Paired sense organs connected to the anterior segments of ARTHROPODS that help them navigate through the environment.
Members of the phylum Arthropoda, composed of organisms having a hard, jointed exoskeleton and paired jointed legs. It includes the class INSECTS and the subclass ARACHNIDA, many species of which are important medically as parasites or as vectors of organisms capable of causing disease in man.
Arthropods, other than insects and arachnids, which transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
Complexes containing CHLOROPHYLL and other photosensitive molecules. They serve to capture energy in the form of PHOTONS and are generally found as components of the PHOTOSYSTEM I PROTEIN COMPLEX or the PHOTOSYSTEM II PROTEIN COMPLEX.
A large family of proteins that have been traditionally classified as the light-harvesting proteins of the photosynthetic reaction complex. Chlorophyll binding proteins are also found in non-photosynthetic settings where they may play a photoprotective role in response to light stress.
Specialized organs adapted for the reception of stimuli by the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Porphyrin derivatives containing magnesium that act to convert light energy in photosynthetic organisms.
Arthropods of the class ARACHNIDA, order Araneae. Except for mites and ticks, spiders constitute the largest order of arachnids, with approximately 37,000 species having been described. The majority of spiders are harmless, although some species can be regarded as moderately harmful since their bites can lead to quite severe local symptoms. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p508; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, pp424-430)
Protein complexes that take part in the process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS. They are located within the THYLAKOID MEMBRANES of plant CHLOROPLASTS and a variety of structures in more primitive organisms. There are two major complexes involved in the photosynthetic process called PHOTOSYSTEM I and PHOTOSYSTEM II.
A large multisubunit protein complex found in the THYLAKOID MEMBRANE. It uses light energy derived from LIGHT-HARVESTING PROTEIN COMPLEXES to catalyze the splitting of WATER into DIOXYGEN and of reducing equivalents of HYDROGEN.
Collective name for a group of external MECHANORECEPTORS and chemoreceptors manifesting as sensory structures in ARTHROPODS. They include cuticular projections (setae, hairs, bristles), pores, and slits.
A large multisubunit protein complex that is found in the THYLAKOID MEMBRANE. It uses light energy derived from LIGHT-HARVESTING PROTEIN COMPLEXES to drive electron transfer reactions that result in either the reduction of NADP to NADPH or the transport of PROTONS across the membrane.
A large subphylum of mostly marine ARTHROPODS containing over 42,000 species. They include familiar arthropods such as lobsters (NEPHROPIDAE), crabs (BRACHYURA), shrimp (PENAEIDAE), and barnacles (THORACICA).
Pyrrole containing pigments found in photosynthetic bacteria.
A class of Arthropoda that includes SPIDERS; TICKS; MITES; and SCORPIONS.
The transfer of energy of a given form among different scales of motion. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed). It includes the transfer of kinetic energy and the transfer of chemical energy. The transfer of chemical energy from one molecule to another depends on proximity of molecules so it is often used as in techniques to measure distance such as the use of FORSTER RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER.
Proteins found in any species of insect.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A genus of bacteria comprised of a heterogenous group of gram-negative small rods and coccoid forms associated with arthropods. (From Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, vol 1, 1984)
The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)
An order of photosynthetic bacteria representing a physiological community of predominantly aquatic bacteria.
Membranous cisternae of the CHLOROPLAST containing photosynthetic pigments, reaction centers, and the electron-transport chain. Each thylakoid consists of a flattened sac of membrane enclosing a narrow intra-thylakoid space (Lackie and Dow, Dictionary of Cell Biology, 2nd ed). Individual thylakoids are interconnected and tend to stack to form aggregates called grana. They are found in cyanobacteria and all plants.
Oxygenated forms of carotenoids. They are usually derived from alpha and beta carotene.
The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)
Proteins synthesized by organisms belonging to the phylum ARTHROPODA. Included in this heading are proteins from the subdivisions ARACHNIDA; CRUSTACEA; and HORSESHOE CRABS. Note that a separate heading for INSECT PROTEINS is listed under this heading.
INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum from the UHF (ultrahigh frequency) radio waves and extending into the INFRARED RAYS frequencies.
Rhodopsin molecules found in microorganisms such as ARCHAEA and PROTEOBACTERIA.
Proteins, usually projecting from the cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, that specifically bind odorant molecules and trigger responses in the neurons. The large number of different odorant receptors appears to arise from several gene families or subfamilies rather than from DNA rearrangement.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.
A genus of small beetles of the family Tenebrionidae; T. confusum is the "confused flour beetle".
A phylum of anoxygenic, phototrophic bacteria including the family Chlorobiaceae. They occur in aquatic sediments, sulfur springs, and hot springs and utilize reduced sulfur compounds instead of oxygen.
Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.
Venoms from animals of the phylum Arthropoda. Those most investigated are from scorpions and spiders of the class Arachnidae and from ant, bee, and wasp families of the Insecta order Hymenoptera. The venoms contain protein toxins, enzymes, and other bioactive substances and may be lethal to man.
Organs and other anatomical structures of non-human vertebrate and invertebrate animals.
Animals that have no spinal column.
The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.

Serotonin modulates olfactory processing in the antennal lobe of Drosophila. (1/177)

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Antennal lobe processing increases separability of odor mixture representations in the honeybee. (2/177)

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Physiological and morphological characterization of local interneurons in the Drosophila antennal lobe. (3/177)

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Regulation of odor receptor genes in trichoid sensilla of the Drosophila antenna. (4/177)

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Switching attraction to inhibition: mating-induced reversed role of sex pheromone in an insect. (5/177)

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On the role of copepod antennae in the production of hydrodynamic force during hopping. (6/177)

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Drosophila CtBP regulates proliferation and differentiation of eye precursors and complexes with Eyeless, Dachshund, Dan, and Danr during eye and antennal development. (7/177)

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Behavioral and neurophysiological responses of an insect to changing ratios of constituents in host plant-derived volatile mixtures. (8/177)

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Arthropod antennae are the primary sensory organs found in arthropods, which include insects, crustaceans, arachnids, and myriapods. These paired appendages are usually located on the head or nearest segment to the head and are responsible for detecting various stimuli from the environment such as touch, taste, smell, temperature, humidity, vibration, and air motion.

The structure of arthropod antennae varies among different groups but generally consists of one or more segments called flagellum or funicle that may be further divided into subsegments called annuli. The number and arrangement of these segments are often used to classify and identify specific taxa.

Insect antennae, for example, typically have a distinct shape and can be thread-like, feathery, or clubbed depending on the species. They contain various sensory receptors such as olfactory neurons that detect odor molecules, mechanoreceptors that respond to touch or movement, and thermoreceptors that sense temperature changes.

Overall, arthropod antennae play a crucial role in enabling these organisms to navigate their environment, find food, avoid predators, and communicate with conspecifics.

Arthropods are a phylum of animals characterized by the presence of a segmented body, a pair of jointed appendages on each segment, and a tough exoskeleton made of chitin. This phylum includes insects, arachnids (spiders, scorpions, mites), crustaceans (crabs, lobsters, shrimp), and myriapods (centipedes, millipedes). They are the largest group of animals on Earth, making up more than 80% of all described species. Arthropods can be found in nearly every habitat, from the deep sea to mountaintops, and play important roles in ecosystems as decomposers, pollinators, and predators.

Arthropod vectors are living organisms, specifically arthropods such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, and lice, that can transmit infectious agents (such as viruses, bacteria, or parasites) from one host to another. This process is called vector-borne transmission. The arthropod vectors become infected with the pathogen while taking a blood meal from an infected host, then transmit the pathogen to another host during subsequent feedings. The transmission can occur through various means, including biting, stinging, or even mechanical contact. It's important to note that not all arthropods are vectors, and only certain species within each group are capable of transmitting diseases.

