Replacement of the knee joint.
Replacement of the hip joint.
Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.
Partial or total replacement of a joint.
Replacement for a hip joint.
Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.
Replacement for a knee joint.
A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.
Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.
A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.
The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.
Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)
Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.
The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.
The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)
The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.
Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).
The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.
Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.
Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.
Replacement of the ANKLE JOINT.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The flat, triangular bone situated at the anterior part of the KNEE.
The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).
A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.
Pathological processes involving the chondral tissue (CARTILAGE).
The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.
Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.
Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.
The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.
In horses, cattle, and other quadrupeds, the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee.
Replacement of the ELBOW JOINT.
The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.
Fractures due to the strain caused by repetitive exercise. They are thought to arise from a combination of MUSCLE FATIGUE and bone failure, and occur in situations where BONE REMODELING predominates over repair. The most common sites of stress fractures are the METATARSUS; FIBULA; TIBIA; and FEMORAL NECK.
Pain during the period after surgery.
A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.
Partial or total replacement of one or more FINGERS, or a FINGER JOINT.
Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.
Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.
X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
The interarticular fibrocartilages of the superior surface of the tibia.
The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)
Surgical techniques used to correct or augment healing of chondral defects in the joints (CARTILAGE, ARTICULAR). These include abrasion, drilling, and microfracture of the subchondral bone to enhance chondral resurfacing via autografts, allografts, or cell transplantation.
Displacement of bones out of line in relation to joints. It may be congenital or traumatic in origin.
An abnormal hardening or increased density of bone tissue.
A depression in the lateral angle of the scapula that articulates with the head of the HUMERUS.
Bony outgrowth usually found around joints and often seen in conditions such as ARTHRITIS.
Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.
A dead body, usually a human body.
The head of a long bone that is separated from the shaft by the epiphyseal plate until bone growth stops. At that time, the plate disappears and the head and shaft are united.
Fixation and immobility of a joint.
Production of a radiographic image of a small or very thin object on fine-grained photographic film under conditions which permit subsequent microscopic examination or enlargement of the radiograph at linear magnifications of up to several hundred and with a resolution approaching the resolving power of the photographic emulsion (about 1000 lines per millimeter).
Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.
The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.
The replacement of intervertebral discs in the spinal column with artificial devices. The procedure is done in the lumbar or cervical spine to relieve severe pain resulting from INTERVERTEBRAL DISC DEGENERATION.
Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.
Synthetic thermoplastics that are tough, flexible, inert, and resistant to chemicals and electrical current. They are often used as biocompatible materials for prostheses and implants.
Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.
Death of a bone or part of a bone, either atraumatic or posttraumatic.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.
Inflammation of a bone and its overlaying CARTILAGE.
Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.
Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.
The surgical fixation of a joint by a procedure designed to accomplish fusion of the joint surfaces by promoting the proliferation of bone cells. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).
Recovery of blood lost from surgical procedures for reuse by the same patient in AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS. It is collected during (intraoperatively) or after completion of (postoperatively) the surgical procedures.
Polymorphic cells that form cartilage.
Fractures around joint replacement prosthetics or implants. They can occur intraoperatively or postoperatively.
General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.
A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.
Congenital dislocation of the hip generally includes subluxation of the femoral head, acetabular dysplasia, and complete dislocation of the femoral head from the true acetabulum. This condition occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is more common in females than in males.
A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.
A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.
Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.
A condition in which one of a pair of legs fails to grow as long as the other, which could result from injury or surgery.
The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.
Pain in the joint.
The articulation between a metatarsal bone (METATARSAL BONES) and a phalanx.
The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Reinfusion of blood or blood products derived from the patient's own circulation. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.
Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.
Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.
Deformities acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease. The joint deformity is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis and leprosy.
The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)
The region corresponding to the human WRIST in non-human ANIMALS.
A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the anterolateral surface of the medial condyle of the femur, passes posteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the posterior intercondylar area of the tibia.
A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.
A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.
The second largest of the TARSAL BONES. It articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA to form the ANKLE JOINT.
Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.
ARTHRITIS that is induced in experimental animals. Immunological methods and infectious agents can be used to develop experimental arthritis models. These methods include injections of stimulators of the immune response, such as an adjuvant (ADJUVANTS, IMMUNOLOGIC) or COLLAGEN.
