A plant genus of the family ASCLEPIADACEAE. This is the true milkweed; APOCYNUM & EUPHORBIA hirta are rarely called milkweed. Asclepias asthmatica has been changed to TYLOPHORA.
Saturated derivatives of the steroid pregnane. The 5-beta series includes PROGESTERONE and related hormones; the 5-alpha series includes forms generally excreted in the urine.
The dogbane family of the order Gentianales. Members of the family have milky, often poisonous juice, smooth-margined leaves, and flowers in clusters. Asclepiadacea (formerly the milkweed family) has been included since 1999 and before 1810.
Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.
A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Slender-bodies diurnal insects having large, broad wings often strikingly colored and patterned.
A plant genus of the family RUBIACEAE. Members contain antimalarial (ANTIMALARIALS) and analgesic (ANALGESICS) indole alkaloids.
All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.
A republic in western Africa, south of GUINEA and west of LIBERIA. Its capital is Freetown.
Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.
A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. Members contain linarin (also called acaciin).
The transfer of POLLEN grains (male gametes) to the plant ovule (female gamete).
The reproductive organs of plants.
A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.
Ecosystem and environmental activities, functions, or events.
The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.
The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
A suborder of HEMIPTERA, called true bugs, characterized by the possession of two pairs of wings. It includes the medically important families CIMICIDAE and REDUVIIDAE. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The group of celestial bodies, including the EARTH, orbiting around and gravitationally bound by the sun. It includes eight planets, one minor planet, and 34 natural satellites, more than 1,000 observed comets, and thousands of lesser bodies known as MINOR PLANETS (asteroids) and METEOROIDS. (From Academic American Encyclopedia, 1983)

Metschnikowia vanudenii sp. nov. and Metschnikowia lachancei sp. nov., from flowers and associated insects in North America. (1/23)

Two new species of the ascosporic yeast genus Metschnikowia were isolated from nectaries and associated muscoid flies of flowers from the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) in North America, and are described as Metschnikowia vanudenii [type strain=PYCC 4650(T)=CBS 9134(T)=NRRL Y-27243(T)=UWO(PS) 86A4.1(T)] and Metschnikowia lachancei [type strain=PYCC 4605(T)=CBS 9131(T)=NRRL Y-27242(T)=UWO(PS) 7ASB2.3(T)]. As with the previously described Metschnikowia gruessii, M. vanudenii has vegetative cells with an 'aeroplane' or cross-like configuration, produces ovoid chlamydospores and forms ellipsoidopedunculate asci with two acicular ascospores. Metschnikowia lachancei is distinguished from other Metschnikowia species by formation of club-shaped asci with 1-2 thick clavate ascospores. The phylogenetic positions of the proposed new species within Metschnikowia were determined from sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA. The new species show low nuclear DNA relatedness with neighbouring taxa.  (+info)

Flavonoids in the leaves of Asclepias incarnata L. (2/23)

Seven flavonoid compounds: quercelin 3-O-beta-galactopyranoside, 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside, 3-O-arabinoside, 3-O-beta-glucopyranosyl (1-->2)-beta-galactopyranoside, 3-O-beta-xylopyranosyl (1-->2)-beta-galactopyranoside, 3-O-alpha-rhamnopyranosyl (1-->2)-beta-galactopyranoside and kaempferol 3-beta-glucopyranoside were isolated and identified from the leaves of Asclepias incarnata, L. (Asclepiadaceae).  (+info)

Steroidal glycosides from the roots of Asclepias curassavica. (3/23)

Twenty-six new acylated-oxypregnane glycosides were obtained along with three known cardenolide glycosides from the roots of Asclepias curassavica (Asclepiadaceae). The new compounds were confirmed to contain 12-O-benzoylsarcostin, 12-O-benzoyldeacylmetaplexigenin, kidjolanin, and 12-O-benzoyltayloron, and one new acylated-oxypregnane, 12-O-(E)-cinnamoyltayloron, as their aglycones, using both spectroscopic and chemical methods.  (+info)

Phylogenetic escalation and decline of plant defense strategies. (4/23)

 (+info)

New cardenolide and acylated lignan glycosides from the aerial parts of Asclepias curassavica. (5/23)

Three new cardenolide glycosides and six new acylated lignan glycosides were obtained along with nineteen known compounds from the aerial parts of Asclepias curassavica L. (Asclepiadaceae). The structure of each compound was determined based on interpretations of NMR and MS measurements and chemical evidence.  (+info)

Acylated-oxypregnane glycosides from the roots of Asclepias syriaca. (6/23)

Twenty new pregnane glycosides were obtained from the roots of Asclepias syriaca L. (Asclepiadaceae). These glycosides were confirmed to contain ikemagenin, 12-O-nicotinoyllineolon, 5alpha,6-dihydroikemagenin, and 12-O-tigloylisolineolon, as their aglycones, using both spectroscopic and chemical methods.  (+info)

Biochemical analysis of a papain-like protease isolated from the latex of Asclepias curassavica L. (7/23)

Most of the species belonging to Asclepiadaceae family usually secrete an endogenous milk-like fluid in a network of laticifer cells in which sub-cellular organelles intensively synthesize proteins and secondary metabolites. A new papain-like endopeptidase (asclepain c-II) has been isolated and characterized from the latex extracted from petioles of Asclepias curassavica L. (Asclepiadaceae). Asclepain c-II was the minor proteolytic component in the latex, but showed higher specific activity than asclepain c-I, the main active fraction previously studied. Both enzymes displayed quite distinct biochemical characteristics, confirming that they are different enzymes. Crude extract was purified by cation exchange chromatography (FPLC). Two active fractions, homogeneous by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, were isolated. Asclepain c-II displayed a molecular mass of 23,590 Da, a pI higher than 9.3, maximum proteolytic activity at pH 9.4-10.2, and showed poor thermostability. The activity of asclepain c-II is inhibited by cysteine proteases inhibitors like E-64, but not by any other protease inhibitors such as 1,10-phenantroline, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, and pepstatine. The Nterminal sequence (LPSFVDWRQKGVVFPIRNQGQCGSCWTFSA) showed a high similarity with those of other plant cysteine proteinases. When assayed on N-alpha-CBZ-amino acid-p-nitrophenyl esters, the enzyme exhibited higher preference for the glutamine derivative. Determinations of kinetic parameters were performed with N-alpha-CBZ-L-Gln-p-nitrophenyl ester as substrate: K(m)=0.1634 mM, k(cat)=121.48 s(-1), and k(cat)/K(m)=7.4 x 10(5) s(-1)/mM.  (+info)

Aerial reproductive structures of vascular plants as a microhabitat for myxomycetes. (8/23)

This study explored the occurrence and distribution of myxomycete species on the aerial reproductive structures of vascular plants. Eight species of vascular plants representing five families were sampled. The doubled rope climbing method was used to collect bark and cones from the canopy of Pinus echinata. Bark and aerial seed pods were gathered from Cercis canadensis, follicles and stems from Asclepias syriaca, dried composite inflorescences and stems from Echinacea angustifolia, E. pallida, and E. paradoxa var. paradoxa, and capsules and stems from Yucca glauca and Y. smalliana. Reproductive structures and bark/stems for 202 host plants were separated and cultured in 541 moist chambers, resulting in 118 collections yielding 32 myxomycete species representing 11 genera, seven families and five orders. There was no significant difference in pH values of the reproductive structures and bark/stems of the host plants, however legume pods of C. canadensis (6.9 +/- 1.3) had higher pH than the bark (6.0 +/- 1.1) and had a different composition of myxomycete species. Myxomycete orders have optimal pH ranges. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling, multiresponse permutation procedure and indicator species analysis showed a significant difference in species richness of reproductive structures and bark/stems. The bark of trees had greater mean species richness of myxomycetes than the reproductive structures, but the reproductive structures of herbaceous plants had greater mean species richness of myxomycetes than the stems. A new term, herbicolous myxomycetes, is proposed for a group of myxomycetes frequently associated with herbaceous, perennial, grassland plants. An undescribed species of Arcyria occurred only on cones of P. echinata.  (+info)