Light-harvesting protein complexes are specialized structures in photosynthetic organisms, such as plants, algae, and some bacteria, that capture and transfer light energy to the reaction centers where the initial chemical reactions of photosynthesis occur. These complexes consist of proteins and pigments (primarily chlorophylls and carotenoids) arranged in a way that allows them to absorb light most efficiently. The absorbed light energy is then converted into electrical charges, which are transferred to the reaction centers for further chemical reactions leading to the production of organic compounds and oxygen. The light-harvesting protein complexes play a crucial role in initiating the process of photosynthesis and optimizing its efficiency by capturing and distributing light energy.

Chlorophyll binding proteins, also known as light-harvesting complexes (LHCs), are a type of protein found in the chloroplasts of plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. They play a crucial role in photosynthesis by binding to and helping to absorb light energy, which is then used to power the conversion of carbon dioxide and water into oxygen and glucose.

Chlorophyll binding proteins are composed of several subunits that contain both protein and chlorophyll molecules. The chlorophyll molecules are bound to the protein subunits in a way that allows them to absorb light energy most efficiently. When light is absorbed by the chlorophyll, it excites the electrons in the chlorophyll molecule, which then transfer the energy to other molecules in the photosynthetic apparatus.

There are several different types of chlorophyll binding proteins, each with slightly different properties and functions. Some are involved in capturing light energy for use in photosystem I, while others are involved in photosystem II. Additionally, some chlorophyll binding proteins are found in the thylakoid membranes of the chloroplasts, while others are located in the stroma.

Overall, chlorophyll binding proteins are essential components of the photosynthetic process, allowing plants and other organisms to harness the energy of the sun to power their metabolic reactions.

Sense organs are specialized structures in living organisms that are responsible for receiving and processing various external or internal stimuli, such as light, sound, taste, smell, temperature, and touch. They convert these stimuli into electrical signals that can be interpreted by the nervous system, allowing the organism to interact with and respond to its environment. Examples of sense organs include the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and skin.

Chlorophyll is a green pigment found in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic plants, algae, and some bacteria. It plays an essential role in light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis by absorbing light energy, primarily from the blue and red parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, and converting it into chemical energy to fuel the synthesis of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water. The structure of chlorophyll includes a porphyrin ring, which binds a central magnesium ion, and a long phytol tail. There are several types of chlorophyll, including chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, which have distinct absorption spectra and slightly different structures. Chlorophyll is crucial for the process of photosynthesis, enabling the conversion of sunlight into chemical energy and the release of oxygen as a byproduct.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "spiders" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a common name used to refer to arachnids of the order Araneae, characterized by having two main body parts (the cephalothorax and abdomen), eight legs, and fangs that inject venom.

However, in a medical context, "spider" or "spider bite" may be used to describe skin lesions or reactions resulting from the bite of certain spiders, particularly those with medically significant venoms. For example, necrotic arachnidism is a condition caused by the bite of some spider species, such as recluse spiders (Loxosceles spp.). The bites can cause skin necrosis and other systemic symptoms in severe cases.

If you are looking for information on a specific medical topic or condition, please provide more details so I can offer a more accurate response.

Photosynthetic Reaction Center (RC) Complex Proteins are specialized protein-pigment structures that play a crucial role in the primary process of light-driven electron transport during photosynthesis. They are present in the thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria, algae, and higher plants.

The Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex Proteins are composed of two major components: the light-harvesting complex (LHC) and the reaction center (RC). The LHC contains antenna pigments like chlorophylls and carotenoids that absorb sunlight and transfer the excitation energy to the RC. The RC is a multi-subunit protein complex containing cofactors such as bacteriochlorophyll, pheophytin, quinones, and iron-sulfur clusters.

When a photon of light is absorbed by the antenna pigments in the LHC, the energy is transferred to the RC, where it initiates a charge separation event. This results in the transfer of an electron from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule, creating a flow of electrical charge and generating a transmembrane electrochemical gradient. The energy stored in this gradient is then used to synthesize ATP and reduce NADP+, which are essential for carbon fixation and other metabolic processes in the cell.

In summary, Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex Proteins are specialized protein structures involved in capturing light energy and converting it into chemical energy during photosynthesis, ultimately driving the synthesis of ATP and NADPH for use in carbon fixation and other metabolic processes.

Photosystem II Protein Complex is a crucial component of the photosynthetic apparatus in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. It is a multi-subunit protein complex located in the thylakoid membrane of the chloroplasts. Photosystem II plays a vital role in light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, where it absorbs sunlight and uses its energy to drive the oxidation of water molecules into oxygen, electrons, and protons.

The protein complex consists of several subunits, including the D1 and D2 proteins, which form the reaction center, and several antenna proteins that capture light energy and transfer it to the reaction center. Photosystem II also contains various cofactors, such as pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids), redox-active metal ions (manganese and calcium), and quinones, which facilitate the charge separation and electron transfer processes during photosynthesis.

Photosystem II Protein Complex is responsible for the initial charge separation event in photosynthesis, which sets off a series of redox reactions that ultimately lead to the reduction of NADP+ to NADPH and the synthesis of ATP, providing energy for the carbon fixation reactions in the Calvin cycle. Additionally, Photosystem II Protein Complex is involved in oxygen evolution, contributing to the Earth's atmosphere's oxygen levels and making it an essential component of global carbon fixation and oxygen production.

"Sensilla" is a term used in anatomy and physiology, particularly in insects and other arthropods. It refers to the sensory structures or receptors found on the external surface of these organisms, which are responsible for detecting various environmental stimuli such as touch, taste, smell, temperature, and humidity.

These sensilla are often small, hair-like or peg-like projections that contain one or more sensory cells or neurons. They can be found on different parts of the insect body, including the antennae, legs, mouthparts, and cerci. The structure and function of sensilla vary depending on their location and the type of stimuli they detect.

Overall, sensilla play a crucial role in helping insects and other arthropods navigate and interact with their environment, allowing them to respond to various stimuli and make appropriate behavioral decisions.

Photosystem I Protein Complex, also known as PsaA/B-Protein or Photosystem I reaction center, is a large protein complex found in the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts and cyanobacteria. It plays a crucial role in light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, where it absorbs light energy and converts it into chemical energy in the form of NADPH.

The complex is composed of several subunits, including PsaA and PsaB, which are the core components that bind to chlorophyll a and bacteriochlorophyll a pigments. These pigments absorb light energy and transfer it to the reaction center, where it is used to drive the electron transport chain and generate a proton gradient across the membrane. This gradient is then used to produce ATP, which provides energy for the carbon fixation reactions in photosynthesis.

Photosystem I Protein Complex is also involved in cyclic electron flow, where electrons are recycled within the complex to generate additional ATP without producing NADPH. This process helps regulate the balance between ATP and NADPH production in the chloroplast and optimizes the efficiency of photosynthesis.

Crustacea is a subphylum of Arthropoda, which is a phylum that includes animals without backbones and with jointed appendages. Crustaceans are characterized by their segmented bodies, usually covered with a hard exoskeleton made of chitin, and paired, jointed limbs.

Examples of crustaceans include crabs, lobsters, shrimps, crayfish, krill, barnacles, and copepods. Many crustaceans are aquatic, living in both freshwater and marine environments, while some are terrestrial. They can vary greatly in size, from tiny planktonic organisms to large crabs and lobsters.

Crustaceans have a complex life cycle that typically involves several distinct stages, including larval and adult forms. They are an important part of many aquatic ecosystems, serving as both predators and prey. Crustaceans also have economic importance as a source of food for humans, with crabs, lobsters, and shrimps being among the most commonly consumed.

Bacteriochlorophylls are a type of pigment that are found in certain bacteria and are used in photosynthesis. They are similar to chlorophylls, which are found in plants and algae, but have some differences in their structure and absorption spectrum. Bacteriochlorophylls absorb light at longer wavelengths than chlorophylls, with absorption peaks in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This allows bacteria that contain bacteriochlorophylls to carry out photosynthesis in environments with low levels of light or at great depths in the ocean where sunlight is scarce.