A type of CARTILAGE characterized by a homogenous amorphous matrix containing predominately TYPE II COLLAGEN and ground substance. Hyaline cartilage is found in ARTICULAR CARTILAGE; COSTAL CARTILAGE; LARYNGEAL CARTILAGES; and the NASAL SEPTUM.
Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.
Mature osteoblasts that have become embedded in the BONE MATRIX. They occupy a small cavity, called lacuna, in the matrix and are connected to adjacent osteocytes via protoplasmic projections called canaliculi.
Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.
The body location or part from which tissue is taken for TRANSPLANTATION.
The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A fibrillar collagen found predominantly in CARTILAGE and vitreous humor. It consists of three identical alpha1(II) chains.
A partial joint replacement in which only one surface of the joint is replaced with a PROSTHESIS.
The period following a surgical operation.
A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.
Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.
Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.
The articulation between a metacarpal bone and a phalanx.
A pathological process consisting of hardening or fibrosis of an anatomical structure, often a vessel or a nerve.
Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
An oxide of aluminum, occurring in nature as various minerals such as bauxite, corundum, etc. It is used as an adsorbent, desiccating agent, and catalyst, and in the manufacture of dental cements and refractories.
Fractures of the femur.
Movement of a body part initiated and maintained by a mechanical or electrical device to restore normal range of motion to joints, muscles, or tendons after surgery, prosthesis implantation, contracture flexion, or long immobilization.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
A trace element that plays a role in glucose metabolism. It has the atomic symbol Cr, atomic number 24, and atomic weight 52. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP85-002,1985), chromium and some of its compounds have been listed as known carcinogens.
Making measurements by the use of stereoscopic photographs.
Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.
A type of osteochondritis in which articular cartilage and associated bone becomes partially or totally detached to form joint loose bodies. Affects mainly the knee, ankle, and elbow joints.
Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).
The articulation between the articular surface of the PATELLA and the patellar surface of the FEMUR.
A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.
A condition caused by degenerative arthritis (see OSTEOARTHRITIS) of the METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT of the great toe and characterized by pain and limited dorsiflexion, but relatively unrestricted plantar flexion.
A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.
The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.
The yellowish discoloration of connective tissue due to deposition of HOMOGENTISIC ACID (a brown-black pigment). This is due to defects in the metabolism of PHENYLALANINE and TYROSINE. Ochronosis occurs in ALKAPTONURIA, but has also been associated with exposure to certain chemicals (e.g., PHENOL, trinitrophenol, BENZENE DERIVATIVES).
Microscopy in which the image is formed by ultraviolet radiation and is displayed and recorded by means of photographic film.
The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the HUMERUS in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the SHOULDER JOINT about its longitudinal axis.
The portion of the upper rounded extremity fitting into the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA. (from Stedman, 27th ed)
The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each finger.
Iodinated derivatives of acetic acid. Iodoacetates are commonly used as alkylating sulfhydryl reagents and enzyme inhibitors in biochemical research.
Antifibrinolytic hemostatic used in severe hemorrhage.
Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.
A departure from the normal gait in animals.
An inborn error of amino acid metabolism resulting from a defect in the enzyme HOMOGENTISATE 1,2-DIOXYGENASE, an enzyme involved in the breakdown of PHENYLALANINE and TYROSINE. It is characterized by accumulation of HOMOGENTISIC ACID in the urine, OCHRONOSIS in various tissues, and ARTHRITIS.
The period before a surgical operation.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.
Bone-forming cells which secrete an EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. HYDROXYAPATITE crystals are then deposited into the matrix to form bone.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.
Agents that cause clotting.
Procedure to accelerate the ability of a patient to walk or move about by reducing the time to AMBULATION. It is characterized by a shorter period of hospitalization or recumbency than is normally practiced.
Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.
Hospitals with a much lower than average utilization by physicians and smaller number of procedures.
Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.
The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.
Tantalum. A rare metallic element, atomic number 73, atomic weight 180.948, symbol Ta. It is a noncorrosive and malleable metal that has been used for plates or disks to replace cranial defects, for wire sutures, and for making prosthetic devices. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.
A trace element that is a component of vitamin B12. It has the atomic symbol Co, atomic number 27, and atomic weight 58.93. It is used in nuclear weapons, alloys, and pigments. Deficiency in animals leads to anemia; its excess in humans can lead to erythrocytosis.
Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).
A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.
Tuberculosis of the bones or joints.
The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The joint that occurs between facets of the interior and superior articular processes of adjacent VERTEBRAE.
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
A secreted member of the TNF receptor superfamily that negatively regulates osteoclastogenesis. It is a soluble decoy receptor of RANK LIGAND that inhibits both CELL DIFFERENTIATION and function of OSTEOCLASTS by inhibiting the interaction between RANK LIGAND and RECEPTOR ACTIVATOR OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-KAPPA B.
Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.
A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.
The quadriceps femoris. A collective name of the four-headed skeletal muscle of the thigh, comprised of the rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis.
A secreted matrix metalloproteinase that plays a physiological role in the degradation of extracellular matrix found in skeletal tissues. It is synthesized as an inactive precursor that is activated by the proteolytic cleavage of its N-terminal propeptide.
The inner membrane of a joint capsule surrounding a freely movable joint. It is loosely attached to the external fibrous capsule and secretes SYNOVIAL FLUID.
The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.
A clear, homogenous, structureless, eosinophilic substance occurring in pathological degeneration of tissues.
Any of a group of bone disorders involving one or more ossification centers (EPIPHYSES). It is characterized by degeneration or NECROSIS followed by revascularization and reossification. Osteochondrosis often occurs in children causing varying degrees of discomfort or pain. There are many eponymic types for specific affected areas, such as tarsal navicular (Kohler disease) and tibial tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter disease).
The area between the EPIPHYSIS and the DIAPHYSIS within which bone growth occurs.
Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.
The lumbar and sacral plexuses taken together. The fibers of the lumbosacral plexus originate in the lumbar and upper sacral spinal cord (L1 to S3) and innervate the lower extremities.
The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.
The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.

International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) and Oswestry macroscopic cartilage evaluation scores validated for use in Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) and microfracture. (1/26)

OBJECTIVE: For young patients with cartilage defects, the emergence of clinically applicable cell therapy for biological joint reconstruction is an appealing prospect. Acceptation of this method as a means of standard care requires proof of being reproducible, having long-lasting mechanical integrity, and having a good clinical outcome. This study evaluates the reliability of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) score and the Oswestry Arthroscopy Score (OAS) in the assessment of regenerative cartilage repair. METHOD: A total of 101 macroscopic images of cartilage repair were made during arthroscopy 12 months post-treatment of either Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) or microfracture. These images were examined by seven independent observers with differing levels of experience. The ICRS and OAS scores were randomly presented twice at a 4-week interval. All observers stated their predicted outcome according to actual treatment and defect size. RESULTS: ICRS and OAS scores showed both good inter- and intra observer reliability (0.62 and 0.56 for ICRS; 0.73 and 0.65 for OAS, respectively). Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was satisfactory for research purposes (0.79 and 0.74, respectively). Correlation (equivalence concordance) between both scoring systems was excellent (r=0.94). All observers were inconsistent in predicting actual treatment. Test-re test reliability of estimated defect size and its correlation to true defect size were poor. These results were also applicable to the sub-analyses of the experience of the observer and the quality of imaging. CONCLUSION: The ICRS and OAS are reliable and relevant scores that are now both validated for macroscopic evaluation of cartilage repair as a research tool.  (+info)

Treatment of focal articular cartilage defects in the knee: a systematic review. (2/26)

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T2 mapping in the knee after microfracture at 3.0 T: correlation of global T2 values and clinical outcome - preliminary results. (3/26)

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Response shift in self-reported functional scores after knee microfracture for full thickness cartilage lesions. (4/26)

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Multimodal approach in the use of clinical scoring, morphological MRI and biochemical T2-mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging in their ability to assess differences between cartilage repair tissue after microfracture therapy and matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation: a pilot study. (5/26)

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Ability of dGEMRIC and T2 mapping to evaluate cartilage repair after microfracture: a goat study. (6/26)

