Artiodactyla is an order of mammals characterized by an even number of digits (two or four) on each foot, hooves as terminal appendages, and a specialized stomach for fermentative digestion, which includes taxonomic families such as Suidae, Cervidae, Bovidae, and Camelidae among others.
An order of wholly aquatic MAMMALS occurring in all the OCEANS and adjoining seas of the world, as well as in certain river systems. They feed generally on FISHES, cephalopods, and crustaceans. Most are gregarious and most have a relatively long period of parental care and maturation. Included are DOLPHINS; PORPOISES; and WHALES. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp969-70)
An order of ungulates having an odd number of toes, including the horse, tapir, and rhinoceros. (Dorland, 27th ed)
An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.
Mammals of the family Phocoenidae comprising four genera found in the North Pacific Ocean and both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean and in various other seas. They differ from DOLPHINS in that porpoises have a blunt snout and a rather stocky body while dolphins have a beak-like snout and a slender, streamlined body. They usually travel in small groups. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp1003-4)
Any of various ruminant mammals of the order Bovidae. They include numerous species in Africa and the American pronghorn.
Mammals of the families Delphinidae (ocean dolphins), Iniidae, Lipotidae, Pontoporiidae, and Platanistidae (all river dolphins). Among the most well-known species are the BOTTLE-NOSED DOLPHIN and the KILLER WHALE (a dolphin). The common name dolphin is applied to small cetaceans having a beaklike snout and a slender, streamlined body, whereas PORPOISES are small cetaceans with a blunt snout and rather stocky body. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp978-9)
Large marine mammals of the order CETACEA. In the past, they were commercially valued for whale oil, for their flesh as human food and in ANIMAL FEED and FERTILIZERS, and for baleen. Today, there is a moratorium on most commercial whaling, as all species are either listed as endangered or threatened.
Warm-blooded vertebrate animals belonging to the class Mammalia, including all that possess hair and suckle their young.
A mammalian order which consists of 29 families and many genera.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.

A survey of serum and dietary carotenoids in captive wild animals. (1/184)

Accumulation of carotenoids varies greatly among animal species and is not fully characterized. Circulating carotenoid concentration data in captive wild animals are limited and may be useful for their management. Serum carotenoid concentrations and dietary intakes were surveyed and the extent of accumulation categorized for 76 species of captive wild animals at Brookfield Zoo. Blood samples were obtained opportunistically from 275 individual animals immobilized for a variety of reasons; serum was analyzed for alpha- and beta-carotene, lutein + zeaxanthin, lycopene, beta-cryptoxanthin and canthaxanthin. Total carotenoid content of diets was calculated from tables and chemical analyses of commonly consumed dietary components. Diets were categorized as low, moderate or high in carotenoid content as were total serum carotenoid concentrations. Animals were classified as unknown, high, moderate or low (non-) accumulators of dietary cartenoids. Nonaccumulators had total serum carotenoid concentrations of 0-101 nmol/L, whereas accumulators had concentrations that ranged widely, from 225 to 35,351 nmol/L. Primates were uniquely distinguished by the widest range of type and concentration of carotenoids in their sera. Most were classified as high to moderate accumulators. Felids had high accumulation of beta-carotene regardless of dietary intake, whereas a wide range of exotic birds accumulated only the xanthophylls, lutein + zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin or cryptoxanthin. The exotic ungulates, with the exception of the bovids, had negligible or nondetectable carotenoid serum concentrations despite moderate intakes. Bovids accumulated only beta-carotene despite moderately high lutein + zeaxanthin intakes. Wild captive species demonstrated a wide variety of carotenoid accumulation patterns, which could be exploited to answer remaining questions concerning carotenoid metabolism and function.  (+info)

The prevalence of Balantidium coli infection in fifty-six mammalian species. (2/184)

A total of 375 fecal samples of 56 mammalian species belonging to 17 families of 4 orders were examined for the detection of Balantidium coli from December 1994 to August 1995. As a result, B. coli was found from 6 species belonging to 4 families of 2 orders (Primates and Artiodactyla) of host animals examined. White-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar), squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) and Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) were new hosts for B. coli. All the wild boar (Sus scrofa) and chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) examined were positive. The highest number of B. coli was obtained from a chimpanzee (1,230/g feces). No B. coli was detected from the animals of orders Rodentia and Carnivora including dogs and cats. The rarity of B. coli infection in breeding animals in Japan. suggests that there is no serious problem in controlling infections.  (+info)

