Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.United StatesMEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Review Literature as Topic: Published materials which provide an examination of recent or current literature. Review articles can cover a wide range of subject matter at various levels of completeness and comprehensiveness based on analyses of literature that may include research findings. The review may reflect the state of the art. It also includes reviews as a literary form.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Medical Subject Headings: Controlled vocabulary thesaurus produced by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. It consists of sets of terms naming descriptors in a hierarchical structure that permits searching at various levels of specificity.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Nursing Research: Research carried out by nurses, generally in clinical settings, in the areas of clinical practice, evaluation, nursing education, nursing administration, and methodology.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Data Mining: Use of sophisticated analysis tools to sort through, organize, examine, and combine large sets of information.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Retraction of Publication as Topic: Authors' withdrawal or disavowal of their participation in performing research or writing the results of their study.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Manuscripts, MedicalComputer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Diagnostic Imaging: Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Meta-Analysis as Topic: A quantitative method of combining the results of independent studies (usually drawn from the published literature) and synthesizing summaries and conclusions which may be used to evaluate therapeutic effectiveness, plan new studies, etc., with application chiefly in the areas of research and medicine.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Journalism: The collection, preparation, and distribution of news and related commentary and feature materials through such media as pamphlets, newsletters, newspapers, magazines, radio, motion pictures, television, and books. While originally applied to the reportage of current events in printed form, specifically newspapers, with the advent of radio and television the use of the term has broadened to include all printed and electronic communication dealing with current affairs.Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Empirical Research: The study, based on direct observation, use of statistical records, interviews, or experimental methods, of actual practices or the actual impact of practices or policies.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Bibliography as Topic: Discussion of lists of works, documents or other publications, usually with some relationship between them, e.g., by a given author, on a given subject, or published in a given place, and differing from a catalog in that its contents are restricted to holdings of a single collection, library, or group of libraries. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Nuclear Medicine: A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Bias (Epidemiology): Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Publication Bias: The influence of study results on the chances of publication and the tendency of investigators, reviewers, and editors to submit or accept manuscripts for publication based on the direction or strength of the study findings. Publication bias has an impact on the interpretation of clinical trials and meta-analyses. Bias can be minimized by insistence by editors on high-quality research, thorough literature reviews, acknowledgement of conflicts of interest, modification of peer review practices, etc.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Societies, Scientific: Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Literature: Writings having excellence of form or expression and expressing ideas of permanent or universal interest. The body of written works produced in a particular language, country, or age. (Webster, 3d ed)Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Biometry: The use of statistical and mathematical methods to analyze biological observations and phenomena.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Nurse's Role: The expected function of a member of the nursing profession.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.EuropeMedical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Sample Size: The number of units (persons, animals, patients, specified circumstances, etc.) in a population to be studied. The sample size should be big enough to have a high likelihood of detecting a true difference between two groups. (From Wassertheil-Smoller, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, 1990, p95)Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Communications Media: The means of interchanging or transmitting and receiving information. Historically the media were written: books, journals, newspapers, and other publications; in the modern age the media include, in addition, radio, television, computers, and information networks.Libraries, Digital: Libraries in which a major proportion of the resources are available in machine-readable format, rather than on paper or MICROFORM.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Evidence-Based Practice: A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Great BritainHistory, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.BrazilPhysician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Famous PersonsPolicy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Online Systems: Systems where the input data enter the computer directly from the point of origin (usually a terminal or workstation) and/or in which output data are transmitted directly to that terminal point of origin. (Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)MEDLARS: A computerized biomedical bibliographic storage and retrieval system operated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLARS stands for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, which was first introduced in 1964 and evolved into an online system in 1971 called MEDLINE (MEDLARS Online). As other online databases were developed, MEDLARS became the name of the entire NLM information system while MEDLINE became the name of the premier database. MEDLARS was used to produce the former printed Cumulated Index Medicus, and the printed monthly Index Medicus, until that publication ceased in December 2004.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Epidemiologic Research Design: The form and structure of analytic studies in epidemiologic and clinical research.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Nursing: The field of nursing care concerned with the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.Biomedical Technology: The application of technology to the solution of medical problems.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Libraries, MedicalHealth Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Infectious Disease Medicine: A branch of internal medicine concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of INFECTIOUS DISEASES.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Toom-Cook[edit]. Main article: Toom-Cook multiplication. Another method of multiplication is called Toom-Cook or Toom-3. The ... The Toom-Cook method is one of the generalizations of the Karatsuba method. A three-way Toom-Cook can do a size-3N ... Main article: Karatsuba algorithm. For systems that need to multiply numbers in the range of several thousand digits, such as ... Main article: Grid method multiplication. The grid method (or box method) is an introductory method for multiple-digit ...