There are several different types of bacteriochlorophylls, including bacteriochlorophyll a, bacteriochlorophyll b, and bacteriochlorophyll c. These pigments play a role in the capture of light energy during photosynthesis and are involved in the electron transfer processes that occur during this process. Bacteriochlorophylls are also used as a taxonomic marker to help classify certain groups of bacteria.

Arachnida is a class of joint-legged invertebrate animals that includes spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks. They are characterized by having two main body segments (the cephalothorax and the abdomen), eight legs, and simple eyes. Most arachnids produce silk, which they use for various purposes such as capturing prey or building shelters.

Arachnids are arthropods, a group that also includes insects, crustaceans, and other related animals. They are found worldwide in diverse habitats, ranging from forests and grasslands to deserts and caves. Many arachnids are predators, feeding on insects and other small animals. Some species are parasites, living on the blood or tissue of other organisms.

Arachnids have a hard exoskeleton made of chitin, which provides protection and support for their soft internal organs. They molt periodically to grow and replace damaged body parts. Arachnids also have a complex reproductive system that involves the transfer of sperm from the male to the female through specialized structures called pedipalps.

While some arachnids are harmless or even beneficial to humans, others can be dangerous or pests. For example, spider bites can cause painful reactions and in rare cases, death. Ticks and mites can transmit diseases such as Lyme disease and scrub typhus. Scorpions can deliver venomous stings that can be fatal to humans. Despite these risks, arachnids play important roles in ecosystems, controlling pests and contributing to nutrient cycling.

"Energy transfer" is a general term used in the field of physics and physiology, including medical sciences, to describe the process by which energy is passed from one system, entity, or location to another. In the context of medicine, energy transfer often refers to the ways in which cells and organ systems exchange and utilize various forms of energy for proper functioning and maintenance of life.

In a more specific sense, "energy transfer" may refer to:

1. Bioenergetics: This is the study of energy flow through living organisms, including the conversion, storage, and utilization of energy in biological systems. Key processes include cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and metabolic pathways that transform energy into forms useful for growth, maintenance, and reproduction.
2. Electron transfer: In biochemistry, electrons are transferred between molecules during redox reactions, which play a crucial role in energy production and consumption within cells. Examples include the electron transport chain (ETC) in mitochondria, where high-energy electrons from NADH and FADH2 are passed along a series of protein complexes to generate an electrochemical gradient that drives ATP synthesis.
3. Heat transfer: This is the exchange of thermal energy between systems or objects due to temperature differences. In medicine, heat transfer can be relevant in understanding how body temperature is regulated and maintained, as well as in therapeutic interventions such as hyperthermia or cryotherapy.
4. Mechanical energy transfer: This refers to the transmission of mechanical force or motion from one part of the body to another. For instance, muscle contractions generate forces that are transmitted through tendons and bones to produce movement and maintain posture.
5. Radiation therapy: In oncology, ionizing radiation is used to treat cancer by transferring energy to malignant cells, causing damage to their DNA and leading to cell death or impaired function.
6. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): This non-invasive diagnostic technique uses magnetic fields and radio waves to excite hydrogen nuclei in the body, which then release energy as they return to their ground state. The resulting signals are used to generate detailed images of internal structures and tissues.

In summary, "energy transfer" is a broad term that encompasses various processes by which different forms of energy (thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic, etc.) are exchanged or transmitted between systems or objects in the context of medicine and healthcare.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Insect Proteins" is not a recognized medical term. However, I can provide some information about insect protein from a nutritional and food science perspective.

Insect proteins refer to the proteins that are obtained from insects. Insects are a rich source of protein, and their protein content varies by species. For example, mealworms and crickets have been found to contain approximately 47-63% and 60-72% protein by dry weight, respectively.

In recent years, insect proteins have gained attention as a potential sustainable source of nutrition due to their high protein content, low environmental impact, and the ability to convert feed into protein more efficiently compared to traditional livestock. Insect proteins can be used in various applications such as food and feed additives, nutritional supplements, and even cosmetics.

However, it's important to note that the use of insect proteins in human food is not widely accepted in many Western countries due to cultural and regulatory barriers. Nonetheless, research and development efforts continue to explore the potential benefits and applications of insect proteins in the global food system.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Wolbachia is a genus of intracellular bacteria that naturally infects a wide variety of arthropods (insects, spiders, mites) and filarial nematodes (roundworms). These bacteria are transmitted vertically from mother to offspring, often through the cytoplasm of eggs. Wolbachia can manipulate the reproductive biology of their hosts in various ways, such as feminization, parthenogenesis, male killing, and cytoplasmic incompatibility, which favor the spread and maintenance of the bacteria within host populations. The interactions between Wolbachia and their hosts have implications for insect pest management, disease transmission, and evolutionary biology.

I apologize for any confusion, but "insects" are not a medical term. Insects are small air-breathing arthropods that have a segmented body with six legs and usually have wings. They make up the largest group of animals on Earth, with over a million described species.

If you're looking for information about a specific medical condition or topic, please provide more details so I can offer a relevant response.

Rhodospirillales is an order of predominantly gram-negative, aerobic or anaerobic, motile bacteria that are found in various environments such as freshwater, marine habitats, and soil. Many species in this order are capable of photosynthesis, particularly those belonging to the family Rhodospirillaceae. These photosynthetic bacteria, called purple bacteria, use bacteriochlorophyll and can grow under anaerobic conditions using light as an energy source. The order Rhodospirillales belongs to the class Alphaproteobacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria.

It is important to note that medical definitions typically focus on bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms of clinical relevance. While Rhodospirillales does include some species that can be pathogenic in certain circumstances, it is not primarily a medical term and is more commonly used in the context of environmental or general microbiology.

Thylakoids are membrane-bound structures located in the chloroplasts of plant cells and some protists. They are the site of the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, where light energy is converted into chemical energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate). Thylakoids have a characteristic stacked or disc-like structure, called grana, and are interconnected by unstacked regions called stroma lamellae. The arrangement of thylakoids in grana increases the surface area for absorption of light energy, allowing for more efficient photosynthesis.

Xanthophylls are a type of pigment known as carotenoids, which are naturally occurring in various plants and animals. They are characterized by their yellow to orange color and play an important role in photosynthesis. Unlike other carotenoids, xanthophylls contain oxygen in their chemical structure.

In the context of human health, xanthophylls are often studied for their potential antioxidant properties and their possible role in reducing the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss in older adults. The two main dietary sources of xanthophylls are lutein and zeaxanthin, which are found in green leafy vegetables, such as spinach and kale, as well as in other fruits and vegetables.

It's important to note that while a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables has many benefits for overall health, including eye health, more research is needed to fully understand the specific role of xanthophylls in preventing or treating diseases.

Photosynthesis is not strictly a medical term, but it is a fundamental biological process with significant implications for medicine, particularly in understanding energy production in cells and the role of oxygen in sustaining life. Here's a general biological definition:

Photosynthesis is a process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria convert light energy, usually from the sun, into chemical energy in the form of organic compounds, such as glucose (or sugar), using water and carbon dioxide. This process primarily takes place in the chloroplasts of plant cells, specifically in structures called thylakoids. The overall reaction can be summarized as:

6 CO2 + 6 H2O + light energy → C6H12O6 + 6 O2

In this equation, carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) are the reactants, while glucose (C6H12O6) and oxygen (O2) are the products. Photosynthesis has two main stages: the light-dependent reactions and the light-independent reactions (Calvin cycle). The light-dependent reactions occur in the thylakoid membrane and involve the conversion of light energy into ATP and NADPH, which are used to power the Calvin cycle. The Calvin cycle takes place in the stroma of chloroplasts and involves the synthesis of glucose from CO2 and water using the ATP and NADPH generated during the light-dependent reactions.

