Sea Lions: A group comprised of several species of aquatic carnivores in different genera, in the family Otariidae. In comparison to FUR SEALS, they have shorter, less dense hair.Los AngelesSan FranciscoPeromyscus: A genus of the subfamily SIGMODONTINAE consisting of 49 species. Two of these are widely used in medical research. They are P. leucopus, or the white-footed mouse, and P. maniculatus, or the deer mouse.Encephalitis, California: A viral infection of the brain caused by serotypes of California encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, CALIFORNIA) transmitted to humans by the mosquito AEDES triseriatus. The majority of cases are caused by the LA CROSSE VIRUS. This condition is endemic to the midwestern United States and primarily affects children between 5-10 years of age. Clinical manifestations include FEVER; VOMITING; HEADACHE; and abdominal pain followed by SEIZURES, altered mentation, and focal neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13)United StatesAsian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.MexicoGeography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Encephalitis, Arbovirus: Infections of the brain caused by arthropod-borne viruses (i.e., arboviruses) primarily from the families TOGAVIRIDAE; FLAVIVIRIDAE; BUNYAVIRIDAE; REOVIRIDAE; and RHABDOVIRIDAE. Life cycles of these viruses are characterized by ZOONOSES, with birds and lower mammals serving as intermediate hosts. The virus is transmitted to humans by the bite of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) or TICKS. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, alterations of mentation, focal neurologic deficits, and COMA. (From Clin Microbiol Rev 1994 Jan;7(1):89-116; Walton, Brain's Diseases of the Nervous System, 10th ed, p321)Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Hospitals, County: Hospitals controlled by the county government.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Eschscholzia: A plant genus of the family PAPAVERACEAE that contains benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids.Pacific OceanPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.NevadaTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Pesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Uncompensated Care: Medical services for which no payment is received. Uncompensated care includes charity care and bad debts.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Sciuridae: A family of the order Rodentia which contains 49 genera. Some of the more common genera are MARMOTA, which includes the marmot and woodchuck; Sciurus, the gray squirrel, S. carolinensis, and the fox squirrel, S. niger; Tamias, the eastern and western chipmunk; and Tamiasciurus, the red squirrel. The flying squirrels, except the scaly-tailed Anomaluridae, also belong to this family.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Coccidioidomycosis: Infection with a fungus of the genus COCCIDIOIDES, endemic to the SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES. It is sometimes called valley fever but should not be confused with RIFT VALLEY FEVER. Infection is caused by inhalation of airborne, fungal particles known as arthroconidia, a form of FUNGAL SPORES. A primary form is an acute, benign, self-limited respiratory infection. A secondary form is a virulent, severe, chronic, progressive granulomatous disease with systemic involvement. It can be detected by use of COCCIDIOIDIN.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Independent Practice Associations: A partnership, corporation, association, or other legal entity that enters into an arrangement for the provision of services with persons who are licensed to practice medicine, osteopathy, and dentistry, and with other care personnel. Under an IPA arrangement, licensed professional persons provide services through the entity in accordance with a mutually accepted compensation arrangement, while retaining their private practices. Services under the IPA are marketed through a prepaid health plan. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Hawaii: A group of islands in Polynesia, in the north central Pacific Ocean, comprising eight major and 114 minor islands, largely volcanic and coral. Its capital is Honolulu. It was first reached by Polynesians about 500 A.D. It was discovered and named the Sandwich Islands in 1778 by Captain Cook. The islands were united under the rule of King Kamehameha 1795-1819 and requested annexation to the United States in 1893 when a provisional government was set up. Hawaii was established as a territory in 1900 and admitted as a state in 1959. The name is from the Polynesian Owhyhii, place of the gods, with reference to the two volcanoes Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, regarded as the abode of the gods. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p493 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p2330)Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Quercus: A plant genus of the family FAGACEAE that is a source of TANNINS. Do not confuse with Holly (ILEX).Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Bunyaviridae: A family of viruses, mainly arboviruses, consisting of a single strand of RNA. Virions are enveloped particles 90-120 nm diameter. The complete family contains over 300 members arranged in five genera: ORTHOBUNYAVIRUS; HANTAVIRUS; NAIROVIRUS; PHLEBOVIRUS; and TOSPOVIRUS.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Persea: A plant genus in the LAURACEAE family. The tree, Persea americana Mill., is known for the Avocado fruit, the food of commerce.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Culex: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) commonly found in tropical regions. Species of this genus are vectors for ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS as well as many other diseases of man and domestic and wild animals.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Pinnipedia: The suborder of aquatic CARNIVORA comprising the WALRUSES; FUR SEALS; SEA LIONS; and EARLESS SEALS. They have fusiform bodies with very short tails and are found on all sea coasts. The offspring are born on land.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Social Control Policies: Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Umbellularia: A plant genus in the LAURACEAE family. The tree, Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt., is known for aromatic leaves used in SPICES having a similar flavor to LAURUS.