A species of parasitic nematode that is the largest found in the human intestine. Its distribution is worldwide, but it is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation. Human infection with A. lumbricoides is acquired by swallowing fully embryonated eggs from contaminated soil.
A genus of nematodes of the superfamily ASCARIDOIDEA whose species usually inhabit the intestine.
Infection by nematodes of the genus ASCARIS. Ingestion of infective eggs causes diarrhea and pneumonitis. Its distribution is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation and where human feces are used for fertilizer.
A genus of nematode worms comprising the whipworms.
Infestation with parasitic worms of the helminth class.
Infections of the INTESTINES with PARASITES, commonly involving PARASITIC WORMS. Infections with roundworms (NEMATODE INFECTIONS) and tapeworms (CESTODE INFECTIONS) are also known as HELMINTHIASIS.
Infection with nematodes of the genus TRICHURIS, formerly called Trichocephalus.
A superfamily of nematode parasitic hookworms consisting of four genera: ANCYLOSTOMA; NECATOR; Bunostomum; and Uncinaria. ANCYLOSTOMA and NECATOR occur in humans and other mammals. Bunostomum is common in ruminants and Uncinaria in wolves, foxes, and dogs.
Infection of humans or animals with hookworms other than those caused by the genus Ancylostoma or Necator, for which the specific terms ANCYLOSTOMIASIS and NECATORIASIS are available.
Commonly known as parasitic worms, this group includes the ACANTHOCEPHALA; NEMATODA; and PLATYHELMINTHS. Some authors consider certain species of LEECHES that can become temporarily parasitic as helminths.
Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.
Determination of parasite eggs in feces.
A benzimidazole that acts by interfering with CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM and inhibiting polymerization of MICROTUBULES.
A benzimidazole broad-spectrum anthelmintic structurally related to MEBENDAZOLE that is effective against many diseases. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p38)
Substances used in the treatment or control of nematode infestations. They are used also in veterinary practice.
A species of parasitic nematode usually found in domestic pigs and a few other animals. Human infection can also occur, presumably as result of handling pig manure, and can lead to intestinal obstruction.
Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa.
A common parasite of humans in the moist tropics and subtropics. These organisms attach to villi in the small intestine and suck blood causing diarrhea, anorexia, and anemia.
Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Broad spectrum antinematodal anthelmintic used also in veterinary medicine.
Facilities provided for human excretion, often with accompanying handwashing facilities.
The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
Any part or derivative of a helminth that elicits an immune reaction. The most commonly seen helminth antigens are those of the schistosomes.
2-Substituted benzimidazole first introduced in 1962. It is active against a variety of nematodes and is the drug of choice for STRONGYLOIDIASIS. It has CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM side effects and hepatototoxic potential. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, p919)
Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. They are often contracted through contact with an intermediate vector, but may occur as the result of direct exposure.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.
A genus of nematode intestinal parasites that consists of several species. A. duodenale is the common hookworm in humans. A. braziliense, A. ceylonicum, and A. caninum occur primarily in cats and dogs, but all have been known to occur in humans.
A class of unsegmented helminths with fundamental bilateral symmetry and secondary triradiate symmetry of the oral and esophageal structures. Many species are parasites.
Infection of humans or animals with hookworms of the genus NECATOR. The resulting anemia from this condition is less severe than that from ANCYLOSTOMIASIS.
An antihelminthic drug that has been tried experimentally in rheumatic disorders where it apparently restores the immune response by increasing macrophage chemotaxis and T-lymphocyte function. Paradoxically, this immune enhancement appears to be beneficial in rheumatoid arthritis where dermatitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia, and nausea and vomiting have been reported as side effects. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p435-6)
The development and establishment of environmental conditions favorable to the health of the public.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Proteins found in any species of helminth.
A species of parasitic nematode widely distributed in tropical and subtropical countries. The females and their larvae inhabit the mucosa of the intestinal tract, where they cause ulceration and diarrhea.
A genus of ascarid nematodes commonly parasitic in the intestines of cats and dogs.
The study of parasites and PARASITIC DISEASES.
Invertebrate organisms that live on or in another organism (the host), and benefit at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of helminths.
Infection of humans or animals with hookworms of the genus ANCYLOSTOMA. Characteristics include anemia, dyspepsia, eosinophilia, and abdominal swelling.
The science dealing with the establishment and maintenance of health in the individual and the group. It includes the conditions and practices conducive to health. (Webster, 3d ed)
Infection with nematodes of the genus STRONGYLOIDES. The presence of larvae may produce pneumonitis and the presence of adult worms in the intestine could lead to moderate to severe diarrhea.
The status of health in rural populations.
An infection of the SMALL INTESTINE caused by the flagellated protozoan GIARDIA LAMBLIA. It is spread via contaminated food and water and by direct person-to-person contact.
Infection with flukes (trematodes) of the genus SCHISTOSOMA. Three species produce the most frequent clinical diseases: SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM (endemic in Africa and the Middle East), SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI (in Egypt, northern and southern Africa, some West Indies islands, northern 2/3 of South America), and SCHISTOSOMA JAPONICUM (in Japan, China, the Philippines, Celebes, Thailand, Laos). S. mansoni is often seen in Puerto Ricans living in the United States.
An independent state in eastern Africa. Ethiopia is located in the Horn of Africa and is bordered on the north and northeast by Eritrea, on the east by Djibouti and Somalia, on the south by Kenya, and on the west and southwest by Sudan. Its capital is Addis Ababa.
A species of parasitic EUKARYOTES that attaches itself to the intestinal mucosa and feeds on mucous secretions. The organism is roughly pear-shaped and motility is somewhat erratic, with a slow oscillation about the long axis.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.
A republic in central Africa lying east of CHAD and the CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC and west of NIGERIA. The capital is Yaounde.

Independent evaluation of the Nigrosin-Eosin modification of the Kato-Katz technique. (1/190)

A new modified quantitative Kato-Katz thick-smear technique for the detection of helminth eggs in faeces preserves hookworm eggs unaltered for a long time, while with the classic Kato-Katz technique, they disappear after approximately 2 h in tropical climates and thus slides must be read within hours after sample collection. For an independent comparison of these two laboratory techniques, faecal smears from 263 school children were examined in two surveys and prevalence, intensity of infection and costs of surveys calculated. There was no statistical difference between the methods in detecting prevalence and stratification of the sample in different classes of intensity. While there was no statistical difference for the arithmetic mean of the epg for T. trichiura and only a small difference for A. lumbricoides (P=0.04), we observed a highly significant difference for hookworm mean intensities of infections (P<0.001). From the public health viewpoint both methods provided similar results, but due to its simplicity and widespread use the classical Kato-Katz technique remains first choice for community investigation of soil-transmitted nematodes. However, the Nigrosin-Eosin approach has several advantages and can be a valuable alternative in certain circumstances.  (+info)

Developmental regulation of SR protein phosphorylation and activity. (2/190)