Main article: History of the Hudson River. Pre-Columbian era[edit]. The area around Hudson River was inhabited by indigenous ... Crescent or Cook's Reach, Hoge's or High Reach, Martyr's or Martelaire Reach, Fisher's Reach, Lange Rack or Long Reach, ... Main articles: List of fixed crossings of the Hudson River and List of ferries across the Hudson River to New York City ... This article is about the river in New York and New Jersey. For other uses, see Hudson River (disambiguation). ...
Cooking. Main article: Cooking oil. Several edible vegetable and animal oils, and also fats, are used for various purposes in ... Main article: Fuel oil. Some oils burn in liquid or aerosol form, generating light, and heat which can be used directly or ... This article contains special characters. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols ... Main article: Oil painting. Color pigments are easily suspended in oil, making it suitable as a supporting medium for paints. ...
Cooking. Main article: Solar cooker. Parabolic dish produces steam for cooking, in Auroville, India ... Anderson, Lorraine; Palkovic, Rick (1994). Cooking with Sunshine (The Complete Guide to Solar Cuisine with 150 Easy Sun-Cooked ... Main article: Solar thermal energy. Solar thermal technologies can be used for water heating, space heating, space cooling and ... Main articles: Solar pond, Salt evaporation pond, and Solar furnace. Solar concentrating technologies such as parabolic dish, ...
At a chuckwagon cook off, each wagon is judged on the authenticity of the wagon. Wagons must be in sound drivable condition, ... Article]. Texas Monthly, 24(9), 92. Butler, Stephanie (August 8, 2014). "From Chuck Wagons to Pushcarts: The History of the ... The wagon was also stocked with a water barrel and a sling to kindle wood to heat and cook food. On cattle drives, it was ... "Cowboy Cooking". American Profile. Archived from the original on 2009-07-08. Retrieved 2010-01-25. In the Driftway. (1928). [ ...
Fertig, Judith M. (1999). Prairie Home Cooking: 400 Recipes that Celebrate the Bountiful Harvests, Creative Cooks, and ... Main article: Cuisine of Omaha. Omaha has some unusual steakhouses such as the famous Gorat's, several of which are Sicilian in ... Main article: Mansfield, Ohio. Mansfield is the home of two well-known food companies. Isaly Dairy Company (AKA Isaly's) was a ... Traditionally, Midwestern cooks used a light hand with seasonings, preferring sage, dill, caraway, mustard and parsley to hot, ...
"Household Appliances-Cooking." Gallawa, Carlton J. "How do Microwaves Cook." How Self Cleaning Ovens Work Article by ... Cooking times are usually long, and the process is usually cooking by slow roasting the food. Earth ovens are among the most ... More recently, ovens have become slightly more high-tech in terms of cooking strategy. The microwave as a cooking tool was ... In cooking, the conventional oven is a kitchen appliance used for roasting and heating. Foods normally cooked in this manner ...
"Cooking Schools in the City - It's Mouth-Watering Array - Article - NYTimes.com". Select.nytimes.com. 2012-06-10. Retrieved ... "Those Proliferating Cooking Schools - A Selection of the Best - Article - NYTimes.com". Select.nytimes.com. 2012-06-10. ... Madame Chu's Chinese Cooking School. "Madame Chu's Chinese Cooking School: G chu: 9780671242091: Amazon.com: Books". Amazon.com ... Article - NYTimes.com". Select.nytimes.com. 2012-06-10. Retrieved 2012-10-30. "STATE SAYS WARDER GOT BRIBE IN PERSON - ...
Journal articles Lindequist, U.; Niedermeyer, T.H.J.; Jülich, W.D. (2005). "The pharmacological potential of mushrooms". Evid ... Thorough cooking may eliminate the allergenicity. There is research investigating the use of shiitake mushrooms in production ... Rarely, consumption of raw or slightly cooked shiitake mushrooms may cause an allergic reaction called "shiitake dermatitis", ... ISBN 978-94-007-0525-8 Tsuji, Shizuo (1980). Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. New York: Kodansha International/USA. ...
"Ghana's cooks take to fast fufu". BBC News. 2006-05-29. Retrieved August 5, 2008. Microwavable instant fufu. Dangers of ... Daghetto, Arose N. (2011). "Say Whaaat??- Fufu and Mofongo!". Article. Literature Voodoo-- Quite Storm Enterprises. Retrieved ... Martinez, Daisy (2013). Daisy Cooks!: Latin Flavors That Will Rock Your World. Hachette Books. Food and Identity in the ...
Link to the article on The Free Library. Retrieved 30 October 2012. Cook, Chris. "John Oxx targets his latest English Classic ... Link to the article on The Free Library. Retrieved 31 October 2012. Durso, Joseph. "His Highness And His Herd Take a Hike", New ... Link to the article on The Free Library. Retrieved 30 October 2012. Muscat, Julian. "Sea The Stars bows out on glorious high", ... Link to the article on Infotrac National Newspaper Database (requires login). Retrieved 30 October 2012. Oakley, Robin. "Derby ...