This dataset contains a draft assembly of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) nuclear genome, linkage group information, and gene family counts for Asclepias and related species. The genome assembly is accompanied by annotation of gene models, repeat models, transfer RNAs, and open reading frames, and mapping information of Asclepias transcripts, Calotropis transcripts, and Coffea proteins onto the assembled scaffolds. The linkage group information includes data input into the linkage group analysis, R scripts for processing, and a final list of scaffolds assigned to linkage groups. Additional data includes the coding sequence alignment of P5βR paralogs described in the article and a table of gene family counts in Asclepias, other Apocynaceae, coffee (Coffea), and grape (Vitis ...
Natural order.- Asclepiadaceae.. Common names.- Pleurisy Root. Butterfly Weed.. General Analysis.-. Acts chiefly on the mucous surfaces, especially of the respiratory organs, and intestinal canal ; also upon the serous tissues, especially the pleura and synovial membranes, producing in all these inflammation, which is subacute in its character.. Characteristic symptoms.. Mind.- (Asclepias tuberosa). Weakness of thought and memory ; at first cheerful, then fretful and peevish.. Head.- (Asclepias tuberosa). Confusion, dullness, and heaviness of the head ; swimming of the head.. Dull headache in the forehead and vertex, aggravated by motion, and relieved by lying down.. Headache pressing deeply on the base of the skull. (Ipec.). Pain in the forehead from coughing. (Bry.). Eyes.- (Asclepias tuberosa). Eyes look dull, fatigued, and heavy.. Ophthalmia, with itching and pain in eyes.. Feeling of sand in the eyes.. Vision disturbed ; large dark spots before the eyes.. Nose.- (Asclepias tuberosa). Fluent ...
Abstract: Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca, to assist in genet identification and the analysis of spatial genetic structure. • Methods and Results: Using an enrichment cloning protocol, eight microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in a North American population of A. syriaca. The primers amplified di- and tri-nucleotide repeats with 4-13 alleles per locus. • Conclusions: The primers will be useful for studies of clonality and gene flow in natural populations. Abstract: Chapter 3 Spatial genetic structure (SGS) is largely determined by the reproductive strategies of species. Many plant species, including Asclepias syriaca, the common milkweed, reproduce both sexually and asexually and there can be great variation in SGS among species that reproduce by both methods. SGS was assessed within an old field population of A. syriaca in northern Michigan. Strong SGS was detected to 38 m when multiple identical ...
A new cardenolide, 12 beta, 14 beta-dihydroxy-3 beta, 19-epoxy-3 alpha-methoxy-5 alpha-card-20(22)-enolide (6), and a new doubly linked cardenolide glycoside, 12 beta-hydroxycalotropin (13), together with eleven known compounds, coroglaucigenin (1), 12 beta-hydroxycoroglaucigenin (2), calotropagenin (3), desglucouzarin (4), 6-O-feruloyl-desglucouzarin (5), calotropin (7), uscharidin (8), asclepin (9), 16 alpha-hydroxyasclepin (10), 16 alpha-acetoxycalotropin (11), and 16 alpha-acetoxyasclepin (12), were isolated from the aerial part of ornamental milkweed, Asclepias curassavica and chemically elucidated through spectral analyses. All the isolates were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against HepG2 and Raji cell lines. The results showed that asclepin (9) had the strongest cytotoxic activity with an IC(50) value of 0.02 mu M against the two cancer cell lines and the new compound 13 had significant cytotoxic activity with IC(50) values of 0.69 and 1.46 mu M, respectively. (C) 2009 Elsevier ...
Support monarch and other butterflies with Asclepias speciosa, the western North American sister species to the eastern common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca).
Action-Diaphoretic, expectorant, cathartic, tonic.. Physiological Action-In regard to the influence of asclepias, Grover Coe, M. D., writing in 1858, gives the following wide range of action. He says: No other remedy with which we are acquainted is so universally admissible in the treatment of disease, either alone or in combination. In fact we think of no pathological condition that would be aggravated by its employment. It expels wind, relieves pain, relaxes spasm, induces and promotes perspiration, equalizes the circulation, harmonizes the action of the nervous system, and accomplishes its work without excitement; neither increasing the force or frequency of the pulse, nor raising the temperature of the body. It is of special service in the treatment of affections involving the serous membranes, as pleuritis, peritonitis, etc. In this it resembles bryonia closely.. The most active apparent influence of this agent is upon the sudoriparous glands. It is distinctively an eliminative agent of ...
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Members of the genus Asclepias produce some of the most complex flowers in the plant kingdom, comparable to orchids in complexity. Five petals reflex backwards revealing a gynostegium (fused stamen filamens and styles) surrounded by a five-membrane corona. The corona is composed of a five paired hood and horn structure with the hood acting as a sheath for the inner horn. Glands holding pollinia are found between the hoods. The size, shape and color of the horns and hoods are often important identifying characteristics for species in the genus Asclepias.[7]. Pollination in this genus is accomplished in an unusual manner. Pollen is grouped into complex structures called pollinia (or pollen sacs), rather than being individual grains or tetrads, as is typical for most plants. The feet or mouthparts of flower-visiting insects such as bees, wasps and butterflies, slip into one of the five slits in each flower formed by adjacent anthers. The bases of the pollinia then mechanically attach to the ...
USDA, ARS, Germplasm Resources Information Network. Asclepias syriaca in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Accessed on 07-Oct-06 ...
A widely distributed North American plant, Asclepias tuberosa is a native of midwest prairies and a favorite garden plant for its ability to attract many butterflies and the profusion of bright orange flowers. The long-lasting flowers combined with a low mounded profile make this the most popular of milkweeds. True to its name Butterflyweed attracts legions of butterflies and is an important host plant for the caterpillars of Monarch, Grey Hairstreak, and Queen butterflies.
Perennial Plant of The Year- Asclepias tuberosa, what a great choice! With all the hype these days over the Monarch Butterfly this orange Milkweed is a perfect selection to be named Perennial Plant of the Year 2017.
Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Weed) milkweed has attractive, bright orange flowers in late spring and is a nectar source for bees and butterflies.
Presented by M di-T Asclepias Tuberosa.. Pleurisy-root. Butterfly-weed. N. O. Asclepiadace . Tincture of fresh root.. Clinical.─Alopecia. Asthma. Bilious fever. Bronchitis. Catarrh. Chancre. Colic. Cough. Diarrh a. Dysentery. Headache. Heart, affections of. Influenza. Ophthalmia. Pericarditis. Pleurisy. Pleurodynia. Rheumatism. Scrofula. Syphilis.. Characteristics.─Asclep. tub. causes sharp, stitching, pricking pains; , by motion. It is of the hydrogenoid type, corresponding to catarrhal complaints from cold and damp weather. Rheumatic pains affect the body diagonally, l. upper and r. lower, or the opposite. Muscular and articular rheumatism with stitching pains, dark red urine and hot, perspiring skin. Sensitive to tobacco. Pain in forehead and abdomen from coughing. Griping and sharp peritoneal pains , by pressure. Dysentery in autumn; and painful diarrh a with griping and tenesmus. Warm feeling in chest. Dyspn a. Cough hard and dry; or hoarse, croupy with tight breathing and constriction ...
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About plant names.... This milkweed variety is found mostly in central and southern California, where it is native.. Identification. Plants are up to 3 (91 cm) in size, upright or reclining, with distinctively fuzzy stems and leaves. The leaves have wrinkly edges and a grayish-white fuzzy or woolly appearance. The buds appear pink, opening into deep red/purple flowers about 1 (2.5 cm) across. A yellow-green pentagon-shaped stamen (actually five fused stamens) is in the center of each flower.. Edibility. A Wikipedia article suggests that this milkweed is edible:. This plant was eaten as candy by the Kawaiisu tribes of indigenous California; the milky sap within the leaves is flavorful and chewy when cooked.[1]. However, the sap mentioned above as a sort of candy contains cardiac glycosides in most other milkweed species, and monarch butterfly larvae eat the plants to make themselves poisonous to predators, so eating the sap in any form is potentially dangerous.. Online References:. Asclepias ...
Used For: The remedy is applied for boosting perspiration, reducing spasms, treating flatulence, decreasing inflammations, and fighting coughs.. Pleurisy Root provides great aid in treating respiratory system diseases, eliminating inflammations and boosting mucus movement. Applied as a treatment from bronchitis and different lung diseases, like pneumonia, pleurisy. Highly effective as a remedy for flu.. Preparation and Intake: If used in form of infusion, half a teaspoon is taken and mixed in a glass of water, then boiled and kept hot for 15 minutes. The result is filtered and taken thrice a day.. In form of a tincture pleurisy root is applied in a dose of 1-2 ml thrice per day.. Safety: There is no data concerning the plants safety level. Still, there is a possibility of interaction with chemical remedies. Dont use the herb before having a consultation with your health-care provider.. ...
Phytochemical investigation of the above-ground biomass of Asclepias sullivantii L. (Asclepiadaceae) afforded six new pregnane glycosides, named sullivantosides A-F (1-6). The structures of 1-6 were elucidated through a variety of spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques (1D and 2D NMR; HRESIMS). To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first phytochemical study of this species ...
Literature References: Dried root of Asclepias tuberosa L., Asclepiadaceae. Habit. Ontario to Minnesota. Constit. Asclepiadin, resins, volatile oil. ...
Asclepias viridiflora is a PERENNIAL growing to 1 m (3ft 3in) by 1 m (3ft 3in). It is in flower from July to August, and the seeds ripen from August to October. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, insects, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). It is noted for attracting wildlife. Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.
Fill your garden with Asclepias seeds from Everwilde Farms, including milkweed and butterfly weed seeds that produce flowers of all different colors.
Asclepias speciosa, or showy Milkweed, is native to the western half of North America. In California, the perennial plant is found in the Sierras and Coast Ranges. The plant is hairy and grows erect to around 1.2m in height. The large, broad leaves are arranged opposite on the stem. The pinkish-purple flowers are star shaped and are arranged in umbels. In the summer months, when the plant is flowering, you can find a number of butterflies tending the flowers, notably the Monarch butterfly. Like all Milkweeds, a white liquid, called latex, is secreted whenever the plant is damaged. Most predators find the liquid very unpalatable, but some caterpillars are able to sequester the latex and become unpalatable themselves.. Click the images above for a larger view. ...
Easy to grow Common Milkweed is native, perennial and the sole host plant for monarch butterflies. Comes with simple growing instructions and videos. Plants are non-GMO, Neonicotinoid-free and 100% guaranteed to grow in your garden.
Asclepias ovalifolia is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 1 m (3ft 3in). It is hardy to zone (UK) 6. It is in flower from July to August, and the seeds ripen from August to October. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, insects, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). It is noted for attracting wildlife. Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.
