A genus of nematodes of the superfamily ASCARIDOIDEA whose species usually inhabit the intestine.
A species of parasitic nematode that is the largest found in the human intestine. Its distribution is worldwide, but it is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation. Human infection with A. lumbricoides is acquired by swallowing fully embryonated eggs from contaminated soil.
Infection by nematodes of the genus ASCARIS. Ingestion of infective eggs causes diarrhea and pneumonitis. Its distribution is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation and where human feces are used for fertilizer.
A genus of nematode worms comprising the whipworms.
Infestation with parasitic worms of the helminth class.
Infections of the INTESTINES with PARASITES, commonly involving PARASITIC WORMS. Infections with roundworms (NEMATODE INFECTIONS) and tapeworms (CESTODE INFECTIONS) are also known as HELMINTHIASIS.
Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.
Infection with nematodes of the genus TRICHURIS, formerly called Trichocephalus.
Determination of parasite eggs in feces.
Infection of humans or animals with hookworms other than those caused by the genus Ancylostoma or Necator, for which the specific terms ANCYLOSTOMIASIS and NECATORIASIS are available.
A superfamily of nematode parasitic hookworms consisting of four genera: ANCYLOSTOMA; NECATOR; Bunostomum; and Uncinaria. ANCYLOSTOMA and NECATOR occur in humans and other mammals. Bunostomum is common in ruminants and Uncinaria in wolves, foxes, and dogs.
Substances used in the treatment or control of nematode infestations. They are used also in veterinary practice.
A benzimidazole broad-spectrum anthelmintic structurally related to MEBENDAZOLE that is effective against many diseases. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p38)
Proteins found in any species of helminth.
Any part or derivative of a helminth that elicits an immune reaction. The most commonly seen helminth antigens are those of the schistosomes.
A benzimidazole that acts by interfering with CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM and inhibiting polymerization of MICROTUBULES.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of helminths.
An antihelminthic drug that has been tried experimentally in rheumatic disorders where it apparently restores the immune response by increasing macrophage chemotaxis and T-lymphocyte function. Paradoxically, this immune enhancement appears to be beneficial in rheumatoid arthritis where dermatitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia, and nausea and vomiting have been reported as side effects. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p435-6)
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.
Analogs or derivatives of bephenium (N,N-dimethyl-N-(2-phenoxyethyl)benzenemethanaminium).
A class of unsegmented helminths with fundamental bilateral symmetry and secondary triradiate symmetry of the oral and esophageal structures. Many species are parasites.
Facilities provided for human excretion, often with accompanying handwashing facilities.
Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.
Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa.
A species of parasitic nematode found in the intestine of dogs. Lesions in the brain, liver, eye, kidney, and lung are caused by migrating larvae. In humans, these larvae do not follow normal patterns and may produce visceral larva migrans (LARVA MIGRANS, VISCERAL).
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
A genus of ascarid nematodes commonly parasitic in the intestines of cats and dogs.

The cat lung strip as an in vitro preparation of peripheral airways: a comparison of beta-adrenoceptor agonists, autacoids and anaphylactic challenge on the lung strip and trachea. (1/247)

1 A new in vitro preparation, the isolated lung strip of the cat, is described for investigating the direct effect of drugs on the smooth muscle of the peripheral airways of the lung. The preparation comprises a thin strip of lung parenchyma which can be mounted in a conventional organ bath for isometric tension recording. Its pharmacological responses have been characterized and compared with the isolated tracheal preparation of the cat. 2 The lung strip exhibited an intrinsic tone which was relaxed by catecholamines, aminophylline and flufenamate. It was contracted strongly by histamine, prostaglandin F2alpha, acetylcholine, compound 48/80, potassium depolarizing solution and alternating current field stimulation. In contrast, the cat trachea was unresponsive to histamine and prostaglandin F2alpha and did not exhibit an intrinsic tone. 3 (-)-Isoprenaline and (-)-adrenaline were much more potent in relaxing the lung strip than the trachea. The potency order of relaxation responses to isoprenaline, adrenaline and (+/-)-noradrenaline in the lung strip was isoprenaline greater than adrenaline greater than noradrenaline but in the trachea was isoprenaline greater than noradrenaline greater than or equal to adrenaline. 4 beta2-Adrenoceptor selective agonists salbutamol and terbutaline were more potent in the lung strip than the trachea, suggesting beta2-adrenoceptors predominated in the lung strip. Propranolol was equipotent in inhibiting isoprenaline relexations of the lung strip and trachea, whereas practolol was much less effective in inhibiting lung strip than trachea, further supporting a predominance of beta2-adrenoceptors in lung strip and beta1-adrenoceptors in trachea. 5 Strong Schultz-Dale type contractions were elicited in both lung strips and trachea by Ascaris lumbricoides antigen in actively sensitized cats. The initial phase of the contractile response of the lung strip following challenge was shown to be due to histamine release and was absent in the trachea. The delayed phase of the contraction which took several minutes to develop in both the mepyramine-treated lung strip and trachea was not due to prostaglandins E1, F2alpha or bradykinin, the probable mediator being slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A). 6 It is concluded that the isolated lung strip of the cat is useful as an in vitro model for investigating the effect of drugs on the smooth muscle of the peripheral airways of the lungs.  (+info)

Transient expression of DNA and RNA in parasitic helminths by using particle bombardment. (2/247)

Parasitic helminths (worms belonging to several metazoan phyla) cause considerable morbidity and mortality in humans. They are an important veterinary problem, and they result in significant economic losses in animal grazing and agriculture. Experimental studies on parasitic helminths have been limited by a lack of parasite cell lines and methods for molecular genetic analyses. We evaluated particle bombardment (biolistics) as a strategy to introduce and express nucleic acids in these multicellular parasites. By using embryos of the parasitic nematode Ascaris as a model, we developed methods to introduce and express both DNA and RNA during several stages of Ascaris embryogenesis. Biolistic transfection will facilitate experimental strategies in Ascaris embryos complementing other biochemical tools available (e.g., in vitro whole-cell embryo extracts for transcription, RNA processing, and translation). Transfection experiments with adult schistosomes further suggest that the biolistic strategy should be applicable to a variety of other parasitic helminths. The development of these methods provides molecular genetic tools to study gene expression and the biology of a variety of types and developmental stages of important helminth parasites.  (+info)

NMR solution structure of Apis mellifera chymotrypsin/cathepsin G inhibitor-1 (AMCI-1): structural similarity with Ascaris protease inhibitors. (3/247)

The three-dimensional structure of the 56 residue polypeptide Apis mellifera chymotrypsin/cathepsin G inhibitor 1 (AMCI-1) isolated from honey bee hemolymph was calculated based on 730 experimental NMR restraints. It consists of two approximately perpendicular beta-sheets, several turns, and a long exposed loop that includes the protease binding site. The lack of extensive secondary structure features or hydrophobic core is compensated by the presence of five disulfide bridges that stabilize both the protein scaffold and the binding loop segment. A detailed analysis of the protease binding loop conformation reveals that it is similar to those found in other canonical serine protease inhibitors. The AMCI-1 structure exhibits a common fold with a novel family of inhibitors from the intestinal parasitic worm Ascaris suum. The pH-induced conformational changes in the binding loop region observed in the Ascaris inhibitor ATI are absent in AMCI-1. Similar binding site sequences and structures strongly suggest that the lack of the conformational change can be attributed to a Glu-->Gln substitution at the P1' position in AMCI-1, compared to ATI. Analysis of amide proton temperature coefficients shows very good correlation with the presence of hydrogen bond donors in the calculated AMCI-1 structure.  (+info)

