is flanked by inverted repeats on each end and the inverted repeats are flanked by direct repeats. The Delta element of Ty retrotransposons and LTRs (long terminal repeats) are examples of this concept.Retroviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the RETROVIRIDAE.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.

Phylogenetic analysis and possible function of bro-like genes, a multigene family widespread among large double-stranded DNA viruses of invertebrates and bacteria. (1/16)

Baculovirus repeated open reading frame (bro) genes and their relatives constitute a multigene family, typically with multiple copies per genome, known to occur among certain insect dsDNA viruses and bacteriophages. Little is known about the evolutionary history and function of the proteins encoded by these genes. Here we have shown that bro and bro-like (bro-l) genes occur among viruses of two additional invertebrate viral families, Ascoviridae and Iridoviridae, and in prokaryotic class II transposons. Analysis of over 100 sequences showed that the N-terminal region, consisting of two subdomains, is the most conserved region and contains a DNA-binding motif that has been characterized previously. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these proteins are distributed among eight groups, Groups 1-7 consisting of invertebrate virus proteins and Group 8 of proteins in bacteriophages and bacterial transposons. No bro genes were identified in databases of invertebrate or vertebrate genomes, vertebrate viruses and transposons, nor in prokaryotic genomes, except in prophages or transposons of the latter. The phylogenetic relationship between bro genes suggests that they have resulted from recombination of viral genomes that allowed the duplication and loss of genes, but also the acquisition of genes by horizontal transfer over evolutionary time. In addition, the maintenance and diversity of bro-l genes in different types of invertebrate dsDNA viruses, but not in vertebrate viruses, suggests that these proteins play an important role in invertebrate virus biology. Experiments with the unique orf2 bro gene of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus showed that it is not required for replication, but may enhance replication during the occlusion phase of reproduction.  (+info)

Evidence for the evolution of ascoviruses from iridoviruses. (2/16)

Ascoviruses (family Ascoviridae) are large, enveloped, double-stranded (ds)DNA viruses that attack lepidopteran larvae and pupae, and are unusual in that they are transmitted by parasitic wasps during oviposition. Previous comparisons of DNA polymerase sequences from vertebrate and invertebrate viruses suggested that ascoviruses are closely related to iridoviruses. This relationship was unexpected because these viruses differ markedly in virion symmetry, genome configuration and cellular pathology. Here we present evidence based on sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses of a greater range of ascovirus proteins and their homologues in other large dsDNA viruses that ascoviruses evolved from iridoviruses. Consensus trees for the major capsid protein, DNA polymerase, thymidine kinase and ATPase III from representative ascoviruses, algal viruses (family Phycodnaviridae), vertebrate and invertebrate iridoviruses (family Iridoviridae) and African swine fever virus (ASFV; family Asfarviridae) showed that ascovirus proteins clustered most closely with those of the lepidopteran iridovirus Chilo iridescent virus (CIV) (Invertebrate iridescent virus 6). Moreover, analysis of the presence or absence of homologues of an additional 50 proteins encoded in the genome of Spodoptera frugiperda ascovirus (SfAV-1a) showed that about 40 % occurred in CIV, with lower percentages encoded by the genomes of, respectively, vertebrate iridoviruses, phycodnaviruses and ASFV. The occurrence of three of these genes in SfAV-1a but not CIV was indicative of the evolutionary differentiation of ascoviruses from invertebrate iridoviruses.  (+info)

A viral caspase contributes to modified apoptosis for virus transmission. (3/16)

The Spodoptera frugiperda ascovirus, a DNA virus that attacks lepidopterans, codes for an executioner caspase synthesized by 9 h after infection of Sf21 cells. This caspase alone induces apoptosis in insect cells and, during viral replication in vivo, contributes to a novel cell cleavage process in which developing apoptotic bodies are rescued by the virus and differentiate to form large vesicles in which virions assemble. These viral vesicles disseminate to the blood, where they are acquired during egg-laying by parasitic wasps that transmit the virus. No other viruses encode caspases or form such modified apoptotic bodies, suggesting this caspase plays a direct role in cell partitioning that facilitates viral reproduction and transmission.  (+info)