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Prospective evaluation of serum biomarker levels and cartilage repair by autologous chondrocyte transplantation and subchondral drilling in a canine model. (7/26)

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Quality of newly formed cartilaginous tissue in defects of articular surface after transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells in a composite scaffold based on collagen I with chitosan micro- and nanofibres. (8/26)

The aim of this study was to evaluate macroscopically, histologically and immunohistochemically the quality of newly formed tissue in iatrogenic defects of articular cartilage of the femur condyle in miniature pigs treated with the clinically used method of microfractures in comparison with the transplantation of a combination of a composite scaffold with allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or the composite scaffold alone. The newly formed cartilaginous tissue filling the defects of articular cartilage after transplantation of the scaffold with MSCs (Group A) had in 60 % of cases a macroscopically smooth surface. In all lesions after the transplantation of the scaffold alone (Group B) or after the method of microfractures (Group C), erosions/fissures or osteophytes were found on the surface. The results of histological and immunohistochemical examination using the modified scoring system according to O'Driscoll were as follows: 14.7+/-3.82 points after transplantations of the scaffold with MSCs (Group A); 5.3+/-2.88 points after transplantations of the scaffold alone (Group B); and 5.2+/-0.64 points after treatment with microfractures (Group C). The O'Driscoll score in animals of Group A was significantly higher than in animals of Group B or Group C (p<0.0005 both). No significant difference was found in the O'Driscoll score between Groups B and C. The treatment of iatrogenic lesions of the articular cartilage surface on the condyles of femur in miniature pigs using transplantation of MSCs in the composite scaffold led to the filling of defects by a tissue of the appearance of hyaline cartilage. Lesions treated by implantation of the scaffold alone or by the method of microfractures were filled with fibrous cartilage with worse macroscopic, histological and immunohistochemical indicators.  (+info)

TY - JOUR. T1 - Glycosaminoglycan/chitosan hydrogel for matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation. T2 - An in vitro study. AU - Fan, Fang Yu. AU - Chiu, Chien Chang. AU - Tseng, Ching Li. AU - Lee, Hsuan Shu. AU - Pan, Yung Ning. AU - Yang, Kai Chiang. PY - 2014. Y1 - 2014. N2 - Matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) is an effective treatment for full-thickness cartilage and osteochondral lesions with encouraging outcomes. However, problems include abnormal growth of chondrocytes during cultivation, cell dedifferentiation, and abnormally regenerated cartilage. A matrix that provides a physicochemical and biological microenvironment for restoring hypertrophic chondrocytes would be beneficial for MACI. Accordingly, this study evaluates the feasibility of using an injectable glycosaminoglycan (GAG)/chitosan hydrogel for MACI. Chitosan gel was prepared and GAGs (hyaluronan and chondroitin-6-sulfate) were added to fabricate a GAG/chitosan matrix. Porcine chondrocytes ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Matrix assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation for cartilage treatment. T2 - A systematic review. AU - Kon, E.. AU - Filardo, G.. AU - Di Matteo, B.. AU - Perdisa, F.. AU - Marcacci, M.. PY - 2013/2/1. Y1 - 2013/2/1. N2 - Objectives: Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) has been developed and applied in the clinical practice in the last decade to overcome most of the disadvantages of the first generation procedures. The purpose of this systematic review is to document and analyse the available literature on the results of MACT in the treatment of chondral and osteochondral lesions of the knee. Methods: All studies published in English addressing MACT procedures were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: 1) level I-IV evidence, 2) measures of functional or clinical outcome, 3) outcome related to cartilage lesions of the knee cartilage. Results: The literature analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles ...
AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTE TRANSPLANTATION Melanie McNeal, PT, CSCS, CFT for patients of DAVID LINTNER, MD Articular cartilage (AC) provides a resilient surface for friction free movement of joints. It must bear ...
For the cartilage cell product NOVOCART® 3D plus, which is used in the study described here, the company TETEC AG obtained an expanded production authorization from the medication monitoring authorities in compliance with Section 13, Para. 1 of the Medicinal Products Act in 2003. This entitles TETEC AG to produce the pharmaceutical product and already distribute it. More than 6000 patients were already successfully treated with NOVOCART® 3D in Europe since 2003. In order to obtain a general market authorization for NOVOCART® 3D plus, this control group study is conducted, in which the superiority of the safety and effectiveness of carrier-bound Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation with NOVOCART® 3D plus compared to the standard of care microfracture surgery needs to be proven. This study further aims at developing and validating known and new biologic markers for the quality and clinical efficacy of the product as requested in the context of identity, purity and potency characteristics of ...