Some risk factors of Ascaris and Trichuris infection in Malaysian aborigine (Orang Asli) children. (4/247)

A study on risk factors of soil-transmitted helminths was conducted in a highly endemic area. In all 205 children (95 boys and 110 girls) participated in this study. The overall prevalences of Ascaris, Trichuris and hookworm infection were 62.5%, 91.7% and 28.8% respectively. Only 22.4% of the children had a single infection either by Ascaris or Trichuris; 69.3% had mixed infection and the most prevalent of mixed infection was a combination of Ascaris and Trichuris. Logistic regression analysis confirmed that low level mother's education was a risk factor for moderate and severe infection of Ascaris and age < or = 6-year-old was a protective factor. In Trichuris infection logistic regression analysis confirmed that usage of well-water and age < or = 6-year-old were the risk factors. Logistic regression analysis on worm scores confirmed that usage of well-water and non-usage of toilets were the risk factors from getting severe worm scores and age < or = 6-year-old was a protective factor. Our finding suggest that socio-behavioural (related to mother's education), demographic (children age) and environmental-factors (usage of well-water and non-usage of toilets) are the elements to be considered in the design of long term soil-transmitted helminths (STH) control in an endemic areas.  (+info)

Jejunal mucosa in marasmic children. Clinical, pathological, and fine structural evaluation of the effect of protein-energy malnutrition and environmental contamination. (5/247)

Seven children suffering from marasmus were investigated clinically, biochemically and morphologically. The fine structure of the jejunal mucosa obtained by peroral biopsy was evaluated. The mucosal changes noted agree with the only other ultrastructural study reported by Brunser et al. (8) and add information on three additional features: an increase in theliolymphocytes, excessive epithelial cell extrusion and abnormalities in the appearances of the mucosal plasma cells, suggesting possible local deficiency in immune function.  (+info)

The development of Ascaris suum in calves. (6/247)

To determine the development of Ascaris suum after a primary and a secondary infection, 18 calves were inoculated with 2,000,000 infective eggs and examined from 18 hours to 13 days postinfection. At 18 hours larvae were recovered from the wall of the abomasum, duodenum and jejunum. They were found in small intestine lymph nodes on the third day, in the liver at five days and were most abundant in the lungs on days 7 and 9. The pattern of recovery of larvae from the lung between days 5 and 13 postinfection was similar after a primary or a secondary infection. Slower growth of larvae following a secondary infection was the only evidence of resistance to A. suum. There were no pathological changes observed in the alimentary canal. White foci were found on the surface of the liver as early as the third day. The rapid decline in the number of A. suum in the lungs after the ninth day was considered to be related to immobilization or death of larvae soon after the reaction to them commences.  (+info)

Wistar strain rats as the model for IgE antibody experiments. (7/247)

The amount of plasma IgE antibody formed and its change over time were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD), Donryu, and Wistar strain rats. IgE antibody formation was initiated by injecting a mixture of 2,4-dinitrophenylated ascaris extract (DNP-As) as antigen and killed Bordetella pertussis as adjuvant into the paws of the animals. The amount of IgE antibody formed was low on day 10 in both male and female SD (40-80 ng/ml) and Donryu (20-40 ng/ml) strain rats, and an increase in the amount was observed on day 20. The peak value of IgE antibody was observed day 10 in Wistar strain rats and was 130 and 200 ng/ml in the male and female rats, respectively. These results suggest that Wistar strain rats produce the most IgE antibody when DNP-As is used as antigen and they can serve as a model for allergic diseases.  (+info)

The Drosophila melanogaster seminal fluid protein Acp62F is a protease inhibitor that is toxic upon ectopic expression. (8/247)

Drosophila melanogaster seminal fluid proteins stimulate sperm storage and egg laying in the mated female but also cause a reduction in her life span. We report here that of eight Drosophila seminal fluid proteins (Acps) and one non-Acp tested, only Acp62F is toxic when ectopically expressed. Toxicity to preadult male or female Drosophila occurs upon one exposure, whereas multiple exposures are needed for toxicity to adult female flies. Of the Acp62F received by females during mating, approximately 10% enters the circulatory system while approximately 90% remains in the reproductive tract. We show that in the reproductive tract, Acp62F localizes to the lumen of the uterus and the female's sperm storage organs. Analysis of Acp62F's sequence, and biochemical assays, reveals that it encodes a trypsin inhibitor with sequence and structural similarities to extracellular serine protease inhibitors from the nematode Ascaris. In light of previous results demonstrating entry of Acp62F into the mated female's hemolymph, we propose that Acp62F is a candidate for a molecule to contribute to the Acp-dependent decrease in female life span. We propose that Acp62F's protease inhibitor activity exerts positive protective functions in the mated female's reproductive tract but that entry of a small amount of this protein into the female's hemolymph could contribute to the cost of mating.  (+info)

'Ascaris' is a genus of parasitic roundworms that are known to infect the human gastrointestinal tract. The two species that commonly infect humans are Ascaris lumbricoides (also known as the "large roundworm") and Ascaris suum (the "pig roundworm").

Human infection with Ascaris lumbricoides typically occurs through the ingestion of contaminated food or water containing the worm's eggs. Once inside the human body, these eggs hatch into larvae, which migrate through various tissues before reaching the small intestine, where they mature into adult worms. Adult female worms can grow up to 20-35 cm in length and produce thousands of eggs per day, which are then excreted in feces and can contaminate the environment, perpetuating the transmission cycle.

Symptoms of ascariasis (the infection caused by Ascaris) can range from mild to severe, depending on the number of worms present and the individual's overall health status. Light infections may not cause any symptoms, while heavy infections can lead to abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and intestinal obstruction. In some cases, Ascaris worms may migrate to unusual locations such as the lungs or bile ducts, causing additional complications.

Preventive measures include improving sanitation and hygiene practices, such as handwashing with soap and water, proper disposal of human feces, and cooking food thoroughly before consumption. Treatment typically involves administration of anthelmintic medications that kill the worms, followed by appropriate follow-up care to ensure complete eradication of the infection.

'Ascaris lumbricoides' is the medical term for a type of intestinal roundworm that can infect humans. This parasitic worm is one of the largest that can infest humans, and it is particularly prevalent in areas with poor sanitation and hygiene.

The life cycle of Ascaris lumbricoides begins when an infected person passes eggs in their feces. These eggs can then be ingested through contaminated food or water, or by accidentally ingesting soil that contains the eggs. Once inside the body, the larvae hatch from the eggs and migrate through the tissues to the lungs, where they mature further. They are then coughed up and swallowed, entering the digestive system again, where they mature into adult worms.

Adult female Ascaris lumbricoides worms can grow up to 20-35 cm in length, while males are smaller, typically around 15-30 cm. They live in the small intestine and feed on partially digested food. Females can lay tens of thousands of eggs per day, which are passed in the feces and can infect other people if they come into contact with them.

Symptoms of ascariasis (the infection caused by Ascaris lumbricoides) can vary depending on the number of worms present and the severity of the infestation. Mild infections may cause no symptoms at all, while more severe infections can lead to abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. In rare cases, the worms can cause intestinal obstruction or migrate to other parts of the body, leading to serious complications.

Treatment for ascariasis typically involves medication to kill the worms, such as albendazole or mebendazole. Preventing infection requires good hygiene practices, including washing hands thoroughly with soap and water after using the toilet and before eating, and avoiding contact with contaminated soil or water.