Serine/arginine-rich splicing factors (SR proteins) are substrates for serine phosphorylation that can regulate SR protein function. We have observed gross changes in SR protein phosphorylation during early development coincident with major zygotic gene activation in the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides. These differences correlate with large-scale changes in SR protein activity in promoting both trans- and cis-splicing. Importantly, inactive early stage extracts can be made splicing competent on addition of later stage SR proteins. These data suggest that changes in SR protein phosphorylation have a role in the activation of pre-mRNA splicing during early development.  (+info)

Genetic analysis of susceptibility to infection with Ascaris lumbricoides. (3/190)

Epidemiologic studies of helminthic infections have shown that susceptibility to these parasites frequently aggregates in families, suggesting the possible involvement of genetic factors. This paper presents a genetic epidemiologic analysis of Ascaris lumbricoides infection in the Jirel population of eastern Nepal. A total of 1,261 individuals belonging to a single pedigree were assessed for intensity of Ascaris infection at two time points. Following an initial assessment in which all individuals were treated with albendazole, a follow-up examination was performed one year later to evaluate reinfection patterns. Three measures of worm burden were analyzed, including eggs per gram of feces, direct worm counts, and worm biomass (weight). For all traits, variance component analysis of the familial data provided unequivocal evidence for a strong genetic component accounting for between 30% and 50% of the variation in worm burden. Shared environmental (i.e., common household) effects account for between 3% and 13% of the total phenotypic variance.  (+info)

A controlled evaluation of two school-based anthelminthic chemotherapy regimens on intensity of intestinal helminth infections. (4/190)

BACKGROUND: School-based deworming programmes have been promoted as a cost-effective strategy for control of nematode infection in developing countries. While numerous efficacy studies have been conducted, there is little information on actual programme effectiveness in areas of intense transmission. METHODS: A randomized trial of a school-based deworming programme was conducted in 12 primary schools on Pemba Island, Zanzibar. Four schools each were randomized to control, twice a year deworming with single dose mebendazole or three times a year deworming. Baseline and 12-month follow-up data on helminth infection using the Kato-Katz technique, demographic information and nutritional status were collected on 3028 children from March 1994 to May 1995. RESULTS: Intensity of infection measured as eggs per gram of faeces (epg) declined significantly for Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm infections in both treatment groups. A. lumbricoides infection intensity declined 63.1% and 96.7% in the twice and three times per year treatment groups compared to the controls. T. trichiura infection intensity declined 40.4% and 75.9% respectively and hookworm intensity declined 35.3% and 57.2% respectively compared to control schools. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that school-based programmes can be a cost-effective approach for controlling the intensity of intestinal helminth infection even in environments where transmission is high.  (+info)

SR proteins are required for nematode trans-splicing in vitro. (5/190)

SR (ser/arg) proteins have been shown to play roles in numerous aspects of pre-mRNA splicing, including modulation of alternative splicing, commitment of substrates to the splicing pathway, and splice site communication. The last of these, splice site communication, is particularly relevant to trans-splicing in which the 5' and 3' exons originate on separate molecules. The participation of SR proteins in naturally occurring, spliced leader RNA-dependent transsplicing has not been examined. Here, we have isolated SR proteins from an organism that performs both trans- and cis-splicing, the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides. To examine their activity in in vitro splicing reactions, we have also developed and characterized an SR protein-depleted whole-cell extract. When tested in this extract, the nematode SR proteins are required for both trans- and cis-splicing. In addition, the state of phosphorylation of the nematode SR proteins is critical to their activity in vitro. Interestingly, mammalian (HeLa) and A. lumbricoides SR proteins exhibit equivalent activities in cis-splicing, while the nematode SR proteins are much more active in trans-splicing. Thus, it appears that SR proteins purified from an organism that naturally trans-splices its pre-mRNAs promote this reaction to a greater extent than do their mammalian counterparts.  (+info)

Immunochemical characterization and diagnostic potential of a 63-kilodalton Schistosoma antigen. (6/190)

Schistosoma circulating antigens were used for the detection of active infection. Anti-S. mansoni IgG2a monoclonal antibody (MAb) designated C5C4 was generated. The target epitope of this MAb was detected in adult worms, eggs, and cercariae antigenic extracts of S. mansoni and S. haematobium, had a molecular size of 63 kD, and was not detected in Fasciola hepatica and Ascaris. In addition, a 50-kD degradation product was identified only in the urine of infected individuals. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography of the purified antigen demonstrated only one peak. The 63-kD antigen was characterized as a protein containing 40.4% hydrophobic, 7.5% acidic, and 8.8% basic amino acids. The C5C4 MAb was used in a Fast Dot-ELISA for rapid and simple diagnosis of human schistosomiasis. The 63-kD circulating antigen was detected in 92% of urine samples from 330 S. mansoni-infected individuals, with 16% false-positive results among 130 noninfected individuals.  (+info)

Clinical features and management of biliary ascariasis in a non-endemic area. (7/190)

Biliary ascariasis is common in certain geographical areas of the world. In India, it is common in the Kashmir valley and only stray cases have been reported from other parts of the country. Between January 1995 and May 1997, 14 patients with biliary ascariasis were seen at our centre, which is more than 1000 km from the Kashmir valley. The mean (+/- SD) age of the patients was 31.7 (+/- 6.1) years and all were females. None of them had been to a place known to be endemic for biliary ascariasis. Four patients presented with acute cholangitis, eight with acute abdominal pain and vomiting, and the remaining two were diagnosed incidentally during surgery for gallstone disease. Barring these two patients, ultrasound examination of the abdomen diagnosed the condition accurately. In 10 patients, a part of the worm was visible outside the papilla of Vater. The roundworm was caught in a Dormia basket and could be extracted in nine patients. In one patient the worm migrated inside the bile duct while it was being caught in a Dormia basket. In this and two other patients, in whom the worm had migrated completely inside the bile duct, worms were removed with the help of a Dormia basket after endoscopic sphincterotomy. There were no complications of endoscopic therapy. In the two patients in whom biliary ascariasis was detected during surgery, the worms were removed after choledocholithotomy. On a mean follow-up of 13.8 months, only one patient had a recurrence of biliary ascariasis. It is concluded that biliary ascariasis is not an uncommon disease and must be considered as a possibility in patients presenting with acute cholangitis and biliary pain even in a non-endemic area. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool and endoscopic management is very effective and safe in the treatment of these patients.  (+info)

Multilocular pyogenic hepatic abscess complicating ascaris lumbricoides infestation. (8/190)

A 74-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with frequent right flank pain. The multiple multilocular hepatic abscesses were revealed by computed tomography. Radiographs following a barium meal showed a linear filling defect in the ileum consistent with ascariasis. One day after treatment with pyrantel pamoate, an Ascaris was passed in the stool. The pyogenic hepatic abscesses gradually healed with both antibiotics and continuous drainage. After 2 months, he was discharged. In this case, the pyogenic hepatic abscesses were thus considered to have been caused by an inflammation which spread through the portal vein.  (+info)

The symptoms of ascariasis can vary depending on the severity of the infection, but may include:

* Abdominal pain
* Diarrhea
* Vomiting
* Weight loss
* Fever
* Coughing

If the infection is left untreated, it can lead to complications such as bowel obstruction, intestinal perforation, and malnutrition. In severe cases, ascariasis can also cause anemia, liver damage, and heart problems.