Sequence and organization of the Trichoplusia ni ascovirus 2c (Ascoviridae) genome. (4/16)

The complete Trichoplusia ni ascovirus 2c (TnAV-2c) genome sequence was determined. The circular genome contains 174,059 bp with 165 open reading frames (ORFs) of greater than 180 bp and two major homologous regions (hrs). The genome is quite A+T rich at 64.6%. Fifty-four ORFs had homologues in other insect viruses, such as ascoviruses, iridoviruses, baculoviruses and entomopoxviruses; 30 ORFs showed low identities with those from different parasitic protozoa and 12 ORFs were unique to TnAV-2c. TnAV-2c has 15 ORFs that could be grouped into six gene families. Three major conserved repeating sequences were identified and were interspersed in two regions. BLAST analyses revealed that there were 16 enzymes involved in gene transcription, DNA replication, and nucleotide metabolism. TnAV-2c has 12 and 25 ORFs sharing high identities with ascovirus and iridovirus homologues, respectively. The codon usage bias appears to be more similar to Spodoptera frugiperda ascovirus 1a than to iridoviruses.  (+info)

Genomic sequence of Spodoptera frugiperda Ascovirus 1a, an enveloped, double-stranded DNA insect virus that manipulates apoptosis for viral reproduction. (5/16)

Ascoviruses (family Ascoviridae) are double-stranded DNA viruses with circular genomes that attack lepidopterans, where they produce large, enveloped virions, 150 by 400 nm, and cause a chronic, fatal disease with a cytopathology resembling that of apoptosis. After infection, host cell DNA is degraded, the nucleus fragments, and the cell then cleaves into large virion-containing vesicles. These vesicles and virions circulate in the hemolymph, where they are acquired by parasitic wasps during oviposition and subsequently transmitted to new hosts. To develop a better understanding of ascovirus biology, we sequenced the genome of the type species Spodoptera frugiperda ascovirus 1a (SfAV-1a). The genome consisted of 156,922 bp, with a G+C ratio of 49.2%, and contained 123 putative open reading frames coding for a variety of enzymes and virion structural proteins, of which tentative functions were assigned to 44. Among the most interesting enzymes, due to their potential role in apoptosis and viral vesicle formation, were a caspase, a cathepsin B, several kinases, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and especially several enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, including a fatty acid elongase, a sphingomyelinase, a phosphate acyltransferase, and a patatin-like phospholipase. Comparison of SfAV-1a proteins with those of other viruses showed that 10% were orthologs of Chilo iridescent virus proteins, the highest correspondence with any virus, providing further evidence that ascoviruses evolved from a lepidopteran iridovirus. The SfAV-1a genome sequence will facilitate the determination of how ascoviruses manipulate apoptosis to generate the novel virion-containing vesicles characteristic of these viruses and enable study of their origin and evolution.  (+info)

Sequence and organization of the Heliothis virescens ascovirus genome. (6/16)

The nucleotide sequence of the Heliothis virescens ascovirus (HvAV-3e) DNA genome was determined and characterized in this study. The circular genome consists of 186,262 bp, has a G+C content of 45.8 mol% and encodes 180 potential open reading frames (ORFs). Five unique homologous regions (hrs), 23 'baculovirus repeat ORFs' (bro) and genes encoding a caspase homologue and several enzymes involved in nucleotide replication and metabolism were found in the genome. Several ascovirus (AV)-, iridovirus- and baculovirus-homologous genes were identified. The genome is significantly larger than the recently sequenced genomes of Trichoplusia ni AV (TnAV-2c) and Spodoptera frugiperda AV (SfAV-1a). Gene-parity plots and overall similarity of ORFs indicate that HvAV-3e is related more closely to SfAV-1a than to TnAV-2c.  (+info)

Identification of Trichoplusia ni ascovirus 2c virion structural proteins. (7/16)

Ascoviruses are a family of insect viruses with circular, double-stranded DNA genomes. With the sequencing of the Trichoplusia ni ascovirus 2c (TnAV-2c) genome, the virion structural proteins were identified by using tandem mass spectrometry. From at least eight protein bands visible on a Coomassie blue-stained gel of TnAV-2c virion proteins, seven bands generated protein sequences that matched predicted open reading frames (ORFs) in the genome, i.e. ORFs 2, 43, 115, 141, 142, 147 and 153. Among these ORFs, only ORF153, encoding the major capsid protein, has been characterized previously.  (+info)