Ascariasis is a medical condition caused by infection with the parasitic roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides. This type of worm infection, also known as intestinal ascariasis, occurs when people ingest contaminated soil, food, or water that contains Ascaris eggs. Once inside the body, these eggs hatch into larvae, which then migrate through the tissues and eventually reach the small intestine, where they mature into adult worms.

The adult worms can grow to be several inches long and live in the small intestine, where they feed on partially digested food. Female worms can produce thousands of eggs per day, which are then passed out of the body in feces. If these eggs hatch and infect other people, the cycle of infection continues.

Symptoms of ascariasis can vary depending on the severity of the infection. Mild infections may not cause any symptoms, while more severe infections can lead to abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. In some cases, the worms can cause intestinal blockages or migrate to other parts of the body, leading to potentially serious complications.

Treatment for ascariasis typically involves medication to kill the adult worms and prevent them from producing more eggs. Preventive measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing hands thoroughly after using the bathroom and before eating, and avoiding contact with contaminated soil or water.

"Trichuris" is a genus of parasitic roundworms that are known to infect the intestines of various mammals, including humans. The species that commonly infects humans is called "Trichuris trichiura," which is also known as the human whipworm. These worms are named for their long, thin shape that resembles a whip.

The life cycle of Trichuris involves ingestion of eggs containing infective larvae through contaminated food or water. Once inside the human body, the larvae hatch and migrate to the large intestine, where they mature into adult worms that live in the caecum and colon. Adult female worms lay thousands of eggs every day, which are passed in the feces and can survive in the environment for years, waiting to infect a new host.

Infections with Trichuris trichiura can cause symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, and weight loss. In severe cases, it can lead to anemia, malnutrition, and impaired growth in children. Treatment for trichuriasis typically involves medication that kills the adult worms, such as albendazole or mebendazole.

Helminthiasis is a medical condition characterized by the infection and infestation of body tissues and organs by helminths, which are parasitic worms. These worms can be classified into three main groups: nematodes (roundworms), cestodes (tapeworms), and trematodes (flukes).

Helminthiasis infections can occur through various modes of transmission, such as ingestion of contaminated food or water, skin contact with contaminated soil, or direct contact with an infected person or animal. The severity of the infection depends on several factors, including the type and number of worms involved, the duration of the infestation, and the overall health status of the host.

Common symptoms of helminthiasis include abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, anemia, and nutritional deficiencies. In severe cases, the infection can lead to organ damage or failure, impaired growth and development in children, and even death.

Diagnosis of helminthiasis typically involves microscopic examination of stool samples to identify the presence and type of worms. Treatment usually consists of administering anthelmintic drugs that are effective against specific types of worms. Preventive measures include improving sanitation and hygiene, avoiding contact with contaminated soil or water, and practicing safe food handling and preparation.

Parasitic intestinal diseases are disorders caused by microscopic parasites that invade the gastrointestinal tract, specifically the small intestine. These parasites include protozoa (single-celled organisms) and helminths (parasitic worms). The most common protozoan parasites that cause intestinal disease are Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Entamoeba histolytica. Common helminthic parasites include roundworms (Ascaris lumbricoides), tapeworms (Taenia saginata and Taenia solium), hookworms (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus), and pinworms (Enterobius vermicularis).

Parasitic intestinal diseases can cause a variety of symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and weight loss. The severity and duration of the symptoms depend on the type of parasite, the number of organisms present, and the immune status of the host.

Transmission of these parasites can occur through various routes, including contaminated food and water, person-to-person contact, and contact with contaminated soil or feces. Preventive measures include practicing good hygiene, washing hands thoroughly after using the toilet and before handling food, cooking food thoroughly, and avoiding consumption of raw or undercooked meat, poultry, or seafood.

Treatment of parasitic intestinal diseases typically involves the use of antiparasitic medications that target the specific parasite causing the infection. In some cases, supportive care such as fluid replacement and symptom management may also be necessary.

Anthelmintics are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by parasitic worms, also known as helminths. These medications work by either stunting the growth of the worms, paralyzing them, or killing them outright, allowing the body to expel the worms through normal bodily functions. Anthelmintics are commonly used to treat infections caused by roundworms, tapeworms, flukeworms, and hookworms. Examples of anthelmintic drugs include albendazole, mebendazole, praziquantel, and ivermectin.

Trichuriasis is a parasitic infection caused by the nematode (roundworm) Trichuris trichiura, also known as the whipworm. This infection primarily affects the large intestine (cecum and colon). The main symptoms of trichuriasis include diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss. In heavy infections, there can be severe complications such as anemia, growth retardation, and rectal prolapse. Trichuriasis is typically transmitted through the ingestion of contaminated soil containing Trichuris trichiura eggs, often through poor hygiene practices or exposure to contaminated food and water.

A "Parasite Egg Count" is a laboratory measurement used to estimate the number of parasitic eggs present in a fecal sample. It is commonly used in veterinary and human medicine to diagnose and monitor parasitic infections, such as those caused by roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, and other intestinal helminths (parasitic worms).

The most common method for measuring parasite egg counts is the McMaster technique. This involves mixing a known volume of feces with a flotation solution, which causes the eggs to float to the top of the mixture. A small sample of this mixture is then placed on a special counting chamber and examined under a microscope. The number of eggs present in the sample is then multiplied by a dilution factor to estimate the total number of eggs per gram (EPG) of feces.

Parasite egg counts can provide valuable information about the severity of an infection, as well as the effectiveness of treatment. However, it is important to note that not all parasitic infections produce visible eggs in the feces, and some parasites may only shed eggs intermittently. Therefore, a negative egg count does not always rule out the presence of a parasitic infection.

Hookworm infections are parasitic diseases caused by the ingestion or penetration of hookworm larvae (immature worms) into the human body. The two main species that infect humans are Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale.

The infection typically occurs through skin contact with contaminated soil, often when walking barefoot on dirty ground. The larvae then penetrate the skin, enter the bloodstream, and travel to the lungs where they mature further. They are coughed up and swallowed, eventually reaching the small intestine, where they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood.

Hookworm infections can cause a range of symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, weight loss, and fatigue. In severe cases, chronic hookworm infections can lead to serious complications such as protein malnutrition and heart failure. Treatment typically involves the use of anti-parasitic medications, such as albendazole or mebendazole, which kill the adult worms and allow the body to expel them. Preventive measures include improving sanitation and hygiene practices, wearing shoes in areas with contaminated soil, and regular deworming of at-risk populations.

Ancylostomatoidea is a superfamily of nematode (roundworm) parasites that includes the genera Ancylostoma and Necator, which are commonly known as hookworms. These parasites are primarily found in the small intestine of their hosts, which can include humans and other animals.

Ancylostomatoidea parasites have a complex life cycle that involves both free-living and parasitic stages. The life cycle begins when the parasite's eggs are passed in the feces of an infected host and hatch into larvae in the soil. The larvae then infect a new host by penetrating the skin, usually through contact with contaminated soil.

Once inside the host, the larvae migrate through the body to the lungs, where they mature and are coughed up and swallowed, allowing them to reach the small intestine. Here, they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on the host's blood, causing anemia and other symptoms of hookworm infection.

Hookworm infections can cause a range of symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and fatigue. In severe cases, they can lead to anemia, intestinal obstruction, and even death. Prevention measures include wearing shoes in areas with contaminated soil, practicing good hygiene, and treating infected individuals to prevent the spread of the parasite.

Antinematodal agents are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by nematodes, which are also known as roundworms. These agents work by either killing the parasitic worms or preventing them from reproducing. Some examples of antinematodal agents include albendazole, ivermectin, and mebendazole. These medications are used to treat a variety of nematode infections, such as ascariasis, hookworm infection, and strongyloidiasis. It is important to note that the use of antinematodal agents should be under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have side effects and may interact with other medications.