Understanding photosynthesis is crucial for understanding various biological processes, including cellular respiration, plant metabolism, and the global carbon cycle. Additionally, research into artificial photosynthesis has potential applications in renewable energy production and environmental remediation.

Arthropods are a phylum of animals that includes insects, spiders, crustaceans, and other creatures with jointed appendages. Arthropod proteins, therefore, refer to the proteins that are found in these organisms. These proteins play various roles in the structure, function, and regulation of arthropod cells, tissues, and organs.

Arthropod proteins can be classified into several categories based on their functions, such as structural proteins, enzymes, signaling proteins, and defense proteins. Structural proteins provide support and protection to the arthropod exoskeleton, which is composed mainly of chitin and proteins. Enzymes are proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in arthropod metabolism, while signaling proteins regulate various physiological processes, including growth, development, and reproduction. Defense proteins protect arthropods from pathogens, parasites, and environmental stressors.

Arthropod proteins have attracted significant interest in biomedical research due to their potential applications in drug discovery, vaccine development, and diagnostic tools. For example, some arthropod proteins have been identified as promising targets for the development of new insecticides and antiparasitic drugs. Additionally, arthropod-derived proteins have been used in the production of recombinant vaccines against infectious diseases such as Lyme disease and malaria.

Understanding the structure and function of arthropod proteins is essential for advancing our knowledge of arthropod biology, evolution, and ecology. It also has important implications for human health, agriculture, and environmental conservation.

"Beetles" is not a medical term. It is a common name used to refer to insects belonging to the order Coleoptera, which is one of the largest orders in the class Insecta. Beetles are characterized by their hardened forewings, known as elytra, which protect their hind wings and body when not in use for flying.

There are many different species of beetles found all over the world, and some can have an impact on human health. For example, certain types of beetles, such as bed bugs and carpet beetles, can cause skin irritation and allergic reactions in some people. Other beetles, like the Colorado potato beetle, can damage crops and lead to economic losses for farmers. However, it is important to note that most beetles are not harmful to humans and play an essential role in ecosystems as decomposers and pollinators.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "microwaves" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Microwaves are a form of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths ranging from one meter to one millimeter; they are commonly used in communication devices and home appliances such as microwave ovens. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, please provide more context so I can give you a more accurate response.

Microbial rhodopsins are a type of light-sensitive proteins found in various microorganisms such as archaea, bacteria, and certain eukaryotic microbes. They are named after their ability to bind retinal, a form of vitamin A, which gives them their light-absorbing properties.

Microbial rhodopsins contain seven transmembrane helices and can be classified into several subfamilies based on their functions, including:

1. Pumping ions across the cell membrane: This group includes bacteriorhodopsin, which pumps protons (H+) out of the cell, and halorhodopsin, which pumps chloride ions (Cl-) into the cell. These ion pumps generate an electrochemical gradient that can be used for various purposes, such as generating ATP or driving secondary transport processes.
2. Sensing light: Some microbial rhodopsins act as photoreceptors, converting light signals into chemical or electrical signals. They are involved in various physiological responses, including phototaxis (movement towards or away from light) and photophosphorylation (generation of ATP using light energy).
3. Generating reactive oxygen species: A subgroup of microbial rhodopsins called xanthorhodopsins can generate reactive oxygen species when exposed to light, which may play a role in microbial defense mechanisms or signaling pathways.

Overall, microbial rhodopsins are versatile proteins that enable various light-dependent processes in microorganisms and have attracted significant interest for their potential applications in optogenetics, biosensors, and renewable energy production.

Odorant receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that are primarily found in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons in the nose. These receptors are responsible for detecting and transmitting information about odorants, or volatile molecules that we perceive as smells.

Each odorant receptor can bind to a specific set of odorant molecules, and when an odorant binds to its corresponding receptor, it triggers a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to the generation of an electrical signal in the olfactory sensory neuron. This signal is then transmitted to the brain, where it is processed and interpreted as a particular smell.

There are thought to be around 400 different types of odorant receptors in humans, each with its own unique binding profile. The combinatorial coding of these receptors allows for the detection and discrimination of a vast array of different smells, from sweet to sour, floral to fruity, and everything in between.

Overall, the ability to detect and respond to odorants is critical for many important functions, including the identification of food, mates, and potential dangers in the environment.

In the context of medical terminology, "light" doesn't have a specific or standardized definition on its own. However, it can be used in various medical terms and phrases. For example, it could refer to:

1. Visible light: The range of electromagnetic radiation that can be detected by the human eye, typically between wavelengths of 400-700 nanometers. This is relevant in fields such as ophthalmology and optometry.
2. Therapeutic use of light: In some therapies, light is used to treat certain conditions. An example is phototherapy, which uses various wavelengths of ultraviolet (UV) or visible light for conditions like newborn jaundice, skin disorders, or seasonal affective disorder.
3. Light anesthesia: A state of reduced consciousness in which the patient remains responsive to verbal commands and physical stimulation. This is different from general anesthesia where the patient is completely unconscious.
4. Pain relief using light: Certain devices like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) units have a 'light' setting, indicating lower intensity or frequency of electrical impulses used for pain management.

Without more context, it's hard to provide a precise medical definition of 'light'.

"Tribolium" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. It is actually the name of a genus of beetles, also known as flour beetles, which are often used in scientific research, particularly in the fields of genetics and evolution. If you have any confusion with a specific medical context where this term was used, I would recommend checking the source again for clarification.

Chlorobi, also known as green sulfur bacteria, are a group of anaerobic, phototrophic bacteria that contain chlorophylls a and b, as well as bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e. They obtain energy through photosynthesis, using light as an energy source and sulfide or other reduced sulfur compounds as electron donors. These bacteria are typically found in environments with limited sunlight and high sulfide concentrations, such as in sediments of stratified water bodies or in microbial mats. They play a significant role in the global carbon and sulfur cycles.

Biological pigments are substances produced by living organisms that absorb certain wavelengths of light and reflect others, resulting in the perception of color. These pigments play crucial roles in various biological processes such as photosynthesis, vision, and protection against harmful radiation. Some examples of biological pigments include melanin, hemoglobin, chlorophyll, carotenoids, and flavonoids.

Melanin is a pigment responsible for the color of skin, hair, and eyes in animals, including humans. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells that contains a porphyrin ring with an iron atom at its center, which gives blood its red color and facilitates oxygen transport. Chlorophyll is a green pigment found in plants, algae, and some bacteria that absorbs light during photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide and water into glucose and oxygen. Carotenoids are orange, yellow, or red pigments found in fruits, vegetables, and some animals that protect against oxidative stress and help maintain membrane fluidity. Flavonoids are a class of plant pigments with antioxidant properties that have been linked to various health benefits.

Arthropod venoms are toxic secretions produced by the venom glands of various arthropods, such as spiders, scorpions, insects, and marine invertebrates. These venoms typically contain a complex mixture of bioactive molecules, including peptides, proteins, enzymes, and small molecules, which can cause a range of symptoms and effects in humans and other animals.

The specific composition of arthropod venoms varies widely depending on the species and can be tailored to serve various functions, such as prey immobilization, defense, or predation. Some arthropod venoms contain neurotoxins that can disrupt nerve function and cause paralysis, while others may contain cytotoxins that damage tissues or hemotoxins that affect the blood and cardiovascular system.

Arthropod venoms have been studied for their potential therapeutic applications, as some of their bioactive components have shown promise in treating various medical conditions, including pain, inflammation, and neurological disorders. However, it is important to note that arthropod venoms can also cause severe allergic reactions and other adverse effects in susceptible individuals, making it essential to exercise caution when handling or coming into contact with venomous arthropods.

'Animal structures' is a broad term that refers to the various physical parts and organs that make up animals. These structures can include everything from the external features, such as skin, hair, and scales, to the internal organs and systems, such as the heart, lungs, brain, and digestive system.