Further studies are needed to investigate ACC as a possible alternative first-line treatment for focal cartilage injuries in the knee.
Dr Suzanne Miller in Waltham, Dedham and Boston, MA offers shoulder debridement and microfracture. Microfracture is a technique used to repair damaged articular cartilage by making multiple small holes in the surface of the joint.
The unique features of our method are as follows: 1) a SDHM with sufficient thickness for cartilage repair can be performed without a HA-based AM scaffold; and 2) increasing the number of SDHM applied to the defect area increases cartilage regeneration.. In recent years, several methods have been developed for repairing full-thickness cartilage defects. The MF technique performed arthroscopically as described by Steadman et al. (7) is a popular treatment method because it is easy applicable and cost-effective (23,24). Microfracture repairs the defective cartilage area by enabling the arrival of stromal cells. However, it results in shallow channels, wall compression, and increased trabecular thickness and density, as demonstrated by micro-computed tomography (microCT) and histology in several clinical and animal studies (25,26). Thus, it does not allow the regeneration of normal hyaline cartilage, perhaps because of the lack of sufficient MSCs or poor cellular differentiation (27-29). Compared ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cartilage failures. Systematic literature review, critical survey analysis, and definition. AU - Filardo, Giuseppe. AU - Andriolo, Luca. AU - Balboni, Federica. AU - Marcacci, Maurilio. AU - Kon, Elizaveta. PY - 2015/12/1. Y1 - 2015/12/1. N2 - Purpose: While midterm results of matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) are now available, less attention has been paid to the evaluation of failures of this surgical approach. Aim of this study was to analyse how failures are generally defined in cartilage surgery, in order to understand how the survival rate may change according to different definitions of failure. Methods: A systematic review on MACT in the knee was conducted to report failure rates as well as different failure definitions in the available literature. Afterwards, we analysed the survival curve at 8.5-year follow-up of a survey of 193 patients treated with MACT. Using different definitions to identify failures, we compared how the survival rate ...
The first clinical experience with ACT (autologous chondrocyte transplantation) was reported on in 1994 by Brittberg et al. The primary success rate then stood at over 75% with clinically good and very good outcomes. The new formation of hyaline-like articular cartilage was histologically proven. These results were confirmed later by many other authors. The term hyaline-like was chosen because following the ACT a zonal structure formation, such as the one which exists in healthy hyaline cartilage had not yet been observed, although the biochemical constitution and the biomechanical weight bearing capacity of the newly formed cartilage basic structure corresponds closely to that of hyaline cartilage ...
Most acute chondral injuries will be treated with arthroscopic surgery as a day case procedure under general anaesthetic.. In general the only repairable injuries of this type are where there is quite a large chunk of articular cartilage with a sliver of bone (an osteochondral fracture) which can be pinned back in place.. If the fragment has to be removed and it leaves behind a crater in an important part of the knee with bare bone in the base, it will not heal up with normal joint surface cartilage. It may heal up with fibrocartilage or scar tissue in the base giving some sort of smooth covering. This type of covering can be encouraged by making some small holes in the bone. By encouraging bleeding into the area, scar tissue will form. This technique is sometimes referred to as microfracture.. If persistent problems arise because of a defect in the articular cartilage, then there are a number of specialised techniques which may be performed, but for which not everybody is ...
The reigning WNBA Rookie of the Year and top overall pick in the 2014 draft had a small lesion in her articular cartilage. Microfracture involves the setting of a cartilage matrix from a donor (i.e., a cadaver) into the lesion, to promote the growth of new cartilage that far more closely approximates the natural material (hyaline cartilage). A gluelike man-made protein is then applied to seal it ...
Microfracture surgery at Silicon Valley Orthopaedics, serving the Palo Alto area, can help repair damaged cartilage. Book an expert consultation with Dr. Nic Gay or Dr. Masi Reynolds today.
Following microfracture all patients demonstrated significant and clinically meaningful improvements in outcomes at a mean of 5.7 years, increasing age and BMI are the patient-related factors that may predict a poor outcome.
Orange County orthopedic surgeon Dr. Ralph Venuto discusses when microfracture surgery is an appropriate option for patients with knee injuries.