An insect virus-encoded microRNA regulates viral replication. (8/16)

 (+info)

*Ascoviridae

ICTV Online (10th) Report: Ascoviridae/ Viralzone: Ascoviridae/ Ascoviridae at the US National Library of Medicine Medical ... Ascoviridae". The Journal of General Virology. 98 (1): 4-5. doi:10.1099/jgv.0.000677. PMID 28218573. "Ascoviridae". ICTV Online ... Ascoviridae is a family of double strand DNA viruses that infect primarily invertebrates, mainly noctuids and spodoptera ...

*Nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses

"Ascoviridae-Ascoviridae-dsDNA Viruses-International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV)". International Committee on ... Ascoviridae can have up to 180 genes in its genome. The replication of this virus takes place in the nucleus of the host cell. ... Other proteins include DNA dependent RNA polymerase II and transcription factor II B. Members of the ascoviridae family come in ... Ascoviridae". The Journal of General Virology. 98 (1): 4-5. doi:10.1099/jgv.0.000677. ISSN 0022-1317. PMC 5370392 . PMID ...

*DNA virus

These four families (Ascoviridae, Iridoviridae, Phycodnaviridae and Polydnaviridae) may form a clade but more work is needed to ... Several studies have suggested that the family Ascoviridae evolved from the Iridoviridae. A study of the Iridoviruses suggests ... The family Polydnaviridae may have evolved from the Ascoviridae. Molecular evidence suggests that the Phycodnaviridae may have ... A second clade includes the alpha- and delta-like viral Pol from insect ascovirus (Ascoviridae), mammalian herpesviruses ( ...

*Jelly roll fold

Although most members of this group are icosahedral, a few families such as the Poxviridae and Ascoviridae have oval or brick- ...

*Taxonomic list of viruses

Ascoviridae Genus: Ascovirus Diadromus pulchellus ascovirus 4a Heliothis virescens ascovirus 3a Spodoptera frugiperda ascovirus ...