Albendazole is an antiparasitic medication used to treat a variety of parasitic infections, including neurocysticercosis (a tapeworm infection that affects the brain), hydatid disease (a parasitic infection that can affect various organs), and other types of worm infestations such as pinworm, roundworm, hookworm, and whipworm infections.

Albendazole works by inhibiting the polymerization of beta-tubulin, a protein found in the microtubules of parasitic cells, which disrupts the parasite's ability to maintain its shape and move. This leads to the death of the parasite and elimination of the infection.

Albendazole is available in oral form and is typically taken two to three times a day with meals for several days or weeks, depending on the type and severity of the infection being treated. Common side effects of albendazole include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and headache. Rare but serious side effects may include liver damage, bone marrow suppression, and neurological problems.

It is important to note that albendazole should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as it can have serious side effects and interactions with other medications. Additionally, it is not effective against all types of parasitic infections, so proper diagnosis is essential before starting treatment.

Helminth proteins refer to the proteins that are produced and expressed by helminths, which are parasitic worms that cause diseases in humans and animals. These proteins can be found on the surface or inside the helminths and play various roles in their biology, such as in development, reproduction, and immune evasion. Some helminth proteins have been identified as potential targets for vaccines or drug development, as blocking their function may help to control or eliminate helminth infections. Examples of helminth proteins that have been studied include the antigen Bm86 from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus, and the tetraspanin protein Sm22.6 from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni.

Helminth antigens refer to the proteins or other molecules found on the surface or within helminth parasites that can stimulate an immune response in a host organism. Helminths are large, multicellular parasitic worms that can infect various tissues and organs in humans and animals, causing diseases such as schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, and soil-transmitted helminthiases.

Helminth antigens can be recognized by the host's immune system as foreign invaders, leading to the activation of various immune cells and the production of antibodies. However, many helminths have evolved mechanisms to evade or suppress the host's immune response, allowing them to establish long-term infections.

Studying helminth antigens is important for understanding the immunology of helminth infections and developing new strategies for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Some researchers have also explored the potential therapeutic use of helminth antigens or whole helminths as a way to modulate the immune system and treat autoimmune diseases or allergies. However, more research is needed to determine the safety and efficacy of these approaches.

Mebendazole is a medication used to treat various types of worm infections, such as roundworm, whipworm, hookworm, and threadworm. It belongs to a class of drugs called anthelmintics, which work by preventing the worms from absorbing nutrients, leading to their eventual death and elimination from the body.

Mebendazole is available in various forms, including tablets, chewable tablets, and suspensions. It is usually taken as a single dose or for several days, depending on the type and severity of the infection being treated.

It's important to note that mebendazole is not effective against all types of worm infections, so it should only be used under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare professional. Additionally, while taking mebendazole, it's recommended to maintain good hygiene practices, such as washing hands frequently and avoiding contaminated food or water, to prevent reinfection.

Helminth DNA refers to the genetic material found in parasitic worms that belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms) and Nematoda (roundworms). These parasites can infect various organs and tissues of humans and animals, causing a range of diseases.

Helminths have complex life cycles involving multiple developmental stages and hosts. The study of their DNA has provided valuable insights into their evolutionary history, genetic diversity, and mechanisms of pathogenesis. It has also facilitated the development of molecular diagnostic tools for identifying and monitoring helminth infections.

Understanding the genetic makeup of these parasites is crucial for developing effective control strategies, including drug discovery, vaccine development, and disease management.

Levamisole is an anthelmintic medication used to treat parasitic worm infections. It works by paralyzing the worms, allowing the body to remove them from the system. In addition, levamisole has been used in veterinary medicine as an immunomodulator, a substance that affects the immune system.

In human medicine, levamisole was previously used in the treatment of colon cancer and autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, its use in these areas has largely been discontinued due to side effects and the availability of more effective treatments.

It is important to note that levamisole has also been identified as a common adulterant in cocaine, which can lead to various health issues, including agranulocytosis (a severe decrease in white blood cells), skin lesions, and neurological symptoms.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, known as an antigen. They are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens, neutralizing or marking them for destruction by other immune cells.

Helminths are parasitic worms that can infect humans and animals. They include roundworms, tapeworms, and flukes, among others. Helminth infections can cause a range of symptoms, depending on the type of worm and the location of the infection.

Antibodies to helminths are produced by the immune system in response to an infection with one of these parasitic worms. These antibodies can be detected in the blood and serve as evidence of a current or past infection. They may also play a role in protecting against future infections with the same type of worm.

There are several different classes of antibodies, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Antibodies to helminths are typically of the IgE class, which are associated with allergic reactions and the defense against parasites. IgE antibodies can bind to mast cells and basophils, triggering the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators that help to protect against the worm.

In addition to IgE, other classes of antibodies may also be produced in response to a helminth infection. For example, IgG antibodies may be produced later in the course of the infection and can provide long-term immunity to reinfection. IgA antibodies may also be produced and can help to prevent the attachment and entry of the worm into the body.

Overall, the production of antibodies to helminths is an important part of the immune response to these parasitic worms. However, in some cases, the presence of these antibodies may also be associated with allergic reactions or other immunological disorders.

Bephenium compounds are a type of anti-parasitic drug that is primarily used to treat intestinal infections caused by parasites such as worms. The most common bephenium compound is bephenium hydroxynaphthoate, which works by paralyzing and eliminating the parasites from the body. These compounds were widely used in the past, but their use has decreased with the development of more modern anti-parasitic drugs. They are still available in some parts of the world as an over-the-counter or prescription medication. As with any medication, bephenium compounds should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, and it's important to follow the recommended dosage and duration of treatment.

Nematoda is a phylum of pseudocoelomate, unsegmented worms with a round or filiform body shape. They are commonly known as roundworms or threadworms. Nematodes are among the most diverse and numerous animals on earth, with estimates of over 1 million species, of which only about 25,000 have been described.

Nematodes are found in a wide range of habitats, including marine, freshwater, and terrestrial environments. Some nematode species are free-living, while others are parasitic, infecting a variety of hosts, including plants, animals, and humans. Parasitic nematodes can cause significant disease and economic losses in agriculture, livestock production, and human health.

The medical importance of nematodes lies primarily in their role as parasites that infect humans and animals. Some common examples of medically important nematodes include:

* Ascaris lumbricoides (human roundworm)
* Trichuris trichiura (whipworm)
* Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus (hookworms)
* Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm or threadworm)
* Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and Loa loa (filarial nematodes that cause lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, and loiasis, respectively)

Nematode infections can cause a range of clinical symptoms, depending on the species and the location of the parasite in the body. Common symptoms include gastrointestinal disturbances, anemia, skin rashes, and lymphatic swelling. In some cases, nematode infections can lead to serious complications or even death if left untreated.

Medical management of nematode infections typically involves the use of anthelmintic drugs, which are medications that kill or expel parasitic worms from the body. The choice of drug depends on the species of nematode and the severity of the infection. In some cases, preventive measures such as improved sanitation and hygiene can help reduce the risk of nematode infections.

'Toilet facilities' refer to the designated area or room that contains fixtures and equipment for the purpose of personal hygiene and sanitation, including toilets (water closets), urinals, sinks (wash basins), and sometimes bathing facilities. They are essential in various settings such as hospitals, clinics, healthcare facilities, schools, workplaces, and public places to maintain cleanliness, promote health, and ensure dignity and comfort for individuals. Accessible and well-maintained toilet facilities are crucial for infection control, prevention of diseases, and ensuring the safety and convenience of users, especially those with special needs or disabilities.