Asclepias galioides is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.4 m (1ft 4in). The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, insects, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). Suitable for: light (sandy) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.
Asclepias subulata is a PERENNIAL growing to 2 m (6ft 7in). It is hardy to zone (UK) 6. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, insects, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). Suitable for: light (sandy) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.
Asclepias pedicellata, Stalked Milkweed, Savanna Milkweed. NameThatPlant.net currently features 3816 plants and 23,855 images. For many plants, the website displays maps showing physiographic provinces within the Carolinas and Georgia where the plant has been documented. On NameThatPlant.net, plants are shown in different seasons (not just in flower), and you can hear Latin names spoken, look up botanical terms, get a feel for which plants to expect to see in various natural communities, and discover botanically interesting places to visit.
Asclepias subulata, a dicot, is a perennial herb that is native to California and is also found outside of California, but is confined to western North America. ...
Ethnobotany. Asclepias speciosa has been used as a food or as medicine by the following First Peoples: Acoma, Apache, Cheyenne, Chiricahua, Crow, Flathead, Keres, Hopi, Laguna, Lakota, Miwok, Mescalero, Montana, Navajo, Okanagan-Colville, Paiute, Pomo and Shoshoni. Except the roots and the seeds, all parts of the plant were eaten - raw or cooked depending on the stage…
Description.-Root large and fusiform, dried in longitudinal or transverse sections, from 2 to 15 Cc. long (3/4 to 6 inches), and about 2 Cc. (3/4 inch) or more in thickness; the head knotty, and slightly but distinctly annulate, the remainder longitudinally wrinkled, externally orange-brown, internally whitish; tough, and having all uneven fracture; bark thin, and in two distinct layers, the inner one whitish; wood yellowish, with large, white, medullary rays. It is inodorous, and has a bitterish, somewhat acrid taste. When long kept it acquires a gray color-(U. S. P.).. Chemical Composition.-Mr. Elam Rhoads found in this root gum, pectin, starch, albumen, gallic and gallo-tannic acids, lignin, salts, an odorous material of a fatty nature, two resinous bodies-one dissolving in ether, the other refusing to so dissolve-and a fixed oil. Mr. Rhoads also obtained a. peculiar body having the taste of the drug, which may be thrown down from a strong infusion of the root by tannin. By decomposing with ...
Wlp40 with NDC 62185-0020 is a a human over the counter drug product labeled by Dr. Donna Restivo Dc. The generic name of Wlp40 is asclepias vincetoxicum, echinacea (angustifolia), hypothalamus (suis), cerebrum suis, hepar suis, kidney suis, methylcobalamin, pancreas suis, stomach (suis), aacg-a, aacg-b, calcarea carbonica, gambogia, gelsemium sempervirens, graphites, nux vomica, phytolacca decandra, 7-keto-dhea (dehydroepiandrosterone), adenosinum triphosphoricum dinatrum, glucagon, insulinum (suis), sarcolacticum acidum, proteus (vulgaris).
Metabolic Rewire Support with NDC 62902-0003 is a a human over the counter drug product labeled by Intentional Nourishment. The generic name of Metabolic Rewire Support is asclepias vincetoxicum, echinacea (angustifolia), hypothalamus (suis), hepar suis, kidney (suis), methylcobalamin, gambogia, graphites, nux vomica, phytolacca decandra, 7-keto (3-acetyl-7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone), adenosinum triphosphoricum dinatrum, glucagon, insulinum (suis), sarcolacticum acidum, proteus (vulgaris).
Latin Name Common Name Strata Native? Acer negundo box elder Herbaceous YES Ailanthus altissima tree of heaven Herbaceous NO [invasive] Allium cernuum nodding wild onion Herbaceous YES Ambrosia artemisiifolia common ragweed Herbaceous YES Ambrosia trifida giant ragweed Herbaceous YES Anemone virginiana tall anemone; thimbleweed Herbaceous YES Aquilegia canadensis wild columbine Herbaceous YES Arnoglossum atriplicifolium pale indian plantain Herbaceous YES Artemisia vulgaris mugwort Herbaceous NO [invasive] Asclepias Herbaceous ? Asclepias syriaca common milkweed Herbaceous YES Asclepias tuberosa butterfly weed; butterly milkweed Herbaceous YES Aster Herbaceous ? Aster ericoides heath aster Herbaceous YES Aster laevis smooth blue aster Herbaceous YES Aster novae-angliae New England aster Herbaceous YES Aster pilosus hairy aster; frost-weed aster Herbaceous YES Bouteloua curtipendula side-oats grama Herbaceous YES Bromus japonicus Japanese chess Herbaceous NO Capsella bursa-pastoris shepherds ...
Asclepias tuberosa Hello Yellow Milkweed , Perennial Plant of the Year 2017. A yellow flowering perennial native to much of the United States except the Northwest.. The Hello Yellow Milkweed is a must have for attracting butterflies, insects and hummingbirds to your garden. Asclepias tuberosa is a host plant for the Monarch butterfly and other butterflies providing food and nectar for the caterpillar to butterflies. Also called Butterfly Weed or Milkweed.. Tips on growing Milkweeds: deadhead for extended blooming from summer to fall, late to emerge in spring, plant with companion plants such as Cheyenne Spirit Echinacea, Goldenrod, and Russian Sage Little Spire.​. Hello Yellow Butterfly Weed Asclepias tuberosa grows approximately 18 to 24 inches tall and spreads in the 18 to 24 inch width. Plant in full sun to lightly filtered shade. Adaptable to dry, well-drained and lightly moist soils. An excellent native perennial plant thats seed pods are also used for dried arrangements. Pair this ...
Many kinds of insects visit A. syriaca flowers, and some kinds pollinate them, including Apis mellifera (Western honey bees) and Bombus spp. (bumble bees).[3][4] In the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Region, the introduced A. mellifera was the most effective and most important diurnal pollinator with regard to both pollen removal and pollen deposition.[5] However, when considering the self-incompatibility of A. syriaca, A. mellifera was not the most important pollinator because of its high self-pollination rate compared to Bombus spp. Additionally, the rate of self-pollination increased more rapidly with the number of flowers per inflorescence in A. mellifera than in native Bombus spp. Many insect species feed on common milkweed, including the red milkweed beetle (Tetraopes tetrophtalmus), large milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus), small milkweed bug (Lygaeus kalmii), milkweed aphid (Aphis nerii), milkweed leaf beetle (Labidomera clivicollis), milkweed stem weevil (Rhyssomatus lineaticollis), milkweed tiger ...
Typical plants are evergreen perennial subshrubs that grow up to 1 m (3.3 ft) tall and have pale gray stems. The leaves are arranged oppositely on the stems and are lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate shaped ending in acuminate or acute tips. Like other members of the genus, the sap is milky. The flowers are in cymes with 10-20 flowers each. They have purple or red corollas and corona lobes that are yellow or orange. Flowering occurs nearly year-round.[5] The 5-10 cm (2.0-3.9 in) long, fusiform shaped fruits are called follicles. The follicles contain tan to brown seeds that are ovate in shape and 6-7 mm (0.24-0.28 in) long. The flat seeds have silky hairs that allow the seeds to float on air currents when the pod-like follicles dehisce (split open).[7] ...
This blog was created as an online diary to capture some of the things I love or experience in life. Anyway, I hope we will all learn to appreciate the simple things in life, cherish our loved ones and make the most of our lives ...
References:. Agrawal, A.A. 2005. Natural selection on common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) by a community of specialized insect herbivores. Evolutionary Ecology Research, 7: 651 667.. Agrawal, A.A. & P.A. Van Zandt. 2003. Ecological play in the coevolutionary theater: Genetic and environmental determinants of attack by a specialist weevil on milkweed. Journal of Ecology 91: 1049-1059.. Arnett, R.H., Jr., M.C. Thomas, P. E. Skelley & J.H. Frank. (editors). 2002. American Beetles, Volume II: Polyphaga: Scarabaeoidea through Curculionoidea. CRC Press. 861 pp.. Fordyce, J.A. & S.B. Malcolm. 2000. Specialist weevil, Rhyssomatus lineaticollis, does not spatially avoid cardenolide defenses of common milkweed by ovipositing into pith tissue. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 26: 2857 2874.. Nishio, S., M.S. Blum, S. Takahashi. 1983. Intraplant distribution of cardenolides in Asclepias humistrata (Asclepiadaceae), with additional notes on their fates in Tetraopes melanurus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) and ...
Swamp Milkweed is a red, showier variety of Common Milkweed. It is extremely elegant, producing willowy foliage and cherry-red blooms. It will also attract beautiful butterflies and hummingbirds to your garden or meadow. Perennial.
FIRST IMPRESSIONS: This elegant plant is upright with slender willow like leaves. In summer plants are topped by clear white flower clusters which attract flocks of butterflies. Plants thrive in sunny sites with moist or saturated soils. The Ice Ballet cultivar differs from the species due to its white flowers, more compact habit and darker green foliage.. HABITAT & HARDINESS: Asclepias incarnata Ice Ballet is a nursery selection of the native Swamp Milkweed so it does not exist in the wild. Plants are hardy from USDA Zones 3-9.. PLANT DESCRIPTION: This Swamp Milkweed cultivar is an erect clump forming perennial that grows from a taproot. Plants have narrow lance shaped leaves with pointed tips and smooth margins. Stems and leaves contain a milky sap that exudes when plants are damaged. Desirable yellow and black Monarch caterpillars feed on the foliage.. Fragrant summer umbels are composed of many tiny star shaped florets. The intricate florets look like freshly extruded white cake ...
Data Availability StatementThe data used to aid the findings of the study can be found in the corresponding writer upon demand. survivin, and upregulated and Mcl-1 proapoptosis protein Bak, Bax, aswell simply because activation of JNK and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. Moreover, inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK by pharmacological inhibitors abrogated EAAC-induced apoptosis.Conclusion.Our data indicated that EAAC exerted potent antitumor impact bothin vitroand invivoby triggering the apoptotic pathway. 1. Background Malignancy has threaten human life and health worldwide; in particular lung, breast, and colon cancer are the three most common cancers. Conventional chemotherapy plays a key role in the treatment of these cancers; the outcomes of treatment are pretty unpleasant nevertheless, which drives us to build up a effective and safe tumor-inhibiting agent highly. Many plants have already been reported to obtain several bioactivities, including antitumor activity.Asclepias curassavica Asclepias ...
Latin Name Common Name Strata Native? Acer rubrum red maple Tree/Shrub/Herbaceous YES Achillea millefolium yarrow; milfoil Herbaceous YES Agrimonia parviflora swamp agrimony Herbaceous YES Ambrosia artemisiifolia common ragweed Herbaceous YES Amelanchier Tree/Shrub/Herbaceous YES Apios americana ground nut Herbaceous YES Apocynum Herbaceous ? Apocynum cannabinum indian help; dogbane Herbaceous YES Asclepias purpurascens purple milkweed Herbaceous YES Asclepias syriaca common milkweed Herbaceous YES Asparagus officinalis asparagus Herbaceous NO Aster Herbaceous ? Betula papyrifera paper birch Tree YES Carex pensylvanica common oak sedge Herbaceous YES Carex vulpinoidea brown fox sedge Herbaceous YES Cirsium arvense field thistle; Canada thistle Herbaceous NO [invasive] Cirsium discolor pasture thistle Herbaceous YES Claytonia virginica spring beauty Herbaceous YES Conopholis americana cancer root Herbaceous YES Daucus carota wild carrot; Queen Annes lace Herbaceous NO [invasive] Dianthus armeria ...