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Capitation Fee: A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Mexican Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.TexasSex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.PhilippinesBirds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Nitric Acid: Nitric acid (HNO3). A colorless liquid that is used in the manufacture of inorganic and organic nitrates and nitro compounds for fertilizers, dye intermediates, explosives, and many different organic chemicals. Continued exposure to vapor may cause chronic bronchitis; chemical pneumonitis may occur. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Tobacco Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Introduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.Medical Indigency: The condition in which individuals are financially unable to access adequate medical care without depriving themselves and their dependents of food, clothing, shelter, and other essentials of living.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Bays: An area of water mostly surrounded by land, usually smaller than a gulf, and affording access to the sea.Encephalomyelitis, Western Equine: A form of arboviral encephalitis (which primarily affects horses) endemic to western and central regions of NORTH AMERICA. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, WESTERN EQUINE) may be transferred to humans via the bite of mosquitoes (CULEX tarsalis and others). Clinical manifestations include headache and influenza-like symptoms followed by alterations in mentation, SEIZURES, and COMA. DEATH occurs in a minority of cases. Survivors may recover fully or be left with residual neurologic dysfunction, including PARKINSONISM, POSTENCEPHALITIC. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp8-9)Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Epidemiological Monitoring: Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.New YorkAlgorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.ArizonaDatabases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Insurance, Hospitalization: Health insurance providing benefits to cover or partly cover hospital expenses.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Mytilus: A genus of marine mussels in the family MYTILIDAE, class BIVALVIA. The species MYTILUS EDULIS is the highly edible common mussel.Oceanic Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Mandatory Programs: Programs in which participation is required.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Sequoia: A plant genus of the family TAXODIACEAE known for including some of the tallest trees.Beauty CultureEmigrants and Immigrants: People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.Ozone: The unstable triatomic form of oxygen, O3. It is a powerful oxidant that is produced for various chemical and industrial uses. Its production is also catalyzed in the ATMOSPHERE by ULTRAVIOLET RAY irradiation of oxygen or other ozone precursors such as VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS and NITROGEN OXIDES. About 90% of the ozone in the atmosphere exists in the stratosphere (STRATOSPHERIC OZONE).Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Pacific States: The geographic designation for states bordering on or located in the Pacific Ocean. The states so designated are Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. (U.S. Geologic Survey telephone communication)Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Firearms: Small-arms weapons, including handguns, pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns, etc.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Communication Barriers: Those factors, such as language or sociocultural relationships, which interfere in the meaningful interpretation and transmission of ideas between individuals or groups.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Fisheries: Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Encephalomyelitis, Equine: A group of ALPHAVIRUS INFECTIONS which affect horses and man, transmitted via the bites of mosquitoes. Disorders in this category are endemic to regions of South America and North America. In humans, clinical manifestations vary with the type of infection, and range from a mild influenza-like syndrome to a fulminant encephalitis. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp8-10)Arthropod Vectors: Arthropods, other than insects and arachnids, which transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.FiresModels, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Encephalitis Virus, Western Equine: A species of ALPHAVIRUS that is the etiologic agent of encephalomyelitis in humans and equines in the United States, southern Canada, and parts of South America.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.West Nile Fever: A mosquito-borne viral illness caused by the WEST NILE VIRUS, a FLAVIVIRUS and endemic to regions of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Common clinical features include HEADACHE; FEVER; maculopapular rash; gastrointestinal symptoms; and lymphadenopathy. MENINGITIS; ENCEPHALITIS; and MYELITIS may also occur. The disease may occasionally be fatal or leave survivors with residual neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13; Lancet 1998 Sep 5;352(9130):767-71)Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.North AmericaMortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Schools: Educational institutions.Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Managed Competition: A strategy for purchasing health care in a manner which will obtain maximum value for the price for the purchasers of the health care and the recipients. The concept was developed primarily by Alain Enthoven of Stanford University and promulgated by the Jackson Hole Group. The strategy depends on sponsors for groups of the population to be insured. The sponsor, in some cases a health alliance, acts as an intermediary between the group and competing provider groups (accountable health plans). The competition is price-based among annual premiums for a defined, standardized benefit package. (From Slee and Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993)OregonHalogenated Diphenyl Ethers: Compounds that contain two halogenated benzene rings linked via an OXYGEN atom. Many polybrominated diphenyl ethers are used as FLAME RETARDANTS.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Rodent Diseases: Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).Air Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Governing Board: The group in which legal authority is vested for the control of health-related institutions and organizations.