Nematode infections, also known as roundworm infections, are caused by various species of nematodes or roundworms. These parasitic worms can infect humans and animals, leading to a range of health problems depending on the specific type of nematode and the location of the infection within the body.

Common forms of nematode infections include:

1. Ascariasis: Caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, this infection occurs when people ingest the parasite's eggs through contaminated food or water. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and can cause abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In severe cases, the worms may obstruct the intestines or migrate to other organs, leading to potentially life-threatening complications.
2. Hookworm infections: These are caused by Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus. The larvae penetrate the skin, usually through bare feet, and migrate to the small intestine, where they attach to the intestinal wall and feed on blood. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and protein loss.
3. Trichuriasis: Also known as whipworm infection, this is caused by Trichuris trichiura. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and reside in the large intestine, causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal prolapse in severe cases.
4. Strongyloidiasis: Caused by Strongyloides stercoralis, this infection occurs when the larvae penetrate the skin, usually through contaminated soil, and migrate to the lungs and then the small intestine. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, and skin rashes. In immunocompromised individuals, strongyloidiasis can lead to disseminated disease, which is potentially fatal.
5. Toxocariasis: This infection is caused by the roundworms Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati, found in dogs and cats, respectively. Humans become infected through ingestion of contaminated soil or undercooked meat. Symptoms include fever, cough, abdominal pain, and vision loss in severe cases.
6. Enterobiasis: Also known as pinworm infection, this is caused by Enterobius vermicularis. The larvae hatch in the small intestine, mature into adult worms, and reside in the large intestine, causing perianal itching and restlessness, especially at night.

Preventive measures include:

1. Proper hand hygiene: Wash hands with soap and water after using the toilet, changing diapers, handling pets or their feces, and before preparing or eating food.
2. Personal hygiene: Keep fingernails short and clean, avoid biting nails, and wear shoes in public areas, especially where soil may be contaminated with human or animal feces.
3. Food safety: Wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly, cook meat properly, and avoid consuming raw or undercooked meat, poultry, or fish.
4. Environmental cleanliness: Regularly clean surfaces that come into contact with food, such as countertops, cutting boards, and utensils. Dispose of trash properly and maintain a clean living environment.
5. Pet care: Keep pets healthy and regularly deworm them as recommended by a veterinarian. Pick up pet feces promptly to prevent contamination of the environment.
6. Public health measures: Implement public health interventions, such as regular waste disposal, sewage treatment, and vector control, to reduce the transmission of parasitic infections.

Protozoan infections are diseases caused by microscopic, single-celled organisms known as protozoa. These parasites can enter the human body through contaminated food, water, or contact with an infected person or animal. Once inside the body, they can multiply and cause a range of symptoms depending on the type of protozoan and where it infects in the body. Some common protozoan infections include malaria, giardiasis, amoebiasis, and toxoplasmosis. Symptoms can vary widely but may include diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, fatigue, and skin rashes. Treatment typically involves the use of antiprotozoal medications to kill the parasites and alleviate symptoms.

"Toxocara canis" is a species of roundworm that primarily infects canids, such as dogs and foxes. The adult worms live in the intestines of the host animal, where they lay eggs that are passed in the feces. These eggs can then mature and become infective to other animals, including humans, if they ingest them.

In humans, infection with "Toxocara canis" can cause a range of symptoms known as toxocariasis, which can include fever, coughing, wheezing, rash, and abdominal pain. In severe cases, the larvae of the worm can migrate to various organs in the body, including the eyes, leading to potentially serious complications.

Preventive measures for "Toxocara canis" infection include good hygiene practices, such as washing hands after handling pets or coming into contact with soil that may contain infected feces, and regular deworming of pets.

Feces are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested or absorbed in the small intestine, along with bacteria and other waste products. After being stored in the colon, feces are eliminated from the body through the rectum and anus during defecation. Feces can vary in color, consistency, and odor depending on a person's diet, health status, and other factors.

Toxocara is a type of parasitic roundworm that belongs to the genus Toxocara. The two most common species that infect humans are Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati, which are primarily found in dogs and cats, respectively.

Humans can become infected with Toxocara through accidental ingestion of contaminated soil or sand that contains the eggs of the parasite. This can occur when people come into contact with infected animal feces and then touch their mouths without properly washing their hands. Children are particularly at risk of infection due to their frequent hand-to-mouth behaviors and tendency to play in environments where the eggs may be present.

In humans, Toxocara infection can cause a range of symptoms known as toxocariasis. The most common form is visceral larva migrans (VLM), which occurs when the parasite's larvae migrate through various organs in the body, causing inflammation and damage. Symptoms of VLM may include fever, fatigue, coughing, wheezing, abdominal pain, and liver enlargement.

Another form of toxocariasis is ocular larva migrans (OLM), which occurs when the parasite's larvae migrate to the eye, causing inflammation and potentially leading to vision loss. Symptoms of OLM may include eye pain, redness, blurred vision, and light sensitivity.

Preventive measures for Toxocara infection include washing hands thoroughly after handling animals or coming into contact with soil, covering sandboxes when not in use, and cooking meat thoroughly before eating. Treatment for toxocariasis typically involves anti-parasitic medications such as albendazole or mebendazole, which can help kill the parasite's larvae and reduce symptoms.

