Arylformamidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of N-formyl-L-kynurenine and water to formate and L-kynurenine. It also acts on other aromatic formylamines. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 3.5.1.9.Adenosine Kinase: An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of ADP plus AMP from adenosine plus ATP. It can serve as a salvage mechanism for returning adenosine to nucleic acids. EC 2.7.1.20.Metabolic Networks and Pathways: Complex sets of enzymatic reactions connected to each other via their product and substrate metabolites.Molecular Sequence Annotation: The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.Gene Ontology: Sets of structured vocabularies used for describing and categorizing genes, and gene products by their molecular function, involvement in biological processes, and cellular location. These vocabularies and their associations to genes and gene products (Gene Ontology annotations) are generated and curated by the Gene Ontology Consortium.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Transcriptome: The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Microfluidics: The study of fluid channels and chambers of tiny dimensions of tens to hundreds of micrometers and volumes of nanoliters or picoliters. This is of interest in biological MICROCIRCULATION and used in MICROCHEMISTRY and INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Microfluidic Analytical Techniques: Methods utilizing the principles of MICROFLUIDICS for sample handling, reagent mixing, and separation and detection of specific components in fluids.Prenatal Diagnosis: Determination of the nature of a pathological condition or disease in the postimplantation EMBRYO; FETUS; or pregnant female before birth.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: Methods used for detecting the amplified DNA products from the polymerase chain reaction as they accumulate instead of at the end of the reaction.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Antibody Specificity: The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Publication Bias: The influence of study results on the chances of publication and the tendency of investigators, reviewers, and editors to submit or accept manuscripts for publication based on the direction or strength of the study findings. Publication bias has an impact on the interpretation of clinical trials and meta-analyses. Bias can be minimized by insistence by editors on high-quality research, thorough literature reviews, acknowledgement of conflicts of interest, modification of peer review practices, etc.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Genetic Vectors: DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.RNA Editing: A process that changes the nucleotide sequence of mRNA from that of the DNA template encoding it. Some major classes of RNA editing are as follows: 1, the conversion of cytosine to uracil in mRNA; 2, the addition of variable number of guanines at pre-determined sites; and 3, the addition and deletion of uracils, templated by guide-RNAs (RNA, GUIDE).RNA, Protozoan: Ribonucleic acid in protozoa having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Glycine Decarboxylase Complex H-Protein: A LIPOIC ACID-containing protein that plays the pivotal role in the transfer of methylamine groups and reducing equivalents between the three enzymatic components of the glycine decarboxylase complex.Glycine Dehydrogenase (Decarboxylating): A PYRIDOXAL PHOSPHATE dependent enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of GLYCINE with the transfer of an aminomethyl group to the LIPOIC ACID moiety of the GLYCINE DECARBOXYLASE COMPLEX H-PROTEIN. Defects in P-protein are the cause of non-ketotic hyperglycinemia. It is one of four subunits of the glycine decarboxylase complex.Aminomethyltransferase: A one-carbon group transferase that transfers lipoamide-linked methylamine groups to tetrahydrofolate (TETRAHYDROFOLATES) to form methylenetetrahydrofolate and AMMONIA. It is one of four components of the glycine decarboxylase complex.Glycine Decarboxylase Complex: A enzyme complex that catalyzes the oxidative DECARBOXYLATION and DEAMINATION of GLYCINE into CARBON DIOXIDE; AMMONIA; NADH; and N5N10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. It is composed of four different component protein components referred to as H, P, L, and T.Glycine: A non-essential amino acid. It is found primarily in gelatin and silk fibroin and used therapeutically as a nutrient. It is also a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter.Amino Acid Oxidoreductases: A class of enzymes that catalyze oxidation-reduction reactions of amino acids.Hydroxymethyl and Formyl Transferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of hydroxymethyl or formyl groups. EC 2.1.2.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Enzymes: Biological molecules that possess catalytic activity. They may occur naturally or be synthetically created. Enzymes are usually proteins, however CATALYTIC RNA and CATALYTIC DNA molecules have also been identified.International Agencies: International organizations which provide health-related or other cooperative services.Molecular Biology: A discipline concerned with studying biological phenomena in terms of the chemical and physical interactions of molecules.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind certain aryl hydrocarbons, translocate to the nucleus, and activate transcription of particular DNA segments. AH receptors are identified by their high-affinity binding to several carcinogenic or teratogenic environmental chemicals including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in cigarette smoke and smog, heterocyclic amines found in cooked foods, and halogenated hydrocarbons including dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls. No endogenous ligand has been identified, but an unknown natural messenger with a role in cell differentiation and development is suspected.Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin: A chemical by-product that results from burning or incinerating chlorinated industrial chemicals and other hydrocarbons. This compound is considered an environmental toxin, and may pose reproductive, as well as, other health risks for animals and humans.Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator is a basic HELIX-LOOP-HELIX MOTIF containing protein that forms a complex with DIOXIN RECEPTOR. The complex binds xenobiotic regulatory elements and activates transcription of a variety of genes including UDP GLUCURONOSYLTRANSFERASE. AhR nuclear translocator is also a subunit of HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1.HydrocarbonsCytochrome P-450 CYP1A1: A liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase capable of biotransforming xenobiotics such as polycyclic hydrocarbons and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons into carcinogenic or mutagenic compounds. They have been found in mammals and fish. This enzyme, encoded by CYP1A1 gene, can be measured by using ethoxyresorufin as a substrate for the ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity.Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic: A major group of unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons containing two or more rings. The vast number of compounds of this important group, derived chiefly from petroleum and coal tar, are rather highly reactive and chemically versatile. The name is due to the strong and not unpleasant odor characteristic of most substances of this nature. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed, p96)