The diagnosis of ascariasis is typically made through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests such as fecal samples or blood tests. Treatment for ascariasis usually involves the use of anthelmintic drugs, which are effective in killing the parasites and reducing symptoms.

Preventive measures for ascariasis include:

* Improving sanitation and hygiene practices, such as properly disposing of human waste and washing hands regularly
* Avoiding consumption of undercooked meat, especially pork
* Boiling water before drinking it
* Avoiding eating raw or undercooked vegetables and fruits, especially in areas where the infection is common
* Keeping children away from areas where contaminated soil may be present.

It is important to note that ascariasis can be a significant public health problem in endemic areas, and efforts should be made to improve living conditions and promote good hygiene practices to prevent the spread of this infection.

The most common types of helminthiasis include:

1. Ascariasis: caused by the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides, this is one of the most common intestinal parasitic infections worldwide. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss.
2. Trichuriasis: caused by the whipworm Trichuris trichiura, this infection can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal bleeding.
3. Hookworm infection: caused by the hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus, this infection can cause symptoms such as anemia, abdominal pain, and diarrhea.
4. Strongyloidiasis: caused by the threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis, this infection can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and skin rashes.
5. Filariasis: caused by the filarial worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and Loa loa, this infection can cause symptoms such as swelling of the limbs, scrotum, and breasts, as well as skin rashes and fever.

Diagnosis of helminthiasis typically involves a physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests such as stool samples or blood tests to detect the presence of parasites or their eggs. Treatment usually involves antiparasitic drugs, and in some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove worms that have migrated to other parts of the body. Prevention measures include improving sanitation and hygiene, wearing protective clothing when working or traveling in areas with high prevalence of helminthiasis, and using insecticides to prevent mosquito bites.

In conclusion, helminthiasis is a group of diseases caused by parasitic worms that can affect humans and other animals. The most common types of helminthiasis include ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm infection, strongyloidiasis, and filariasis. Diagnosis and treatment involve laboratory tests and antiparasitic drugs, respectively. Prevention measures include improving sanitation and hygiene, wearing protective clothing, and using insecticides. Understanding the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of helminthiasis is essential for effective control and management of these diseases.

Some common types of intestinal diseases, parasitic include:

1. Amoebiasis: This is an infection caused by the amoeba Entamoeba histolytica, which can cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever.
2. Giardiasis: This is an infection caused by the parasite Giardia duodenalis, which can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and weight loss.
3. Cryptosporidiosis: This is an infection caused by the parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, which can cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever.
4. Isosporiasis: This is an infection caused by the parasite Isospora belli, which can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and weight loss.
5. Tapeworm infections: These are infections caused by tapeworms, such as Taenia saginata (beef tapeworm) and Dipylidium caninum (dog tapeworm), which can cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss.
6. Strongyloidiasis: This is an infection caused by the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis, which can cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fatigue.

Intestinal diseases, parasitic can be diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests such as stool samples or blood tests. Treatment depends on the specific type of infection and may include antiparasitic medications, anti-diarrheal medications, and supportive care to manage symptoms.

The infection is typically spread through the fecal-oral route, where the parasitic eggs or larvae are ingested from contaminated food, water, or soil. Once ingested, the Trichuris worms migrate to the large intestine and feed on the host's nutrients, causing a range of symptoms including:

* Abdominal pain
* Diarrhea
* Weight loss
* Fatigue
* Rectal bleeding

Trichuriasis can affect anyone, but it is most common in children and young adults. The disease is often diagnosed through a stool sample or a physical examination of the intestines. Treatment typically involves the use of anthelmintic drugs, which are medications that kill parasitic worms.

Preventive measures for trichuriasis include:

* Improving sanitation and hygiene practices
* Avoiding consumption of undercooked or raw meat, particularly pork and other animal products
* Avoiding contact with contaminated soil or water
* Ensuring proper food handling and preparation practices
* Regularly washing hands and fruits and vegetables before consumption.

1. Types of Hookworms: There are two main types of hookworms that can infect humans: Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. A. duodenale is more common in temperate climates, while N. americanus is found in tropical and subtropical regions.
2. Transmission: Hookworms are typically spread through contact with contaminated feces or soil. This can happen when someone ingests food or water that has been contaminated with hookworm eggs or larvae. In rare cases, hookworms can also be transmitted through blood transfusions or organ transplants.
3. Symptoms: The symptoms of hookworm infections can vary depending on the severity of the infection and the number of worms present. Common symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss, and anemia. In severe cases, hookworms can cause inflammation of the intestines, which can lead to complications such as bowel obstruction or perforation.
4. Diagnosis: Hookworm infections are typically diagnosed through a stool sample or blood test. A doctor may also perform a physical examination and take a medical history to help determine the presence of hookworms.
5. Treatment: Hookworm infections can be treated with antiparasitic medications, such as albendazole or mebendazole. These medications work by killing the worms in the intestines, which helps to relieve symptoms and prevent complications. In some cases, treatment may also involve addressing any underlying conditions that have been exacerbated by the hookworm infection, such as anemia or malnutrition.
6. Prevention: The best way to prevent hookworm infections is to practice good hygiene and avoid contact with contaminated feces or soil. This includes washing your hands frequently, especially after using the bathroom or before handling food. Additionally, wearing shoes when outdoors can help reduce the risk of contracting a hookworm infection through contact with contaminated soil.


Some common types of protozoan infections include:

1. Malaria: Caused by the Plasmodium parasite, which is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito.
2. Giardiasis: Caused by the Giardia parasite, which can be found in contaminated food and water or spread through close contact with an infected person.
3. Amoebiasis: Caused by the Entamoeba parasite, which can infect the intestines and cause symptoms such as diarrhea and abdominal pain.
4. Toxoplasmosis: Caused by the Toxoplasma parasite, which can be spread through contact with contaminated soil or cat feces.
5. Cryptosporidiosis: Caused by the Cryptosporidium parasite, which can be found in contaminated water and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea and stomach cramps.

Protozoan infections are typically treated with antiparasitic medications, and early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent complications and improve outcomes.

Nematode infections are parasitic infections caused by nematodes, a type of worm. Nematodes are helminths, which are parasites that infect the body and feed on its tissues and fluids. There are several types of nematode infections, including:

1. Ascariasis: This is an infection caused by the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides. It is one of the most common intestinal parasitic infections in the world and can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss.
2. Trichinellosis: This is an infection caused by the parasite Trichinella. It can be transmitted through the consumption of undercooked meat, particularly pork or wild game. Symptoms include fever, muscle pain, and diarrhea.
3. Strongyloidiasis: This is an infection caused by the roundworm Strongyloides. It can affect people with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS or cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fatigue.
4. Hookworm infection: This is an infection caused by the hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale. It can be transmitted through contact with contaminated feces or soil. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, and anemia.
5. Trichuriasis: This is an infection caused by the whipworm Trichuris trichiura. It can affect people of all ages and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss.