Male Ascaris cross section 200x Esophagus of an Ascaris worm Ascaris cross section 40× Ascaris cross section 40× Ascaris cross ... The genus Ascaris was originally described as the genus for Ascaris lumbricoides by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. The morphologically ... One species, Ascaris lumbricoides, affects humans and causes the disease ascariasis. Another species, Ascaris suum, typically ... Leles D, Gardner SL, Reinhard K, Iniguez A, Araujo A (2012). "Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?". ...
"Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?". Parasites & Vectors. 5: 42. doi:10.1186/1756-3305-5-42. PMC ... The larvae of Ascaris complete two moults within the egg; therefore, the larvae emerging from the egg is not a second-stage ... Ascaris infections are treated with ascaricides. A. suum is in the family Ascarididae, and is one of the oldest associations to ... Ascaris suum, also known as the large roundworm of pig, is a parasitic nematode that causes ascariasis in pigs. While ...
It has been proposed that Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum (pig roundworm) are the same species. Ascaris lumbricoides, a ... ISBN 0-85198-689-7. Ascaris lumbricoides Video - DAVE Project Ascaris lumbricoides Poll - Research Ascaris lumbricoides image ... Ascaris lumbricoides is a large parasitic worm that causes ascariasis in humans. A roundworm of genus Ascaris, it is the most ... "Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?". Parasites & Vectors. 5: 42. doi:10.1186/1756-3305-5-42. ISSN 1756 ...
Ascaris lumbricoides adult worms Ascaris egg, incubation process: The Ascaris egg incubation process consists of placing the ... The larva of Ascaris lumbricoides developing in the egg Ascaris lumbricoides adult worms (with measuring tape for scale) ... Ascaris takes most of its nutrients from the partially digested host food in the intestine. There is some evidence that it can ... Ascaris have an aversion to some general anesthetics and may exit the body, sometimes through the mouth, when an infected ...
Ascaris lumbricoides).[citation needed] Tracking the transmission of infectious diseases is called disease surveillance. ...
Ascaris lumbricoides". Parasitic Diseases (PDF) (7 ed.). New York: Parasites Without Borders. p. 211. Archived (PDF) from the ...
ATA/AUA ATT/AUU ATC/AUC: Apis GTG/GUG: Polyplacophora TTG/UUG: Ascaris, Caenorhabditis. Nematoda: Ascaris, Caenorhabditis ; ...
Ascaris, Enterobius spp.). The rationale for this suggestion was that D. fragilis is closely related to the turkey parasite ...
Dold, Christina; Holland, Celia V. (2011). "Ascaris and ascariasis". Microbes and Infection. Elsevier BV. 13 (7): 632-637. doi: ...
Ascaris lumbricoides Eustrongylides sp. Toxocara Trichinella spiralis Trichuris trichiura Protozoa:[citation needed] ...
Ascaris suum, pig-infecting giant roundworm, closely related to human-infecting giant roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides (2011) ... October 2011). "Ascaris suum draft genome". Nature. 479 (7374): 529-33. Bibcode:2011Natur.479..529J. doi:10.1038/nature10553. ...
Ascaris lumbricoides) Other Protozoa (e.g. Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora, Microsporidia, Entamoeba histolytica) Bacterial ...
... s that commonly parasitise humans include ascarids (Ascaris), filarias, hookworms, pinworms (Enterobius), and whipworms ... Ascaris), then included in the Vermes. The name of the group Nematoda, informally called "nematodes", came from Nematoidea, ...
The parasites were Ascaris lumbricoides worms. Oh was treated by surgeon Lee Guk-jong at the Ajou University Hospital's ...
Boring, Alice (1909). "A small chromosome in Ascaris megalocephala". Archiv für Zellforschung. 4: 120-131. Boring, Alice; Peal ... including a paper on Ascaris. She also collaborated with Pearl and co-author papers on fowl. Boring was a supporter of Women's ...
Hagel I, Giusti T (October 2010). "Ascaris lumbricoides: an overview of therapeutic targets". Infectious Disorders Drug Targets ... Ascaris lumbricoides, and Cyclospora cayetanensis). Nitazoxanide alone has shown preliminary evidence of efficacy in the ...
Hagel I, Giusti T (October 2010). "Ascaris lumbricoides: an overview of therapeutic targets". Infect Disord Drug Targets. 10 (5 ... Antiparasitics that specifically target worms of the genus Ascaris are called ascaricides. Benzimidazoles: Albendazole - ... readily kills Ascaris lumbricoides, and also possess antiprotozoal effects Oxamniquine - effective against flatworms (e.g., ...
Saz HJ, Hubbard JA (1957). "The oxidative decarboxylation of malate by Ascaris lumbricoides". J. Biol. Chem. 225 (2): 921-933. ...
In 1999, The New York Times, Science Daily and the Duke Chronicle covered research on Ascaris hemoglobin that Grayson had ... August 2, 1999). "Ascaris haemoglobin is a nitric oxide-activated 'deoxygenase'". Nature. 401 (6752): 497-502. Bibcode: ...
Minning, DM; Gow, AJ; Bonaventura, J; Braun, R; Dewhirst, M; Goldberg, DE; Stamler, JS (1999-09-30). "Ascaris haemoglobin is a ... Examining the hemoglobins of microbes and the parasitic worm Ascaris, Stamler found that ancient forms of hemoglobin either ... eliminate NO enzymatically (bacteria and yeast) or utilize it to eliminate oxygen from its anaerobic environment (Ascaris), ...
Ascaris), Anclostoma duodenale and Necator americanus (hookworm), and Trichuris trichiura (whipworm). Ascaris and whipworm that ... In the case of Ascaris lumbricoides (giant roundworm), which has been considered the most resistant and common helminth type, ... Helminth eggs that are found in wastewater and sludge stem from soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) which include Ascaris ... Lýsek H., Malínský J., Janisch R. (1985). "Ultrastructure of eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides Linnaeus, 1758. I. Egg-shells" (PDF ...
Standen OD (July 1955). "Activity of piperazine, in vitro, against Ascaris lumbricoides". British Medical Journal. 2 (4930): 20 ...
Albertone's heavily outnumbered Ascaris held their position for two hours until Albertone's surrender, and under Ethiopian ... With 1,865 Italians and 2,000 ascaris taken prisoner. Richard Caulk estimates that the number of Italians killed were 300 ...
Fujimoto, Daisaburo; Kanaya, Shigenori (July 1973). "Cuticlin: a noncollagen structural protein from Ascaris cuticle". Archives ...
List of parasites of humans Rudolphi, Carolo Asmundo (1809). "Ascaris simplex R.". Animadversiones in generaet species ...
Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Hymenolepis nana, and Enterobius vermicularis. Houseflies do not serve as a ...
With 1,865 Italians and 1,000-2,000 ascaris taken prisoner. Richard Caulk estimates that the number of Italians killed were 300 ...
Müller S, Walter RD (April 1992). "Purification and characterization of polyamine oxidase from Ascaris suum". The Biochemical ...
The Ascarididae include the giant intestinal roundworms (Ascaris spp.). The Cosmocercidae include taxa that parasitize certain ... they are not as close to Ascaris as such a treatment would place them. These "worms" contain a number of important parasites of ...
Die Befruchtung und Teilung des Eies von Ascaris megalocephala. Jena. Z. Naturwiss. 22, 685-882. Boveri, T. Ueber das Verhalten ...
Intestinal Roundworms (Ascariasis, Ascaris Infection). Iodamoeba buetschlii. Infection (Nonpathogenic [Harmless] Intestinal ...
Male Ascaris cross section 200x Esophagus of an Ascaris worm Ascaris cross section 40× Ascaris cross section 40× Ascaris cross ... The genus Ascaris was originally described as the genus for Ascaris lumbricoides by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. The morphologically ... One species, Ascaris lumbricoides, affects humans and causes the disease ascariasis. Another species, Ascaris suum, typically ... Leles D, Gardner SL, Reinhard K, Iniguez A, Araujo A (2012). "Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?". ...
Of these, the intestinal roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides is the most common. ... encoded search term (Ascaris Lumbricoides) and Ascaris Lumbricoides What to Read Next on Medscape ... Ascaris Lumbricoides. Updated: Jan 10, 2023 * Author: Aaron Dora-Laskey, MD, MS; Chief Editor: Jeter (Jay) Pritchard Taylor, ... Ascaris as a leading point for small-bowel intussusception in an adult: a rare cause of intussusception. Am J Emerg Med. Mar 1 ...
Ascaris digitata Linstow, 1905. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: https://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php? ...