The nuclear gene phytochrome A (PHYA) from 71 species of crown clade Apocynaceae (subfamilies Asclepiadoideae, Secamonoideae, Periplocoideae, and four lineages of Apocynoideae) and outgroups is used to (1) test the chloroplast phylogeny that places the African tribe Baisseeae, with solitary pollen grains, as sister to the pollinia-bearing milkweeds (Secamonoideae plus Asclepiadoideae); (2) resolve the position of tetrad-bearing Periplocoideae, the proposed milkweed sister group based on morphology; (3) place the enigmatic Dewevrella; and (4) clarify relationships of the three other primary crown clade lineages: Rhabdadenia, New World clade, and Asian clade. Separate analyses of PHYA and chloroplast sequences agree in placing an African monad-bearing clade (Baisseeae plus Dewevrella) as the sister group of the milkweeds. Combined PHYA and chloroplast datasets under parsimony and maximum likelihood reject Periplocoideae as the milkweed sister group with statistical significance. Rhabdadenia is ...
mtDNA to ptDNA transfers were originally thought to be extremely rare [55] or non-existent events [56, 57]. The first two documented cases of mtDNA to ptDNA transfer were discovered in the eudicots Daucus carota [58] and Asclepias syriaca [59]. The first instance of mtDNA to ptDNA transfer in monocots was found in two genera of the subtribe Parianinae of the Olyreae (herbaceous bamboos Eremitis sp. and Pariana radiciflora) by Wysocki et al. [25] and was subsequently confirmed in two other Parianinae species [60]. Another instance was found in Triticum monococcum [23]. The sequence in Paspalum dilatatum and P. fimbriatum plastomes with high sequence similarity to mtDNA, which were sequenced in this study, provide further evidence of mtDNA to ptDNA transfer. Neither extracts nor libraries were enriched for any specific type of DNA, and the read depths of each insert are similar to the read depth of the IR region in which it is found. On average there are around 50 chloroplasts per mesophyll cell, ...
Background: Coral reef ecosystems are declining in response to global climate change and anthropogenic impacts. Yet patterns of standing genetic variation within cnidarian species, a major determinant of adaptive potential, are virtually unknown at genome-scale resolution. We explore patterns of genome-wide polymorphism and identify candidate loci under selection in the sea anemone Aiptasia, an important laboratory model system for studying the symbiosis between corals and dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium. Results: Low coverage genome sequencing revealed large genetic distances among globally widespread lineages, novel candidate targets of selection, and considerably higher heterozygosity than previously reported for Aiptasia. More than 670,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified among 10 Aiptasia individuals including two pairs of genetic clones. Evolutionary relationships based on genome-wide polymorphism supported the current paradigm of a genetically distinct ...
Looking for online definition of Mexican whorled milkweed in the Medical Dictionary? Mexican whorled milkweed explanation free. What is Mexican whorled milkweed? Meaning of Mexican whorled milkweed medical term. What does Mexican whorled milkweed mean?
Monarch butterflies are one of natures most recognizable creatures, known for their bright colors and epic annual migration from the United States and Canada to Mexico. Yet there is much more to the monarch than its distinctive presence and mythic journeying. In Monarchs and Milkweed, Anurag Agrawal presents a vivid investigation into how the monarch butterfly has evolved closely alongside the milkweed-a toxic plant named for the sticky white substance emitted when its leaves are damaged-and how this inextricable and intimate relationship has been like an arms race over the millennia, a battle of exploitation and defense between two fascinating species. Check the PUP blog each Monday for new installments in our Monarch Monday blog series by Anurag Agrawal.. What makes monarchs and milkweeds so special?. AA: Monarchs and milkweed are remarkable creatures, theyre on a wild ride! From the monarchs perspective, its only food as a caterpillar is the milkweed plant. This makes them highly ...
Looking for Asclepiadaceae? Find out information about Asclepiadaceae. A family of tropical and subtropical flowering plants in the order Gentianales characterized by a well-developed latex system; milkweed is a well-known... Explanation of Asclepiadaceae
Discover Lifes page about the biology, natural history, ecology, identification and distribution of Danaus plexippus, Monarch, larvae image
Dear Taxacomers, A postdoctoral position at the University of Utah is available in the area of the systematics of the Solanaceae (nightshade family). Several projects are underway, including one to produce a global monograph of the genus Solanum (Solanaceae). Solanum includes between 1000 and 2000 species and is one of the largest genera of angiosperms. The species level taxonomy, including images, keys and specimen data, are being made available over the Internet on the Solanaceae Source webpage at www.solanaceaesource.org. Other projects include systematic and phylogenetic studies of other genera in the Solanaceae. Responsibilities include monographic taxonomy of selected groups of Solanaceae; specimen and image databasing and manipulation; field work for the collection of herbarium, seed and silica gel samples; generation of molecular data for phylogeny reconstruction (mainly sequences of chloroplast and nuclear genes); maintenance and analysis of living greenhouse collections of Solanaceae; ...
Monarch butterflies move to the northern range of their breeding territory in the northern United States and Canada from late May through July. One of the most exciting places to see monarchs in the fall is Point Pelee National Park in Ontario, Canada. Point Pelee National Park is a particularly important location for monarchs in the fall. The Great Lakes are a significant barrier to the monarchs southern migration. As they move south, they search for shorter ways across the lake and the Pelee peninsula provides an excellent start! Point Pelees shape funnels the monarchs to the tip. If the weather is cold, they will roost in trees and wait for warmer temperatures and favorable winds to cross the lake. If the weather is warm, they will often go directly across the lake without stopping in the park.. CLICK HERE for a PowerPoint presentation about monarchs in Canada in English.. CLICK HERE for a PowerPoint presentation about monarchs in Canada in French.. Because monarchs breed only where ...
These first few weeks its all about caterpillars and butterflies! On our Nature Walks we have been exploring the milkweed patches around Tompkins Field. Weve broken leaves off the plants to see the milk* and searched for caterpillars to take back to the classroom. In the classroom many caterpillars have turned into beautiful, green chrysalises. We await the emerging caterpillars.. *Common Milkweed, when broken, lets out a milky sap. This sap has poisons in it, called Cardiac Glycosides. Some animals can eat the glycosides and not be harmed. When the Monarch butterflys caterpillar munches the leaves of milkweed, the glycosides go into its body, making the caterpillar poisonous to predators. Even after the caterpillar has changed into an adult butterfly, it keeps the glycosides in its body.. ...
This is a Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, a group sometimes called the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers because many family members feed on milkweed and they are able to retain toxic compounds in their bodies that act as a deterrent to predators. Many Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers also have aposomatic or warning coloration. The striped antennae and cobalt blue markings near the base of the legs are distinctive and we will attempt to find a species name for you. We have not seen any examples with this much black in the coloration and we are not certain if this is a subspecies, an example of individual variation or a new species for our site ...
Monarch butterfly populations have been declining in the U.S. for the past two decades. One of the many factors contributing to this decline is the shrinking number of milkweed plants. Milkweed is a critical component in the monarchs reproduction cycle.. The monarch butterfly is one of the most well-known butterflies in the United States and North America. The iconic orange and black butterfly is known for its annual migration from Mexico through the United States to as far north as Canada.. During their journey north, monarchs lay their eggs on milkweed. In the past two decades, populations have decreased significantly in part because of the decrease in native plants including milkweed on which their caterpillars feed. Agriculture and development have removed much of the native milkweed that once spanned the country.. Because monarchs are always on the move, they need to have the right plants at the right time along their migration route. Caterpillars need to feed on milkweed to complete their ...
Since, for me, gardening really takes off in August, Im a big fan of solidago and other members of the Composite family. August through October is so important for pollinators and the composites fill the bill. A late blooming sunflower head can actually be composed of one thousand flowers. No wonder the bees hang out there for so long. But, my favorite is the zinnia, especially the one member I simply cannot be without. I can have a yard filled with pollinator plants, but when I release the monarch butterflies that feasted on my common milkweed, they head to, and spend the entire day on, tithonia, Mexican sunflower. They fight the other butterflies and bees for space at the table. It is a feast for them and a feast for my eyes. There is nothing like it late in the year. Deadhead every other day and fertilize for flower and nectar production and the insects will fatten up. I grow them from seed indoors even up through July. Heres a video I took yesterday in Maryland. ...
This project is part of a collaborative effort to map and better understand monarch butterflies and their host plants across the Western U.S. Data compiled through this project will improve our understanding of the distribution and phenology of monarchs and milkweeds, identify important breeding areas, and help us better understand monarch conservation needs.
De Roode and Hunter discovered in 2010 that female monarch butterflies infected with the parasite Ophryocystis elektroscirrha prefer to lay their eggs on species of milkweed that will make their caterpillars less sick. Monarchs appear to have evolved the ability to medicate their offspring by choosing milkweed plants with high levels of cardenolides, a class of toxins that appear to kill the parasites ...
who directs the conservation group Monarch Watch. Should they be there? Probably not. But will they do immense harm? Probably not.. If monarch populations keep falling, the coastal regions could become more important, Dr. Oberhauser said. Migration can limit disease by weeding out the sick and allowing butterflies to leave contaminated plants behind. If year-round milkweed changes the migratory behavior of enough monarchs, she said, it could have really far-reaching impacts.. So far, evidence that monarchs stop migrating to breed is indirect. People plant tropical milkweed and then we see monarchs reproducing when they should be migrating or overwintering, Dr. Altizer said. There needs to be more experimental work done.. And that is why Ms. Satterfield drove all night to catch butterflies in Texas. The monarchs she collected in Dallas and at another site without tropical milkweed will help her assess the plants effects at four coastal sites where it is common. She plans to analyze ...
ContentsBlack veined brownMonarch butterfly migration48 united states.Subspecies danaus plexippusThe monarch butterfly or simply monarch (Danaus plexippus) is a milkweed butterfly (subfamily Danainae) in the family Nymphalidae. Other common names depending on region include milkweed, common tiger, wanderer, and black veined brown. It may be the most familiar North American butterfly,…