Animal structures are designed to perform specific functions that enable the animal to survive, grow, and reproduce. For example, the heart pumps blood throughout the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to the cells, while the lungs facilitate gas exchange between the animal and its environment. The brain serves as the control center of the nervous system, processing sensory information and coordinating motor responses.

Animal structures can be categorized into different systems based on their function, such as the circulatory system, respiratory system, nervous system, digestive system, and reproductive system. Each system is made up of various structures that work together to perform a specific function.

Understanding animal structures and how they function is essential for understanding animal biology and behavior. It also has important implications for human health, as many animals serve as models for studying human disease and developing new treatments.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Invertebrates" is not a medical term. It is a term used in biology to describe a vast group of animals that do not have a vertebral column or spinal cord. This includes creatures such as insects, worms, starfish, and shellfish, among many others. They are classified as invertebrates because they lack a backbone, which is a characteristic of vertebrates, or animals that include humans and other mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish.

In medical terms, the sense of smell is referred to as olfaction. It is the ability to detect and identify different types of chemicals in the air through the use of the olfactory system. The olfactory system includes the nose, nasal passages, and the olfactory bulbs located in the brain.

When a person inhales air containing volatile substances, these substances bind to specialized receptor cells in the nasal passage called olfactory receptors. These receptors then transmit signals to the olfactory bulbs, which process the information and send it to the brain's limbic system, including the hippocampus and amygdala, as well as to the cortex. The brain interprets these signals and identifies the various scents or smells.

Impairment of the sense of smell can occur due to various reasons such as upper respiratory infections, sinusitis, nasal polyps, head trauma, or neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Loss of smell can significantly impact a person's quality of life, including their ability to taste food, detect dangers such as smoke or gas leaks, and experience emotions associated with certain smells.

Biological evolution is the change in the genetic composition of populations of organisms over time, from one generation to the next. It is a process that results in descendants differing genetically from their ancestors. Biological evolution can be driven by several mechanisms, including natural selection, genetic drift, gene flow, and mutation. These processes can lead to changes in the frequency of alleles (variants of a gene) within populations, resulting in the development of new species and the extinction of others over long periods of time. Biological evolution provides a unifying explanation for the diversity of life on Earth and is supported by extensive evidence from many different fields of science, including genetics, paleontology, comparative anatomy, and biogeography.