Kynurenine formamidase: determination of primary structure and modeling-based prediction of tertiary structure and catalytic triad. (1/10)

Kynurenine formamidase (KFase) (EC 3.5.1.9) hydrolyzes N-formyl-L-kynurenine, an obligatory step in the conversion of tryptophan to nicotinic acid. Low KFase activity in chicken embryos, from inhibition by organophosphorus insecticides and their metabolites such as diazoxon, leads to marked developmental abnormalities. While KFase was purportedly isolated previously, the structure and residues important for catalysis and inhibition were not established. KFase was isolated here from mouse liver cytosol by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation and three FPLC steps (resulting in 221-fold increase in specific activity for N-formyl-L-kynurenine hydrolysis) followed by conversion to [3H]diethylphosphoryl-KFase and finally isolation by C4 reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Determination of tryptic fragment amino acid sequences and cDNA cloning produced a new 305-amino-acid protein sequence. Although an amidase by function, the primary structure of KFase lacks the amidase signature sequence and is more similar to esterases and lipases. Sequence profile analysis indicates KFase is related to the esterase/lipase/thioesterase family containing the conserved active-site serine sequence GXSXG. The alpha/beta-hydrolase fold is suggested for KFase by its primary sequence and predicted secondary conformation. A three-dimensional model based on the structures of homologous carboxylesterase EST2 and brefeldin A esterase implicates Ser162, Asp247 and His279 as the active site triad.  (+info)

Alternate activation of two divergently transcribed mouse genes from a bidirectional promoter is linked to changes in histone modification. (2/10)

Thymidine kinase (TK) is a growth factor-inducible enzyme that is highly expressed in proliferating mammalian cells. Expression of mouse TK mRNA is controlled by transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms including antisense transcription. Here we report the identification of a novel gene that is divergently transcribed from the bidirectional TK promoter. This gene encodes kynurenine formamidase (KF), an enzyme of the tryptophan metabolism. Whereas the TK gene is induced upon interleukin-2-mediated activation of resting T cells, the KF gene becomes simultaneously repressed. The TK promoter is regulated by E2F, SP1, histone acetyltransferases, and deacetylases. The binding site for the growth-regulated transcription factor E2F is beneficial for TK promoter activity but not required for KF expression. In contrast, the SP1 binding site is crucial for transcription in both directions. Inhibition of histone deacetylases by trichostatin A leads to increased histone acetylation at the TK/KF promoter and thereby to selective activation of the TK promoter and simultaneous shut-off of KF expression. Similarly, TK gene activation by interleukin-2 is linked to histone hyperacetylation, whereas KF expression correlates with reduced histone acetylation. The KF gene is the rare example of a mammalian gene whose expression is linked to histone hypoacetylation at its promoter.  (+info)