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Last year I saw only one monarch butterfly and found only one monarch caterpillar at our house. This is after cultivating milkweed at numerous spots around my yard and planting three seasons of nectar plants. The only other monarchs my family was lucky enough to see were hatched by the Wild Center and at the Paul Smiths VIC Butterfly House as part of their programs to raise awareness regarding the perils of the monarch habitat.. Since milkweed is critically important to monarchs, both butterfly and caterpillars, we decided to widen our milkweed patch. Last fall we did a bit of seed sprinkling along the berm across the street from our house. I followed up with a few phone calls to our town supervisor and highway crew to let them know I could maintain the patch. It was important for me to communicate with as many people as possible. It was an encouraging conversation.. Now that the trees are finally starting to bud, my children and I are on the lookout for young milkweed shoots. We hope that this ...
Carlquist, S. 1987. Presence of vessels in wood of Sarcandra (Chloranthaceae): comments on vessel origins in angiosperms. American Journal of Botany 74:1765-1771.. Carlquist, S. 1992. Wood anatomy and stem of Chloranthus: summary of wood anatomy of Chloranthaceae, with comments on relationships, vessellessness, and the origin of Monocotyledons. IAWA Bulletin II 13:3-16 Crane, P. R., E. M. Friis, and K. R. Pedersen. 1989. Reproductive structure and function in Cretaceous Chloranthaceae. Plant Systematics & Evolution 156:211-226.. Doyle, J. A., H. Eklund, and P. S. Herendeen. 2003. Floral evolution in Chloranthaceae: Implications of a morphological phylogenetic analysis. International Journal of Plant Sciences 164 (5):S365-S382.. Eklund, H., J. A. Doyle, and P. S. Herendeen. 2004. Morphological phylogenetic analysis of living and fossil Chloranthaceae. International Journal of Plant Sciences 165 (1): 107-151.. Eklund, H., E. M. Friis, and K. R. Pedersen. 1997. Chloranthaceous floral structures ...
Spring Monarch Migration - Monarch butterflies leave their Mexican roosts during the second week of March, flying north and east looking for milkweed plants on which to lay their eggs. These Monarchs have already survived a long southward flight in the fall and winters cold; they have escaped predatory birds and other hazards along the way, and are the only Monarchs left that can produce a new generation. If they are unable to find milkweed when they arrive in the U.S., then they will not be able to lay their eggs and continue the monarch life cycle. For more information please visit monarchwatch.org. Milkweed will be available for purchase at the spring plant sale!. ...
My milkweed have been completely taken over by the aphids. First I tried removing them with my hands, then ladybugs, now half of the plants are almost dead. I found so many caterpillars and plucked them up and have them safely separated and enclosed with plenty of food but dont know if I should spray and leave a few plants that are doing well. The aphids are all the way down to the dirt on some plants. ...
A graduate student is researching regional differences in milkweed and the implications of those differences on populations of monarch butterflies in eastern North America
The Monarchs will search for nectar plants the entire time they are traveling to their winter roosting sites in Mexico. Gardens can provide a place for the migrating monarchs so they can refuel and continue their journey. Help Monarchs by planting flowers that bloom late into the fall such as the flowers listed below.. Asters (Aster spp.) are a favorite of Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) in the fall, particularly the New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae).. ...
12/10/10. Even animals and insects recognize the healing power of medicinal plants. While mainstream medicine largely continues to deny the inherent healing capacity of natural plants and herbs, the insect world is abuzz with activities that confirm the plant world to be natures medicine cabinet. According to a new study published in the journal Ecology Letters, the Monarch butterfly routinely uses medicinal plants to help its offspring resist disease and infection.. Researchers observed that Monarch butterflies prefer to lay their egg larvae on milkweed leaves, so they decided to investigate why this is the case. They discovered that milkweed plants contain vital compounds that help the larvae to stay healthy.. We have shown that some species of milkweed, the larvas food plants, can reduce parasite infection in monarchs, explained Jaap de Roode, an evolutionary biologist at Emory University, and author of the study. [W]e have also found that infected female butterflies prefer to lay their ...
If the plant you are looking for is not an Angiosperm, gopher to the Missouri Botanic Garden at mobot.mobot.org and look in their database for the Flora North America project. You can see the information on gymnosperms, but angiosperms arent available yet. Its a great resource. Next best: Call a professor of plant systematics, (e.g. J.L.Reveal in the department of Botany, U. Md., College Park, phone 301-545-0100.) That person will have the latest references on hand and can answer specific questions (Dr. Reveal is at a land-grant school and answers questions for a living) or at least refer you to the right sources. Good luck. David Wheat dwheat at mcimail.com ...
The Plant Ontology Consortium (POC) (www.plantontology.org) is a collaborative effort among several plant databases and experts in plant systematics, botany and genomics. A primary goal of the POC is to develop simple yet robust and extensible controlled vocabularies that accurately reflect the biol …
J. F. Doebley and Wendel, J. F., Application of RFLPs to plant systematics, Development and application of molecular markers to problems in plant genetics. New York, USA Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, pp. 57-67, 1989. ...
J. F. Doebley and Wendel, J. F., Application of RFLPs to plant systematics, Development and application of molecular markers to problems in plant genetics. New York, USA Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, pp. 57-67, 1989. ...
Cossard, G., Sannier, J., Sauquet, H., Damerval, C., de Craene, L.R., Jabbour, F. & Nadot, S. 2016. Subfamilial and tribal relationships of Ranunculaceae: evidence from eight molecular markers. Plant Systematics and Evolution 302(4): 19-431. doi: 10.1007/s00606-015-1270-6 Reference page. ...
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Distribution of population density in the Southern Appalachians is, in its extreme occurrences of concentration and sparsity, largely controlled by and related to the physiographic character of the region and the location of its mineral resources. For the immediate densities, in areas in which the population is primarily dependent on land use, especially farming, a similar simple and direct relationship is much less evident. ...
Distribution of population density in the Southern Appalachians is, in its extreme occurrences of concentration and sparsity, largely controlled by and related to the physiographic character of the region and the location of its mineral resources. For the immediate densities, in areas in which the population is primarily dependent on land use, especially farming, a similar simple and direct relationship is much less evident. ...
Silver, W.; Siccama, T.; Johnson, C.J.hnson, A., 1991: Changes in red spruce populations in montane forests of the Appalachians, 1982-1987
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While the monarchs might be fun to spot in your garden, make sure to keep pets and children from trying to sample the insects. As larvae, the monarchs eat a strict diet of only milkweed, which helps them develop cardenolides - a poison that works like digitalis - as adults. How much the larvae ate is directly proportionate to how poisonous the adult becomes ...
All the Monarch caterpillars are gathered from milkweed in our yard. The wild, female Monarch butterflies lay their eggs on this milkweed. Once I see a catepillar, I move it into my butterfly cage to protect it from birds, wasps and tachnid flies. I continually add fresh milkweed into the cage to provide plenty of food for all the caterpillars. Once they finish growing and completing 5 instar stages, they crawl to the top of the cage and make their chrysalis. When they emerge (about 10 days later), I release them. This isnt a quick thing to tend to. There are plenty of hours dedicated to restocking their food, cleaning up the frass (caterpillar poop - A LOT of caterpillar poop) and moving caterpillars one by one to new plants. However, as tedious as it is...it is so worth it. To all the little angels...you will never be forgotten...and always be missed. ...
All the Monarch caterpillars are gathered from milkweed in our yard. The wild, female Monarch butterflies lay their eggs on this milkweed. Once I see a catepillar, I move it into my butterfly cage to protect it from birds, wasps and tachnid flies. I continually add fresh milkweed into the cage to provide plenty of food for all the caterpillars. Once they finish growing and completing 5 instar stages, they crawl to the top of the cage and make their chrysalis. When they emerge (about 10 days later), I release them. This isnt a quick thing to tend to. There are plenty of hours dedicated to restocking their food, cleaning up the frass (caterpillar poop - A LOT of caterpillar poop) and moving caterpillars one by one to new plants. However, as tedious as it is...it is so worth it. To all the little angels...you will never be forgotten...and always be missed. ...
Heres a cautionary story for gardeners who enjoy growing milkweed: My sister lives in the tidewater area of Virginia. She had a very scary experience this weekend and she thinks other gardeners should be warned so they wont have to.... ...
The University of Maryland Extensions garden expert explains those bugs in the milkweed are all right and so is that patchy butternut squash.
my friend and i are debating these questions: 1. WHat characteristics must all isects have in order to be classified and insect? 2.What structure do true bugs have? WHy do insects molt? Whtat kingodom did the population jane goodall studied catigorize in? explain the diffrence beetween femaile and male milkweed bugs. thx i will vote you best answer if you answer them all and add u as a friend.
(PRWEB) June 29, 2017 -- The Journal of Parasitology - Parasites are some of the most common and diverse organisms in the world. Studying the relationship
... , commonly called common milkweed, butterfly flower, silkweed, silky swallow-wort, and Virginia silkweed, is a ... "Common Milkweed: Asclepias syriaca L." (PDF). Plant Guide. United States Department of Agriculture: Natural Resources ... It is in the genus Asclepias, the milkweeds. This species is native to southern Canada and of much of the conterminous eastern ... Monarch Watch provides information on rearing monarchs and their host plants.[4] Asclepias syriaca seeds require a period of ...
Wikispecies has information related to Asclepias curassavica. *^ a b Raker, C (1995). "Comprehensive Report Species - Asclepias ... Asclepias curassavica, commonly known as tropical milkweed,[3] is a flowering plant species of the milkweed genus, Asclepias.[4 ... "Asclepias curassavica in Flora of China". Flora of China @ eFloras.org. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2014-03-22.. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Asclepias curassavica.. References[edit]. ...
... albicans. Whitestem milkweed, native to the Mojave and Sonoran deserts Asclepias amplexicaulis. Blunt-leaved milkweed ... Asclepias asperula. Antelope horns, native to American southwest and northern Mexico Asclepias californica. California milkweed ... Asclepias exaltata. Poke milkweed, native to eastern North America Asclepias fascicularis. Narrow-leaf milkweed, native to ... Asclepias welshii. Welsh's milkweed There are also 12 species of Asclepias in South America, among them: A. barjoniifolia, A. ...
Asclepias amplexicaulis. - acuminata. - Linaria. - pedicellata. - perfoliata. - salviaefolia. Azalea arborescens. - ...
"Asclepias welshii". Center for Plant Conservation. 2010-09-28. Archived from the original on 2010-12-15. Coral Pink Sand Dunes ... The park also contains most of the remaining individuals of the rare plant known as Welsh's milkweed (Asclepias welshii), a ...
In addition, Asclepias syriaca seed needs a period of cold treatment (cold stratification) before it will germinate. Although ... As monarch reproduction in that area peaks in late summer when most Asclepias syriaca leaves are old and tough, the plant needs ... "Asclepias syriaca: Common Milkweed for Monarch Caterpillars". Monarch Butterfly Garden. Archived from the original on March 16 ... "Milkweeds (mostly Asclepias spp.)". Alonso Abugattas Shares Native Plant Picks for Wildlife. Mid-Atlantic Gardener. 2016. ...