Nematode infections can be diagnosed through a variety of tests, including stool samples, blood tests, and imaging studies. Treatment depends on the type of infection and may involve medication to kill the parasites, as well as supportive care to manage symptoms. Prevention includes avoiding exposure to contaminated food and water, practicing good hygiene, and using insecticides to control the spread of hookworms.

Overall, nematode infections can have a significant impact on human health, especially in areas with poor sanitation and hygiene. It is important to be aware of these infections and seek medical attention if symptoms persist or worsen over time.

1. Malaria: A disease caused by a parasite that is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito. It can cause fever, chills, and flu-like symptoms.
2. Giardiasis: A disease caused by a parasite that is found in contaminated food and water. It can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and weight loss.
3. Toxoplasmosis: A disease caused by a parasite that is transmitted through the consumption of contaminated meat or cat feces. It can cause fever, headache, and swollen lymph nodes.
4. Leishmaniasis: A group of diseases caused by a parasite that is transmitted through the bite of an infected sandfly. It can cause skin sores, fatigue, and weight loss.
5. Chagas disease: A disease caused by a parasite that is transmitted through the bite of an infected triatomine bug. It can cause heart problems, digestive issues, and brain damage.
6. Trichomoniasis: A disease caused by a parasite that is transmitted through sexual contact with an infected person. It can cause vaginal itching, burning during urination, and abnormal vaginal discharge.
7. Cryptosporidiosis: A disease caused by a parasite that is found in contaminated water and food. It can cause diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach cramps.
8. Amoebiasis: A disease caused by a parasite that is found in contaminated water and food. It can cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, and rectal bleeding.
9. Babesiosis: A disease caused by a parasite that is transmitted through the bite of an infected blacklegged tick. It can cause fever, chills, and fatigue.
10. Angiostrongyliasis: A disease caused by a parasite that is transmitted through the ingestion of raw or undercooked snails or slugs. It can cause eosinophilic meningitis, which is an inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord.

It's important to note that these are just a few examples of parasitic diseases, and there are many more out there. Additionally, while some of these diseases can be treated with antiparasitic medications, others may require long-term management and supportive care. It's important to seek medical attention if you suspect that you have been infected with a parasite or if you experience any symptoms that could be related to a parasitic infection.

The infection occurs when the larvae of the roundworm enter the body through the skin or mucous membranes, typically through contact with contaminated soil or water. Once inside the body, the larvae migrate to various organs and tissues, including the liver, lungs, and intestines, where they can cause a range of symptoms.

The symptoms of necatoriasis can vary depending on the location of the infection and the severity of the infestation. Common symptoms include:

* Skin lesions or rashes
* Respiratory problems, such as coughing and wheezing
* Abdominal pain and diarrhea
* Fever and chills
* Weakness and fatigue

If left untreated, necatoriasis can lead to serious complications, such as intestinal obstruction, anemia, and other infections. Treatment typically involves the use of anti-parasitic medications, such as albendazole or mebendazole, to kill the parasites and prevent further damage. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary to manage complications and supportive care.

Preventing necatoriasis involves measures to avoid contact with contaminated soil and water, such as using clean water for drinking and washing, wearing protective clothing when working or playing outdoors, and practicing good hygiene. In areas where the infection is common, regular deworming programs can also help to reduce the prevalence of necatoriasis.

The symptoms of ancylostomiasis can vary depending on the severity of the infection, but they typically include abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss, and iron deficiency anemia. In severe cases, it can lead to life-threatening complications such as intestinal blockage or bleeding.

The diagnosis of ancylostomiasis is made by identifying the parasites in a stool sample or through blood tests that detect antigens produced by the parasites. Treatment typically involves the use of anthelmintic drugs to kill the parasites, and supportive care to manage symptoms such as diarrhea and anemia. Prevention measures include improving sanitation and personal hygiene, and avoiding contact with contaminated soil or feces.

The symptoms of strongyloidiasis can vary depending on the location and severity of the infection, but they typically include abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue, and weight loss. In severe cases, the parasite can migrate to other parts of the body, including the lungs, liver, and brain, causing a range of complications such as pneumonia, hepatitis, and meningitis.

Strongyloidiasis is diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests such as stool samples or blood tests. Treatment typically involves antiparasitic medications, such as ivermectin or albendazole, which are effective in eliminating the parasite from the body. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary to manage complications and supportive care.

Preventive measures for strongyloidiasis include improving sanitation and hygiene practices, wearing protective clothing and footwear when working or living in areas with poor sanitation, and avoiding contact with contaminated soil or water. In endemic areas, mass drug administration programs can be effective in reducing the prevalence of strongyloidiasis and other neglected tropical diseases.

Giardiasis is a disease caused by the protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis, which is found in contaminated water, food, or direct contact with infected individuals. The parasite enters the small intestine and feeds on the mucosal lining, causing inflammation, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps.

Prevalence:

Giardiasis is a common disease worldwide, affecting approximately 500 million people annually, with higher prevalence in developing countries. In the United States, it is estimated that over 1.5 million people are infected each year, with the highest incidence rates found among children and travelers to endemic areas.

Symptoms:

The symptoms of giardiasis can vary in severity but typically include:

* Diarrhea (sometimes bloody)
* Abdominal cramps
* Weight loss
* Fatigue
* Nausea and vomiting
* Fever
* Headache

In some cases, the infection can lead to more severe complications such as:

* Malabsorption (deficiency of essential nutrients)
* Inflammation of the intestine
* Rectal prolapse

Diagnosis:

The diagnosis of giardiasis is based on a combination of clinical symptoms, laboratory tests, and medical history. The most common diagnostic techniques include:

* Microscopic examination of stool samples for the presence of Giardia eggs or trophozoites
* Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antigens or antibodies against Giardia in stool or blood samples
* Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect the parasite's DNA in stool samples

Treatment:

The treatment of giardiasis typically involves the use of antiparasitic drugs, such as metronidazole or tinidazole. These medications are effective against the parasite and can be administered orally or intravenously, depending on the severity of the infection. The duration of treatment varies depending on the individual case, but it is generally between 5-10 days.

Prevention:

Preventing giardiasis involves avoiding exposure to contaminated water or food sources. Some measures that can be taken to prevent the infection include:

* Avoiding consumption of untreated water, especially when traveling to areas with poor sanitation
* Avoiding contact with people who have diarrhea or are infected with Giardia
* Properly storing and cooking food to kill any parasites that may be present
* Avoiding raw or undercooked meat, especially pork and wild game
* Washing hands frequently, especially before eating or preparing food

It is important to note that giardiasis can be a recurring infection, so it is important to take preventive measures consistently.