NAD biosynthesis: identification of the tryptophan to quinolinate pathway in bacteria. (3/10)

Previous studies have demonstrated two different biosynthetic pathways to quinolinate, the universal de novo precursor to the pyridine ring of NAD. In prokaryotes, quinolinate is formed from aspartate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate; in eukaryotes, it is formed from tryptophan. It has been generally believed that the tryptophan to quinolinic acid biosynthetic pathway is unique to eukaryotes; however, this paper describes the use of comparative genome analysis to identify likely candidates for all five genes involved in the tryptophan to quinolinic acid pathway in several bacteria. Representative examples of each of these genes were overexpressed, and the predicted functions are confirmed in each case using unambiguous biochemical assays.  (+info)

Effect of arylformamidase (kynurenine formamidase) gene inactivation in mice on enzymatic activity, kynurenine pathway metabolites and phenotype. (4/10)

The gene coding for arylformamidase (Afmid, also known as kynurenine formamidase) was inactivated in mice through the removal of a shared bidirectional promoter region regulating expression of the Afmid and thymidine kinase (Tk) genes. Afmid/Tk -deficient mice are known to develop sclerosis of glomeruli and to have an abnormal immune system. Afmid-catalyzed hydrolysis of N-formyl-kynurenine is a key step in tryptophan metabolism and biosynthesis of kynurenine-derived products including kynurenic acid, quinolinic acid, nicotinamide, NAD, and NADP. A disruption of these pathways is implicated in neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity. In wild-type (WT) mice, Afmid-specific activity (as measured by formyl-kynurenine hydrolysis) was 2-fold higher in the liver than in the kidney. Formyl-kynurenine hydrolysis was reduced by approximately 50% in mice heterozygous (HZ) for Afmid/Tk and almost completely eliminated in Afmid/Tk knockout (KO) mice. However, there was 13% residual formyl-kynurenine hydrolysis in the kidney of KO mice, suggesting the existence of a formamidase other than Afmid. Liver and kidney levels of nicotinamide plus NAD/NADP remained the same in WT, HZ and KO mice. Plasma concentrations of formyl-kynurenine, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid were elevated in KO mice (but not HZ mice) relative to WT mice, further suggesting that there must be enzymes other than Afmid (possibly in the kidney) capable of metabolizing formyl-kynurenine into kynurenine. Gradual kidney deterioration and subsequent failure in KO mice is consistent with high levels of tissue-specific Afmid expression in the kidney of WT but not KO mice. On this basis, the most significant function of the kynurenine pathway and Afmid in mice may be in eliminating toxic metabolites and to a lesser extent in providing intermediates for other processes.  (+info)

The actinomycin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces chrysomallus: a genetic hall of mirrors for synthesis of a molecule with mirror symmetry. (5/10)

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Biochemical identification and crystal structure of kynurenine formamidase from Drosophila melanogaster. (6/10)

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Tryptophan metabolism in tsetse flies and the consequences of its derangement. (7/10)

Literature comparing salmon and wild type Glossina morsitans morsitans and that comparing tan and wild type Glossina palpalis palpalis is reviewed. New information is presented on behaviour and biochemistry of salmon and wild type G. m. morsitans. The eye color mutants result from two lesions in the tryptophan to xanthommatin pathway: lack of tryptophan oxygenase in G. m morsitans and failure to produce or retain xanthommatin in eyes (but not in testes) of G. p. palpalis. The salmon allele in G. m. morsitans is pleiotropic and profoundly affects many aspects of fly biology including longevity, reproductive capacity, vision, vectorial capacity and duration of flight, but not circadian rhythms. The tan allele in G. p. palpalis has little effect upon the biology of flies under laboratory conditions, except that tan flies appear less active than normal. Adult tsetse flies metabolize tryptophan to kynurenine which is excreted; fluctuations in activities of the enzymes producing kynurenine suggest this pathway is under metabolic control.  (+info)