... heartleaf milkweed Asclepias curassavica Asclepias eriocarpa - woolly pod milkweed Asclepias erosa - desert milkweed Asclepias ... zizotes milkweed Asclepias perennis - aquatic milkweed Asclepias speciosa - showy milkweed Asclepias subulata - rush milkweed ... Asclepias syriaca - common milkweed Asclepias tuberosa - butterfly weed Asclepias variegata - white milkweed Asclepias ... Mexican whorled milkweed Asclepias humistrata - sandhill/pinewoods milkweed Asclepias incarnata - swamp milkweed Asclepias ...
New York: Nightboat, 2015 ISBN 978-1-937658-38-0. Asclepias The Milkweeds. New York: Nightboat, 2015 ISBN 978-1-937658-39-7. ...
accepted as Asclepias fulva N.E.Br. indigenous Asclepias dregeana Schltr. var. sordida N.E.Br. accepted as Asclepias fulva N.E. ... endemic Asclepias cooperi N.E.Br. endemic Asclepias crassinervis N.E.Br. indigenous Asclepias crinita (G.Bertol.) N.E.Br. ... endemic Asclepias pulchella (Decne.) N.E.Br. accepted as Asclepias ameliae S.Moore, present Asclepias rara N.E.Br. endemic ... endemic Asclepias vicaria N.E.Br. endemic Asclepias viridiflora (E.Mey.) Goyder, accepted as Asclepias fulva N.E.Br. present ...
Sparrow, F. K. & N. L. Pearson (1948). "Pollen compatibility in Asclepias syriaca". J. Agric. Res. 77: 187-199. Lipow, S. R. & ... as in certain species of Asclepias and in Spathodea campanulata). The existence of the LSI mechanism among different taxa and ... R. Wyatt (2000). "Single gene control of postzygotic self-incompatibility in poke milkweed, Asclepias exaltata L". Genetics. ... "Self-incompatibility in Asclepias". Plant Cell Incomp. Newsl. 23: 55-57. ...
Asclepias verticillata, used medicinally. Baccharis sarothroides, used by the Seri people to make a decoction by cooking the ...
"Milk Weed Asclepias fruticosa". Retrieved 10 January 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) p. 36 in D. Jesse Wagstaff ( ...
"Asclepias nivea". butterfly gardening & all things milkweed. Google. Archived from the original on 7 July 2015. Retrieved 7 ... "Asclepias syriaca". butterfly gardening & all things milkweed. Google. Archived from the original on 7 July 2015. Retrieved 7 ... "Common Milkweed: Asclepias syriaca L." (PDF). Plant Guide. United States Department of Agriculture: Natural Resources ... Asclepias curassavica or tropical milkweed, is often planted as an ornamental in butterfly gardens. Its distribution is ...
Atriplex cristata, 'orache' Asclepias sp., toxic, but first growth is edible if cooked thoroughly and before sap runs. Caltha ...
Insects feed on Asclepias sp.. and bittersweet nightshade, Cestrum nocturnum. Gerstaecker CEA (1869) Archiv für Naturgeschichte ...
The larvae feed on Asclepias subverticillata. Moth Photographers Group at Mississippi State University Savela, Markku. " ...
"Indiana Dunes Plant Guide - Asclepias amplexicaulis". indianadunesguide. Retrieved 2019-04-02. Csurhes, S.M., Mackay, A.P. and ...
Asclepias physocarpa photos USDA Plants Profile. ...
The larvae feed on Asclepias species. They are black and covered with hairs. Ectypia clio clio Ectypia clio jessica (Barnes, ...
... syn of Asclepias eminens (Harv.) Schltr. Schlechter, Friedrich Richard Rudolf. 1894. Botanische Jahrbücher für Systematik, ...
The larvae feed on Asclepias species. Early instar larvae feed communally. Full-grown larvae reach a length of 28 mm. Pupation ...
Biogasoline Energy crop Asclepias "Hydrocarbon plants". www.grasys.com (in Russian). Retrieved 2017-04-22. [1][dead link] ...
The larvae feed on Asclepias species. The species name is derived from Latin inopinatus (meaning unexpected, surprising). ...
Common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca. *Asters, Aster sp.. *Bearded beggarticks, Bidens aristosa. *Thistles, Cirsium sp. ...
Rush milkweed (Asclepias subulata). *Purple desert sand-verbena (Abronia villosa). *Sacred datura (Datura wrightii) ...
... albens now Asclepias albens P. crispus now Asclepias crispa P. fulvus now Asclepias fulva P. gomphocarpoides now Asclepias ... 1810, not the Mexican species Asclepias grandiflora L.f.) Pachycarpus grantii (Oliv.) Bullock - E Africa Pachycarpus inconstans ... South Africa formerly included moved to other genera (Asclepias, Gomphocarpus, Xysmalobium) P. ... gomphocarpoides P. graminifolius now Asclepias graminifolia P. humilis now Asclepias humilis P. ligulatus now Xysmalobium ...
Asclepias amplexicaulis; special concern) Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) Green milkweed (Asclepias viridiflora) Narrow- ... leaved milkweed (Asclepias stenophylla; endangered) Oval-leaved milkweed (Asclepias ovalifolia) Poke milkweed (Asclepias ... Asclepias speciosa) Sullivant's milkweed (Asclepias sullivantii; threatened) Swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata var. incarnata ... Whorled milkweed (Asclepias verticillata) Woolly milkweed (Asclepias lanuginosa) Miterworts Naked miterwort (Mitella nuda) Two- ...
Asclepias curassavica L. Ascolepis brasiliensis (Kunth) Benth. Ascolepis capensis (Kunth) Ridl. Ascolepis dipsacoides (Schumach ...
Asclepias syriaca. It is also destructive to the rare and threatened milkweed species Asclepias meadii. "Species Rhyssomatus ... Betz, R. F. (1989). Ecology of Mead's milkweed (Asclepias meadii) Torrey. in Proceedings of the 11th North American Prairie ...
Asclepias syriaca, commonly called common milkweed, butterfly flower, silkweed, silky swallow-wort, and Virginia silkweed, is a ... "Asclepias syriaca". Butterfly gardening & all things milkweed. Archived from the original on July 7, 2015. Retrieved July 7, ... "Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.)". Plant of the Week. United States Department of Agriculture: United States Forest ... "Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.)". Plant of the Week. United States Department of Agriculture: United States Forest ...
Asclepias asperula, commonly called green-flowered milkweed or spider antelope horns,[2] is a species of milkweed native to the ... Asclepias asperula is divided into two subspecies: asperula and capricornu (also known as var. decumbens), with the latter ... "Asclepias asperula ssp. capricornu". Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. The University of Texas at Austin. 2019. Retrieved 21 ... "Asclepias asperula subsp. asperula". The Jepson Herbarium. Regents of the University of California. 2019. Retrieved 21 January ...
For a wider selection of images connected with Asclepias curassavica, see Category:Asclepias curassavica ... Vernacular names [edit wikidata Asclepias curassavica] *. English. : bloodflower milkweed, bastard-ipecac, bloodflower, false ... Retrieved from "https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Asclepias_curassavica&oldid=321413756" ...
Asclepias syriaca 3, Common Milkweed, Howard County, MD, Helen Lowe Metzman 2017-07-19-12.51.27 ZS PMax UDR - USGS Bee ... Asclepias syriaca 4, Common Milkweed, Howard County, MD, Helen Lowe Metzman 2017-07-19-13.00.38 ZS PMax UDR (40128213112).jpg ... Asclepias syriaca, Common Milkweed, Howard County, MD, Helen Lowe Metzman 2017-07-19-13.07.20 ZS PMax UDR (39262031285).jpg ... Common Milkweed - Asclepias syriaca, Meadowood Farm SRMA, Mason Neck, Virginia.jpg 2,640 × 3,168; 1.86 MB. ...
Asclepias incarnata a.k.a. swamp milkweed by Mary. 1sagebrush4 Asclepias incarnata flower © 2008 1sagebrush4 ... Asclepias incarnata. Left: branch with leaves and flowers © John Cardina. Center: close-up of buds and flowers © David Cappaert ... More specifically, the medicine relates to appetite-suppressing compositions comprising an extract product of an Asclepias ...
Similar Species: The green comet milkweed is part of the genus Asclepias, which has at least 140 species. All of these species ... Asclepias viridiflora. Left: branch with flowers © Richard Old, XID Services, Inc., United States Right: flowers © 2004 ...
... Habit: Annual, perennial herb, shrub. Stem: prostrate to erect. Leaf: generally opposite (alternate, whorled), each ... Citation for this treatment: Thomas J. Rosatti & Carol A. Hoffman 2013, Asclepias, in Jepson Flora Project (eds.) Jepson eFlora ... including Asclepias, Hoya, Nerium, Plumeria, Stapelia); cardiac glycosides, produced by some members formerly treated in ...
... © 2009 Thomas Stoughton. Asclepias eriocarpa. © 2013 Keir Morse. Asclepias eriocarpa. © 2013 Keir Morse. ... Asclepias eriocarpa. © 2010 Neal Kramer. Asclepias eriocarpa. © 2008 Aaron Schusteff. More photos of Asclepias eriocarpa in ... Asclepias eriocarpa Benth.. NATIVE. Habit: Perennial herb, very hairy (less so in age or not). Stem: erect. Leaf: opposite or ... Genus: Asclepias. View Description. Dichotomous Key. Common Name: MILKWEED. Habit: Annual, perennial herb, shrub. Stem: ...
1193 Asclepias syriaca. Common Names: common milkweed, silkweed Family: Apocynaceae (dogbane Family) ... Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) is a very wide ranging wildflower that grows naturally throughout most all of North America ... The milkweeds are familiar wildflowers throughout North America, and the aptly named common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) is the ...
By contrast, some species of Asclepias are extremely poor sources of cardenolides, such as Asclepias fascicularis, Asclepias ... Some Asclepias species: There are also 12 species of Asclepias in South America, among them: A. barjoniifolia, A. boliviensis, ... "Asclepias L." Plants of the World Online. Royal Botanical Gardens Kew. Retrieved 2018-11-23. "Asclepias". ipni.org. ... Asclepias subverticillata (A. Gray) Vail, USDA PLANTS "GRIN Species Records of Asclepias". Germplasm Resources Information ...
click on a thumbnail to view an image, or see all the Asclepias thumbnails at the Plants Gallery ...
Asclepias viridiflora is a species of plant in the family Apocynaceae. It is a photoautotroph. ...
Asclepias speciosa, or showy Milkweed, is native to the western half of North America. In California, the perennial plant is ...
Asclepias sullivantii is a species of flowering plant in the milkweed genus, Asclepias. Common names include prairie milkweed, ... Most Asclepias are toxic if consumed in large quantities due to cardiac glycoside content. Asclepias sullivantii. Missouri ... "Asclepias sullivantii". Native Plant Database. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, University of Texas at Austin. Penskar, M. ... The original range of Asclepias sullivantii was the tall grass prairie, but very little of that habitat remains because of wide ...
Asclepias albicans. Whitestem milkweed, native to the Mojave and Sonoran deserts Asclepias amplexicaulis. Blunt-leaved milkweed ... Asclepias asperula. Antelope horns, native to American southwest and northern Mexico Asclepias californica. California milkweed ... Asclepias exaltata. Poke milkweed, native to eastern North America Asclepias fascicularis. Narrow-leaf milkweed, native to ... Asclepias welshii. Welshs milkweed There are also 12 species of Asclepias in South America, among them: A. barjoniifolia, A. ...
... Erect herbaceous perennials; roots often fleshy. Leaves usually with conspicuous transverse veins. Flowers in ...
Tropical Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica Silky Gold). Its a different botanical species. compare inflorescence !. yellow ... Milkweed... Asclepias http://garden.org/plants/searc.... (1) , Quote , Post #902272 (2) ...
Asclepias asperula (Decne.) Woodson - spider milkweed Subspecies. Asclepias asperula (Decne.) Woodson ssp. capricornu (Woodson ... click on a thumbnail to view an image, or see all the Asclepias thumbnails at the Plants Gallery ... Asclepias asperula (Decne.) Woodson ssp. capricornu (Woodson) Woodson Show All. Show Tabs. antelopehorns ...
Asclepias mexicana is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in). It is hardy to zone (UK) 6. The species is hermaphrodite (has ... Asclepias decumbens. Perennial. 0.9. - L. SN. DM. 2. 0. Asclepias eriocarpa. Woollypod Milkweed. Perennial. 0.9. 7-10 L. SN. DM ... Asclepias galioides. Bedstraw Milkweed. Perennial. 0.4. - L. SN. DM. 2. 1. Asclepias hallii. Purple Silkweed, Halls milkweed. ... Asclepias latifolia. Broadleaf Milkweed. Perennial. 0.8. - L. SN. DM. 0. 1. Asclepias ovalifolia. Oval-leaf milkweed. Perennial ...