"LassoSoft LLC acquisition article". Gunderson, Lars. "What I hope Lassosoft is doing right now". Gunderson, Lars. "Graph of ... Cook, Brad. "Lasso Pro receives MySQL Network certification". MacWorld. IDG. Retrieved 28 October 2013. "OmniPilot Software ... acquisition article". "Lasso 8 release announcement". "8.5 for free". MacNN. Cohen, Peter. "Lasso Studio 8 for Dreamweaver & ...
Cook, Jonathan., @ Nazareth, The Guardian, Article, 15 December 2003. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Staff Page, Prof. A. ...
Tampa Bay Times published a featured article about Gay. Cook, Rhonda; MARCUS K. GARNER (03-04-2009). "'Little Houdini' still on ... Check date values in: ,date= (help) Davis, Mark; Rhonda Cook (03-05-2009). The Atlanta Journal-Constitution http://www.ajc.com/ ...
Link to article on The Free Library. Cook, Chris."Super sire Sadler's Wells dies at Coolmore Stud", The Guardian, 24 April 2011 ... Link to article on The Free Library. Green, Graham. "Sangster UK assets less than pounds 5,000", The Racing Post, 16 July 2005 ... Link to article on The Free Library. Lynch, Michael."Sangster racing for work and play", The Age, 11 November 2002. Retrieved ... Link to article on The Free Library. Collins, Liam. "The battle for the Rock of Gibraltar", Irish Independent, 27 March 2011. ...
Christensen, Clayton M.; Cook, Scott; Hall, Taddy (December 2005), "Marketing malpractice: the cause and the cure", Harvard ... The seminal article. Christensen, Clayton M.; Overdorf, Michael (March-April 2000), "Meeting the challenge of disruptive change ... However, due to constant misinterpretation, Christensen still often writes articles trying to explain the concept even further ...
Cook, Richard; Morton, Brian (2008). The Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings (9th ed.). Penguin. p. 990. ISBN 978-0-141-03401-0. ... One Way Magazine article: Brad Mehldau, Anything Goes. ...
Harper, Paw; Latter, Mr; Nicholas, Fw; Cook, Rw; Gill, Pa (1998-03-01). "Chondrodysplasia in Australian Dexter cattle". ... http://dextercattle.org/adca/adca_article_chondrodysplasia.html Crew, F. A. E. (1923-01-01). "The Significance of an ... http://dextercattle.org/adca/adca_article_pha.html Nanci, Gabriella; Millman, Stefani (2009). Dexter Cattle: A Breeders' ...
"Reviews & Feature Articles". Steven Pinker. Retrieved 3 February 2015. McGrath, Charles. "Steven Pinker's "The Sense of Style ... Cook, Gareth. "Steven Pinker's Sense of Style". Scientific American. Retrieved 3 February 2015. Straaijer, Robin. "Can ...
... www.theflorentine.net/articles/article-view.asp?issuetocId=10074 "Marsala". SicilyWeb. Retrieved 2007-12-04. Thomson, Patricia ... Dry Marsala wine is used in savory cooking. A typical savory Marsala sauce, for example, involves reducing the wine almost to a ... Marsala wine is frequently used in cooking, and is especially prevalent in dishes served in Italian restaurants in the United ... "Marsala Ice Cream". Cooking With Booze website. Archived from the original on 2007-11-14. Retrieved 2007-12-04. http:// ...
This is not an encyclopedia article. If you find this page on any site other than Wikipedia, you are viewing a mirror site. Be ... Cook's Theorem and NP completeness. Approximation strategies for intractable problems. Fall Semester 2014. Course CS 6850 ... The blog part is just articles (blog posts) about dog-related topics. There's also a t-shirt section and a shopping section. ...
... photo gallery VIREO Photo-Medium Res; Article tropicalbirding Photo-High Res; Article splatzone.nl Lophornis ... Cook, Fred; Jenni Bruce (2004). The encyclopedia of animals: a complete visual guide. University of California Press. p. 331. ...
Link to article on The Free Library. Retrieved 11 October 2012. Keogh, Frank. "Workforce storms to victory in the Derby at ... Cook, Chris. "Frankel reaches superstar status after 2,000 Guineas win at Newmarket", The Guardian, 30 April 2011. Retrieved 27 ... Link to article on The Free Library. Retrieved 11 October 2012. "Humphrey Cottrill dies at 92", The Racing Post, 1 September ... Link to article on The Free Library. Retrieved 11 October 2012. "The billionaires" Archived 17 January 2013 at the Wayback ...
Recipes, Menus, Cooking Articles & Food Guides. Stuffed Cabbage: Holishkes - meat. Mimi's Cyber-Kitchen Recipes - "Your First ...
"A Genie of Cuisine Brings Fresh Discoveries to America". Article. The New York Sun. "Suvir Saran". Article. Hub-UK.com. "Top ... During this time he enjoyed cooking and entertaining friends when he was not working or going to school. He quickly took what ... Masala Farm (Chronicle Books, 2011) American Masala (Clarkson Potter, 2007) Indian Home Cooking (Clarkson Potter, 2004) Dévi, ... Indian Home Cooking (Clarkson Potter, 2004) • USA Today - Top 5 Cookbooks of Year • Newsweek and Newsweek International - Top ...