Aberrant Ascaris suum Nematode Infection in Cattle, Missouri, USA Holly L. Taylor, Sean T. Spagnoli, Michael J. Calcutt, and ... Multiple cross-section of Ascaris suum nematode larvae in the lung of cattle. Larvae have prominent lateral alae and lateral ... Aberrant Ascaris suum Nematode Infection in Cattle, Missouri, USA. ...
BOWEL SODE (ascaris lumbricoides, borrelia burgdorferi, botulinum, colibacillinum cum natrum muriaticum, enterobius ...
Ascaris lumbricoides is one of the most well-known helminthic parasites affecting humans, and ascariasis remains common with , ... Ascaris and ascariasis. Microbes and Infection, 2011, 13:632-637.. *Moradpour D, Blum HE. Acute abdominal pain. In: ... Sonographic diagnosis of Ascaris lumbricoides infestation as a cause of intestinal obstruction. Indian Journal of Pediatrics, ... Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal , All issues , Volume 19, 2013 , Volume 19, issue 12 , Case report: Ascaris lumbricoides ...
Ascaris suum (large roundworm of pigs) is a parasitic nematode that causes substantial losses to the meat industry. This ... The genus Ascaris, also known as the "giant intestinal roundworms", contains the largest intestinal nematode species. Ascaris ... Ma, X., Zhu, Y., Li, C. et al. Comparative transcriptome sequencing of germline and somatic tissues of the Ascaris suum gonad. ... Ascaris suum (large roundworm of pigs) is a parasitic nematode that causes substantial losses to the meat industry. This ...
Ascaris species are not suitable for use in helminthic therapy. While Ascaris lumbricoides (the "giant roundworm" of humans) ... Ascaris roundworms are also known to significantly increase the risk of asthma. [8] [9] [10] [11] ... Ascaris species in general are associated with an increase in allergy, and this has been linked to cross-reactivity between ... Ascaris species have an aversion to some general anaesthetics and may exit the body, sometimes through the mouth, when an ...
mision tritura ascaris. Mision Tritura Ascaris Trituradoras para Minería y la piperazina tritura las ascaris GME ... ebullición basado en tritura la piperazina tritura las ascaris . Ascaris pneumonia ScienceDirectThe clinical picture of Ascaris ... Ascaris Negator , WARFRAME Wiki , Fandom. Ascaris Negator is a quest item in Vors Prize that is used to take off Captain Vors ... Ascaris lumbricoides, commonly is known as #NTA #NEET .. · Ascaris lumbricoides, commonly is known as #NTA #NEET #NEETquestion ...
MIAM collection Ascaris ring / earcuff / Multifunctional ring available in 925 silver and 18k gold plated brass. Adjustable ... Ascaris ring / earcuff. by Yizon Jewellery. $2,432.00 MIAMR1G Sterling silver. 18K gold plated Material. Sterling silver 18K ...
Ascaris is the most common cause of soil-transmitted helminthiasis, a class of intestinal infections also transmitted by ... Estimates actually vary between 3,000 and 60,000 deaths per year, but well give Ascaris the benefit of the doubt.) ...
Analysis of Ribosomal DNA Cannot Unequivocally Assign Ascaris to Species Level or Identify Hybrids ... ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9370-3420 (2017) Analysis of Ribosomal DNA Cannot Unequivocally Assign Ascaris to Species ...
Ascaris, Prepared Slides show top quality specimens in Zoology, Botany, General Biology, Histology, Parasitology, Embryology, ...
Ascaris lumbricoides eggs characteristics is hydrophobic and sticky that made it easy to stick on the floor, household and ... Pembersih Lantai Kombinasi Alkohol Etoksilat-Natrium Lauril Eter Sulfat Dan Kombinasi Karbolpine Oil Terhadap Telur Ascaris ... Pembersih Lantai Kombinasi Alkohol Etoksilat-Natrium Lauril Eter Sulfat Dan Kombinasi Karbolpine Oil Terhadap Telur Ascaris ...
In vitro activity of lachesis muta and bothrops atrox venoms on the viability and embrionary development of ascaris suum eggs. ... To study the in vitro activity of Lachesis muta and Bothrops atrox venoms on the viability and the development of Ascaris suum ... We conclude that L muta and B. atrox venoms have an inhibitory activity at the begining of segmentation in Ascaris suum eggs ... To study the in vitro activity of Lachesis muta and Bothrops atrox venoms on the viability and the development of Ascaris suum ...
Toll-Like Receptor 7/8 Ligand, S28463, Suppresses Ascaris Suum Induced Allergic Asthma in Nonhuman Primates. American Journal ... Toll-Like Receptor 7/8 Ligand, S28463, Suppresses Ascaris Suum Induced Allergic Asthma in Nonhuman Primates ... Toll-Like Receptor 7/8 Ligand, S28463, Suppresses Ascaris Suum Induced Allergic Asthma In Nonhuman Primates ...
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Ascaris is a nematode that lives in the gut of vertebrates. There is an ascaris that lives in dogs, theres an ascaris that ... And Ive previously told you about ascaris. ...
Ascariasis is an infection with the parasitic roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides. ... Ascariasis is an infection with the parasitic roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides. ...
Ascaris Herpes e. Parasitic infection Encephalitis Hepatitis f. Acute or chronic infection Rabies Veneral disease (V.D.) g. Any ...
Categories: Ascaris Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 26 images ...
Ascaris lumbricoides as etiologic factor for pancreas inflammatory tumor. Rev. esp. enferm. dig., Nov 2011, vol.103, no.11, p. ...
Ascaris species are soil-transmitted helminths that infect humans and livestock mainly in low and middle-income countries. ... Ascaris β-tubulin isotype A clusters with helminth β-tubulins previously shown to interact with BZ. Molecular dynamics ... Three Ascaris proteomes predicted from whole-genome sequences were analyzed. Candidate proteins were identified using open- ... The appearance of anthelmintic resistance in Ascaris is a risk for the target of eliminating ascariasis as a public health ...
Boveri, T. Uber differenzierung der zellkerne wahrend der furchung des eies von ascaris megalocephala. Anat. Anz. 1887, 2, 688- ... Ascaris [8] and zebra finch [30,36], many of which are thought to function in the maintenance of pluripotency, proliferation, ...
Taenia solium, the pork tapeworm, infects millions of Africans with Ascaris spp. and the protozoa Cryptosporidium spp. and ...
Ascaris lumbricoides (Human Roundworm-Intestinal Nematode) Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus (Human Hookworms- ...
  • Another species, Ascaris suum, typically infects pigs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The morphologically similar Ascaris suum was described from pigs by Johann August Ephraim Goeze in 1782. (wikipedia.org)
  • Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species? (wikipedia.org)
  • Ascariasis is indigenous to the rural southeast, where cross-infection by pigs with the nematode Ascaris suum is thought to occur. (medscape.com)
  • Multiple cross-section of Ascaris suum nematode larvae in the lung of cattle. (cdc.gov)
  • Ascaris suum (large roundworm of pigs) is a parasitic nematode that causes substantial losses to the meat industry. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Ascaris lumbricoides causes the commonest helminth infection of humans, whereas a closely related species, Ascaris suum , typically infects pigs and causes substantial financial losses to the meat industry. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Genome sequencing of A. suum somatic cells is ongoing http://www.sanger.ac.uk/resources/downloads/helminths/ascaris-suum.html , and a draft genome and transcriptome of A. suum is now available http://www.nematode.net/NN3_frontpage.cgi?navbar_selection=home&subnav_selection=asuum_ftp . (biomedcentral.com)
  • To study the in vitro activity of Lachesis muta and Bothrops atrox venoms on the viability and the development of Ascaris suum eggs is the main objective of this work. (edu.pe)
  • The venoms were employed in non embryonated and in vitro embryonated eggs of Ascaris suum at different concentrations (2, 4, 8,16 mg/mL). (edu.pe)
  • We conclude that L muta and B. atrox venoms have an inhibitory activity at the begining of segmentation in Ascaris suum eggs and they do not cause any effect on embryonated ones. (edu.pe)
  • Paredes, C, Gárate, I & Yarlequé, A 1999, ' In vitro activity of lachesis muta and bothrops atrox venoms on the viability and embrionary development of ascaris suum eggs ', Revista Peruana de Biologia , pp. 85-93. (edu.pe)
  • Ascariasis is infection with Ascaris lumbricoides or occasionally Ascaris suum (a closely related parasite of pigs). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Humans can also be infected with ascaris ( A. suum ) from pigs when they ingest eggs from handling pigs or from consuming undercooked vegetables or fruits contaminated with pig feces. (msdmanuals.com)