Phylogenetic relationships among cetartiodactyls based on insertions of short and long interpersed elements: hippopotamuses are the closest extant relatives of whales. (3/184)

Insertion analysis of short and long interspersed elements is a powerful method for phylogenetic inference. In a previous study of short interspersed element data, it was found that cetaceans, hippopotamuses, and ruminants form a monophyletic group. To further resolve the relationships among these taxa, we now have isolated and characterized 10 additional loci. A phylogenetic analysis of these data was able to resolve relationships among the major cetartiodactyl groups, thereby shedding light on the origin of whales. The results indicated (i) that cetaceans are deeply nested within Artiodactyla, (ii) that cetaceans and hippopotamuses form a monophyletic group, (iii) that pigs and peccaries form a monophyletic group to the exclusion of hippopotamuses, (iv) that chevrotains diverged first among ruminants, and (v) that camels diverged first among cetartiodactyls. These findings lead us to conclude that cetaceans evolved from an immediate artiodactyl, not mesonychian, ancestor.  (+info)

Genealogy of families of SINEs in cetaceans and artiodactyls: the presence of a huge superfamily of tRNA(Glu)-derived families of SINEs. (4/184)

Several novel (sub)families of SINEs were isolated from the genomes of cetaceans and artiodactyls, and their sequences were determined. From comparisons of diagnostic nucleotides among the short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs) in these (sub)families, we were able to draw the following conclusions. (1) After the divergence of the suborder Tylopoda (camels), the CHRS family of SINEs was newly created from tRNA(Glu) in a common ancestor of the lineages of the Suina (pigs and peccaries), Ruminantia (cows and deer), and Cetacea (whales and dolphins). (2) After divergence of the Suina lineage, the CHR-1 SINE and the CHR-2 SINE were generated successively in a common ancestor of ruminants, hippopotamuses, and cetaceans. (3) In the Ruminantia lineage, the Bov-tA SINE was generated by recombination between the CHR-2 SINE and Bov-A. (4) In the Suina lineage, the CHRS-S SINE was generated from the CHRS SINE. (5) In this latter lineage, the PRE-1 family of SINEs was created by insertion of part of the gene for tRNA(Arg) into the 5' region of the CHRS-S family. The distribution of a particular family of SINEs among species of artiodactyls and cetaceans confirmed the most recent conclusion for paraphyly of the order Artiodactyla. The present study also revealed that a newly created tRNA(Glu)-derived family of SINEs was subjected both to recombination with different units and to duplication of an internal sequence within a SINE unit to generate, during evolution, a huge superfamily of tRNA(Glu)-related families of SINEs that are now found in the genomes of artiodactyls and cetaceans.  (+info)

The role of wild ruminants in the epidemiology of bovine petechial fever. (5/184)

After experimental inoculation of Cytoecetes ondiri, the agent of bovine petechial fever (BPF), multiplication occurred in impala, bushbuck, Thomson's gazelles and wildebeest, as shown by infectivity studies and clinical findings. Similar attempts to infect one eland failed. As a sequel to this, blood and spleen samples were collected from four species of wild ruminants in an area where BPTF was endemic. Isolations of C. ondiri were made from three of five bushbuck, but not from any other species.  (+info)

Phylogeography of three closely related African bovids (tribe Alcelaphini). (6/184)

The phylogeography of three species of African bovids, the hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus), the topi (Damaliscus lunatus), and the wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus), is inferred from sequence variation of 345 sequences at the control region (d-loop) of the mtDNA. The three species are closely related (tribe Alcelaphini) and share similar habitat requirements. Moreover, their former distribution extended over Africa, as a probable result of the expansion of open grassland on the continent during the last 2.5 Myr. A combination of population genetics (diversity and structure) and intraspecific phylogeny (tree topology and relative branch length) methods is used to substantiate scenarios of the species history. Population dynamics are inferred from the distribution of sequence pairwise differences within populations. In the three species, there is a significant structuring of the populations, as shown by analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) pairwise and hierarchical differentiation estimations. In the wildebeest, a pattern of colonization from southern Africa toward east Africa is consistent with the asymmetric topology of the gene tree, showing a paraphyletic position of southern lineages, as well as their relatively longer branch lengths, and is supported by a progressive decline in population nucleotide diversity toward east Africa. The phylogenetic pattern found in the topi and the hartebeest differs from that of the wildebeest: lineages split into monophyletic clades, and no geographical trend is detected in population diversity. We suggest a scenario where these antelopes, previously with wide pan-African distributions, became extinct except in a few refugia. The hartebeest, and probably also the topi, survived in refugia north of the equator, in the east and the west, respectively, as well as one in the south. The southern refugium furthermore seems to have been the only place where the wildebeest has survived.  (+info)