Find this book on the James Cook University (Qld) library catalogue. * Find this book on the Monash University library system ... Google Books and Amazon.com may be particularly helpful if you want to verify citations in Wikipedia articles, because they ...
agree that posting the review and/or published versions of the article or any part of this article in personal, institutional ... Biogas for Cooking Stoves. London: Chapman and Hall.. *Journal references should contains: name of author(s); year of ... the right to post copies of this article or any part of this article readily available and/or downloadable in public domains ... The authors shall not grant the right to print, publish, copy, or store electronically any part of the article to any other ...
The article, "Artists In Residence Give High-Tech Projects A Human Touch" discusses my Water Works* project as well as artwork ... It vaguely looks like cooking pot or a tortilla canister, but not *very* much. Those three rectangular ridges, parked at 120- ... We do know from various news articles and by my own photographs that there was not only a map, but physical blue drops painted ... Such is the case, with Owen Mundys article, Display at Your Own Risk, which looks at 3D printing, copyright and photogrammetry ...
Find some easy tips for cooking with wine including selection, how to use and recipes. ... WebMd - Article by Elaine Magee, MPH, RD. Cooking with wine articles tips on how to use wine as a substitute for fats in ... In This Article. When and Why To Add Wine To Your Recipe. Here are some tips on how to use wine in cooking. First you should ... How Much Alcohol Is Left After Cooking?. Cooking Method Residual Alcohol Alcohol added to boiling liquid & removed from heat 85 ...
Cooking With (Bio)Gas. Who knew changing a common kitchen appliance could lead to big conservation wins? When WWF replaces wood ... Biogas units reduce the demand for wood to cook with, which conserves about 254 acres of forest a year in Nepal and leaves more ... Biogas systems create methane cooking gas from the breakdown of animal, agricultural and human waste. When these natural ...
How Much Alcohol Burns Out After Cooking?. There is no exact way to know if all alcohol has been burnt off during cooking ... If this is for your day-to-day cooking, have fun experimenting. If you are cooking for guests and special occasions, then you ... For more ingredient substitutions, browse our Cooking Dictionary of Ingredients and Substitutions. Our cooking dictionary ... In This Article. About. We have compiled a list of nonalcoholic substitutes for recipes that call for various wines, spirits, ...
The whole process of cooking the food, spending time with family and friend whilst cooking up dinner is the best way to spend a ... At least, one of your members we re love to cook and good in it. Chicken recipe and pork recipe are one of the major dishes ... Understanding the Various Ways of Cooking Lamb Chops. 11th March 2009. One of the special and expensive meats that are used in ... You dont need to weigh the ingredients!) So, you want to cook yourself some irish stew? It is simple and literally does not ...
Beauty Cooking Health Life: 20 assigned downloads, like Juice + Nourish: 100 Refreshing Juices and Smoothies to Promote Health ... Similar tags: adsense • affiliate making money • articlearticlescooking • diet • fitness • general • healing • health • ... Recipes & Cooking. Music. MP3 (all). Jazz, Blues, Funk. Software / Programs. Business. Website Promotion. Development. HTML / ... Herbs have a myriad of uses, and not just for cooking. Herbs are also incredibly useful for healing the minor... ...
Location: Categories / Family & Home / Cooking & Food. Magazine articles on cooking, food, wine, and restaurants. ... Seasoned Cooking. November 2009. Sandra Lee. Slow Cooker Gatherings Like all busy cooks, I can always use the help the slow ... all articles. this category. Browse Main Topics:. Business. Computers & Electronics. Education & Reference. Entertainment & ... Seasoned Cooking. November 2009. Ronda L. Carnicelli. Rush Hour As fall brings an early taste of winter, fight back with a pot ...
Location: Categories / Family & Home / Cooking & Food. Magazine articles on cooking, food, wine, and restaurants. ... all articles. this category. Browse Main Topics:. Business. Computers & Electronics. Education & Reference. Entertainment & ... To help you silence such goons, here are some of the best cooking philosophies. Learn them and defeat all comers. ...
Find breaking news, commentary, and archival information about Cook County From The tribunedigital-chicagotribune (Page 4 of 5) ... Hospital of Cook County, according to the Cook County medical examiners office. He had been taken to Stroger in critical ... The Cook County probation department has a record of failing to do things it is supposed to do, like keep track of offenders ... Cook County Chief Judge Timothy Evans on Wednesday hired a well-known law firm to investigate allegations that the courts ...