  • The world's toughest motor vehicle race, the Baja 1000, followed an 883-mile desert loop designed by the devil himself, out, up, down and around, across washes and over boulders, on the most inhospitable terrain of the Baja California peninsula, starting and finishing in Ensenada. (mexconnect.com)
  • It winds through mountains and desert in the most remote parts of Baja California with drivers dodging Mother Nature's homespun hazards like rugged dry washes and rapid changes in altitude. (mexconnect.com)
  • Baja California is a peninsula, over 1,000 miles long. (mexconnect.com)
  • There are few places more relaxing than Baja California, and no time better to go there than winter. (mexconnect.com)
  • The most recent California poll ( http://www.ppic.org/publication/californians-views-on-climate-change/ ) found that two-thirds of respondents believe the effects of climate change "are already occurring" and 81 percent believe it to be "a serious threat" to the state's future. (opednews.com)
  • California could lose 170,000 aerospace-related jobs by the end of the decade if it does not act aggressively to improve the state's competitiveness, according to a study by a prominent consulting firm. (latimes.com)
  • Ten years ago, I published a book that explores the history of eugenics and sterilization in California, but I was frustrated that my research had yielded so little information about the state's extensive sterilization program. (cidsanmateo.org)
  • California Gov. Gavin Newsom discussing the state's covid-19 cases during a recent press conference. (technologyreview.com)
  • The proposed expansion would affect some of the parts of California hardest hit by drought, from the state's agriculturally rich central valley to wine country and oil-drilling fields along the Salinas River. (commondreams.org)
  • The grim prediction came as the California Public Utilities Commission launched an investigation into two of the state's largest utilities - PG&E in Northern California and Southern California Edison. (nypost.com)
  • Drought has expanded from just under 10% of the state last week to nearly a quarter, mainly in central California, the heart of the state's agricultural sector, according to a U.S. Drought Monitor map made public Thursday. (nypost.com)
  • Even if Brown had signed the proposed law, separate rules still prohibit the state's California Institute for Regenerative Medicine from funding research on stem cell lines created with eggs from paid donors. (nature.com)
  • Serious fires in California are increasingly frequent and violent, as evidenced by the fact that four of the five most destructive fires in the state's history have occurred in the past six years, according to official records dating back to 1932. (business-standard.com)
  • In response, on August 5th, Donald Trump tweeted: "California wildfires are being magnified & made so much worse by the bad environmental laws. (opednews.com)
  • In Trump's full tweet, he said: "California wildfires are being magnified & made so much worse by the bad environmental laws which aren't allowing massive amount of readily available water to be properly utilized. (opednews.com)
  • A recent article by Alice Hill and William Kakenmaster ( https://www.hoover.org/research/new-normal-californias-increasing-wildfire-risk-and-what-do-about-it ) reported: "Many factors contribute to [California] wildfires, but two in particular greatly contribute to increasing risk: climate change and growing development in the wildland-urban interface (WUI). (opednews.com)
  • The Governor noted that California is already experiencing some consequences of climate change, including "loss of snowpack, drought, sea level rise, more frequent and intense wildfires, heat waves, more severe smog, and harm to natural and working lands. (handelonthelaw.com)
  • The complex near Simi Valley is the second big southern California institution in as many days to be protected from a rash of wildfires by fire-prevention work. (nationalpost.com)
  • The hellish California wildfires are now the most destructive in state history , authorities said Monday as they continued the grim task of searching for bodies and investigating whether faulty utility equipment sparked the blazes. (nypost.com)
  • On Wednesday, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said 22 wildfires were burning, up from 17 a day earlier. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • The blaze in Lake County is one of two wildfires that sped through parched Northern California on Sunday, destroying at least 81 homes, forcing thousands to flee, injuring four firefighters and prompting the governor to declare a state of emergency. (voanews.com)