The video demonstrates the surgical technique for the arthroscopic treatment of an osteochondral lesion of the talus with micronized allograft cartilage matrix (BioCartilage). The lesion is debrided to its base and vertical borders are created. Marrow stimulation is then performed. Next all water is removed from the joint and the lesion is completely dried. The BioCartilage is introduced into the lesion and filled to just under the articular surface. It is contoured appropriately, and fibrin glue is applied to the surface of the lesion. This is allowed to set without manipulation for 5 minutes. ...
Autologous cultured chondrocytes, MACI is an autologous cellularized scaffold product indicated for the repair of symptomatic, single or multiple full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee with or without bone involvement in adults.
Red marrow is present in the fetal skeleton and converts to yellow marrow after birth. In sickle cell anemia (SCA) destruction of RBCs causes anemia which prevents the conversion of red marrow to yellow marrow. The persistent red marrow is seen in all bones of patients with SCA and has pathologic and radiologic consequences. Red marrow stimulation leads to widening of the medullary spaces and cortical thinning which can cause pathologic fractures. Coarse trabeculation and osteopenia may also be seen. Persistent red marrow presents as low signal intensity in osseous structures on T1WI. On skull radiographs the widening of the diploic spaces is a manifestation of bone marrow expansion. The hair on end appearance of the skull is secondary to coarse trabeculation from new bone formation. In the spine, cortical thinning results in biconcave deformities of the vertebral bodies sometimes referred to as the fish-mouth appearance. ...
Intra-articular fracture of the tibial plateau has a risk factor for post traumatic osteoarthritis.Large focal lesions of the tibial plateau resulting from fracture offer fewer management alternatives when compared with their femoral condylar counterparts. Techniques such as mosaicplasty or autologous chondrocyte transplantation have not been as positive for patients with tibial ...
Tissue engineering researchers, including Elisseeff, theorized that the specialized stem cells needed a nourishing scaffold on which to grow, but demonstrating the clinical value of hydrogels has taken a lot of time, Elisseeff says. By experimenting with various materials, her group eventually developed a promising hydrogel, and then an adhesive that could bind it to the bone.. After testing the combination for several years in the lab and in goats, with promising results, she says, the group and their surgeon collaborators conducted their first clinical study, in which 15 patients with holes in the cartilage of their knees received a hydrogel and adhesive implant along with microfracture. For comparative purposes, another three patients were treated with microfracture alone. After six months, the researchers reported that the implants had caused no major problems, and MRIs showed that patients with implants had new cartilage filling an average 86 percent of the defect in their knees, while ...
Still, there is no getting around that this is a devastating blow to Oden and Portland and that Oden has a lot of rehabilitation work ahead of him before he can be a productive NBA player. If Oden is not able to play this season then he will become just the second number one overall pick since 1966 to not play in the NBA in the year that he was selected; in 1987, David Robinson did not join the San Antonio Spurs because he had to fulfill his commitment to the Navy. However, there have been several number one overall picks whose rookie seasons were impacted in some way by injuries, including future All-Stars Bob Lanier, Doug Collins and Bill Walton. Lanier actually did not miss a game during his first season but he was playing hurt and he told me, In hindsight, what we should have done--if I had had any sense and if there was some sophistication with the powers that be way back then in Detroit--is have me sit out the first half of the season, at least, and just worked on getting my knee right, ...
Described by Dr. Stone as a gift to his patients, this short, weekly blog focuses on sports, performance, & orthopaedic care.. ...
Today at 2pm, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson will visit a childrens hospital in Washington, D.C. and unveil the Agencys new Utility MACT rules. She will
im starting this as part of my break from hormones hoping to bulk up 10 lbs in 12 weeks. goin like this. 1-4 mass FX 4 caps ED, 5-8 6 caps ED 1-4 Jw 3
Bone marrow stimulation with G-CSF (Neupogen®, Granocyte®) is only recommended for febrile neutropenia which does not respond to antibiotic treatment, severe neutropenia (granulocytes , 0.5 x 109 /L for more than 1 week), and in cases where it is necessary to administer curative treatment with sufficient dosage intensity.. ...