End-product regulation of the tryptophan-nicotinic acid pathway in Neurospora crassa. (8/10)

The regulation of the tryptophan-nicotinic acid pathway in Neurospora crassa was examined with mutants (nic-2, nic-3) which require nicotinamide for growth. The accumulation of N-acetylkynurenin and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid by these mutants served to estimate the level of function of the early reactions in the pathway. In still cultures, maximal accumulation occurred with media containing growth-limiting amounts of nicotinamide; the accumulation of intermediates was almost negligible with nicotinamide in excess. Only nicotinamide and closely related compounds which also supported the growth of these mutants inhibited the accumulation of intermediates. The site of inhibition was assessed to be between tryptophan and kynurenin (or N-acetylkynurenin). The synthesis of N-acetylkynurenin was examined in washed germinated conidia suspended in buffer; the level of N-acetylkynurenin-synthesizing activity was inversely related to the concentration of nicotinamide in the germination medium. The addition of large amounts of nicotinamide to suspensions of germinated conidia did not affect their N-acetylkynurenin-synthesizing activity. Formamidase activity, kynurenin-acetylating activity, and gross tryptophan metabolism in germinated conidia was not influenced by the concentration of nicotinamide in the germination medium. The results obtained indicate that the site of inhibition by nicotinamide is the first step in the pathway, the tryptophan pyrrolase reaction. The data are interpreted as nicotinamide or a product thereof, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, acting as a repressor of the formation of tryptophan pyrrolase in N. crassa.  (+info)