Cooking Equipment, Cooking Utensils, Preparation Tips, Food Safety, Food Storage, Food Handling, Kitchen Safety., Page: 2 ... Articles about or concerning Cooking Tips & Advice, Cooking Equipment, Cooking Utensils, Preparation Tips, Food Safety, Food ... Sarah Cook (June 09, 2012) Cooking is a skill that often has the potential to have many effects on the person doing it. For ... Chef Todd Mohr (March 15, 2012) Simple cooking is the best cooking. There, I said it for the 1000th time! No matter where I ...
Love BBQ? Are you looking for the best propane grill? Look no further than this article. This article has the best propane ... The Difference between Direct and Indirect Cooking on Gas Grills. Cooking Lara - November 13, 2019. 0 ... How to Choose the Right Grill for Your Cooking Style. Cooking Lara - October 1, 2019. 0 ... How to Choose the Right Grill for Your Cooking Style Roasting meat on a grill, outdoors, in particular, is not just cookery! A ...
... sound and video of over 4000 species from the Cook Islands. ... Cook Islands Natural Heritage Articles. Articles Index The ... The Cook Islands Biodiversity Database contains detailed information, images, ... Recently Posted Articles *Dengue and Mosquito Control on Rarotonga 6/11/2007 ... Copyright © 2007 (July) The Cook Islands Natural Heritage Trust, all rights reserved.. Copyright & Use Policy ...
Stéphane Cook is the author of these articles in the Journal of Visualized Experiments: Kanin modellen av accelererad ... JoVE Articles. Dr. Stéphane Cook has not added a biography.. If you are Dr. Stéphane Cook and would like to personalize this ... Manish Jain*1, Aurélien Frobert*1, Jérémy Valentin1, Stéphane Cook1, Marie-Noëlle Giraud1 ... Aurélien Frobert1, Jérémy Valentin1, Stéphane Cook1, Justine Lopes-Vicente1, Marie-Noëlle Giraud1 ...
Cooking Practices During Pregnancy Affect Hyperactivity Children PubMed Journal Articles published on BioPortfolio , ... Three cooking conditions were studied: control, cooking time traditionally adopted by the meat industry; TUS and TWUS: cooking ... Search PubMed Articles Only by Keyword: Relevance Date Showing "Cooking practices during pregnancy affect hyperactivity ... In this review article, the most recent and innovative applications of recycled waste cooking oil are reported and discussed. ...
Cooking. Written by John Immel, Asheville, NC. Sign in to review this page. SAVE ARTICLE ... Questions, Comments & Impressions of cooking?. Is there something youd like to know about cooking? Sign in to review this ... My Saved Articles , Browse All , Recently Published , Most Popular , Seasonal Tips , Browse Symptoms STUDY AYURVEDA ... Learn about Ayurveda from the author of this article and founder of Joyful Belly, John Immel. ...
Questions and Answers - Paraffin Wax, Parawax, Bakers Wax, or Cooking Wax Question: I have a question about cooking wax. I ... Converted Rice Question: I am going to cook some Risotto for my family. How is Arborio rice different from Converted rice? T ... Whats Cooking America is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program ... Travels in Jerez de la Frontera, Spain - Part 6 By Nancy Hartman of Whats Cooking America Destino - Jerez de la Frontera, ...
Cooking Snow Peas. Questions and Answers - Snow Pea, Chinese Pea Pod, Sugar Peas Question: How should snow peas be cooked? ... Questions and Answers - Pique Seasoning Question: I have a copy of The Gold Cook Book by Louis P. DeGouy and am reading it ... Whats Cooking America is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program ... Travels in Olvera and Antequera, Spain - Part 7 By Nancy Hartman of Whats Cooking America Destino - Olvera, Spain: Route of ...
Raw versus Cooked: Which is More Natural? - This archives is presented to assist our visitors in taking a pro-active part in ... Raw versus Cooked: Which is More Natural?. A Vegan Health Article from All-Creatures.org. These vegan health articles are ... even individuals living for more than a few days without access to cooked foods. Then they take on the belief that cooking is a ... We believe the articles and information contained herein are true, but are not presenting them as advice. We, personally, have ...
Contact Us - Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums - Archive - Community Rules - Terms of Service - Privacy - Top ... Cooking Links. Member Photos. FAQ. Members List. Social Groups. Calendar. Search. Todays Posts. Mark Forums Read. Log in. ... Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums , General Cooking Information , Menu Planning , Todays Menu Interesting article about MSG ...
Geography of the Cook Islands History of the Cook Islands LGBT rights in the Cook Islands Music of the Cook Islands New Zealand ... Communications in the Cook Islands Cook Islands Maori Cook Islands Party Cook, Captain James Catholic Church in Rarotonga ... Roman Catholic Diocese of Rarotonga Rugby union in the Cook Islands Sport in the Cook Islands Survivor: Cook Islands Transport ... This page contains a list topics related to the Cook Islands: Contents : Top 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W ...