There are two main types of schistosomiasis:

1. Schistosoma haematobium: This type is most commonly found in Africa and the Middle East, and affects the urinary tract, causing bleeding, kidney damage, and bladder problems.
2. Schistosoma japonicum: This type is found in Asia, and affects the intestines, causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal bleeding.
3. Schistosoma mansoni: This type is found in sub-Saharan Africa, and affects both the intestines and the liver, causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, and liver damage.

Symptoms of schistosomiasis can include:

* Bloody urine
* Abdominal pain
* Diarrhea
* Rectal bleeding
* Fatigue
* Anemia
* Weight loss

If left untreated, schistosomiasis can lead to serious complications such as kidney damage, bladder cancer, and infertility.

Treatment of schistosomiasis typically involves the use of praziquantel, an antiparasitic drug that is effective against all species of Schistosoma. In addition to treatment, preventive measures such as avoiding contact with contaminated water and using protective clothing when swimming or bathing in areas where the disease is common can help reduce the risk of infection.

Preventive measures for schistosomiasis include:

* Avoiding contact with contaminated water
* Using protective clothing such as long sleeves and pants when swimming or bathing in areas where the disease is common
* Avoiding activities that involve exposure to water, such as swimming or fishing, in areas where the disease is common
* Using clean water for drinking, cooking, and personal hygiene
* Implementing sanitation measures such as building latrines and improving sewage systems in areas where the disease is common

It is important to note that schistosomiasis is a preventable and treatable disease, but it requires awareness and action from individuals, communities, and governments to control and eliminate the disease.