Antennae (SG: antenna), sometimes referred to as "feelers", are paired appendages used for sensing in arthropods. Antennae are ... The pair attached to the second segment are called secondary antennae or simply antennae. The second antennae are ... all non-crustacean arthropods have a single pair of antennae. Crustaceans bear two pairs of antennae. The pair attached to the ... and even anchoring the arthropod to a substrate. Larval arthropods have antennae that differ from those of the adult. Many ...
... "antennae" may in fact be produced through decay. Holm, E.; Dippenaar-Schoeman, A. (2010). The Arthropods of Southern Africa. ... What is the ancestral visual organ in arthropods?". Arthropod Structure & Development. 35 (4): 231-45. doi:10.1016/j.asd. ... shared characteristics that support common ancestry of velvet worms and arthropods. Together, the velvet worms, arthropods, and ... The "stem-group arthropod" hypothesis is very widely accepted, but some trees suggest that the onychophorans may occupy a ...
Some Arthropod groups can swim - including many crustaceans. Most crustaceans, such as shrimp, will usually swim by paddling ... swims by beating its antennae instead. There are also a number of forms of swimming molluscs. Many free-swimming sea slugs, ... Some arthropods, such as lobsters and shrimps, can propel themselves backwards quickly by flicking their tail, known as ... These are mostly related to the arthropods, and include the Anomalocaridids, which swam by means of lateral lobes in a fashion ...
Antennae brown mixed with ochreous, ciliations in ♂ 2. Thorax and abdomen purplish-brown. Legs purplish-brown mixed with ... The holotype is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described the adult of this species as follows: ♂. 20 mm ...
The Helotes mold beetles are eyeless Arthropods. There are 5 species of Batrisodes in the Edwards Plateau region that typically ... The species in this region have abnormally long antennae and legs. Additionally, the species that live under these conditions ... They exhibit troglobitic traits, such as absent or reduced eyes, long antennae, legs, and sensory setae (hair-like structures ... Previous studies show that troglobitic arthropods thrive in higher humidity and lower air temperatures, which explains their ...
Antennae brown, ciliations 1. Thorax brown mixed with white. Abdomen greyish-ochreous. Legs ochreous, tarsi banded with fuscous ... The holotype is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described the species as follows: ♂ 13 mm. Head white ...
Head, palpi, and antennae purplish-grey. Thorax fuscous-brown mixed with grey. Abdomen fuscous-grey with some reddish scales ... The holotype specimen is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described the species as follows: ♂︎. 30 mm. ...
Head, antennae and thorax light buff. Palpi light buff mixed with ochreous on lower half externally. Abdomen ochreous-white. ... The holotype specimen is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott originally described the species as follows ...
"whorled antennae". The species is named in honour of Annette Walker, who captured the holotype. The holotype specimen is held ... at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. The wingspan is 18-20 mm for males. The female has yet to be described. This species ... walkerae can be distinguished by its whorls of long dark sensilla on its antennae as well as its distinctive genitalia. This ...
Antennae purplish-black, ciliations ¾. Legs purplish-fuscous, tarsi annulated with ochreous. Forewings, costa slightly arched, ... The male holotype is held in the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described this species as follows: ♂. 9-11 mm. Head ...
Head, palpi and antennae bronzy-brown. Thorax and abdomen purplish-brown. Legs greyish-fuscous. Forewings lanceolate, costa ... The holotype specimen is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described the species as follows: ♂ 10 mm. ...
Antennae grey annulated with black, ciliations 3. Abdomen grey-fuscous. Legs grey-whitish. Forewings, costa slightly arched, ... The male holotype is held in the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described the adults of this species as follows ...
The holotype specimen is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described the species as follows: ♀︎. 27 mm. ... Antennae black, annulated with whitish. Abdomen black, segmental divisions whitish. Legs ochreous-whitish, strongly infuscated ...
Antennae fuscous. Thorax dark fuscous mixed with ochreous. Abdomen dark greyish-fuscous. Legs fuscous mixed with ochreous. ... The holotype specimen is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described this species as follows: ♂. 17-19 mm ...
Cement glands near the base of the antennae fix them to the rock. The carapace of this species is conical with a circular base ... Crustaceans portal Arthropods portal "Balanus balanus (Linnaeus, 1758)". Encyclopedia of Life. April 13, 2011. Retrieved May 5 ... The nauplii feed, moult five times and swim with their antennae. It takes about one month for them to develop into the cyprid ...
Antennae black, stout and short. Pronotum transverse. Elytra apically truncate with margined lateral sides. Scutellum is ... Arthropod Systematics and Phylogeny 76(2). Retrieved 2021-06-17. "Gyrinidae of Silent Valley" (PDF). Rec. zool. Surv. India. 84 ...
Antennae moderately bipectinated, stalk white basally. Thorax brownish-ochreous. Abdomen pale ochreous with paired linear black ... The male holotype specimen is held in the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott originally described this species as ...
Antennae fuscous, eye-cap whitish. Thorax ochreous. Abdomen dark fuscous. Forewings white with much admixture of ochreous, ... The male holotype specimen is held in the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described this species as follows: n. sp ... The female is visually similar to the male with the exception of their antenna which have 28 segments. S. insignis is larger ... Frontal tuft, scape, and collar white; antenna grey-brown, comprising about 35 segments, lustrous, reflecting purple and copper ...
Antennae ochreous, ciliations in male 3. Abdomen fuscous-brown. Legs fuscous mixed with ochreous, posterior pair more ochreous ... The male holotype specimen is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described this species as follows: ♂. 14- ...
Antennae brown annulated with ochreous, ciliations in male ½. Thorax brown, apices of tegulae pale ochreous. Abdomen grey ... The male holotype specimen is held in the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described this species as follows: ♂ ♀. 13 ...
Antennae greyish-brown spotted with whitish. Abdomen brown, segmental divisions lead-coloured. Legs greyish-brown, posterior ... The male holotype specimen is held in the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described this species as follows: 13-15 ...
Chelicerates are more easily distinguished from other arthropods in lacking antennae and mandibles. Chelicerae are chelate ... The mouthparts of arthropods have evolved into a number of forms, each adapted to a different style or mode of feeding. Most ... In general, arthropods have mouthparts for cutting, chewing, piercing, sucking, shredding, siphoning, and filtering. This ... Insects are not, however, the ancestral form of the other arthropods discussed here. Insect mouthparts exhibit a range of forms ...
Antennae minutely ciliated; ferruginous, basal third ochreous-grey. Thorax with slight anterior crest, greyish-brown. Abdomen ... The male holotype specimen is held in the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described this species as follows: ♂. 38 ...
Antennae ochreous annulated with brown. Legs whitish-ochreous, anterior pair infuscated, tarsi faintly annulated with paler. ... The holotype specimen is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described this species as follows: ♀. 10-11 mm ...
Antennae bronzy-brown, broadly annulated with white. Thorax shining-dark brown. Abdomen and legs grey-fuscous. Forewings rather ... The male holotype is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described the male adult as follows: ♂. 11mm. Head ...
In arthropods, it contains the pars intercerebralis and pars lateralis. six3 is associated with the euarthropod labrum and the ... onychophoran frontal appendages (antennae). The other region expresses homologues of orthodenticle, Otx or otd. This region is ... Arthropod brains. Ortega-Hernández J., Janssen R., Budd G.E. (2017). "Origin and evolution of the panarthropod head - A ... Scholtz G., Edgecombe G.D. (2006). "The evolution of arthropod heads: reconciling morphological, developmental and ...
Unusually among artiopods, the antennae are strongly reduced in size. Hou, Xianguang. (1997). Arthropods of the Lower Cambrian ...
This Ur-arthropod had a ventral mouth, pre-oral antennae and dorsal eyes at the front of the body. It was assumed to have been ... were arthropods, but later study shows that their affinities of being origin of arthropods are not reliable. Small arthropods ... of the evolution from Anomalocaris to true arthropods and could be at the evolutionary root of true arthropods. Arthropods ... The antennae of most hexapods include sensor packages that monitor humidity, moisture and temperature. Most arthropods lack ...
Head covered with dense long hair reaching beyond 1⁄2 of antennae, light tawny. Antennae bright brown, tips black. Thorax tawny ... The holotype specimen is held at the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described the adults of the species as follows ...
Head and antennae fuscous mixed with ochreous. Palpi whitish ochreous, outwardly more or less infuscated. Thorax and abdomen ... The male holotype is held in the New Zealand Arthropod Collection. Philpott described the adults of this species as follows ... Head, antennae, and thorax shining dark purplish-fuscous, antennal ciliations in male 3, whorled. Palpi shining dark purplish- ...
Insect & Arthropod Publications. Book available now!. Orthopteran Zoology: How to Keep Grasshoppers, Crickets, and Katydids ... This amazing arthropod apex predator is the most significant arthropod predator in its range and yet few humans could answer a ... E&A site on US Arthropods: millipedes, arachnids, etc.. Some Vendors With E&A Titles BioQuip Entomological Supply Bugs In ... Spectacular cultivars and amazing species represent an often forgotten group of backyard arthropods. In recent years the ...
In addition, most insects can use their antennae to detect sound. The little hairs on the antennae can vibrate as sound waves ... This also combines with using their antennae for touch, because when the touch something with their antennae, they are also ... Overall, antennae are really a good idea, and it some ways I am sorry that we dont have them. But then I think about what ... The arthropods are Protostomes, which start as a sphere of cells that develops a dimple on one side that eventually turns into ...
"Arthropod Antennae" by people in this website by year, and whether "Arthropod Antennae" was a major or minor topic of these ... "Arthropod Antennae" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Arthropod Antennae" by people in Profiles. ... Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more general than "Arthropod Antennae". ...