Model dependence of the phylogenetic inference: relationship among carnivores, Perissodactyls and cetartiodactyls as inferred from mitochondrial genome sequences. (7/184)

Some previous analysis of mitochondrial proteins strongly support the Carnivora/Perissodactyla grouping excluding Cetartiodactyla (Artiodactyla + Cetacea) as an outgroup, but the support of the hypothesis remains equivocal from the analysis of several nuclear-encoded proteins. In order to evaluate the strength of the support by mitochondrial proteins, phylogenetic relationship among Carnivora, Perissodactyla, and Cetartiodactyla was estimated with the ML method by using the updated data set of the 12 mitochondrial proteins with several alternative models. The analyses demonstrate that the phylogenetic inference depends on the model used in the ML analysis; i.e., whether the site-heterogeneity is taken into account and whether the rate parameters are estimated for each individual proteins or for the concatenated sequences. Although the analysis of concatenated sequences strongly supports the Carnivora/Perissodactyla grouping, the total evaluation of the separate analyses of individual proteins, which approximates the data better than the concatenated analysis, gives only ambiguous results, and therefore it is concluded that more data are needed to resolve this trichotomy.  (+info)

Conservation within artiodactyls of an AATA interrupt in the IGF-I microsatellite for 19-35 million years. (8/184)

Occurrence of an AATA interrupt in the IGF-I microsatellite was investigated in a number of Artiodactyl species, namely pigs, camels, deer, cattle, goats, and sheep. Comparison of DNA sequences in the 5' flank of the microsatellite in these species revealed that the interrupt within the microsatellite is conserved in deer, cattle, sheep, and goats but is absent from camels and pigs. The interrupt was introduced into the Artiodactyl phylogeny after the divergence of the Camelidae but before the divergence of the Cervidae, and thus its time of origin can be estimated to be 19-35 MYA. In contrast to the repeat units which are hypermutable, the interrupt has been conserved for a very long time and may even have suppressed microsatellite variation by inhibiting replication slippage. A 12-bp deletion in the 5' flank of the microsatellite in camels corresponds to a consensus reversed repeat in deer, cattle, sheep, and goats with unknown functional significance. Apart from this deletion, the 5' flank of the microsatellite is highly conserved in Artiodactyl species.  (+info)

Artiodactyla is an order of mammals that includes even-toed ungulates, or hooved animals, with an odd number of toes. This group includes animals such as pigs, peccaries, hippos, camels, deer, giraffes, antelopes, and ruminants like cattle, sheep, and goats. The primary identifying feature of Artiodactyls is the presence of a pair of weight-bearing toes located in the middle of the foot, with the other toes being either reduced or absent. This arrangement provides stability and adaptability for these animals to thrive in various habitats worldwide.

Cetacea is a taxonomic order that includes whales, dolphins, and porpoises. This group of marine mammals is characterized by their fully aquatic lifestyle, torpedo-shaped bodies, modified limbs that serve as flippers, and the absence of external hindlimbs. Cetaceans have streamlined bodies that minimize drag while swimming, and their tail flukes enable powerful propulsion through vertical movement in the water column.

Their respiratory system features a pair of blowholes on the top of their heads, which they use to breathe air at the surface. Cetaceans exhibit complex social behaviors, advanced communication skills, and sophisticated echolocation abilities for navigation and hunting. They primarily feed on fish and invertebrates, with some larger species preying on marine mammals.

Cetaceans have a global distribution, occupying various habitats such as open oceans, coastal areas, and rivers. Unfortunately, many cetacean populations face threats from human activities like pollution, habitat degradation, climate change, and direct hunting or bycatch in fishing gear. Conservation efforts are crucial to protect these remarkable creatures and their vital roles in marine ecosystems.