  • halai, then at Stanford University and now chair of otolaryngology at the University of Southern California 's Keck School of Medicine , uses a laser-based technology called optical coherence tomography (OCT) to get the pi. (octnews.org)
  • Researchers at the University of Southern California 's (USC's) Keck School of Medicine has been studying noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and according to their findings, t. (octnews.org)
  • Peter K. Kaiser, MD Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Carmen A. Puliafito, MD, MBA Keck School of Medicine University of Southern California Philip J. Rosenfeld, MD, PhD Bascom Palmer Eye Institute SriniVas R. (octnews.org)
  • 5 Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California , Los Angeles, California, USA ^* Correspondence Professor Christopher Huds. (octnews.org)
  • President Trump thanked first responders in a tweet Monday, writing: "The California Fire Fighters, FEMA and First Responders are amazing and very brave. (nypost.com)
  • A helicopter drops flame retardant on a wildfire in Malibu, California. (nypost.com)
  • SAN FRANCISCO - A dry beginning of the year has left most of California abnormally parched, as officials brace for the possibility of an early and more intense wildfire season amid record-breaking temperatures. (nypost.com)
  • A wildfire that raced through dry brush in Northern California on Sunday heavily damaged the small town of Middletown, burning buildings in the downtown and reducing other parts of the town to ash. (voanews.com)
  • Last year, California Governor Jerry Brown called extreme fire conditions "the new normal" under climate change. (opednews.com)
  • California Governor Jerry Brown has vetoed a proposed law that would have allowed payments to women who give their eggs to scientific researchers , a move that may deter other states from attempting to ease similar bans. (nature.com)
  • Analyses of hospital length of stay and clinical outcomes included 1328 people admitted by 9 April 2020 (534 in northern California, 711 in southern California, and 83 in Washington). (bmj.com)
  • Results As of 22 April 2020, cumulative incidences of a first acute hospital admission for covid-19 were 15.6 per 100 000 cohort members in northern California, 23.3 per 100 000 in southern California, and 14.7 per 100 000 in Washington. (bmj.com)
  • Michael Ares I was born and raised in Whittier, Calif., in Los Angeles County. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Large-scale false imprisonments in Los Angeles County, California, were previously reported. (opednews.com)
  • Starting in 2001, Richard Fine, a former US Prosecutor, exposed and protested the then secret payment to all Superior Court of California judges by Los Angeles County. (opednews.com)
  • In a matching parallel, Lee Baca, Sheriff of Los Angeles County, after over three months of communications, including intervention by the Honorable Michael Antonovich, Los Angeles County Supervisor, has refused to comply with the law, and has continuously denied access to California Public Records, which were the arrest and booking papers of Mr. Fine. (opednews.com)
  • In a notice of ruling filed Oct. 8 in the California Superior Court for Los Angeles County, the parties noted that, one day prior, the court denied Kelly-Moore Paint Company Inc.'s motion to dismiss or, in the alternative, stay based on forum non conveniens. (harrismartin.com)
  • There have been 576 cases throughout California, including 490 in San Diego County, 71 in Santa Cruz County and eight in Los Angeles County. (nationalpost.com)
  • city, seat of Los Angeles county, southern California, U.S. It is the second most populous city and metropolitan area (after New York City) in the United States. (britannica.com)
  • Downey , city, Los Angeles county, southern California , U.S. Situated about 10 miles (16 km) east of the Pacific Ocean , it lies just southeast of central Los Angeles . (britannica.com)
  • The southern California city of Downey is situated in Los Angeles County about 9 miles (15 kilometers) southeast of central Los Angeles and 10 miles (16 kilometers) east of the Pacific Ocean. (britannica.com)
  • Considered by the Spanish Empire to be the only viable method of spreading the Catholic faith among the local Native American populations, the missions represented the first major effort by Europeans to colonize the Pacific Coast region, and helped Spain enforce its 167-year-old claim to Alta California as established by Sebastián Vizcaíno in 1602. (citizendium.org)