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Want more articles like this?. Sign up to receive weekly articles. Youll also receive a 15% off coupon, weekly articles, and ... I assume that cooking it could do the same. If you eat cooked broccoli, eat some raw radish with it to restore some of the lost ... Cooking reduces the content by around 30%.. Dont worry though -- the only way it could ever lead to thyroid suppressing ... Thanks for this article! I was recently diagnosed with hypothyroid and I was beyond upset to read that cruciferous vegetables ...
Article printed from Gourmet Kosher Cooking: https://gourmetkoshercooking.com URL to article: https://gourmetkoshercooking.com/ ... Gourmet Kosher Cooking - https://gourmetkoshercooking.com - Finish Your Chocolate - Maybe Posted By On November 27, 2011 @ 2:00 ... Copyright © 2009 Gourmet Kosher Cooking. All rights reserved. ...
Want more articles like this?. Sign up to receive weekly articles. Youll also receive a 15% off coupon, weekly articles, and ... Is it possible to have a healthy Chili Cook-Off? Well, for the sake of those amazing dads in our lives, we decided to give it a ... Fathers Day Chili Cook-Off: 2 Healthy Chili Recipes Dad Will Love ... Fathers Day Chili Cook-Off: 2 Healthy Chili Recipes Dad Will Love. ...
  • England's two-month tour of the West Indies takes place at the start of 2019 and Cook could join the likes of David Lloyd, Darren Gough and Mark Nicholas if he takes up the commentary stint. (sport360.com)
  • Minnesota Vikings running back Dalvin Cook (33) scores on a 1-yard touchdown run ahead of Oakland Raiders defensive tackle Maurice Hurst (73) during the first half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019, in Minneapolis. (kimt.com)
  • How to Choose the Right Grill for Your Cooking Style Roasting meat on a grill, outdoors, in particular, is not just cookery! (mippin.com)
  • The aim of this study was to determine and to compare the presence of oxytetracycline (OTC) residues in raw and cooked (boiled) meat before and after withdrawal period with the Maximum Residue Limits (MRL) using biological and physicochemical techniques. (springer.com)
  • For each portions of sample, the juice meat and muscle tissues samples were collected after cooking at 80 °C during 45 min and after freezing/defrosting for the raw meat. (springer.com)
  • While the Premi®Test analysis showed negative results for raw meat tested and positive results for juice of meat cooked in both samples. (springer.com)
  • a relationship between the concentrations of residues of antibiotics after waiting period and cooking is not established since meat is always cooked before consumption. (springer.com)
  • Data from in vitro studies show that red meat (beef) is a highly bioavailable source of several key elements, but cooking method may influence this bioavailability. (springer.com)
  • In a randomized cross-over controlled trial, healthy males ( n = 12, 18-25 years) were fed a breakfast of beef steak (270 ± 20 g) in which the meat was either pan-fried (PF) or sous-vide (SV) cooked. (springer.com)
  • Make sure to use separate cutting boards, utensils, tongs and plates for raw meat and cooked products. (medicinenet.com)
  • Trim all visible fat from meat before cooking. (heart.org)
  • Stews, boiled meat, soup stock or other dishes in which fat cooks into the liquid can be refrigerated. (heart.org)
  • In order to make the process of cooking easier, you should take to time to make large amounts of meat or vegetable stock and store it in the freezer. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Extract Mix Affects Spoilage Microorganisms Growth Rate in Vacuum-Packaged Cooked Sausages Made from Pork Meat, Emmer Wheat (Triticum dicoccum Schübler), Almond (Prunus dulcis Mill. (mdpi.com)
  • OBJECTIVE To examine open-flame and/or high-temperature cooking (grilling/barbecuing, broiling, or roasting) and doneness preferences (rare, medium, or well done) for red meat, chicken, and fish in relation to type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk among U.S. adults who consumed animal flesh regularly (≥2 servings/week). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • After multivariate adjustments including baseline BMI and total consumption of red meat, chicken, and fish, higher frequency of open-flame and/or high-temperature cooking was independently associated with an elevated T2D risk. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS Independent of consumption amount, open-flame and/or high-temperature cooking for both red meat and chicken is associated with an increased T2D risk among adults who consume animal flesh regularly. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Cooking a duck on a rotisserie produces a very moist and flavorful bird with well-done meat and crisp skin. (livestrong.com)
  • Use moist-cooking methods for tender, flavorful meat because rabbit meat has naturally low moisture content. (livestrong.com)
  • Rubbing them with butter, margarine , or some kind of cooking oil not only helps the skin get crispy and brown, it also helps keep the meat moist and flavorful. (wisegeek.com)
  • When cooking a ham, it's best to turn it over at the half-way point in order to evenly distribute juices and salt throughout the meat. (wisegeek.com)
  • Vegetarians have finessed the cooking of soya and for people with allergies to cow's milk, meat products or any of the usage of animal fats, soya products works for them and the family that join in for the overall eatable family meal. (infobarrel.com)
  • Cooking Term Dégorger : french term meaning to soak meat, poultry, fish or offal in cold water (with or without vinegar) to eliminate impurities. (cheftalk.com)
  • Cooking Term A l'Anglaise : description given for diverse preparations to vegetable, meat and fish. (cheftalk.com)