Perissodactyla is not a medical term, but rather a taxonomic order in zoology. It includes mammals with an odd number of toes on each foot and a particular type of digestive system called "hindgut fermentation." The order Perissodactyla includes horses, rhinos, and tapirs.

Carnivora is an order of mammals that consists of animals whose primary diet consists of flesh. The term "Carnivora" comes from the Latin words "caro", meaning flesh, and "vorare", meaning to devour. This order includes a wide variety of species, ranging from large predators such as lions, tigers, and bears, to smaller animals such as weasels, otters, and raccoons.

While members of the Carnivora order are often referred to as "carnivores," it is important to note that not all members exclusively eat meat. Some species, such as raccoons and bears, have an omnivorous diet that includes both plants and animals. Additionally, some species within this order have evolved specialized adaptations for their specific diets, such as the elongated canines and carnassial teeth of felids (cats) and canids (dogs), which are adapted for tearing and shearing meat.

Overall, the medical definition of Carnivora refers to an order of mammals that have a diet primarily consisting of flesh, although not all members exclusively eat meat.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "porpoises" are not a medical term. They refer to a group of marine mammals that are closely related to dolphins. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help clarify those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "antelopes" is a common name that refers to a group of hoofed mammals in the family Bovidae. They are not a medical term or concept. Antelopes are known for their speed and agility, and they are found primarily in Africa, with a few species in Asia.

If you have any questions related to biology, veterinary medicine, or any other scientific field, I would be happy to help answer them to the best of my ability!

"Dolphins" is a common name that refers to several species of marine mammals belonging to the family Delphinidae, within the larger group Cetacea. Dolphins are known for their intelligence, social behavior, and acrobatic displays. They are generally characterized by a streamlined body, a prominent dorsal fin, and a distinctive "smiling" expression created by the curvature of their mouths.

Although "dolphins" is sometimes used to refer to all members of the Delphinidae family, it is important to note that there are several other families within the Cetacea order, including porpoises and whales. Therefore, not all small cetaceans are dolphins.

Some examples of dolphin species include:

1. Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) - This is the most well-known and studied dolphin species, often featured in aquariums and marine parks. They have a robust body and a prominent, curved dorsal fin.
2. Common Dolphin (Delphinus delphis) - These dolphins are characterized by their hourglass-shaped color pattern and distinct, falcate dorsal fins. There are two subspecies: the short-beaked common dolphin and the long-beaked common dolphin.
3. Spinner Dolphin (Stenella longirostris) - Known for their acrobatic behavior, spinner dolphins have a slender body and a long, thin beak. They are named for their spinning jumps out of the water.
4. Risso's Dolphin (Grampus griseus) - These dolphins have a unique appearance, with a robust body, a prominent dorsal fin, and a distinctive, scarred skin pattern caused by social interactions and encounters with squid, their primary food source.
5. Orca (Orcinus orca) - Also known as the killer whale, orcas are the largest dolphin species and are highly intelligent and social predators. They have a distinctive black-and-white color pattern and a prominent dorsal fin.

In medical terminology, "dolphins" do not have a specific relevance, but they can be used in various contexts such as therapy, research, or education. For instance, dolphin-assisted therapy is an alternative treatment that involves interactions between patients and dolphins to improve psychological and physical well-being. Additionally, marine biologists and researchers study dolphin behavior, communication, and cognition to understand their complex social structures and intelligence better.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. Whales are not a medical term but rather large marine mammals. They belong to the Cetacean family, which includes dolphins and porpoises. If you're asking about a medical condition or something similar that might be associated with the word "whales," I would need more information to provide an accurate response.

Mammals are a group of warm-blooded vertebrates constituting the class Mammalia, characterized by the presence of mammary glands (which produce milk to feed their young), hair or fur, three middle ear bones, and a neocortex region in their brain. They are found in a diverse range of habitats and come in various sizes, from tiny shrews to large whales. Examples of mammals include humans, apes, monkeys, dogs, cats, bats, mice, raccoons, seals, dolphins, horses, and elephants.

"Rodentia" is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in biology. It refers to the largest order of mammals, comprising over 40% of all mammal species. Commonly known as rodents, this group includes mice, rats, hamsters, gerbils, guinea pigs, squirrels, prairie dogs, capybaras, beavers, and many others.