  • A successful missionary, he was appointed a member of the second Spanish land expedition to Alta California in 1769. (history.com)
  • Appointed president of the Alta California presidios, Serra eventually founded a total of nine missions, stretching from San Diego to present-day San Francisco . (history.com)
  • A search-and-rescue team pulled a rare half-ton whale fossil from a Southern California backyard Friday, a feat that the team agreed to take on as a makeshift training mission. (csmonitor.com)
  • Alameda County sheriff's and coroner's officers search for human remains at a burned residence in Paradise, California. (nypost.com)
  • Father Junípero Serra, a Spanish Franciscan missionary, founds the first Catholic mission in California on the site of present-day San Diego. (history.com)
  • The new rail corporation's Los Angeles-San Diego route was selected based upon engineering and feasibility studies of California sites. (csmonitor.com)
  • Sunsweet traces its history back to 1917, when some California fruit growers formed a cooperative named California Prune and Apricot Growers in an effort to raise and stabilize what had been disastrously low prices for their commodities. (encyclopedia.com)
  • FRIDAY, Sept. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News)-- Lawmakers in California on Friday gave final approval to "right-to-die" legislation that would allow the terminally ill to legally end their lives. (medicinenet.com)
  • Maynard moved to Oregon so she could end her own life when the time was right, and became a prominent activist in the "death with dignity" movement through online videos and well-read news articles about her choice. (medicinenet.com)
  • At a New York news conference March 31, Lawrence D. Gilson, vice-president of Corporate Development at Amtrak and president of the American High Speed Rail Corporation, said he believes that once bullet train service is established in California, ''the demand will be great for other routes around the country. (csmonitor.com)
  • The influence of human anti-OC125 antibodies formed after multiple infusions of OC125 F(ab′) 2 fragments on the apparent levels of CA 125 measured with four different tests were examined in two ovarian cancer patients. (springer.com)
  • 80% or more of women with ovarian cancer have high levels of CA-125. (webmd.com)
  • And you also can have higher-than-normal levels of CA-125 without having ovarian cancer . (webmd.com)
  • Also, healthy, normal tissue in the cells of the ovaries, pancreas , breast , and lining of the chest and stomach make and release low levels of CA-125. (webmd.com)
  • Very high levels of CA-125 after you finish ovarian cancer treatment could be a sign that the cancer has returned. (webmd.com)
  • Hmm, so California "environmentalists" are responsible for the fires? (opednews.com)
  • Meanwhile, the Woolsey and Hill fires in Southern California, which are threatening the star-studded neighborhood of Malibu, grew more than 143 square miles overnight. (nypost.com)
  • In Southern California, firefighters quickly knocked down several brush fires on Wednesday. (nypost.com)
  • PBE and PME data for California kindergarten classes from the 2001/2002 to 2013/2014 school years were matched to the locations of schools. (aappublications.org)
  • The current study examines PBE data from California between the 2001/2002 and 2014/2015 school years to determine spatial patterns of PBEs in kindergartners as well as the type of school populations associated with higher rates of PBEs. (aappublications.org)
  • In 2010, 9120 cases of pertussis were reported in California, more than any year since 1947. (aappublications.org)
  • We analyzed nonmedical exemptions (NMEs) for children entering kindergarten from 2005 through 2010 and pertussis cases with onset in 2010 in California to determine if NMEs increased in that period, if children obtaining NMEs clustered spatially, if pertussis cases clustered spatially and temporally, and if there was statistically significant overlap between clusters of NMEs and cases. (aappublications.org)
  • Our data suggest clustering of NMEs may have been 1 of several factors in the 2010 California pertussis resurgence. (aappublications.org)
  • Apologists argue that as the nation's most populous state and its largest economy, California requires a heightened level of government oversight-a claim that loses validity when one considers that Texas is second in both categories. (city-journal.org)
  • Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Klug TL, Green PJ, Zurawski VR, Davis HM (1988) Confirmation of a false positive result in CA 125 immunoradiometric assay caused by human anti-idiotypic immunoglobulin. (springer.com)