Asclepias syriaca L. (1763). Synonyms[edit]. *Homotypic *Asclepias pubescens Moench, Methodus (Moench) 716. 1794, nom. illeg. ... Asclepias syriaca f. inermis J.R.Churchill, Rhodora 20: 207. 1919.. *Asclepias syriaca f. leucantha Dore, Rhodora 46: 387. 1944 ... Asclepias syriaca f. polyphylla B.Boivin, Naturaliste Canad. 94: 521 1967.. *Asclepias syriaca var. kansana (Vail) E.J.Palmer ... Asclepias capitellata Raf., Med. Repos., ser. 2, 5: 354. 1808.. *Asclepias cornuti Decne, Prodr. (Candolle) 8: 564. 1844, nom. ...
... Dataset GBIF Backbone Taxonomy Rank SPECIES Published in Gaterau. In: Descr. Pl. Montauban 58. (1789 ...
Asclepias species Asclepias syriaca Name. Homonyms. Asclepias fragrans Raf.. Asclepias fragrans (Benth.) Decne.. ... Asclepias fragrans Raf. Dataset GBIF Backbone Taxonomy Rank SPECIES Published in Med. Repos. 5: 354 (1808) Classification. ...
Asclepias latifolia is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in). The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs ... Asclepias hallii. Purple Silkweed, Halls milkweed. 3. 1. Asclepias incarnata. Swamp Milkweed, Swamp Butterfly Weed, Marsh ... Asclepias syriaca. Common Milkweed, Silkweed, Milkweed. 3. 2. Asclepias tuberosa. Pleurisy Root, Butterfly milkweed, Rolfs ... Asclepias latifolia is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in). The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs ...
Asclepias galioides is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.4 m (1ft 4in). The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) ... Asclepias mexicana. Perennial. 0.8. 5-9 L. SN. DM. 1. 0. Asclepias ovalifolia. Oval-leaf milkweed. Perennial. 0.6. 5-9 LM. SN. ... Asclepias decumbens. Perennial. 0.9. - L. SN. DM. 2. 0. Asclepias eriocarpa. Woollypod Milkweed. Perennial. 0.9. 7-10 L. SN. DM ... Asclepias involucrata. Dwarf Milkweed. Perennial. 0.0. - L. SN. DM. 2. 1. Asclepias lanceolata. Purple Silkweed, Fewflower ...
Thread by dirtdorphins: I cant believe we dont have a picture of this plant in our database featuring the nasty little oleander aphids that are such a c...
... www.johnnyseeds.com/flowers/asclepias-butterfly-weed/pleurisy-root-organic-asclepias-seed-2347G.11.html Size ... Asclepias tuberosa. Days To Maturity. About Quick Fact Days To Maturity. Average number of days from seeding date to harvest, ...
Comments: Prairie Milkweed (Asclepias sullivantii) somewhat resembles Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) in appearance, but ... Asclepias sullivantii. Milkweed family (Asclepiadaceae). Description: This perennial herbaceous plant is 2-3 tall and ... While it can spread by means of its rhizomes, this plant is far less aggressive than Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca). ... Other insects feed on the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seedpods of Prairie Milkweed and other milkweeds (Asclepias spp. ...
Petricic, J. [On the cardenolides of roots of Asclepias tuberosa L.]. Arch Pharm Ber Dtsch Pharm Ges 1966;299(12):1007-1011. ... Abe, F. and Yamauchi, T. Pregnane glycosides from the roots of Asclepias tuberosa. Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo) 2000;48(7):1017-1022 ... Asclepiadaceae (family), Asclepias tuberose, butterfly milkweed, butterfly weed, chigger-weed, pleurisy root. ... thiazolidinone derivatives of doubly-linked cardenolide glycosides from the roots of Asclepias tuberosa. Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo ...
Rose Milkweed is a showy pink Asclepias species that is a food plant for Monarch butterfly caterpillars and a nectar source for ... Asclepias can be divided into two groups for plant care; Asclepias tuberosa with orange (sometimes yellow) flowers and all the ... Milkweed , Asclepias Ornamental Grass Penstemon , Beardtongue Poppy , Papaver Sage , Salvia Shrubs & Small Trees Thyme , Thymus ... Rose Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) is a showy pink blooming Asclepias species that is a food plant for Monarch butterfly ...
Asclepias can be divided into two groups for plant care; Asclepias tuberosa with orange (sometimes yellow) flowers and all the ... Milkweed , Asclepias Ornamental Grass Obedient Plant (Physostegia) Pasque Flower , Pulsatilla Penstemon (Beardtongue) ... Most Asclepias species are late to wake up in the spring, and will often be shipped as dormant plants. Dont despair if your ... All species of Asclepias are late to emerge in the spring, so dont be concerned if other perennials come up first and they ...
  • By contrast, some species of Asclepias are extremely poor sources of cardenolides, such as Asclepias fascicularis, Asclepias tuberosa, and Asclepias angustifolia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Photo of Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa): eww-gross! (garden.org)
  • Abe, F. and Yamauchi, T. Pregnane glycosides from the roots of Asclepias tuberosa. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Abe, F. and Yamauchi, T. An androstane bioside and 3'-thiazolidinone derivatives of doubly-linked cardenolide glycosides from the roots of Asclepias tuberosa. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Petricic, J. [On the cardenolides of roots of Asclepias tuberosa L.]. Arch Pharm Ber Dtsch Pharm Ges 1966;299(12):1007-1011. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Asclepias tuberosa with orange (sometimes yellow) flowers and all the other species with pink (sometimes white) flowers. (highcountrygardens.com)
  • Asclepias tuberosa (Orange Butterfly Weed) - this perennial stays dormant until later in the spring than many other plants, especially when grown in pots. (highcountrygardens.com)
  • Butterflyweed for Clay Asclepias tuberosa, var. (prairienursery.com)
  • Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa) is the famous orange milkweed species native from Canada to Florida. (americanmeadows.com)
  • Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa) is one of our great North American native flowers with rich Indian and medicinal history. (americanmeadows.com)
  • Asclepias tuberosa L. (swbiodiversity.org)
  • Asclepias is named for the Greek god of healing Asklepios, while tuberosa means bearing tubers. (swbiodiversity.org)
  • Butterfly milkweed ( Asclepias tuberosa ) is a member of the Apocynaceae or dogbane family and is a low maintenance, native plant that is well-suited for rain gardens. (clemson.edu)
  • 1 Asclepias tuberosa has several common names including butterfly milkweed, butterfly weed and orange milkweed. (clemson.edu)
  • The sap of A. tuberosa contains lower levels of the toxic compounds found in other Asclepias species. (clemson.edu)
  • The Perennial Plant Association has chosen Asclepias tuberosa as Perennial Plant of the Year. (gpnmag.com)
  • Several species of milkweed, or asclepias, are native to North America, and this year the Perennial Plant Association has chosen one of them as Perennial Plant of the Year: Asclepias tuberosa. (gpnmag.com)
  • Asclepias tuberosa is listed as "Possibly Extirpated" in Maine, "Endangered" in New Hampshire, "Exploitably Vulnerable" in New York, of "Special Concern" in Rhode Island, and "Threatened" in Vermont. (unitedplantsavers.org)
  • Asclepias tuberosa has not yet been evaluated by the IUCN Red List. (unitedplantsavers.org)
  • Though not specific to Asclepias tuberosa , The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation released an in-depth report on the subject, titled Milkweeds: A Conservation Practitioner's Guide , that includes advice on how you can help support Butterfly Weed from your own backyard. (unitedplantsavers.org)
  • Asclepias tuberosa Common Name: Butterfly Weed, pleurisy root. (bloomindesigns.com)
  • Perennial Plant of The Year- Asclepias tuberosa , what a great choice! (gardencrossings.com)
  • Asclepias tuberosa grows to be about 2 foot tall and wide and is a very hardy plant down to zone 3. (gardencrossings.com)
  • Asclepias tuberosa is a prairie plant native to North America found naturally in dry fields, along the highways and on slopes, it does not require rich soil or much moisture. (gardencrossings.com)
  • Orange butterfly weeds (Asclepias tuberosa), North American wildflowers, work well in butterfly gardens, attracting many different types of butterflies to their showy flowers. (sfgate.com)
  • Here I am offering seeds from Asclepias tuberosa Gay Butterflies, also known as Butterfly Milkweed, Butterfly Weed, and Pleurisy Root. (georgiavines.com)
  • Dried root of Asclepias tuberosa L. (drugfuture.com)
  • The root of Asclepias tuberosa , Linné"-( U. S. P. ). (henriettes-herb.com)
  • The most important plant bearing the name asclepias (derived from Aesculapius), to Eclectics at least, is the Asclepias tuberosa , or butterfly weed. (henriettes-herb.com)
  • The estrogenic and uterine-stimulating activity of asclepias tuberosa. (tinkturenpresse.de)
  • Pregnane glycosides from the roots of Asclepias tuberosa. (tinkturenpresse.de)
  • Asclepias syriaca , commonly called common milkweed , butterfly flower , silkweed , silky swallow-wort , and Virginia silkweed , is a species of flowering plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Milkweed is grown commercially as a hypoallergenic filling for pillows and as insulation for winter coats.Asclepias is also known as "Silk of America" which is a strand of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) gathered mainly in the valley of the Saint Lawrence River in Canada. (wikipedia.org)
  • The milkweeds are familiar wildflowers throughout North America, and the aptly named common milkweed ( Asclepias syriaca ) is the most common species in the East. (floridata.com)
  • Common milkweed ( Asclepias syriaca ) is a very wide ranging wildflower that grows naturally throughout most all of North America east of the Rockies from Saskatchewan east to Quebec and Newfoundland, and southward to Texas and Georgia, not quite as far south as Florida. (floridata.com)
  • This species is very similar to Asclepias syriaca, the common milkweed, and the two easily hybridize. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asclepias syriaca f. inermis J.R.Churchill , Rhodora 20: 207. (wikimedia.org)
  • Asclepias syriaca f. leucantha Dore , Rhodora 46: 387. (wikimedia.org)
  • Asclepias syriaca f. polyphylla B.Boivin , Naturaliste Canad. (wikimedia.org)
  • Asclepias syriaca in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN) , U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. (wikimedia.org)
  • It has been known to hybridize with Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) when the plants occur in close proximity. (prairienursery.com)
  • Asclepias syriaca is very familiar to many eastern gardeners. (americanmeadows.com)
  • Genetic Structure of the Common Milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L. (umich.edu)
  • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca, to assist in genet identification and the analysis of spatial genetic structure. (umich.edu)
  • Many plant species, including Asclepias syriaca, the common milkweed, reproduce both sexually and asexually and there can be great variation in SGS among species that reproduce by both methods. (umich.edu)
  • The much sought-after Asclepias purpurascens, Purple Milkweed looks similar to Common Milkweed ( Asclepias syriaca ), but the flower color is a rich red-purple color compared to the soft gray-pink of Common Milkweed. (prairiemoon.com)
  • Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) - 07) The milkweed seed pods are depicted in this photo, from the immature (in the background) to the more mature (foreground-right). (all-creatures.org)
  • This species of milkweed does not spread by runners like common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) does, so it is not invasive. (gpnmag.com)
  • We investigated the role of several factors in promoting coexistence among the aphids Aphis nerii, Aphis asclepiadis, and Myzocallis asclepiadis that all specialize on common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca). (cornell.edu)
  • This dataset contains a draft assembly of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) nuclear genome, linkage group information, and gene family counts for Asclepias and related species. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Myers A, Bahlai CA, Landis DA (2019) Habitat type influences Danaus plexippus (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) oviposition and egg survival on Asclepias syriaca (Gentianales: Apocynaceae). (datadryad.org)