While "Rodentia" itself is not a medical term, certain conditions or issues related to rodents can have medical implications. For instance, rodents are known to carry and transmit various diseases that can affect humans, such as hantavirus, leptospirosis, salmonellosis, and lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCMV). Therefore, understanding the biology and behavior of rodents is important in the context of public health and preventive medicine.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

In medical terms, "fossils" do not have a specific or direct relevance to the field. However, in a broader scientific context, fossils are the remains or impressions of prehistoric organisms preserved in petrified form or as a mold or cast in rock. They offer valuable evidence about the Earth's history and the life forms that existed on it millions of years ago.

Paleopathology is a subfield of paleontology that deals with the study of diseases in fossils, which can provide insights into the evolution of diseases and human health over time.

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

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Watabe, Mahito (2013-11-29). "New specimens of Entelodon gobiensis (Mammalia; Artiodactyla; Entelodontidae) from the Eocene ...
... constitute the second most diverse family of artiodactyla after bovids. Though of a similar build, deer are strongly ... Wang, X.; Xie, G.; Dong, W. (2009). "A new species of crown-antlered deer Stephanocemas (Artiodactyla, Cervidae) from the ... ISBN 978-0-300-08142-8. De Vos, J.; Mol, D.; Reumer, J. W. F. (1995). "Early Pleistocene Cervidae (Mammalia, Artiodactyla) from ... Dong, W.; Pan, Y.; Liu, J. (September 2004). "The earliest Muntiacus (Artiodactyla, Mammalia) from the Late Miocene of Yuanmou ...
Watabe, Mahito (2013-11-29). "New specimens of Entelodon gobiensis (Mammalia; Artiodactyla; Entelodontidae) from the Eocene ...
Watabe, Mahito (2013-11-29). "New specimens of Entelodon gobiensis (Mammalia; Artiodactyla; Entelodontidae) from the Eocene ... Tsubamoto, Takehisa (2020-03-31). "Additional specimens of the Anthracotheriidae (Mammalia; Artiodactyla) from the upper Eocene ...
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Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ... Randi, E.; Mucci, N.; Pierpaoli, M.; Douzery, E. (1998). "New phylogenetic perspectives on the Cervidae (Artiodactyla) are ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ... Grubb, P. (2001). "Hippotragus Sundevall, 1845 (Mammalia, Artiodactyla): Proposed Conservation". Bulletin of Zoological ... Artiodactyla): conserved". Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature. 60: 90-91. ISSN 0007-5167. "Blauwbok, n." Dictionary of South ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
"Yak , mammal , Britannica". Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the ... Leslie, D.M.; Schaller, G.B. (2009). "Bos grunniens and Bos mutus (Artiodactyla: Bovidae)". Mammalian Species. 836: 1-17. doi: ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ... Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
20, pp.77-80 Kurten, B; Anderson, E (1980). "Order Artiodactyla". Pleistocene mammals of North America (1st ed.). New York: ... ISBN 0-231-13040-6. Scott E, Cox SM (2008). "Late Pleistocene distribution of Bison (Mammalia; Artiodactyla) in the Mojave ...
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Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ... Rossi, R. V. (2000). Taxonomia de Mazama Rafinesque, 1817 do Brasil (Artiodactyla, Cervidae). M.Sc. Thesis, Universidade de São ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ... Meijaard, E.; Groves, C.P. (2004). "A taxonomic revision of the Tragulus mouse-deer (Artiodactyla)". Zoological Journal of the ... Artiodactyla, Tragulidae) from Vietnam, and its sympatric occurrence with T. kanchil" (PDF). Russian Journal of Theriology. 3 ( ...
Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and ...
"Artiodactyla" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Artiodactyla" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Artiodactyla" by people in Profiles. ... and whether "Artiodactyla" was a major or minor topic of these publication. ...