Antennae (SG: antenna), sometimes referred to as "feelers", are paired appendages used for sensing in arthropods. Antennae are ... The pair attached to the second segment are called secondary antennae or simply antennae. The second antennae are ... all non-crustacean arthropods have a single pair of antennae. Crustaceans bear two pairs of antennae. The pair attached to the ... and even anchoring the arthropod to a substrate. Larval arthropods have antennae that differ from those of the adult. Many ...
They have long, hair like antennae and a broad saddle like plate (pronotum) that covers the head. Adult stages of most species ... Ants, Cockroaches (meaning jointed foot). All arthropods possess the following combination of characteristics which make them ... They may kill the insect by having the chemical penetrate the insect body or be swallowed as the cockroach cleans its antennae ... They are small, blackish-brown ants with pale legs and antennae. As the name might suggest, pavement ants commonly nest under ...
Scorpions are among the arthropods with the longest lifespan. Some insects have a lifespan of only a few days, and others few ... Insects also have one pair of antennae and compound eyes. Additionally, insects are the largest group in the animal kingdom, ... However, like insects, spiders and scorpions belong to the arthropod phylum. Insects have three body segments, which are the ...
Antenna. *Arthropod. *Behaviour. *Calosoma inquisitor. *Capture. *Carabidae. *Catching. *Caterpillar. *Central. *Central Europe ...
for specialised nest-dwelling arthropods. Article - Training a new generation of Dipterists ...
Centipedes belong to different classes of arthropods, called Chilopoda. Centipedes have long antennae atop their heads. When ... 2. Centipedes have antennae that are long, and millipedes have short, chopped looking antennae.. 3. The bodies of the two ... 4. Centipedes are quick and predatory arthropods. Millipedes are slow, scavenger arthropods.. 5. Both, centipedes and ... The antennae on the top of a millipedes head are short and look cut when compared to centipedes. When comparing the legs of a ...
"The third amber specimen, a fly, cannot be identified because, outside of the insects antennae, its body parts were not well ... The newly discovered arthropods break that mold with an age of 230 million years. They are the first arthropods to be found in ... The oldest record of arthropods has been found preserved in amber. Arthropods are the invertebrate animals that include insects ... resulting in the discovery of the three arthropods. The tiny arthropods were studied by Grimaldi and Evert Lindquist, an expert ...
Seasoned with garlic, lime, and salt, the little rust-colored arthropods arrived nestled into a guacamole dip. Summoning my ... courage, and steeling my stomach, I crunched into the toasted exoskeletons, swallowing my first-ever insect thorax, antennae, ...
In both groups, the front pair of legs have evolved to long "whip" like appendages that they use just like antennae. Hence the ... Categories ARACHNIDS, ARTHROPODS, kids and science, SCORPIONS Tags scorpion quiz WHIP IT! WHIP IT GOOD!. October 7, 2021. May ... ARTHROPODS Are You Secretly a Scorpion?. October 7, 2021. February 1, 2021. by bugwhisperer ... Categories ARTHROPODS, INSECTS, kids and science, SCORPIONS, SPIDERS, TALES FROM THE BUG WHISPERER Tags bugwhisperer, ...
Arthropods are incredible animals that include insects, arachnids and crustaceans. Together, they make up over eighty percent ... It moves unpredictably to mimic the wind and uses its antennae, which are as long as its body, to detect changes in the ... Arthropods are incredible animals that include insects, arachnids and crustaceans. Together, they make up over eighty percent ... The Cyanide millipede-Harpaphe haydeniana-is the chemist of the arthropod world. This millipede produces hydrogen cyanide (HCN ...
The Big ImageBoard (TBIB) - anthro arthropod bee big breasts. tbib.org The Big ImageBoard (TBIB) - antennae (anatomy) anthro ...
... field of forensic entomology is broadly defined as the application of the scientific study of insects and their arthropod ... 1 pair of antenna, and 1 pair of compound eyes. The rapidly growing ... one pair of antenna, and one pair of compound eyes. The field of forensic entomology is broadly defined as the application of ... Insects and associated arthropods analyzed during medicolegal death investigations in Harris County, Texas, USA: January 2013- ...
Mites are small arthropods that live in the nooks and crannies on insects. There are mites that live specifically on an army ... ants antennas, noted Wiens. Whats more, insects also carry little worms, called nematodes, in their stomachs. So when one ... One recent analysis estimates tens of millions of animal species (this number is dominated by insects and tiny arthropods). ...
2 Additional arthropods from the Castle Bank Fauna.. a-d, stem-group xiphosuran from level A0 with detail view of anterior ... possible superimposed antenna (ant?) and possible mandible (m?) (NMW.2021.3 G.11); i, j, pair of barnacles, the right attached ... Wolfe, J. M., Daley, A. C., Legg, D. A. & Edgecombe, G. D. Fossil calibrations for the arthropod Tree of Life. Earth Sci. Rev. ... The diversity figures are estimates pending full taxonomic treatment, especially for sponges and arthropods. ...
You will never find the distinguishing features of calypterate flies on a non-fly, much less on a non-insect or non-arthropod. ... Calypterate flies have all that plus a certain style of antennae, wing veins, and sutures on the face and back. ... For example, arthropods all have chitinous exoskeleton, hemocoel, and jointed legs. Insects have all these plus head-thorax- ... For example, the eyes of molluscs, arthropods, and vertebrates are extremely different, and ears can appear on any of at least ...
Antennae. A centipedes antennae are crucial sensory organs that aid in navigation and hunting. Their antennae:. *Detect ... Other Arthropods. - Can hunt in tight spaces. - Various hunting tactics. Competition for prey. ... Well, its tail (?) was completely red and white stripped, its head was black, and it had red antennas; I dont know if that ... Well, its tail (?) was completely red and white stripped, its head was black, and it had red antennas; I dont know if that ...
The backs of the antennae dont look like they have as much roughness, so they are probably a lot less sensitive to smells ... The Backyard Arthropod Project is part of the Digital Bits Network, LLC. Copyright 2023 Tim Eisele ...
Their short antennae end in clubs made of plates called lamellae, which unfurl into a fan. ... Insects and other arthropods*What is an arthropod?*What is an insect?*A three-part body ... The extremely mobile head has short antennae, well-developed mouthparts and two huge compound eyes. ...
Jointed structures of arthropods, such as legs, wings, or antennae * Charateristics to Classify Mollusks ...
... a body divided into cephalothorax and abdomen two pairs of antennae and three pairs of mouth appendages Examples of crustaceans ... Crustaceans are a group of arthropods distinguished by the following characters: ... Crustaceans are a group of arthropods distinguished by the following characters:. *a body divided into cephalothorax and ...
Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods that have a chitinous exoskeleton, a three-part body , three ... pairs of jointed legs, compound eyes, and two antennae.... -like alien. Extraterrestrial life in popular culture ...
antenna + anterior ectosylvian visual area (sensu Mustela putorius furo) arthropod sensillum + ascidian anterior sensory ...
Trilobites are an extinct group of arthropods, distinguished by the following characters:. *a body built from a cephalon, ... one pair of antennae. The last trilobites went extinct about 245 million years ago, but they are well represented by the fossil ...
This was one of my favorites back in the day; a darkly colored, elongated arthropod with four sickle-like clawed arms, huge ... electrified antennae. They almost look a little plant-like, which would be cool, since I seldom see any electrical plant ... You have to love the number of almost interchangeable arthropod-type enemies in this game; it really adds a sense of natural ... segmented antennae. They attack primarily by slowing you down with silk thread, confirming a caterpillar theme, but do they ...
They have oblong heads with bulging eyes and very short antennae.. Coloration: often brightly colored with green, blue, red, ... Feeding habits/specializations: They feed on aquatic insects and other arthropods that are found in the water. Damselfly adults ... They have long hair-like antennae. Most species are small and are dull colored. However, some species are more brightly colored ... Key characteristics for distinction: They have simple mouthparts with chewing mandibles, long, multiple-segmented antennae, ...
  • We all know that insects have antennae, but the question is, what are they for , exactly? (somethingscrawlinginmyhair.com)
  • All insects have antennae, however they may be greatly reduced in the larval forms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Overall, the antennae are very much general-purpose sensory organs, and an insect that has lost them basically has had its senses reduced to sight and maybe some vibration sensitivity due to body hairs. (somethingscrawlinginmyhair.com)
  • Antennae have an advantage over licking in that the insect doesn't ingest the item. (somethingscrawlinginmyhair.com)
  • Antennae can also locate other group members if the insect lives in a group, like the ant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amongst the non-insect classes of the Hexapoda, both Collembola and Diplura have antenna, but Protura do not. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The three basic segments of the typical insect antenna are the scape or scapus (base), the pedicel or pedicellus (stem), and finally the flagellum, which often comprises many units known as flagellomeres. (wikipedia.org)
  • The whole structure enables the insect to move the antenna as a whole by applying internal muscles connected to the scape. (wikipedia.org)
  • Summoning my courage, and steeling my stomach, I crunched into the toasted exoskeletons, swallowing my first-ever insect thorax, antennae, and abdomen. (orionmagazine.org)
  • [ 1 ] Forensic entomologists frequently deal with non-insect arthropods such as spiders, mites, and ticks. (medscape.com)
  • You will never find the distinguishing features of calypterate flies on a non-fly, much less on a non-insect or non-arthropod. (don-lindsay-archive.org)
  • Efforts to control house centipedes should focus on controlling the other household insect pests on which they feed, and on physical exclusion practices that make it more difficult for insects and other arthropod pests to enter the building. (msstate.edu)
  • Many crustaceans, for example, have free-swimming larvae that use their antennae for swimming. (wikipedia.org)