  • One hypothesis explaining the monarch's decline is reduced breeding habitat via loss of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) from agricultural landscapes in the north central United States due to adoption of herbicide tolerant row crops. (datadryad.org)
  • I compared herbivore activity and its effect on plant reproduction for three milkweed species (Asclepias syriaca, Asclepias viridis, Asclepias meadii) in eastern Kansas. (ku.edu)
  • Map of the chloroplast genome of Asclepias syriaca. (nih.gov)
  • Building a model: developing genomic resources for common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) with low coverage genome sequencing. (nih.gov)
  • This study explored how low coverage genome sequencing of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) could be useful in characterizing the genome of a plant without prior genomic information and for development of genomic resources as a step toward further developing A. syriaca as a model in ecology and evolution. (nih.gov)
  • The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias . (peerj.com)
  • Asclepias specios a and Asclepias syriaca (and their hybrids) have been tested, since 1985, for commercial seed floss production as a hypo-allergenic substitute for goose down. (gaianethnobotany.com)
  • Asclepias asperula , commonly called green-flowered milkweed or spider antelope horns , [2] is a species of milkweed native to the Southwestern United States and northern Mexico . (wikipedia.org)
  • The green comet milkweed is part of the genus Asclepias , which has at least 140 species. (tolweb.org)
  • The size, shape and color of the horns and hoods are often important identifying characteristics for species in the genus Asclepias. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asclepias species produce their seeds in pods termed follicles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asclepias sullivantii is a species of flowering plant in the milkweed genus, Asclepias. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asclepias viridiflora is a species of plant in the family Apocynaceae . (eol.org)
  • Asclepias L. (1753), the milkweeds , is an American genus of herbaceous perennial , dicotyledonous plants that contains over 140 known species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rose Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) is a showy pink blooming Asclepias species that is a food plant for Monarch butterfly caterpillars and a nectar source for adult butterflies. (highcountrygardens.com)
  • Here we test this hypothesis by tandem cardenolide quantification using HPLC (UV absorption of the unsaturated lactone) and a pharmacological assay ( in vitro inhibition of a sensitive Na + /K + ATPase) in a comparative study of 16 species of Asclepias . (springer.com)
  • An apparent phylogenetic progression in the potency and location of milkweed cardenolides: seemingly related to species diversity of both Asclepias and Tetraopes subclades, provides further suggestive evidence for that model. (harvard.edu)
  • The phylogeography of the Tetraopes/Asclepias assemblage suggests that extant species evolved largely in their current, often quite localized biomes, facilitating potential experimental tests for hypotheses of adaptation and counteradaptation and their importance to diversification. (harvard.edu)
  • The Asclepias incarnata species can be substituted if needed. (newmoonnursery.com)
  • R.E. Woodson, Jr. The North American species of Asclepias L. Ann. (worldfloraonline.org)
  • A large genus centered principally in temperate North and South America, Asclepias is represented by about 10 species in Central America and by one species in Panama. (worldfloraonline.org)
  • [3] It is in the genus Asclepias , the milkweeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asclepias is a genus of herbaceous, perennial, flowering plants known as milkweeds, named for their latex, a milky substance containing cardiac glycosides termed cardenolides, exuded where cells are damaged. (wikipedia.org)
  • Members of the genus Asclepias produce some of the most complex flowers in the plant kingdom, comparable to orchids in complexity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unique among milkweeds, this Asclepias is one of the most shade tolerant of its genus. (prairienursery.com)
  • Most milkweed plants ( Asclepias genus) are noted for their unique and complicated flower structure, the thick milky juice which oozes from broken stems and leaves, their long pointed seedpods, and the almost magnetic attractiveness of their flowers to visiting butterflies and moths. (missouribotanicalgarden.org)
  • The genus Asclepias is thought to have been named for the Greek god of medicine, Asklepios. (clemson.edu)
  • This paper begins an inquiry into possible coevolutionary diversification for North American milkweeds of the genus Asclepias and one of their few major herbivores, the longhorn beetle genus Tetraopes, focusing first on the historical duration and continuity of the interaction. (harvard.edu)
  • Genomic Investigations of Diversity within the Milkweed Genus Asclepias, at Multiple Scales (Doctoral dissertation). (oregonstate.edu)
  • Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) across the milkweed genus, Asclepias . (peerj.com)
  • Additional data includes the coding sequence alignment of P5βR paralogs described in the article and a table of gene family counts in Asclepias, other Apocynaceae, coffee (Coffea), and grape (Vitis). (oregonstate.edu)
  • Asclepias (ass- kleep -ee-ass), Milkweed, Milkweed Family (Asclepiadaceae). (bloomindesigns.com)
  • The Timing of Insect/Plant Diversification: Might Tetraopes (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) and Asclepias (Asclepiadaceae) Have Co-Evolved? (harvard.edu)
  • Asclepias speciosa , or showy Milkweed, is native to the western half of North America. (csuchico.edu)
  • Showy Pink Milkweed (Asclepias speciosa) is an essential wildflower for supporting Monarch butterflies by providing food for caterpillars and nectar for the adult butterflies. (highcountrygardens.com)
  • Showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa) is a hairy perennial with stems ascending to erect. (healthyhomegardening.com)
  • The sap of Asclepias speciosa was used as a cleansing and healing agent by some of the desert tribes for sores, cuts, and as a cure for warts and ringworm. (healthyhomegardening.com)
  • The most common use for these plants, recorded among almost all the tribes throughout California, was to obtain a kind of chewing gum from the sap of Asclepias speciosa. (healthyhomegardening.com)
  • Asclepias curassavica , commonly called blood flower, is a tender evergreen perennial in the dogbane and milkweed family. (missouribotanicalgarden.org)
  • In the Warwoman Wildlife Management Area , along Sarah's Creek Road from where we found the Showy Gentian ( Gentiana decora ) and the Fla xleaf Whitetop A ster ( Ionactis linari ifolius ) , we found several asclepias plants with seed pods releasing seeds, or about to. (blogspot.com)
  • Asclepias incarnata, which is more commonly known as swamp milkweed, is a native perennial found throughout most of the United States. (tnnursery.net)
  • Asclepias incarnata 'Ice Ballet' is a nursery selection of the native Swamp Milkweed so it does not exist in the wild. (newmoonnursery.com)
  • Asclepias incarnata 'Ice Ballet' is a sun loving plant for moist or saturated soils. (newmoonnursery.com)
  • Asclepias incarnata 'Ice Ballet' is a great choice for a well drained Perennial Border or a garden with a difficult sunny wet microclimate. (newmoonnursery.com)
  • Asclepias incarnata 'Ice Ballet' mingles well with other sun & moisture lovers like Eupatorium fistulosum , Lobelia cardinalis , Helianthus angustifolia , Eupatorium colestinum and Aster novae-angliae . (newmoonnursery.com)
  • Other insects feed on the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seedpods of Prairie Milkweed and other milkweeds ( Asclepias spp. (illinoiswildflowers.info)
  • Asclepias hirtella , commonly known as tall green milkweed or prairie milkweed, is an upright herbaceous perennial that typically grows to 3' tall on one or more unbranched stems. (missouribotanicalgarden.org)
  • Chapter 2: Influence of seed characteristics and site conditions on establishment of a threatened prairie milkweed, Asclepias meadii, in Kansas. (ku.edu)
  • Chapter 1: Comparative Herbivory and Herbivore Effects on Reproduction for Three Milkweeds (Asclepias) in Two Landscape Contexts. (ku.edu)
  • Milkweeds (Asclepias) are an excellent system for studying the relationships between herbivores, plants, and plant reproduction in a complex community. (ku.edu)
  • The original range of Asclepias sullivantii was the tall grass prairie, but very little of that habitat remains because of wide spread conversion to farming. (wikipedia.org)
  • Special plant abstract for Asclepias sullivantii. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asclepias californica , a dicot, is a perennial herb that is native to California and is found only slightly beyond California borders. (calflora.org)
  • Asclepias californica description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 25 May 2020. (florafinder.org)
  • I investigated the influence of seed characteristics and manipulations of the field environment on seedling emergence and seedling growth in Asclepias meadii (Mead's milkweed). (ku.edu)
  • Asclepias (Milkweed) are sun loving plants that are essential perennials for monarch butterflies providing food for caterpillars and nectar for adult butterflies. (highcountrygardens.com)
  • Grow Asclepias purpurascens in a site that is well drained but has ample moisture. (prairiemoon.com)
  • Large-bodied hymenopterans are the most common and best pollinators, accounting for over 50% of all Asclepias pollination, whereas monarch butterflies are poor pollinators of milkweed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Asclepias solanoana , a dicot, is a perennial herb that is native to California and is endemic (limited) to California. (calflora.org)
  • Asclepias or otherwise known as Milkweed, plays a very important role in the life cycle of the Monarch Butterfly, This is a native host plant where the Monarch lays its eggs, which in turn form into tiny caterpillars to start. (gardencrossings.com)
  • Asclepias asperula has a native range from Texas north to Nebraska and Idaho and extending westward to California. (nababutterfly.com)
  • Asclepias viridis , listed as Green Antelopehorn by the USDA Plants Database, is also called spider milkweed by many sources. (nababutterfly.com)
  • In Texas, Asclepias viridis is quite common and is considered an important food source for the Monarchs as they start their spring migration northward. (nababutterfly.com)
  • Asclepias latifolia - (Torr. (pfaf.org)
  • Asclepias latifolia is a PERENNIAL growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in). (pfaf.org)
  • BASIONYM: Asclepias longifolia Michaux 1803. (usf.edu)
  • BASIONYM: Asclepias parviflora Aiton 1789. (usf.edu)
  • Citation for this treatment: Thomas J. Rosatti & Carol A. Hoffman 2013, Asclepias , in Jepson Flora Project (eds. (berkeley.edu)
  • Wikimedia Commons has media related to Asclepias asperula . (wikipedia.org)
  • As the caterpillars start to munch on the tasty green foliage that Asclepias provide, they turn into mature caterpillars that will soon spin a cocoon and then form a beautiful butterfly. (gardencrossings.com)
  • Asclepias is named for the Greek god of healing Asklepios, while engelmanniana is named for George Engelmann (1809-1884), a German-American doctor and botanist who worked in the western US. (swbiodiversity.org)
  • Asclepias incarnate grows in upright clumps of fleshy white tubers. (tnnursery.net)
  • This plant differs from its congeners in being destitute of the milky juice common to most of them, such as the common milkweed ( Asclepias Cornuti ), and others. (henriettes-herb.com)
  • Alcohol extract of freshly dried, wildharvested Inmortal Root (Asclepias asperula). (gingerwebb.com)
  • Like its cousin inmortal (Asclepias asperula), the herb stimulates lymph drainage from the lungs, though not so markedly. (gaianethnobotany.com)
  • The Redring (or White) Milkweed ( Asclepias variegata ) is my favorite milkweed. (blogspot.com)
  • Asclepias variegata gets one of its common names, 'Redring,' from the red ring at the base of the hoods. (blogspot.com)
  • Asclepias viridiflora Raf. (eol.org)