ISBN 0-85198-689-7. Ascaris lumbricoides Video - DAVE Project Ascaris lumbricoides Poll - Research Ascaris lumbricoides image ... It has been proposed that Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum (pig roundworm) are the same species. Ascaris lumbricoides, a ... Ascaris lumbricoides is a large parasitic worm that causes ascariasis in humans. A roundworm of genus Ascaris, it is the most ... "Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?". Parasites & Vectors. 5: 42. doi:10.1186/1756-3305-5-42. ISSN 1756 ...
The larva of Ascaris lumbricoides developing in the egg Ascaris lumbricoides adult worms (with measuring tape for scale) ... Ascaris lumbricoides adult worms Ascaris egg, incubation process: The Ascaris egg incubation process consists of placing the ... Ascariasis is a disease caused by the parasitic roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides. Infections have no symptoms in more than 85% of ... Crompton DW, Pawlowski ZS (1985). "Life history and development of Ascaris lumbricoides and the persistence of human ascariasis ...
Ascaris lumbricoides).[citation needed] Tracking the transmission of infectious diseases is called disease surveillance. ...
Ascaris lumbricoides". Parasitic Diseases (PDF) (7 ed.). New York: Parasites Without Borders. p. 211. Archived (PDF) from the ...
Ascaris lumbricoides Eustrongylides sp. Toxocara Trichinella spiralis Trichuris trichiura Protozoa:[citation needed] ...
Ascaris lumbricoides) Other Protozoa (e.g. Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora, Microsporidia, Entamoeba histolytica) Bacterial ...
The parasites were Ascaris lumbricoides worms. Oh was treated by surgeon Lee Guk-jong at the Ajou University Hospital's ...
It includes species-specific diseases such as[citation needed] Ascariasis, which is caused by Ascaris lumbricoides Hookworm ... Ascaris lumbricoides Whipworms (family Trichuridae), e.g. Trichuris trichiura Hookworms (family Ancylostomatidae), e.g. ... Holland CV, Kennedy MW (Eds.) (2002). The Geohelminths: Ascaris, Trichuris and Hookworm. Springer. pp. 1-352. ISBN 978-0-7923- ... Soil-transmitted helminthiasis is a collective name for the diseases caused by ascaris, whipworm and hookworms in humans. ...
Hagel I, Giusti T (October 2010). "Ascaris lumbricoides: an overview of therapeutic targets". Infectious Disorders Drug Targets ... Ascaris lumbricoides, and Cyclospora cayetanensis). Nitazoxanide alone has shown preliminary evidence of efficacy in the ... lumbricoides and other soil-transmitted helminthiases in human trials. Shoff WH (5 October 2015). Chandrasekar PH, Talavera F, ...
Hagel I, Giusti T (October 2010). "Ascaris lumbricoides: an overview of therapeutic targets". Infect Disord Drug Targets. 10 (5 ... readily kills Ascaris lumbricoides, and also possess antiprotozoal effects Oxamniquine - effective against flatworms (e.g., ... Antiparasitics that specifically target worms of the genus Ascaris are called ascaricides. Benzimidazoles: Albendazole - ... lumbricoides and other soil-transmitted helminthiases in human trials. Shoff WH (5 October 2015). Chandrasekar PH, Talavera F, ...
Saz HJ, Hubbard JA (1957). "The oxidative decarboxylation of malate by Ascaris lumbricoides". J. Biol. Chem. 225 (2): 921-933. ...
In the case of Ascaris lumbricoides (giant roundworm), which has been considered the most resistant and common helminth type, ... Lýsek H., Malínský J., Janisch R. (1985). "Ultrastructure of eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides Linnaeus, 1758. I. Egg-shells" (PDF ... In particular, the number of viable Ascaris eggs is often taken as an indicator for all helminth eggs in treatment processes as ... Ascaris is the name of a type of helminth, and ascariasis is the name of the infection caused by that helminth. Helminths are a ...
Standen O (1955). "Activity of Piperazine, in vitro, Against Ascaris lumbricoides". British Medical Journal. 2 (4930): 20-2. ...
The genus Ascaris was originally described as the genus for Ascaris lumbricoides by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. The morphologically ... Esophagus of an Ascaris worm Ascaris cross section 40× Ascaris cross section 40× Ascaris cross section 400× List of parasites ( ... One species, Ascaris lumbricoides, affects humans and causes the disease ascariasis. Another species, Ascaris suum, typically ... Leles D, Gardner SL, Reinhard K, Iniguez A, Araujo A (2012). "Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?". ...
"Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?". Parasites & Vectors. 5: 42. doi:10.1186/1756-3305-5-42. PMC ... The larvae of Ascaris complete two moults within the egg; therefore, the larvae emerging from the egg is not a second-stage ... Ascaris infections are treated with ascaricides. A. suum is in the family Ascarididae, and is one of the oldest associations to ... Ascaris suum, also known as the large roundworm of pig, is a parasitic nematode that causes ascariasis in pigs. While ...
Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Hymenolepis nana, and Enterobius vermicularis. Houseflies do not serve as a ...
Heft 1. p. 69-74). Ueber ausgepresste Extrakte von Ascaris lumbricoides und ihre Wirkung. (Z. Biol., 48, 86. - 1902). Thies - ... He is known for his pioneer research involving the metabolism of parasitic nematodes (Ascaris). He also published papers on the ...
Some of her solo-authored papers and monographs include: "The contribution of Ascaris lumbricoides to malnutrition in children ... Stephenson, Lani S. (August 1980). "The contribution of Ascaris lumbricoides to malnutrition in children". Parasitology. 81 (1 ... and Ascaris Lumbricoides Infections". The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 41 (1): 78-87. doi:10.4269/ajtmh. ... Trichuris trichiura and Ascaris lumbricoides Infections are Improved Four Months after a Single Dose of Albendazole". The ...
These include Ascaris lumbricoides, commonly known as human giant roundworm; Strongyloides stercoralis, commonly known as human ... However, Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercoralis and Enterobius vermicularis are not considered suitable for ... Hookworms have been linked to reduced risk of developing asthma, while Ascaris lumbricoides (roundworm infection) was ... Similarly, Hymenolepis nana, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercoralis, Enterobius vermicularis, and ...
It is also used to treat Ascaris lumbricoides (roundworms). Diatrizoate may not actually kill Ascaris, but instead it promotes ... shifting of fluid in the bowel lumen[clarify], so may relieve intestinal obstruction caused by impacted Ascaris. Diatrizoate is ...
Anthelminthic efficacy of traditional herbs on Ascaris lumbricoides. J Egypt Soc Parasitol. 2002; 32(3):893-900. Habluetzel A, ...
This can include Trichinella spiralis, Strongyloides stercoralis, Ascaris lumbricoides, the hookworms, and the schistosomes. ... Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercoralis and the hookworms Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. When ...
The Roman physicians Celsus and Galen documented the roundworms Ascaris lumbricoides and Enterobius vermicularis. In his Canon ...
Whipworm commonly infects patients also infected with Giardia, Entamoeba histolytica, Ascaris lumbricoides, and hookworms. ... and Ascaris Lumbricoides Infections." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, The American Society of Tropical ...
"Infection with Schistosoma mansoni correlates with altered immune responses to Ascaris lumbricoides and hookworm". Acta Tropica ...
Hepatolithiasis is associated with Clonorchis sinensis and Ascaris lumbricoides infestation of the liver. This theory is based ...
John's from 1940 to 1949 focused on the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides. He also spent the summer of 1948 at the Marine ...
Among the 100 stool samples tested, whipworm (Trichuris trichiura) and roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) were most commonly ...
... these include the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides and the liver flukes Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini and ...
Ascaris lumbricoides) Diverticulosis Certain medications, such as phentermine Occurs in some due to salivary hypersecretion and ...
... she aided in his exploration of the nervous system of the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides using light microscopy. When ... C. elegans is around 100 times smaller than Ascaris (~1mm compared to ~10 cm), so they had to use a higher-resolution imaging ... Additionally, it aided researchers in studying analogous nerves other nematodes, including Ascaris, which, due to its larger ...
... which include Ascaris lumbricoides (Ascaris), Anclostoma duodenale and Necator americanus (hookworm), and Trichuris trichiura ( ... whipworm). Ascaris and whipworm that are identified in reusable wastewater systems can cause certain diseases and complications ...
3 (1894) Ein abnorm weiblicher Genital-Apparat von Ascaris lumbricoides L. "Centralblatt für Bakteriologie" 15 (13-14), s. 473- ...
... causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis Ascaris lumbricoides: causes ascariasis Pinworm: causes enterobiasis Strongyloides ... and the Ascaris worm. This followed a tradition of Arab medical writings spanning over 1000 years in the area near the Red Sea ...