  • Krantz MJ, MacLean G, Longenecker BM, Suresh MR (1988) A radioimmunoassay for CA 125 employing two new monoclonal antibodies (Abstract). (springer.com)
  • For the study, researchers used the California Cancer Registry to evaluate the records of 77,363 confirmed kidney cancer cases diagnosed in California from 1988 through 2013. (eurekalert.org)
  • California, with nearly 21 million people in health maintenance organizations, is driving the rapid expansion of these networks. (latimes.com)
  • I found Mallick's article to be offensive to young people. (rabble.ca)
  • What do other people think about this article? (rabble.ca)
  • While I don't agree with violence or threats of violence, I think that Mallick's article fails to be critical on even the most superficial level of the oppressive nature of schools and the serious lack of power that young people have in our society. (rabble.ca)
  • I agree with many of the points she makes in the article but her treatment of youth supports status quo ideas that oppress young people. (rabble.ca)
  • Did you know that 1,458,000 people in California have coronary heart disease? (cmanet.org)
  • Until now, tenure-track faculty have had the privilege of passing such policies to govern themselves, but at most universities, such faculty are a fraction of the people who do research and publish articles," explains Christopher Kelty, professor of Information Studies and Anthropology at UCLA and chair of the Presidential Open Access Policy Task Force. (cdlib.org)
  • Even though we will never be able to divulge the real names or precise circumstances of the 20,000 people sterilized in California, we can still see the ugly underside of medical paternalism and how authorities treated Mexican-Americans, African-Americans, immigrant groups, and people with disabilities and mental illnesses in 20th-century America. (cidsanmateo.org)
  • When a streak of fire blazed through the air above southern California, people could have been forgiven for thinking the Earth was under attack. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • California would become the fifth state in which people are allowed to legally end their lives. (medicinenet.com)
  • In California, "authorized copies" can only be obtained by the person named on the birth certificate, parents of the person named on the certificate and a few other people. (wikihow.com)
  • Authorities in the western U.S. state of California say a heavily armed gunman killed at least four people Friday in the city of Santa Monica before he was shot dead by police in the library of a local college. (voanews.com)
  • Two things California won't do, because feelings (see In California, It's Worse to Misgender Someone Than Infect Them with HIV and Purposefully Exposing People to HIV is No Longer a Felony in California… ). (prisonplanet.com)
  • It would be unconscionable to expand the commercial market in women's eggs without obtaining significantly more information about the risks of retrieving them," said Diane Tober, associate executive director at the Center for Genetics and Society in Oakland, California, in a statement. (nature.com)
  • Muto MG, Lepisto EM, Van den Abbeele AD, Knapp RC, Kassis AI (1989) Influence of human antimurine antibody on CA 125 levels in patients with ovarian cancer undergoing radioimmunotherapy or immunoscintigraphy with murine monoclonal antibody OC 125. (springer.com)
  • Niloff JM, Bast RC, Schaetzl EM, Knapp RC (1985) Predictive value of CA 125 antigen levels in second-look procedure of ovarian cancer. (springer.com)
  • To determine the risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer and fallopian tube cancer associated with a raised concentration of the tumour marker CA 125 in asymptomatic postmenopausal women. (bmj.com)
  • Since the initial reports of CA 125 1 2 numerous publications have assessed the use of this marker in the management of ovarian cancer. (bmj.com)
  • Serum CA 125 concentrations are raised preoperatively in 85% of epithelial ovarian cancers and have an established role in differential diagnosis of ovarian cancer, the monitoring of disease status during treatment, and surveillance during follow up. (bmj.com)
  • The role of CA 125 in screening for early stage ovarian cancer is currently under investigation. (bmj.com)
  • Serum CA 125 concentrations are raised before the diagnosis of ovarian cancer in a significant proportion of patients. (bmj.com)
  • 5 6 7 8 9 Furthermore, in prospective studies of screening using serum CA 125 measurement ovarian cancer has been diagnosed at a preclinical stage. (bmj.com)
  • Your doctor may order a CA-125 test if you're about to start treatment for ovarian cancer . (webmd.com)