Taen frae "https://sco.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:Taxonomy/Artiodactyla&oldid=562828" ...
ARTIODACTYLA. The name for this order of mammals, ARTIODACTYLA designates the even-number of digits, which is a major feature ...
Lo taxon dels artiodactils (Artiodactyla), del grèc artios « par » e dactylos « det », es, segon la classificacion tradicionala ... Recuperada de « https://oc.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Artiodactyla&oldid=2020440 » ...
Everything in your life, right now, is awesome. Everything is in its right place, under grace, and whether or not this makes perfect sense yet, one day it will ...
SOL-649 La bahía de Walker, en Gansbaai, Western Cape, es uno de los lugares de la costa sudafricana que aloja a numerosas ballenas…. Read More ...
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WildAfrica.cz , Animal Encyclopedia , Mammalia , Artiodactyla class Reptilia class Aves class Mammalia order Rodentia order ... Tubulidentata order Proboscidea order Perrissodactyla order Pholidota order Primates order Artiodactyla suborder Nonruminantia ...
Order: Artiodactyla. Family: Bovidae. 1) General Zoological Data. This species is found in the savannah of most of southern ...
Order: Artiodactyla. Family: Bovidae. 1) General Zoological Data. The Dorcas gazelle (dorcas [Greek=gazelle]) is a North ...
Professionelle Präparation von Knochen. Perfekte Schädel und Skelettpräparate für Sammlung, Unterricht und Ausstellungen.
Comparação cariotípica entre Mazama gouazoubira e Mazama nemorivaga (Artiodactyla; Cervidae) por meio de marcadores ... Comparação cariotípica entre Mazama gouazoubira e Mazama nemorivaga (Artiodactyla; Cervidae) por meio de marcadores ...
Giraffokeryx is represented in the middle Miocene vertebrate assemblage from the Chinji Formation by 13 remains. The material comprises predominantly isolated
Artiodactyla; Rodentia)". Comunicaciones Paleontologicas Museo Nacional de Historia Natural de Montevideo. 20: 255-277. ...
Watabe, Mahito (2013-11-29). "New specimens of Entelodon gobiensis (Mammalia; Artiodactyla; Entelodontidae) from the Eocene ...
In some countries, such as the United States and the Netherlands (varkenshaas), pork tenderloin can be bought as a processed product, already flavored with a marinade. A regional dish of the Midwestern United States is a pork tenderloin sandwich,[4] also called a tenderloin - a very thinly sliced piece of pork, which is the larger, tougher loineye - or longissimus - muscle, which is battered or breaded, deep fried, and served on a small bun,[4] often with garnishes such as mustard, pickle and onions. This sandwich is relatively common and popular in the U.S. Midwest, especially in the states of Iowa and Indiana.[5] In the southern states, tenderloin is often prepared as a breakfast biscuit, typically with egg or cheese.[citation needed] It is quite common for pork tenderloin to be used as an alternative to beef tenderloin[according to whom?] as it can be just as tender but costs significantly less. ...
The table below is a high-level overview of the subsequent branches of this taxon, organized by taxonomic level and further subdivided by items that FWS focuses on, either through a regulatory or other capacity. You can change your list view by selecting an option from the overview table:. ...
Artiodactyla • Subordo: Ruminantia • Familia: Bovidae • Subfamilia: Bovinae • Tribus: Boselaphini • Genus: Boselaphus ...
1) ABl. L 61 vom 3.3.1997, S. 1.. (2) Durchführungsverordnung (EU) 2017/1915 der Kommission vom 19. Oktober 2017 zum Verbot der Einfuhr von Exemplaren bestimmter Arten wild lebender Tiere und Pflanzen in die Union (ABl. L 271 vom 20.10.2017, S. 7).. (3) Durchführung der Resolution Conf. 12.8 (Rev. CoP 17), „Review of Significant Trade in specimens of Appendix-II species - Recommendations of the Standing Committee", Genf, 6. Mai 2019. Verfügbar unter: https://cites.org/sites/default/files/notif/E-Notif-2019-027.pdf. (4) Technischer Bericht Nr. 79/4/2/1 vom Mai 2017, „Amendments to SRG opinions: Including an overview of opinions for wildsourced Annex A species and opinions for former countries/territories"; Technischer Bericht Nr. 80/4/2/2 vom August 2017, „Review of CITES-listed Ovis subspecies in Uzbekistan: evaluating the EU import suspension for Ovis vignei bochariensis"; Technischer Bericht Nr. 82/4/2/2 vom Januar 2018, „Comparison of EU decisions and decisions formed at the 69th ...