Can Med Assoc J. 1986; 135: 313-19, Embil J, Pereira L, White FMM, Garner J, Manuel F, Prevalence of ascaris lumbricoides in a ...
... drew attention to the disease in cases of eosinophilic pneumonia caused by the parasites Ascaris lumbricoides,[2] Strongyloides ... The parasite can be Ascaris, Strongyloides stercoralis, or Dirofilaria immitis which can enter the body through contact with ...
Ascaris lumbricoides, and among species of Gnathostoma, Angiostrongylus, and Ancylostoma. Distinguishing features of B. ...
... was used in treatment of infestation by the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides and in ascarid parasitoses in general ( ...
The seeds and fruits are used for medicinal purposes for the worm diseases caused by nematode Ascaris lumbricoides. Artocarpus ...
... lumbricoides. The half maximal effective concentration (EC50) value was 74 μg/mL. The authors concluded that these results ... identification of extracts with potent activity against Ascaris suum in vitro". Parasite. 23: 24. doi:10.1051/parasite/2016024 ... and Jäger showed than ethanolic extracts of Clausena anisata have in vitro anthelmintic properties against the nematode Ascaris ...
Ascaris suum) typically infects pigs while Ascaris lumbricoides affects human populations, typically in sub-tropical and ... Piperazine, a flaccid paralyzing agent that causes a blocking response of ascaris muscle to acetylcholine. The narcotizing ... of the genus Ascaris (giant intestinal roundworms). The large roundworm of pigs ( ...
... ascaris MeSH B01.500.500.294.700.100.100.108.425 - ascaris lumbricoides MeSH B01.500.500.294.700.100.100.108.700 - ascaris suum ...
Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura) and protozoan cysts (Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica). The exact same ...
... such as Ascaris lumbricoides. In 1810 he was appointed Professor of Anatomy and Physiology at the University of Berlin, a ...
... hominis and Ascaris lumbricoides. The child quickly recovered after proper medication. Diagnosis is made by examination of the ...
Ascaris suum, pig-infecting giant roundworm, closely related to human-infecting giant roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides (2011) ... October 2011). "Ascaris suum draft genome". Nature. 479 (7374): 529-33. Bibcode:2011Natur.479..529J. doi:10.1038/nature10553. ...
Ascaris vermicularis - pinworm Ascaris lumbricoides - giant roundworm Fasciola (liver flukes) Fasciola hepatica - sheep liver ... Lumbricus (earthworms) Lumbricus terrestris - common earthworm Lumbricus marinus - lugworm Ascaris (giant intestinal roundworms ...
... ascaris lumbricoides)', British Journal of Surgery, Vol. 11, No. 43 (1924), pp. 432-38. 'Note on a porocephalid found in a ...
The first crucial step in understanding the life cycle of the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides was demonstrated by Grassi in a ... He was the first to demonstrate the direct life cycle of the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides by self-experimentation. He ...
Parasites Ascaris Lumbricoides Album. /Upload/Parasites/Ascaris_Lumbricoides/ 0 subfolders 35 files ...... Up Upload Files To ...
This is an egg of Ascaris lumbricoides. Ascarides are roundworms, a common parasitic infection throughout the world. It is ... This is an egg of Ascaris lumbricoides. Ascarides are roundworms, a common parasitic infection throughout the world. It is ...
... ... Galzerano, A., Sabatini, E. & Duri, D. (‎2010)‎. Ascaris lumbricoides infection: an unexpected cause of pancreatitis in a ...
... lumbricoides infection may be associated with poorer general intelligence, as measured through the Raven Colored Progr … ... Epidemiology of human hookworm and Ascaris lumbricoides infestations in rural Gambia. Palmer DR, Bundy DA. Palmer DR, et al. ... Hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polyparasitism associated with poor cognitive performance in Brazilian ... Hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polyparasitism associated with poor cognitive performance in Brazilian ...
Ascaris lumbricoides infection: an unexpected cause of pancreatitis in a western Mediterranean country ... Ascaris lumbricoides is a nematode parasite, endemic in the Middle East and South America, especially in rural countries. ... Ascaris lumbricoides infestation is acquired through ingestion of eggs in raw vegetables. The human is the definitive host. ... Ascaris lumbricoides infestation as a cause of intestinal obstruction in children: experience with 87 cases. Journal of ...
Comparison and validation of two mathematical models for the impact of mass drug administration on Ascaris lumbricoides and ... Comparison and validation of two mathematical models for the impact of mass drug administration on Ascaris lumbricoides and ...
The Anderson-May model of human parasite infections and specifically that for the intestinal worm Ascaris lumbricoides is ... The Anderson-May model of human parasite infections and specifically that for the intestinal worm Ascaris lumbricoides is ... Digestive System, Animals, Humans, Ascaris lumbricoides, Ascariasis, Parasite Egg Count, Binomial Distribution, Stochastic ...
Seasonally timed treatment programs for Ascaris lumbricoides to increase impact-An investigation using mathematical models.. ... Anti-Helmínticos/administração & dosagem Ascaríase/epidemiologia Ascaríase/prevenção & controle Ascaris lumbricoides/efeitos ... A new model framework reflecting four key stages of the A. lumbricoides life cycle, incorporating the effects of rainfall and ... There is clear empirical evidence that environmental conditions can influence Ascaris spp. free-living stage development and ...
Ascaris Lumbricoides. Ascaris or Oxyuris Vermicularis. Tricocephalus Dispar. Anchylostoma Duodenale. Ascaris Alata. Taeniae. ...
Ascaris lumbricoides. 10 (2.7). 8 (2.4). 2 (6.1). 0.23. Schistosomiasis. 34 (9.2). 31 (9.2). 3 (9.1). 0.94. ...
Roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides). Emverm: 100 mg PO q12hr for 3 days; if cure is not achieved 3 wk after treatment, a second ...
Nano Biomedicine and Engineering.. Copyright © Shanghai Jiao Tong University Press ...
... for the treatment of patients one year of age and older with gastrointestinal infections caused by Ascaris lumbricoides ( ... Table 4: Clinical Response at the End of the Double-Blind Period (Day 19) for A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura Infection Type. ... Clinical cure was defined as zero egg count (A. lumbricoides and/or T. trichiura) at the end of the double-blind period (Day 19 ... lumbricoides and/or T. trichiura was statistically significant (p,0.001) compared to placebo, 100% compared to 30.0% for A. ...
Ascaris Lumbricoides. Crianças com Idade entre 1 a 10 anos. Estado Nutricional. Helmintíases. Trichuris Trichiura. ... Ascaris Lumbricoides. Helminthic Infections. Nutritional Health. Pre-School and School Children. Trichuris Trichiura. ... e os parasitas mais prevalentes foram Ascaris lumbricoides 18,9%(143) e Trichuris trichiura 16,9% (128). Foi encontrada uma ... and the most prevalent parasites were Ascaris lumbricoides (18.9% - 143) and Trichuris trichiura (16.9% - 128). Malnutrition ...
Ascaris lumbricoides, and Taenia sp. A review of paleoparasitological studies in Europe shows that these 3 parasites have ...
Ascaris lumbricoides 127.0. *. mural thickening 560.89. *. procedure 997.49. *. involving urinary tract 997.5. ...
Seasonally timed treatment programs for Ascaris lumbricoides to increase impact - An investigation using mathematical models ...
Su di una anomalia nell apparato genitale femminile di "Ascaris lumbricoides" L. ... Sviluppo precoce degli organi della riproduzione in un nematode, Ascaris capsularia Rud., nello stadio di passaggio dalla forma ... Sovra due casi di anormale espulsione di Ascaris lumbricoides Lin.. Subject(s):. Ascaris lumbricoides (Infection by). ...
... and pyrantel pamoate show high cure rates against A lumbricoides. For hookworm infection, albendazole was more efficacious than ... Context: More than a quarter of the human population is likely infected with soil-transmitted helminths (Ascaris lumbricoides, ... Results: Single-dose oral albendazole, mebendazole, and pyrantel pamoate for infection with A lumbricoides resulted in cure ... Conclusions: Single-dose oral albendazole, mebendazole, and pyrantel pamoate show high cure rates against A lumbricoides. For ...
Categories: Ascaris lumbricoides Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
Ascaris lumbricoides Infection Following School-Based Deworming in Western Kenya: Assessing the Role of Pupils School and Home ...
Arthropod ID; Ascaris lumbricoides; Dermacentor species; Diphyllobothrium latum; Ixodes species; Taenia species; Tapeworm; Tick ... Amebiasis; Ascaris lumbricoides; Balantidium coli; Blastocystis hominis; Dientamoeba fragilis; Chilomastix mesnili; ... Amebiasis; Ascaris lumbricoides; Balantidium coli; Blastocystis hominis; Dientamoeba fragilis; Chilomastix mesnili; ...
This case demonstrated a mixed infection of ascariasis, caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, and giardiasis, caused by Giardia ... unembryonated, fertile eggs of A. lumbricoides within the size range for the species and demonstrating a thick wall with a ... an infertile egg of A. lumbricoides within the size range for the species (Figure E). ...