  • One species, Ascaris lumbricoides, affects humans and causes the disease ascariasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • An estimated 807 million- billion people in the world are infected with Ascaris lumbricoides (sometimes called just Ascaris or ascariasis).Ascaris, hookworm, and whipworm are parasitic worms known as soiltransmitted helminths (STH). (rosacasals.es)
  • Ascariasis is an infection with the parasitic roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Ascaris and ascariasis. (bvsalud.org)
  • In some regions, Ascaris infection is thought to contribute significantly to the burden of abdominal surgical emergencies. (medscape.com)
  • Owing to similarities in the means of infection, many individuals infected with Ascaris are also co-infected with other intestinal parasites. (medscape.com)
  • Ascaris is a nematode genus of parasitic worms known as the "small intestinal roundworms", which is a type of parasitic worm. (wikipedia.org)
  • The genus Ascaris , also known as the "giant intestinal roundworms", contains the largest intestinal nematode species. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Ascaris species inhibit MCPs by releasing an enzyme known as Ascaris carboxypeptidase inhibitor (ACI). (wikipedia.org)
  • Ascaris species are not suitable for use in helminthic therapy. (helminthictherapywiki.org)
  • Ascaris species in general are associated with an increase in allergy, and this has been linked to cross-reactivity between worm proteins (e.g., tropomyosins) and highly similar molecules in dust-mites and insects. (helminthictherapywiki.org)
  • There is a risk of mis-migration with some ascaris species. (helminthictherapywiki.org)
  • Mis-migration in humans is a particular risk with Ascaris species that are adapted to living in other animals. (helminthictherapywiki.org)
  • Ascaris species have an aversion to some general anaesthetics and may exit the body, sometimes through the mouth, when an infected individual is put under general anaesthesia. (helminthictherapywiki.org)
  • In view of these issues, ascaris species are unsuitable for use in helminthic therapy and, if one is acquired accidentally, it would arguably be sensible to terminate it. (helminthictherapywiki.org)
  • the major species are roundworm ( Ascaris lumbricoides ), hookworm ( Ancylostoma duodenale , Ancylostoma ceylanicum , Necator americanus ), whipworm ( Trichuris trichiura ) and Strongyloides stercoralis . (who.int)
  • Of these, the intestinal roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides is the most common. (medscape.com)
  • While Ascaris lumbricoides (the "giant roundworm" of humans) was estimated to infect approximately 1.2 billion people (20% of the worlds population) in 2005, according to the World Health Organisation, [1] it is not risk-free. (helminthictherapywiki.org)
  • The main STH parasitic worms that infect people are the roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides), the whipworm (Trichuris trichiura) and hookworms (Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale) 1 . (givingwhatwecan.org)
  • Taenia solium, the pork tapeworm, infects millions of Africans with Ascaris spp. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • As part of the parasite defense strategy, Ascaris roundworms secrete a series of inhibitors to target digestive and immune-related host proteases, which include pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin/elastase, cathepsins, and metallocarboxypeptidases (MCPs). (wikipedia.org)
  • Ascaris larvae migrating through the lungs may cause cough, wheezing, and occasionally hemoptysis or other respiratory symptoms in people without prior exposure to Ascaris . (msdmanuals.com)
  • After ingestion of Ascaris lumbricoides eggs, larvae hatch in the intestine and penetrate the mesenteric lymphatics and venules to enter the pulmonary circulation. (medscape.com)
  • Ascaris is the most common cause of soil-transmitted helminthiasis , a class of intestinal infections also transmitted by whipworm and hookworm. (discovermagazine.com)
  • The genus Ascaris was originally described as the genus for Ascaris lumbricoides by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ascaris has been present in humans for at least several thousand years, as evidenced by Ascaris eggs found in paleofeces and in the intestines of mummified humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms appear 10-16 days after ingestion of Ascaris eggs. (medscape.com)
  • Ascaris lumbricoides was found in 0.4% of the children while other soil-transmitted helminths were not found. (who.int)
  • Instances have been reported in which Ascaris have migrated into and blocked the bile or pancreatic duct or in which the worms have penetrated the small intestine resulting in acute (and fatal) peritonitis. (helminthictherapywiki.org)
  • Male Ascaris cross section 200x Esophagus of an Ascaris worm Ascaris cross section 40× Ascaris cross section 40× Ascaris cross section 400× List of parasites (human) Carter, Burton J. Bogitsh, Clint E. (2013). (wikipedia.org)
  • Other parasites, such as Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, and Strongyloides stercoralis, have a similar cycle to Ascaris, with passage of larval forms through the alveolar walls. (medscape.com)
  • 113 797, with 21 393 schoolchildren en- for both S. haematobium and S. mansoni rolled in 90 schools according to the statisti- infections. (who.int)
  • The migration seems to have gone well except for one thing: The ascaris is back on my ankle and right shoulder. (rosacasals.es)
  • [2] [3] This is of particular concern for anyone with Crohn's disease who might have intestinal strictures that could become blocked by even a single ascaris. (helminthictherapywiki.org)
  • Ascaris phylogeny based on multiple whole mtDNA genomes. (cdc.gov)
  • The epidemiology of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworm in children in the Ranomafana rainforest, Madagascar. (nih.gov)
  • Point-of-care sonographic detection of intestinal ascaris lumbricoides in the pediatric emergency department. (medscape.com)
  • The infestation can present as a wide range of symptoms: intestinal perforation or occlusion, cholangitis, obstructive jaundice, acute pancreatitis or appendicitis, pneumonia and respiratory failure and allergic reactions to the ascaris antigen. (who.int)
  • Like other intestinal worms, Ascaris worms are transferred through food. (harcourthealth.com)
  • Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum are widespread parasitic nematodes of humans and pigs respectively. (nih.gov)
  • nematodes-Ascaris spp. (archaeology.wiki)
  • The genus Anisakis was defined in 1845 [2] by Félix Dujardin as a subgenus of the genus Ascaris Linnaeus , 1758 . (wikipedia.org)
  • Efek Ekstrak Etanol Bawang Lanang (Aliium sativum L.) terhadap Paralisis dan Kematian Cacing Dewasa Ascaris suum, Goeze. (ubpkarawang.ac.id)
  • Ascaris suum is a parasitic worm in pigs that is closely related to the worm in humans, A. lumbricoides . (ubpkarawang.ac.id)
  • Distribution of Ascaris suum in experimentally and naturally infected pigs and comparison with Ascaris lumbricoides infections in humans. (nih.gov)
  • Like Ascaris , hookworms are soil-transmitted helminths , whose life cycle begins outside the body and is transmitted through contaminated soil (or food that grows there). (harcourthealth.com)
  • Ascaris is thought to modulate host immune and inflammatory responses, which may lead to immune hyporesponsiveness during chronic infections. (ubpkarawang.ac.id)
  • CONCLUSION: In our population there is an interaction between the presence of severe bronchiolitis, TLR4 Asp299Gly and Ile399Thr polymorphisms, anti-Ascaris IgE levels and RSV. (ox.ac.uk)
  • MIG-23 is involved in sperm migration by modulating extracellular ATP levels in Ascaris suum. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Ascaris trypsin inhibitor (ATI) is a member of a new family of serine protease inhibitors isolated from the helminthic worm Ascaris lumbricoides var suum. (nih.gov)
  • STH adversely affect nutritional status and impairs femmes en âge de procréer, dont les besoins en micronutri- cognitive development in children. (who.int)
  • Baralo B, Gurram S, Steckel J, Chulii M, Sharpilo A. Ascaris in the urinary tract: A case report and review of the literature. (medscape.com)
  • Ascaris lumbricoides), there are some key features that allow us to identify this as plant material. (medworm.com)