Artiodactyla (even-toed ungulates). *Wild boar - Sus scrofa (N). *Red deer - Cervus elaphus (N) ...
Artiodactyla 3/90 HI *. Aves 17/1635 HI *. Reptilia 21/200 HI *. ...
MEDRI, Ísis Meri and MOURAO, Guilherme. Male-male aggression in free-ranging collared peccaries, Pecari tajacu (Artiodactyla, ...
Artiodactyla • Subordo: Ruminantia • Familia: Bovidae • Subfamilia: Alcelaphinae • Genus: Connochaetes • Species: Connochaetes ...
Order: Artiodactyla Family: Suidae Genus and Species: Sus scrofa scrofa ossabaw island ...
September 29, 2022 by artiodactyla in ...
Artiodactyla. Kidney. Immortalized. KN-R. Cattle (Bos taurus)*. Artiodactyla. Kidney. Primary. KLu-R. Cattle (B. taurus)*. ... Artiodactyla. Umbilical cord. Immortalized. PO. Sheep (Ovis aries)*. ... Artiodactyla. Kidney. Primary. TT-R.B. Arabian camel (Camelus dromedarius)*†. ... Artiodactyla. Lung. Primary. LGK-1-R. Alpaca (Llama pacos)*. ... Artiodactyla. Kidney. Primary. ZLu-R. Goat (C. hircus)*. ...
Artiodactyla. Family. Bovidae. Scientific name. Kobus kob leucotis. Sub-Species. leucotis. Author. Lichtenstein and Peters ( ...
Pigs are even-toed ungulate mammals (Order Artiodactyla) of the genus Sus, within the Suidae family. They are native to Eurasia ...
Úvod Periodické publikace Lynx, nová série 2001/32/1 Pomelomeryx gracilis (Pomel, 1853) (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Moschidae) ... New rich material of the cervoid Pomelomeryx gracilis (Artiodactyla, Cervoidea) from the Lower Miocene of Europe (Agenian, MN2 ... Pomelomeryx gracilis (Pomel, 1853) (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Moschidae) from the Lower Miocene karstic fissure filling complex ... Pomelomeryx gracilis (Pomel, 1853) (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Moschidae) from the Lower Miocene karstic fissure filling complex ...
Return to Article Details First song description of the humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae (Balaenopteridae: Artiodactyla ...
  • Pomelomeryx gracilis (Pomel, 1853) (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Moschidae) from the Lower Miocene karstic fissure filling complex Rothenstein 10/14 (Germany, Bavaria) [Pomelomeryx gracilis (Pomel, 1853) (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Moschidae) ze spodněmiocénního krasového komplexu Rothenstein 10/14 (Německo, Bavorsko). (nm.cz)
  • Pigs are even-toed ungulate mammals (Order Artiodactyla) of the genus Sus, within the Suidae family. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • The name for this order of mammals, ARTIODACTYLA designates the even-number of digits, which is a major feature of the families in this order, distinguishing them from the PERISSSODACTYLS (zebras, horses, asses). (brainmuseum.org)
  • Artiodactyla" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (harvard.edu)
  • Snøgeit ( Oreamnos americanus ) er en monotypisk art i den monotypiske slekten Oreamnos , som videre inngår i tribuset sauer og geiter (Caprini) i kvegfamilien (Bovidae). (wikipedia.org)
  • New morphological evidence for the phylogeny of Artiodactyla, Cetacea, and Mesonychidae. (amnh.org)
  • However, mitochondrial genomes studies suggest that the order Perissodactyla is part of one eutherian clade, comprising also Pholidota, Carnivora, and Cetertiodactyla (Artiodactyla and Cetacea). (encyclopedia.com)
  • These two groups are prominently distinguished by the feet, as evident from the origin of the names-Perissodactyla comes from the Greek perissos , meaning "odd" and dactylos , meaning finger or toe, and Artiodactyla comes from the Greek artios , meaning "even numbered" or "entire" and dactylos (Shackleton and Harestad 2004). (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • As evident by the names of the orders-Artiodactyla comes from the Greek artios , meaning "even numbered" or "entire" and dactylos , meaning finger or toe, and Perrissodactyla from the Greek perissos , meaning "odd" and dactylos -the two groups are primarily distinguished by the feet (Shackleton and Harestad 2004). (newworldencyclopedia.org)