  • Carrie Westengate (July 03, 2012) One of the hardest things to master in cooking is learning how to bake. (articleslash.net)
  • Bake the salmon for 10-14 minutes, or until the salmon is cooked through and flakes easily with a fork. (diabetes.org)
  • Many persons with eating disorders love to cook and will constantly cook and bake for their family or friends," said Theresa Fassihi, PhD, a psychologist with the Eating Disorders Program at The Menninger Clinic in Houston. (psychcentral.com)
  • Cooks should almost always coat the turkey wings with some kind of fat, add water to the pan to ensure moisture, and leave plenty of time for the wings to bake all the way through. (wisegeek.com)
  • It is usually best to keep the oven at a low temperature when cooking a ham and bake it for a longer period of time in order to avoid drying it out. (wisegeek.com)
  • The simple cooking tips below will help you prepare tasty, heart-healthy meals that could help improve your cholesterol levels by reducing excess saturated fat and trans fat. (heart.org)
  • As parents are key for family meals, we analysed the influence of parents' cooking skills confidence on children's consumption of ultra-processed foods at dinner. (bioportfolio.com)
  • More than three million children in Maharashtra will no longer be served freshly cooked meals in government-run crèches called anganwadis . (business-standard.com)
  • So far, under the four-decades old nationwide scheme called the Integrated Child Development Services, anganwadis provide supplementary nutrition to children between the age of three and six in the form of daily hot cooked meals, either prepared by anganwadi staff or supplied by local groups. (business-standard.com)
  • The state government's move will provide an assured Rs 575 crore worth annual business to the few who can manufacture the ready-to-cook meals. (business-standard.com)
  • Older children love the hot cooked meals, but the take-home rations are so bad to taste, they are usually just thrown away or given to cattle," said Nilima Ghate, who has been running the Mauli Mahila Bachatgat since 2006. (business-standard.com)
  • This site is dedicated to showing you that even with a limited grocery budget you can cook good meals for your family. (blogspot.com)
  • My focus here is showing people that you can cook home made meals for you and your family even if your grocery budget is tight. (blogspot.com)
  • As part of the search process, Bishop Cook fully disclosed the 2010 DUI for which charges were filed resulting in a 'probation before judgment. (christianpost.com)
  • He continued: "Understanding that [the] discussion of alcohol and alcoholism in the Cook case is sheer speculation, I'd like to make several tentative remarks to those who might argue that Bishop Cook may have demonstrated to the search committee that she was in a recovery program and was addressing her alcoholism successfully. (christianpost.com)
  • Alastair Cook might still be playing his final Test but the commentary gigs have already started pouring in for the England opener. (sport360.com)
  • Everything went well from the first morning when the Indian third slip, Ravindra Jadeja, dropped Alastair Cook on 15. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • In typically vague fashion, Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook evaded questions and offered little in the way of details during his company's quarterly earnings conference call on Tuesday. (appleinsider.com)
  • Apple Inc. Chief Executive Tim Cook on Wednesday called for privacy regulation, saying consumers should have more visibility into not only what personal information they share online but how companies stitch together that information to better understand their users. (wsj.com)
  • BEIJING-Apple Inc. Chief Executive Tim Cook, in a meeting with senior Chinese government officials, pledged to increase investment in China, including creating Apple's first research center in the country. (wsj.com)
  • The Australian supermarket giant focuses on keeping their business efficient and simple, and believes that the sale of cooked chickens frightens management. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • While supermarket giants such as Woolworths and Coles sell millions of cooked chickens every year, Aldi refuses to do so. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • Cooking with these delicate oils at high temperatures can degrade some of their healthy benefits, so use them when baking or cooking at lower temps, or save the expensive stuff for drizzling on dishes. (active.com)
  • Cooking Term Zephyr: (Zéphyre) (the name mean literally "a light Wind") the name is given to various savoury and sweet dishes, served Hot or. (cheftalk.com)
  • some times i roast the quinos in its cook pan until the quinoa starts popping and then i add the liquid. (blogspot.com)
  • Healthy pigments are lost through cooking, so the longer you steam or roast beets, the fewer phytonutrients you'll end up with. (canadianliving.com)
  • Coating a stainless steel surface with an everyday cooking oil has proven remarkably effective in repelling bacteria," says Hatton who collaborated on the project with AGRI-NEO, an Ontario seed processing company looking for a solution to a common problem in its industry. (eurekalert.org)
  • The research showed that using a surface treatment and a cooking oil barrier provides greater coverage and results in 1,000 less bacteria roaming around. (eurekalert.org)
  • Cooking destroys a slew of bacteria that would otherwise go unnoticed into your system. (business-standard.com)
  • Parents' cooking skills confidence reduce children's consumption of ultra-processed foods. (bioportfolio.com)
  • First, they note that other than the new deliberate 'raw foodists,' there do not seem to be any current or historical populations, small groups or even individuals living for more than a few days without access to cooked foods. (all-creatures.org)