  • The common ancestor of all arthropods likely had one pair of uniramous (unbranched) antenna-like structures, followed by one or more pairs of biramous (having two major branches) leg-like structures, as seen in some modern crustaceans and fossil trilobites. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crustaceans bear two pairs of antennae. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are several notable non-sensory uses of antennae in crustaceans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many crustaceans have a mobile larval stage called a nauplius, which is characterized by its use of antennae for swimming. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insects evolved from prehistoric crustaceans, and they have secondary antennae like crustaceans, but not primary antennae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arthropods are the invertebrate animals that include insects, arachnids, and crustaceans. (planetsave.com)
  • The second antennae are plesiomorphically biramous, but many species later evolved uniramous pairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • One recent analysis estimates tens of millions of animal species (this number is dominated by insects and tiny arthropods). (mashable.com)
  • In fact, the number of living arthropod species is in the tens of millions, making up over three-fourths of all known living and fossil organisms. (goaptive.com)
  • Other species in the Twin Oaks Valley area have black antennae. (waynesword.net)
  • Oribatids are considered successful soil arthropods because more than 9000 species of 172 families are lived in soil. (agrihunt.com)
  • This characteristic sets them apart from closely related crab and arthropod species. (reptileszilla.com)
  • Insects also have one pair of antennae and compound eyes. (worldatlas.com)
  • Entomology is the study of insects, which are organisms that have an exoskeleton, six legs, three body segments, one pair of antenna, and one pair of compound eyes. (medscape.com)
  • The extremely mobile head has short antennae, well-developed mouthparts and two huge compound eyes. (espacepourlavie.ca)
  • Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods that have a chitinous exoskeleton, a three-part body , three pairs of jointed legs, compound eyes, and two antennae. (absoluteastronomy.com)
  • Cinderella , another arthropod showing well developed compound eyes, antennae and digestive tract. (evolutionandid.com)
  • However, like insects, spiders and scorpions belong to the arthropod phylum. (worldatlas.com)
  • Arthropods are considered the largest phylum of invertebrates. (goaptive.com)
  • Scorpions are among the arthropods with the longest lifespan. (worldatlas.com)
  • Spiders are one of the most common arthropods on Earth. (goaptive.com)
  • In certain arthropods, the head and thorax are combined together as a cephalothorax. (goaptive.com)
  • Theoretically, insects are arthropods that possess specialized extremities and a body split into parts, covered in exoskeleton which can even develop into a shell. (acu-doctor.com)
  • Collective name for a group of external MECHANORECEPTORS and chemoreceptors manifesting as sensory structures in ARTHROPODS. (lookformedical.com)
  • House centipedes are not insects, but they are arthropods and belong to a special class of arthropods known as centipedes. (msstate.edu)
  • The second antennae may be significantly reduced (e.g. remipedes) or apparently absent (e.g. barnacles). (wikipedia.org)
  • Barnacles, a highly modified crustacean, use their antennae to attach to rocks and other surfaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fossil specimens, are one fly and two mites that were found in millimeter-scale droplets of amber from northeastern Italy, they are around 100 million years older than any other amber arthropod ever found. (planetsave.com)
  • The tiny arthropods were studied by Grimaldi and Evert Lindquist, an expert on gall mites at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in Ottawa. (planetsave.com)
  • These could cause causing allergens include: arthropods (dust mites, various types of allergy in some people ( 6 ). (who.int)
  • Those long thready antennae, some of which are longer than the insect's body, allow them to poke things from a distance. (somethingscrawlinginmyhair.com)
  • The third amber specimen, a fly, cannot be identified because, outside of the insect's antennae, its body parts were not well preserved. (planetsave.com)
  • Silverfish are nocturnal arthropods that are known for their speed and ability to avoid threats. (goaptive.com)
  • Like other arthropods, silverfish like warm, moist environments. (goaptive.com)
  • Although these arthropods are crucial to our ecosystem, it's understandable if you don't want them in your home. (goaptive.com)
  • Arthropods are ecosystem engineers, their burrows contain a wide range of tunnels and nests of termites and ants. (agrihunt.com)
  • Paired sense organs connected to the anterior segments of ARTHROPODS that help them navigate through the environment. (ucdenver.edu)
  • Antennae are connected to the first one or two segments of the arthropod head. (wikipedia.org)
  • The subdivisions of crustacean antennae have many names, including flagellomeres (a shared term with insects), annuli, articles, and segments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Except for the chelicerates and proturans, which have none, all non-crustacean arthropods have a single pair of antennae. (wikipedia.org)
  • The terminal ends of crustacean antennae have two major categorizations: segmented and flagellate. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1. Centipedes and millipedes are both multi-legged arthropods that hunt during the night and in damp conditions, also they are known for invading homes. (differencebetween.net)
  • Antennae (SG: antenna), sometimes referred to as "feelers", are paired appendages used for sensing in arthropods. (wikipedia.org)
  • In both groups, the front pair of legs have evolved to long "whip" like appendages that they use just like antennae. (creepycrawlyzoo.com)
  • Antennae are the primary olfactory sensors of insects and are accordingly well-equipped with a wide variety of sensilla (singular: sensillum). (wikipedia.org)
  • Many arthropods in particular - consider moths that produce olfactory signals that males have evolved enormous antennae to detect - use female-initiated signals to initiate courtship behavior in males, as if every day were Sadie Hawkins Day . (freethoughtblogs.com)
  • They're flat and speedy pests that have long antennae. (goaptive.com)
  • They also possess antennas, several extremities and in some cases, wings. (acu-doctor.com)
  • The second antennae in the burrowing Hippoidea and Corystidae have setae that interlock to form a tube or "snorkel" which funnels filtered water over the gills. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arthropod Antennae" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (ucdenver.edu)
  • Cockroaches are also one of the most common arthropods living on our planet. (goaptive.com)
  • Any plan to cockroaches, etc.), animal hair or dander, dust, respired control and prevent the spread of these arthropods must chemicals, mould, pollen and tobacco smoke ( 1 ). (who.int)
  • Considering their size-mature specimens are slightly over an inch long not counting their legs and antennae-this really is fast, but it is hard to appreciate just how fast one MPH can seem until you have seen one on the run. (msstate.edu)
  • Can you name the mystery arthropod named for its hundred-some legs? (amnh.org)
  • This amazing arthropod apex predator is the most significant arthropod predator in its range and yet few humans could answer a single question about it. (angelfire.com)
  • Allergenic arthropods are crucial agents in inducing medically important respiratory diseases like asthma and the inflammation of the respiratory tract worldwide. (who.int)
  • 1] It has been a loooooong time since arthropods like insects had a common ancestor with vertebrates like us. (somethingscrawlinginmyhair.com)
  • Then, later on, the vertebrates develop with their main nerve running along the back, while arthropods develop their main set of nerves along their bellies. (somethingscrawlinginmyhair.com)
  • And then, finally, vertebrates grow their skeletons on the inside while arthropods grow their skeletons on the outside. (somethingscrawlinginmyhair.com)
  • Even though arthropods are more than 400 million years old, until now, the oldest record of the animals in amber dates to about 130 million years. (planetsave.com)
  • The little hairs on the antennae can vibrate as sound waves pass over them, and depending on the length of the hairs they can respond to different sound frequencies. (somethingscrawlinginmyhair.com)
  • Nitrogen fixation, nutrient recycling and formation of pores are also performed by the arthropods. (agrihunt.com)
  • however, I have read that females can occasionally straighten their antennae! (waynesword.net)
  • This is good for finding food (you can poke something without walking over to it, to decide if it is food), or for avoiding harm (if it is dangerous, you just lose an antenna tip instead of your head). (somethingscrawlinginmyhair.com)
  • The pair attached to the first segment of the head are called primary antennae or antennules. (wikipedia.org)
  • The antennae on the top of a millipede's head are short and look cut when compared to centipedes. (differencebetween.net)
  • To describe locks of hair that stick up from a characters head, please use antenna hair tag. (donmai.us)
  • Its head has two short, club-shaped antennae. (espacepourlavie.ca)
  • Amber is an extremely valuable tool for paleontologists because it preserves specimens with microscopic fidelity, allowing uniquely accurate estimates of the amount of evolutionary change over millions of years," said corresponding author David Grimaldi, a curator in the American Museum of Natural History's Division of Invertebrate Zoology and a world authority on amber and fossil arthropods. (planetsave.com)
  • Here's a look at the common arthropods you may find in your home. (goaptive.com)
  • However, it may be beneficial to learn more about arthropods since you're most likely around them more than you even know. (goaptive.com)
  • however, they can apparently also straighten their antennae like wasps in photo. (waynesword.net)
  • The pair attached to the second segment are called secondary antennae or simply antennae. (wikipedia.org)
  • a darkly colored, elongated arthropod with four sickle-like clawed arms, huge jagged mandibles and an additional pair of massive, antenna-like lances emerging from its back. (bogleech.com)
  • The oldest record of arthropods has been found preserved in amber. (planetsave.com)
  • They are the first arthropods to be found in amber from the Triassic Period. (planetsave.com)
  • Large number of micro arthropods are found in the under cultivated soil surface. (agrihunt.com)
  • If it's a poison, it only damages the antennae can doesn't make its way into the internal organs. (somethingscrawlinginmyhair.com)
  • Feces of the arthropods make the aggregate of soil which improves the nutrient holding capacity of the soil .They are also responsible for the soil formation and nutrient cycling. (agrihunt.com)
  • Their short antennae end in clubs made of plates called lamellae, which unfurl into a fan. (espacepourlavie.ca)