*List of virus families and subfamilies

Alphatetraviridae Alvernaviridae Amalgaviridae Ampullaviridae Anelloviridae Arenaviridae Arteriviridae Ascoviridae Asfarviridae ...
Figure 2.Ascoviridae: Phylogenetic tree obtained with nine core proteins shared by the members of Ascoviridae, Iridoviridae and Marseilleviridae. The tree was calculated using Mafft or Muscle alignments curated with Gblock (parameters were: -t=p -e=-gb1 -b2=N -b3=40 -b4=2 -b5=a -v=120), except for the RNase III orthologues, for which the complete sequence alignment was used. Alignments of the homologues of HvAV-3g ORF1 (DNA polymerase), 11 (DNA-directed RNA polymerase), 15 (DEAD-like helicase), 70 (DNA-directed RNA polymerase II), 74 (hypothetical protein), 81 (hypothetical protein), 85 (serine/threonine protein kinase), 122 (ATPase), 160 (hypothetical protein) were concatenated and trees based on maximum likelihood were calculated with PhyML. Parameters used were WAG (substitution matrix), 0 (proportion of invariable sites), 7 in a, and 5 in f (number of relative substitution rate categories), and F (substitution model). The protein substitution model, the proportion of invariable sites, the ...
Ascoviruses are ds DNA viruses that attack caterpillars and differ from all other viruses by inducing nuclear lysis followed by cleavage of host cells into numerous anucleate vesicles in which virus replication continues as these grow in the blood. Ascoviruses are also unusual in that most encode apoptosis inhibitors and caspase or caspase-like proteins. A robust cell line to study the novel molecular biology of ascovirus replication in vitro is lacking. Therefore, we used strand-specific RNA-Seq to study transcription in vivo in third instars of Spodoptera frugiperda infected with the Spodoptera frugiperda ascovirus, a member of the type species, Spodoptera frugiperda ascovirus (SfAV-1a), sampling transcripts at different time points after infection ...
Krafft L.; Klingauf F., 1981: Differences in the development of heliothis virescens when given artificial diets with admixtures of secondary plant substances and amino acids
Schematic illustration of the organization of the Diadromus pulchellus ascovirus 4a (DpAV4a) genome.Predicted ORFs are indicated by their location, orientation,
This report explores how mobile services provided by Vodafone and the Vodafone Foundation are enabling women to seize new opportunities and improve their lives. Accenture Sustainability Services were commissioned to conduct research on the services and to assess their potential social and economic impact if they were widely available across Vodafones markets by 2020. It showcases the projects and the work of those involved and also poses the question -- what would the benefit to women and to society at large be if projects such as these were taken to scale and achieved an industrialscale of growth? This reflects the Foundations commitment not solely to the development of pilots but rather the Trustees ambition to see projects which lead to transformational change. In order to understand this more deeply, the Report looks at the benefits for women and society and providessome financial modelling for how the engagement of commercial players could achieve industrial, sustainable growth in these ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cloning and characterization of a microsomal epoxide hydrolase from Heliothis virescens. AU - Kamita, Shizuo G.. AU - Yamamoto, Kohji. AU - Dadala, Mary M.. AU - Pha, Khavong. AU - Morisseau, Christophe. AU - Escaich, Aurélie. AU - Hammock, Bruce D.. PY - 2013/3. Y1 - 2013/3. N2 - Epoxide hydrolases (EHs) are α/β-hydrolase fold superfamily enzymes that convert epoxides to 1,2-trans diols. In insects EHs play critical roles in the metabolism of toxic compounds and allelochemicals found in the diet and for the regulation of endogenous juvenile hormones (JHs). In this study we obtained a full-length cDNA, hvmeh1, from the generalist feeder Heliothis virescens that encoded a highly active EH, Hv-mEH1. Of the 10 different EH substrates that were tested, Hv-mEH1 showed the highest specific activity (1180 nmol min-1 mg-1) for a 1,2-disubstituted epoxide-containing fluorescent substrate. This specific activity was more than 25- and 3900-fold higher than that for the general EH ...
Im working on iridoviruses infecting erythrocytes of poikilotherms which are often misinterpreted as protozoan parasites. I would like to make contacts with anyone interested in these infections. E-mail address is zmtlopes at cc.fc.ul.pt my name is A.P. Alves de Matos ...
Heliothis is a genus of moths, whose larvae are agricultural pests on crop species such as tobacco, cotton, soybean and pigeon pea. Several species of moths of agricultural importance that used to be placed in this genus now are classified as members of the genus Helicoverpa, such as the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea. Eyes naked and without lashes. Proboscis fully developed. Palpi porrect and second joint evenly clothes with long hair. The third joint is short and depressed and a short frontal shift. Thorax and abdomen without tufts. Fore tibia has a pair of slender terminal spines, whereas mid and hind tibia also spined. Fore wings with veins 8 and 9 sometimes given off from the end of the areole. Subgenus Heliothis: Heliothis acesias Felder & Rogenhofer, 1872 Heliothis australis Hardwick, 1994 Heliothis belladonna (H. Edwards, 1881) Heliothis borealis (Hampson, 1903) Heliothis conifera (Hampson, 1913) Heliothis cystiphora (Wallengren, 1860) Heliothis flavescens (Janse, 1917) Heliothis ...

Ascoviridae - WikipediaAscoviridae - Wikipedia

ICTV Online (10th) Report: Ascoviridae/ Viralzone: Ascoviridae/ Ascoviridae at the US National Library of Medicine Medical ... Ascoviridae". The Journal of General Virology. 98 (1): 4-5. doi:10.1099/jgv.0.000677. PMID 28218573. "Ascoviridae". ICTV Online ... Ascoviridae is a family of double strand DNA viruses that infect primarily invertebrates, mainly noctuids and spodoptera ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascoviridae

Ascoviridae<...Ascoviridae<...