infections~American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) describes a related species of M tuberculosis, which doctors call non-TB mycobacteria, which can cause other illnesses in children and adults.
Kynurenine formamidase (KynB) forms part of the kynurenine pathway which metabolises tryptophan to anthranilate. This metabolite can be used for downstream production of 2-alkyl-4-quinolone (AQ) signalling molecules that control virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we investigate the role of kynB in the production of AQs and virulence-associated phenotypes of Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243, the causative agent of melioidosis. Deletion of kynB resulted in reduced AQ production, increased biofilm formation, decreased swarming and increased tolerance to ciprofloxacin. Addition of exogenous anthranilic acid restored the biofilm phenotype, but not the persister phenotype. This study suggests the kynurenine pathway is a critical source of anthranilate and signalling molecules that may regulate B. pseudomallei virulence ...
Spectrophotometric determination of the ionophore compounds and mass spectrometry of the biosynthesis products revealed that the cells of Streptomyces chrysomallus subsp. macrotetrolidi during the lag phase permanently contained practically constant though insignificant (about 20 to 40 nmol/mg of protein) amounts of biosynthetic precursors of macrotetrolides, oligomers of nactinic acids. The oligomers of nactinic acids had antibiotic activity and in an amount of 2.5 micrograms/ml inhibited the growth of Bacillus mycoides. The oligomers of nactinic acids had ionophore properties and were highly labile with respect to inorganic cations. The presence of sodium in the extragent stabilized the calcium monomer, a trimer of nonactinic acid, and promoted washing off the substances of the nactinic nature from the cells. The cations of ammonia and possibly potassium stabilized the dimer and tetramer of nonactinic acid forming a more hydrophobic complex by comparison with the initial compounds.
why: "There are two main reasons. Because Bahrain is more central, it is, in fact, located between Kuwait and Qatar and opposite Saudi Arabia; besides there is a bridge linking Bahrain to Saudi Arabia, which allows one country to be reached from the other in only an hour. The second reason is that it is easier to get entry visas in Bahrain for priests, catechists and Christian leaders arriving from other countries on the occasion of meetings".. What are the main pastoral challenges of the Vicariate? "Mainly the different nationalities, languages, cultures and rites among the faithful. In Kuwaits cathedral we celebrate in five different rites - Latin, Malabar, Malankarese, Maronite and Coptic - and in 12 languages. Diversity of rites and languages may sometimes create tensions. It is easily understood how complex it can be, trying to match 5 rites and 12 languages. The other main problem is room shortage which is sometimes the reason for tensions among the groups of our hundreds of thousands of ...
Summary: A mutation in a gene designated gmdA has been found to lead to loss of ability of Aspergillus nidulans to use benzamide, phenylacetamide and several other amides as sole nitrogen sources for growth. The gmdAI lesion results in low levels of an enzyme, called the general amidase, which has activity for a wide range of amide substrates. This enzyme is repressed by certain nitrogen-containing metabolites, including ammonium, but is probably not regulated by induction or by carbon catabolite repression. Evidence is presented for the general amidase being distinct from the previously characterized acetamidase and formamidase enzymes. The data also indicate that there is a fourth amidase capable of the hydrolysis of valeramide and hexanamide.
For the first time the influence of the chirality of the gel fibers in protein crystallogenesis has been studied. Enantiomeric hydrogels 1 and 2 were tested with model proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase and a formamidase extracted from B. cereus. Crystallization behaviour and crystal quality of these pr
Researchers have conducted a study that shows that those suffering from tuberculosis are 10.9 times more likely than non-tuberculosis patients to develop lung cancer.
Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are relatively common neurodevelopmental conditions whose biological basis has been incompletely determined. Several biochemical markers have been associated with ASDs
Fish tank granuloma is a rare skin infection caused by Mycobacterium marinum, a non-tuberculosis mycobacterium. The organism is found worldwide in stagnant freshwater and saltwater environments including lakes, inadequately chlorinated swimming pools, and aquariums. In the United States, this skin infection is strongly associated with those who handle fish tanks, including pet shop workers and aquarium owners. Individuals who shuck raw oysters or prepare shellfish or sushi also have been reported with the skin disease. Infection occurs when water containing M. marinum enters through a break in the skin. A thorough history from infected individuals usually reveals an injury associated with cleaning fish tanks, changing aquarium water, or trauma from fish hooks. The skin infection is not spread from person to person. Fish tank granuloma presents as a slow-growing, inflamed red bump (nodule or plaque) at the trauma site. The lesion is often painful and may become ulcerated or crusted. Skin changes ...