  • There have been major changes in our digestive biology over the past few hundred thousand years, and the researchers argue that these changes may have been due to the availability of cooked foods. (all-creatures.org)
  • 100,000 years ago, for example, the size of our jaws and molar teeth started to shrink, perhaps as an adaptation to softer, easier-chewed cooked foods. (all-creatures.org)
  • They also posit that perhaps other differences between our digestive systems and those of the great apes may also have been because of our adaptation to cooked foods--our smaller gut volume, longer small intestine, smaller colon, and faster gut passage rate. (all-creatures.org)
  • The second technique, called pressure cooking, requires a tightly sealed, often latched, vessel, in which characteristically tough or long-cooking foods may be subjected to steam cooking under high pressure. (britannica.com)
  • Our results indicate that in both warm eastern Mediterranean and cold northwestern European climates, and across their latitudinal range, Neanderthals made use of the diverse plant foods available in their local environment and transformed them into more easily digestible foodstuffs in part through cooking them, suggesting an overall sophistication in Neanderthal dietary regimes. (pnas.org)
  • They can also be can be lost through contact with water - in some cases, up to 80 per cent of some flavonoids can be lost into cooking water during the boiling of foods. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • When using it in cooking, opt for the fresh leaves and wait until the very last moment before adding them to your dish. (theecologist.org)
  • Many cooks like to add about .5 inch (about 1 cm) of water to the bottom of the baking dish before adding the turkey wings. (wisegeek.com)
  • He is quick to point out the finer points of old-fashioned bush cooking, and is happy to share tricks of the trade with travellers who do not have time to build up the necessary coals. (abc.net.au)
  • The traditional cast iron camp oven is a prized piece of equipment in the cupboard of the aspiring bush cook, and can be worth hundreds of dollars to the collector. (abc.net.au)
  • Watch the bird carefully, as duck usually cooks more quickly in a rotisserie than in the oven, the Hobby Farms website advises. (livestrong.com)
  • Cook received a guard of honour from India in his final Test. (sport360.com)
  • Replacing smoky indoor cooking fires in India with environmentally friendly cookstoves would have the same effect on health as almost halving the country's cancer burden, a study says. (scidev.net)
  • Frying and broiling are also best for thin slices of ham as the outsides will be crisp and insides will be moist, if cooked properly. (wisegeek.com)
  • I know that this is not the most delicate way to cook it, but I make mine by simply frying it in a pan in oil with a little salt and pepper. (wisegeek.com)
  • Cooked quinoa will keep tightly covered in the refrigerator for several days, and is prepared by thoroughly rinsing and scrubbing the seeds with your fingers under cold running water and soaking for at least four hours in two parts fresh water. (blogspot.com)
  • That's the first rule of cooking something in a poaching method. (articleslash.net)
  • Baking is typically the method of choice when cooking turkey wings because it is often the most reliable way to ensure they're cooked through to the bone. (wisegeek.com)
  • To use this method, cooks often cover the wings with aluminum foil for about half the baking time, then uncover them to allow the water to evaporate and encourage the wings to get crispy. (wisegeek.com)
  • According to the report, Cook is yet to make a call on the offer but the signs are that the Englishman will not be short of career options once he finally hangs up his cricketing boots. (sport360.com)
  • 3. A Ramen cooker that'll make cooking up ramen even faster and easier. (buzzfeed.com)
  • Make sure that when you are making your pasta, not to use oil in the water upon cooking. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Make changes/additions/deletions to the article below, and one of our editors will publish your suggestions if warranted. (wisegeek.com)
  • Too much of anything will in the soya bean products case over load you with protein so, make sure you cook knowing soya is a protein product. (infobarrel.com)
  • When cooking from 200 degrees to 250 degrees HCA formations increases by three times. (business-standard.com)
  • Close the lid and cook the duck for 45 to 60 minutes, or until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the bird's thigh, without touching bone, reads a minimum of 165 degrees F. If necessary, continue cooking the duck until it is done. (livestrong.com)
  • Cook the quinoa by bringing the water and soaked seeds to a boil, then reducing the heat to low, covering the pan with a lid, and simmering for 20 minutes or until the liquid has been absorbed before fluffing with a fork. (blogspot.com)
  • If you're cooking them long and slow with water in the pan this isn't so crucial, but they generally won't get crispy in that case. (wisegeek.com)
  • imgs/articles/sweetbreads/Fig2.jpgRemove sweetbreads from the blanching water and plunge them into ice water. (cheftalk.com)
  • What's Cooking America is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to products which are identified on this web site with green text. (whatscookingamerica.net)
  • If you are Dr. Stéphane Cook and would like to personalize this page please email our Author Liason for assistance. (jove.com)
  • There are 14 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. (wikihow.com)
  • The first page of the PDF of this article appears below. (bmj.com)