Figure 2.Ascoviridae: Phylogenetic tree obtained with nine core proteins shared by the members of Ascoviridae, Iridoviridae and ... Figure 1.Ascoviridae: Morphology of ascovirus virions. A. Schematic illustration of the structure of a typical ascovirus virion ... The family Ascoviridae includes viruses with circular dsDNA genomes of 100-200 kilobase pairs (kbp) characterized by oblong ... Members of the family Ascoviridae vary in tissue tropism, with some attacking most host tissues, such as TnAV-2a and HvAV-3a, ...
more infohttps://talk.ictvonline.org/ictv-reports/ictv_online_report/dsdna-viruses/w/ascoviridae

Revision #84 - Ascoviridae - dsDNA Viruses - International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV)Revision #84 - Ascoviridae - dsDNA Viruses - International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV)

Figure 2.Ascoviridae: Phylogenetic tree obtained with nine core proteins shared by the members of Ascoviridae, Iridoviridae and ... Figure 1.Ascoviridae: Morphology of ascovirus virions. A. Schematic illustration of the structure of a typical ascovirus virion ... The family Ascoviridae includes viruses with circular dsDNA genomes of 100-200 kilobase pairs (kbp) characterized by oblong ... Members of the family Ascoviridae vary in tissue tropism, with some attacking most host tissues, such as TnAV-2a and HvAV-3a, ...
more infohttps://talk.ictvonline.org/ictv-reports/ictv_online_report/dsdna-viruses/w/ascoviridae/407/defaultwikipage/revision/84

Virus DNA - Wikipedia bahasa Indonesia, ensiklopedia bebasVirus DNA - Wikipedia bahasa Indonesia, ensiklopedia bebas

Famili Ascoviridae. *Famili Adenoviridae. *Famili Asfarviridae - includes African swine fever virus. *Famili Baculoviridae ...
more infohttps://id.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus_DNA

Bideshi DK[au] - PubMed - NCBIBideshi DK[au] - PubMed - NCBI

ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Ascoviridae.. Asgari S, Bideshi DK, Bigot Y, Federici BA, Cheng XW, Ictv Report Consortium. ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=Bideshi+DK%5Bau%5D&dispmax=50

Federici BA[au] - PubMed - NCBIFederici BA[au] - PubMed - NCBI

ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Ascoviridae.. Asgari S, Bideshi DK, Bigot Y, Federici BA, Cheng XW, Ictv Report Consortium. ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=Federici+BA%5Bau%5D&dispmax=50

DNA virus - wikidocDNA virus - wikidoc

Family Ascoviridae. *Family Adenoviridae. *Family Asfarviridae - includes African swine fever virus. *Family Baculoviridae ...
more infohttps://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/DsDNA_virus

DNA virus - wikidocDNA virus - wikidoc

Family Ascoviridae. *Family Adenoviridae. *Family Asfarviridae - includes African swine fever virus. *Family Baculoviridae ...
more infohttps://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/SsDNA_virus

Nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses - WikipediaNucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses - Wikipedia

"Ascoviridae-Ascoviridae-dsDNA Viruses-International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV)". International Committee on ... Ascoviridae can have up to 180 genes in its genome. The replication of this virus takes place in the nucleus of the host cell. ... Other proteins include DNA dependent RNA polymerase II and transcription factor II B. Members of the ascoviridae family come in ... Ascoviridae". The Journal of General Virology. 98 (1): 4-5. doi:10.1099/jgv.0.000677. ISSN 0022-1317. PMC 5370392 . PMID ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nucleocytoplasmic_large_DNA_viruses

Coral-associated viral communities show high levels of diversity and host auxiliary functions [PeerJ]Coral-associated viral communities show high levels of diversity and host auxiliary functions [PeerJ]

1). The NCLDVs Ascoviridae and Marseilleviridae were rare, as were other viral families (,0.5%; Fig. 1). The most predominant ... Ascoviridae; with Caudovirales or tailed bacteriophages being the most dominant order (reviewed in Thurber et al., 2017). ...
more infohttps://peerj.com/articles/4054/

Publications by B.M. Arif | Canadian Forest Service Publications | Natural Resources CanadaPublications by B.M. Arif | Canadian Forest Service Publications | Natural Resources Canada

Sequence and organization of the Trichoplusia ni ascovirus 2c (Ascoviridae) genome. 2006. Wang, L.; Xue, J.; Seaborn, C.P.; ...
more infohttps://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/authors/read/12417?format=citation