... arylformamidase MeSH D08.811.277.087.116 --- asparaginase MeSH D08.811.277.087.125 --- aspartylglucosylaminase MeSH D08.811. ...
... arylformamidase EC 3.5.1.10: formyltetrahydrofolate deformylase EC 3.5.1.11: penicillin amidase EC 3.5.1.12: biotinidase EC 3.5 ...
In enzymology, an arylformamidase (EC 3.5.1.9) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction N-formyl-L-kynurenine + H2O ...
Arylformamidase. *Kynureninase. *3-hydroxyanthranilate oxidase. *Aminocarboxymuconate-semialdehyde decarboxylase. * ...
Arylformamidase. *Kynureninase. *3-hydroxyanthranilate oxidase. *Aminocarboxymuconate-semialdehyde decarboxylase. * ...
Arylformamidase. *Kynureninase. *3-hydroxyanthranilate oxidase. *Aminocarboxymuconate-semialdehyde decarboxylase. * ...
Arylformamidase. *Kynureninase. *3-hydroxyanthranilate oxidase. *Aminocarboxymuconate-semialdehyde decarboxylase. * ...
In enzymology, an arylformamidase (EC 3.5.1.9) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction N-formyl-L-kynurenine + H2O ...
Compare arylformamidase ELISA Kits from leading suppliers on Biocompare. View specifications, prices, citations, reviews, and ... arylformamidase ELISA Kits. The ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) is a well-established antibody-based tool for ...
Based on automated MP annotations supported by experiments on knockout mouse models. Click on icons to go to all Afmid data for that phenotype. ...
Arylformamidase, including: function, proteins, disorders, pathways, orthologs, and expression. GeneCards - The Human Gene ... AFMID (Arylformamidase) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases associated with AFMID include Glaucomatocyclitic Crisis. Among its ... Gene Ontology (GO) annotations related to this gene include hydrolase activity and arylformamidase activity. An important ...
EC 3.5.1.9 arylformamidase. EC 3.7.1.3 kynureninase. ...
arylformamidase [KO:K07130] [EC:3.5.1.9]. Alide2_0457 formyltetrahydrofolate deformylase [KO:K01433] [EC:3.5.1.10] ...
3.5.1.9 arylformamidase 3.5.1.10 formyltetrahydrofolate deformylase 3.5.1.11 penicillin amidase 3.5.1.12 biotinidase ...
Arylformamidase. NM_027827. Gene Info. Agxt. Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase. NM_016702. Gene Info. ...
Arylformamidase Aliases:. 9030621K19Rik, Ammd, Kf, formylase RefSeq:. NC_000077.6 NT_096135.6 Ensembl:. ENSMUSG00000017718 ...
Mouse polyclonal antibody raised against a full-length human AFMID protein. AFMID (ACE87637.1, 1 a.a. ~ 308 a.a) full-length human protein. (H00125061-B01P) - Products - Abnova
Loss of arylformamidase with reduced thymidine kinase expression leads to impaired glucose tolerance.. Hugill, Alison J; ...
Recombinant protein of human arylformamidase (AFMID), transcript variant 1. Human. > 80 % Preparation: Recombint protein was ... Lenti ORF particles, AFMID (Myc-DDK-tagged)-Human arylformamidase (AFMID), transcript variant 1, 200 uL, ,10^7 TU/mL. Not ... Lenti ORF particles, AFMID (Myc-DDK tagged) - Human arylformamidase (AFMID), transcript variant 2 , 200 uL, ,10^7 TU/mL. Not ... Lenti ORF particles, AFMID (mGFP-tagged)-Human arylformamidase (AFMID), transcript variant 1, 200 uL, ,10^7 TU/mL. Not ...
arylformamidase Assay Type: Probe Assay Design: Intron-spanning Application: Gene Expression Unique Assay ID: qHsaCIP0039610 ... arylformamidase Assay Type: EvaGreen Application: Gene Expression Unique Assay ID: dHsaEG5025033 Info: EG; Same primer pair as ... arylformamidase Assay Type: Probe Application: Gene Expression Unique Assay ID: dHsaCPE5058752 Info: FAM; Same primer pair and ... arylformamidase Assay Type: Probe Application: Gene Expression Unique Assay ID: dHsaCPE5058753 Info: HEX; Same primer pair and ...
Arylformamidase]] * [[Kynureninase]] * [[3-hydroxyanthranilate oxidase]] * [[Aminocarboxymuconate-semialdehyde decarboxylase ...
... arylformamidase MeSH D08.811.277.087.116 --- asparaginase MeSH D08.811.277.087.125 --- aspartylglucosylaminase MeSH D08.811. ...
Arylformamidase Current Synonym true false 60537010 Kynurenine formamidase Current Synonym true false ...
Arylformamidase. *Kynureninase. *3-hydroxyanthranilate oxidase. *Aminocarboxymuconate-semialdehyde decarboxylase. * ...
Arylformamidase. 0.900. Dehly_0033. Dehly_0992. Dehly_0033. Dehly_0992. Formate dehydrogenase subunit alpha ...
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. ...
Lockridge, O., Schopfer, L. M. & Masson, P., Jan 21 2015, Handbook of Toxicology of Chemical Warfare Agents: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc., p. 953-965 13 p.. Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding › Chapter ...
... arylformamidase; KAT 1C3, kynurenine amino transferase 1, 2 and 3; KMO, kynurenine 3-hydroxylase; KYNU, kynureninase; 3HAAO, 3- ...
... 9 arylformamidase. EC 3.5.1.10 formyltetrahydrofolate deformylase. EC 3.5.1.11 penicillin amidase. EC 3.5.1.12 ...
PREDICTED- similar to arylformamidase [Hydra magnipapillata]. 0.659. XP_002161518. XP_002161965. PREDICTED- similar to CG11055 ...
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