  • If you have a high risk for ovarian cancer, your doctor may recommend that you have the CA-125 blood test along with a transvaginal ultrasound on a regular basis. (webmd.com)
  • Unless you're at high risk, your doctor probably won't use the CA-125 test to screen you for ovarian cancer . (webmd.com)
  • A very high level of CA-125 is something the doctor will want to look into, but it doesn't always mean you have ovarian cancer. (webmd.com)
  • If you are being treated for ovarian cancer and your CA-125 levels go down during this time, it usually means your treatment is working. (webmd.com)
  • In my opinion - shared by dozens of dealer principals and colleagues who have contacted me to register their objections to the article in question - the picture that this writer paints of the retail auto industry is inaccurate. (wheels.ca)
  • It's the most Republican congressional district in Northern California, represented by Doug LaMalfa. (opednews.com)
  • Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee and a prominent congressional voice on foreign policy , blasted Baghdad in a Tuesday morning Christian Science Monitor breakfast with reporters. (house.gov)
  • His face was featured in advertisements for at least three Republican candidates in California congressional races who sought to portray their opponents as "soft" on crime. (history.com)
  • Under the Oregon law and the California bill, two physicians must see the patient, review the prognosis and agree that the person has an illness that will be fatal in six months, Coombs Lee said. (medicinenet.com)
  • The CA 125 antigen is a glycoprotein with a high molecular weight that is expressed by most epithelial ovarian cancers and is recognised by a monoclonal antibody (OC 125). (bmj.com)
  • Mission La Purísima Concepción and Mission San Francisco Solano are administered by the California Department of Parks and Recreation as State Historic Parks. (citizendium.org)
  • SAN FRANCISCO - A California federal judge has dismissed without prejudice claims that Covidien LP failed to warn of the numerous side effects associated with its Parietex hernia mesh product, ruling that they are time-barred as pled. (harrismartin.com)
  • The region from Point Arena, N of San Francisco, to the southern part of the state is subject to tremors and sometimes to severe earthquakes caused by tectonic stress along the San Andreas fault San Andreas fault, great fracture (see fault) of the earth's crust in California. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The Coast Ranges receive heavy rainfall in the north, where the giant cathedrallike redwood forests prevail, but the climate of these mountains is considerably drier in S California, and S of the Golden Gate Golden Gate, strait, 4 mi (6.4 km) long and 1 to 2 mi (1.6-3.2 km) wide, linking San Francisco Bay with the Pacific Ocean. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Diamond Walnut president and general manager A.L. Buffington became CEO of the separate cooperatives, and headquarters were established in Stockton, California. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This American Heart Month, the California Medical Association is joining the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in a national pledge to #MoveWi. (cmanet.org)
  • School vaccination rates in California have fallen as more parents opt for personal belief exemptions (PBEs) for their children. (aappublications.org)
  • 17 - 20 Within California, there is high heterogeneity in the rates of personal belief exemptions (PBEs), with northern and southern coastal regions exhibiting higher PBE proportions. (aappublications.org)
  • California is one of at least 23 states where so-called aquifer exemptions - exceptions to federal environmental law that allow mining or oil and gas companies to dump waste directly into drinking water reserves - have been issued. (commondreams.org)
  • Here, using measurements of radioactive 35 S contained in sulfate aerosols and SO 2 gas at a coastal site in La Jolla, California, we show that nearly 4 × 10 11 neutrons per m 2 leaked at the Fukushima nuclear power plant before March 20, 2011. (pnas.org)
  • Rising as an almost impenetrable granite barrier E of the Central Valley is the Sierra Nevada Sierra Nevada , mountain range, c.400 mi (640 km) long and from c.40 to 80 mi (60-130 km) wide, mostly in E Calif. It rises to 14,495 ft (4,418 m) in Mt. Whitney, the highest peak in the United States outside Alaska. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Within the "Cite this article" tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. (encyclopedia.com)