Ascariasis: Caused by the soil-transmitted roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides, it can impair growth and cognition. ...
  • Cure rates and % egg reduction rates are presented from studies published through March 1998 both for the recommended single dose of 400 mg for hookworm (separately for Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale when possible), Ascaris lumbricoides , Trichuris trichiura , and Enterobius vermicularis and, in separate tables, for doses other than a single dose of 400 mg. (cdc.gov)
  • Many individuals are infected with 2-3 of the 3 major parasites (ie, A lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworm). (medscape.com)
  • VERMOX™ CHEWABLE is indicated for the treatment of patients one year of age and older with gastrointestinal infections caused by Ascaris lumbricoides (roundworm) and Trichuris trichiura (whipworm). (nih.gov)
  • Os resultados mostraram que a prevalência inicial de helmintos foi de 33,6% (255), e os parasitas mais prevalentes foram Ascaris lumbricoides 18,9%(143) e Trichuris trichiura 16,9% (128). (usp.br)
  • A infecção concomitante de Ascaris e Trichuris foi observada em 26%(11) dos desnutridos, mostrando uma associação positiva entre as duas variáveis. (usp.br)
  • More than a quarter of the human population is likely infected with soil-transmitted helminths (Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, and Trichuris trichiura) in highly endemic areas. (nih.gov)
  • The main species that infect people are the roundworm ( Ascaris lumbricoides ), the whipworm ( Trichuris trichiura ) and the hookworms ( Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale ). (who.int)
  • Ascaris lumbricoides, which causes ascariasis, is the largest of the round worms (nematodes), with females measuring 30 cm x 0.5 cm. (medscape.com)
  • The roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides causes ascariasis. (medscape.com)
  • This case demonstrated a mixed infection of ascariasis, caused by Ascaris lumbricoides , and giardiasis, caused by Giardia duodenalis . (cdc.gov)
  • Ascariasis: Caused by the soil-transmitted roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides, it can impair growth and cognition. (nih.gov)
  • Ascariasis is a human disease caused by the parasitic roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides . (doctorbhatia.com)
  • Hookworms are much smaller than the large roundworm , Ascaris lumbricoides, and the complications of tissue migration and mechanical obstruction so frequently observed with roundworm infestation are less frequent in hookworm infestation. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • To investigate the relationship between hookworm and Ascaris lumbricoides infection and performance on three subsets of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - third edition (WISC-III) (Digit Span, Arithmetic and Coding) and Raven Colored Progressive Matrices. (nih.gov)
  • Children co-infected with A. lumbricoides infection and hookworm infection had greater odds of poor performance on some WISC-III subtests than children with only A. lumbricoides infection. (nih.gov)
  • A new model framework reflecting four key stages of the A. lumbricoides life cycle , incorporating the effects of rainfall and temperature , is used to describe the level of infection in the human population alongside the environmental egg dynamics. (bvsalud.org)
  • Although the sidered to be virtually identical (conspecific) in the detailed mechanisms of action are unclear, exper- past, such as Ascaris lumbricoides of humans and A . imental evidence from exposure of intestinal hel- suum of pigs, have recently been shown to be distinct, minths of several different species to albendazole without cross infection under natural conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • Infection occurs through ingestion of food contaminated with feces containing Ascaris eggs. (doctorbhatia.com)
  • Human infection with A. lumbricoides is acquired by swallowing fully embryonated eggs from contaminated soil. (nih.gov)
  • The Dynamics of Ascaris lumbricoides Infections. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The Anderson-May model of human parasite infections and specifically that for the intestinal worm Ascaris lumbricoides is reconsidered, with a view to deriving the observed characteristic negative binomial distribution which is frequently found in human communities. (ox.ac.uk)
  • To assess the efficacy of single-dose oral albendazole, mebendazole, levamisole, and pyrantel pamoate against A lumbricoides, hookworm, and T trichiura infections. (nih.gov)
  • Piperazine generic Piperazine citrate is used as a second-line treatment for treating roundworm infections caused by Ascaris lumbricoides and pinworm infections caused by Enterobius vermicularis (oxyuris). (medindia.net)
  • A lumbricoides is one of the soil-transmitted helminths (STH), a group that includes 16 worms. (medscape.com)
  • A similar study in the same area showed that 73% of children working on these farms were infected with helminths , particularly Ascaris, probably as a result of exposure to the raw sewage. (doctorbhatia.com)
  • According to H. Maissoneuve and I.F. Rossignol (1985), albendazole renders high ovicidal effect on Ascaris lumbricoides, Ancylostoma duodenale and Trichocephalus trichiuris eggs. (vin.com)
  • Ascaris lumbricoides is a nematode parasite, endemic in the Middle East and South America, especially in rural countries. (who.int)
  • Sviluppo precoce degli organi della riproduzione in un nematode, Ascaris capsularia Rud. (nih.gov)
  • Although A lumbricoides has been present in humans for many thousands of years, science only began to elucidate its biology in the 17th century, and effective chemotherapy was only developed in the late 20th century. (medscape.com)
  • A lumbricoides has a high host specificity for humans and, rarely, for pigs. (medscape.com)
  • E. I. Malakhova (1958) and O.I. Plaan (1961) noticed that santonine, sodium fluoride and tetrachlormethane did not render any influence on the development and infestive properties of Ascaris suum and Parascaris equorum eggs after deworming. (vin.com)
  • O.I. Plaan (1961) also noticed that Ascaris suum eggs matured to infestive stage in usual terms after faeces treatment with santonine, sodium fluoride, hexachloroethane or phenothiazine in 1:100-1:2000 proportions. (vin.com)
  • Cross-species RNAi: Selected Ascaris suum dsRNAs can sterilize Caenorhabditis elegans. (missouri.edu)
  • Ascaris lumbricoides infestation is acquired through ingestion of eggs in raw vegetables. (who.int)
  • unembryonated, fertile eggs of A. lumbricoides within the size range for the species and demonstrating a thick wall with a mammillated layer ( Figures A and C ). (cdc.gov)
  • A 1978 study showed about 75% of all sewage sludge samples sampled in United States urban catchments contained Ascaris ova, with rates as high as 5 to 100 eggs per litre. (doctorbhatia.com)
  • In one field study in Marrakech, Morocco, where raw sewage is used to fertilize crop fields, Ascaris eggs were detected at the rate of 0.18 eggs/kg in potatoes, 0.27 eggs/kg in turnip, 4.63 eggs/kg in mint, 0.7 eggs/kg in carrots, and 1.64 eggs/kg in radish [6] . (doctorbhatia.com)
  • According to V.F. Melashenko and A.M. Kelina (1957), Ascaris lumbricoides eggs develop normally after oxygenotherapy. (vin.com)
  • Other species of the genus Ascaris are parasitic and can cause disease in domestic animals. (doctorbhatia.com)
  • It is an infestation with one or more intestinal parasitic roundworms that include whipworms, hookworms and ascaris. (who.int)
  • Although it is highly active against Ascaris and Enterobius, it is not commonly used because of its repeated doses while other anthelmintics offer single dose treatment. (medindia.net)
  • The infestation can present as a wide range of symptoms: intestinal perforation or occlusion, cholangitis, obstructive jaundice, acute pancreatitis or appendicitis, pneumonia and respiratory failure and allergic reactions to the ascaris antigen. (who.int)
  • The genus Ascaris is composed of 17 species. (medscape.com)
  • an infertile egg of A. lumbricoides within the size range for the species ( Figure E ). (cdc.gov)
  • To further investigate worm burdens of Ascaris lumbricoides, adult worms were expelled using Combantrin and measured. (rti.org)
  • Seasonally timed treatment programs for Ascaris lumbricoides to increase impact-An investigation using mathematical models. (bvsalud.org)
  • Desiccated human feces from Big Bone Cave, Tennessee dating to approximately 2177 BCE contained A lumbricoides. (medscape.com)
  • In Macon, Georgia, one of the 13 soil samples tested positive for Ascaris. (doctorbhatia.com)
  • There is clear empirical evidence that environmental conditions can influence Ascaris spp. (bvsalud.org)
  • Ascariasis: Caused by the soil-transmitted roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides, it can impair growth and cognition. (nih.gov)
  • Ascaris lumbricoides of unusual size. (nih.gov)
  • Baralo B, Gurram S, Steckel J, Chulii M, Sharpilo A. Ascaris in the urinary tract: A case report and review of the literature. (medscape.com)