Code System ConceptCode System Concept

Family Ascoviridae (organism) {424599004 , SNOMED-CT } Parent/Child (Relationship Type) Genus Ascovirus (organism) {424847007 ...
more infohttps://phinvads.cdc.gov/vads/ViewCodeSystemConcept.action?oid=2.16.840.1.113883.6.96&code=424599004

Eukaryotic large nucleo-cytoplasmic DNA viruses: Clusters of orthologous genes and reconstruction of viral genome evolution |...Eukaryotic large nucleo-cytoplasmic DNA viruses: Clusters of orthologous genes and reconstruction of viral genome evolution |...

At the first step, relationships between the 6 NCLDV families (Poxviridae, Asfarviridae, Irido- and Ascoviridae, Mimiviridae, ... the Ascoviridae and the putative new family represented by the Marseillevirus, did not result in an erosion of the ... except for Poxviridae and Ascoviridae, and possibly, representatives of new families as well [19-23]. Thus, there seems to ...
more infohttps://virologyj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-422X-6-223

Professor Sassan Asgari - UQ ResearchersProfessor Sassan Asgari - UQ Researchers

Family Ascoviridae. Bigot, Y., Asgari, S., Bideshi, D., Cheng, X. W., Federici, B. A. and Renault, S (2011). Family Ascoviridae ... ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Ascoviridae. Asgari, Sassan, Bideshi, Dennis K. , Bigot, Yves, Federici, Brian A., Cheng, Xiao-Wen ... and ICTV Report Consortium (2017) ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Ascoviridae. Journal of General Virology, 98 1: 4-5. doi:10.1099 ...
more infohttps://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/1323

Code System ConceptCode System Concept

Family Ascoviridae (organism) {424599004 , SNOMED-CT } Other Relationships No other relationships present. ...
more infohttps://phinvads.cdc.gov/vads/ViewCodeSystemConcept.action?oid=2.16.840.1.113883.6.96&code=424847007

E C   X ̕E C X ̕

Family Ascoviridae. @ Family Asfarviridae. @ Family Baculoviridae @ b k ( ځE I). @ @ @ @Genus Granulovirus. @ @ @ @Genus ...
more infohttp://mayatan.web.fc2.com/virus2.htm

Chlorovirus ATCV-1 is part of the human oropharyngeal virome and is associated with changes in cognitive functions in humans...Chlorovirus ATCV-1 is part of the human oropharyngeal virome and is associated with changes in cognitive functions in humans...

Viruses in the phycodnavirus family, together with those in the Poxviridae, Iridoviridae, Ascoviridae, Asfarviridae, ...
more infohttps://www.pnas.org/content/111/45/16106.full

Frontiers | Saudi Moumouvirus, the First Group B Mimivirus Isolated from Asia | MicrobiologyFrontiers | Saudi Moumouvirus, the First Group B Mimivirus Isolated from Asia | Microbiology

Ascoviridae, Poxviridae and the recently discovered families Mimiviridae and Marseilleviridae (Iyer et al., 2006; Colson et al ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2016.02029/full

DiVA - Search resultDiVA - Search result

Ascoviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Marseilleviridae, and Mimiviridae, as well as still unclassified pithoviruses, pandoraviruses, ...
more infohttp://www.diva-portal.org/smash/resultList.jsf?af=%5B%5D&aq=%5B%5B%7B%22organisationId%22%3A%226812%22%7D%5D%5D&aqe=%5B%5D&aq2=%5B%5B%5D%5D&language=en&query=
  • The family Ascoviridae includes viruses with circular dsDNA genomes of 100-200 kilobase pairs (kbp) characterized by oblong enveloped virions of 200-400 nm in length. (ictvonline.org)
  • The family Ascoviridae was erected almost a decade ago to accommodate a number of large double-stranded DNA viruses that are pathogenic to larvae and pupae of lepidopterous insects, primarily in the family Noctuidae . (caister.com)
  • Members of the family Ascoviridae , in particular members of the genus Ascovirus , can have broad host ranges among the larvae of lepidopteran species, and the fat body tissue is a major site of replication for most species ( Federici and Govindarajan 1990 ). (ictvonline.org)