Bone marrow stimulation with G-CSF (Neupogen®, Granocyte®) is only recommended for febrile neutropenia which does not respond to antibiotic treatment, severe neutropenia (granulocytes , 0.5 x 109 /L for more than 1 week), and in cases where it is necessary to administer curative treatment with sufficient dosage intensity.. ...
In order to be able to use second-generation ACT techniques for the repair of cartilage defects in patients with OA, it is highly important to investigate whether OA chondrocytes have an irreversibly altered phenotype or if these cells can differentiate towards a hyaline cartilage phenotype after in vitro expansion. Today, there are conflicting data whether OA chondrocytes fulfill the prerequisites for ACT treatment or not [12, 13, 15, 21]. This encouraged us to investigate more thoroughly the chondrogenic differentiation potential of human OA chondrocytes using microarray technology in order to determine whether OA chondrocytes might possibly be used in second-generation ACT.. Microarray analysis of human OA and ND chondrocytes cultured in ML indicated that the OA chondrocytes were in a less differentiated state compared with the ND chondrocytes. This is thus in accordance with the differences detected in vivo between OA and ND cartilage [10, 22]. Re-differentiation in scaffold cultures ...
Articular cartilage lesions are commonly occurring. In a prospective study of 1,000 knee arthroscopies focal chondral or osteochondral defects were found in 19% of the patients (Hjelle 2002). Chronic articular cartilage defects do not heal spontaneously. However, acute traumatic osteochondral lesions or surgically inflicted lesions extending into subchondral bone, e.g. by drilling (Pridie 1959), spongialization, abrasion or microfracture with an angled awl (Rodrigo 1994) causing the release of pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow, may heal with repair tissue consisting of fibrous tissue, fibrocartilage or hyaline-like cartilage. The microfracture technique causes little damage to the subchondral bone plate and the risk of heat necroses caused by drilling or abrasion is eliminated. The quality of the repair tissue after these bone marrow stimulating techniques depends on various factors including the species and age of the individual, the size and localization of the defect, ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cell therapy, biomaterials and other options may enhance cartilage repair. AU - Saris, Daniël B.F.. PY - 2013/3/1. Y1 - 2013/3/1. N2 - There are several articular cartilage repair techniques being used, including microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation and mosaicplasty, and orthopaedic surgeons have found they offer some improvement for patients, overall. The physicians who spoke with Orthopaedics Today Europe discussed indications for the major techniques currently used worldwide and noted that results of each approach are somewhat mixed. From their comments it seems that orthopaedic clinicians and researchers are divided over which cartilage repair approaches are optimal and whether developments being worked on now will deliver on the promise of improved outcomes in the future.. AB - There are several articular cartilage repair techniques being used, including microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation and mosaicplasty, and orthopaedic surgeons have found ...
Microfracture is a surgical technique that has been developed to treat chondral defects, which are damaged areas of articular cartilage of the knee. It is a common procedure used to treat patients with full thickness damage to the articular cartilage that goes all the way down to the bone.. This arthroscopic procedure was first introduced about 20 years ago as a treatment method that uses the bodys own healing abilities and provides an enriched environment for tissue regeneration on the chondral surface.. Since its development, the microfracture procedure has been used by its originator to treat more than 2000 patients. Of these patients, 75 to 80% experienced significant pain relief and improvement in the ability to perform daily activities and participate in sports. Fifteen percent noticed no change, and five percent continued to have joint deterioration. Next ...
When different surgical approaches have similar outcomes, the decision over treatment choice is based on individual surgeon preferences, experience, and lesion location and amount of cartilage damage. The initial surgical treatment for most defects involves arthroscopy with debridement (removal of damaged tissue), andmicrofracture.. Regardless of the specific technique, improvement in pain is seen in 85% of people. If the initial microfracture or drilling procedure is not successful, repeat microfracture for continued pain can be effective.. Revision microfracture is used in patients with persistent pain who have imaging results that suggest healing was incomplete but who cannot have more invasive surgical procedures. Repeat microfracture or drilling is a reasonable, low complication procedure for such patients.. Although the goal of drilling and microfracture is to stimulate healing and restoration of hyaline cartilage, defects usually heal with fibrocartilage, which is less organised scar ...
Option for repair damaged knee cartilage is microfracture procedure. Articular cartilage repair can done by Dr.Raju Easwaran, best knee specialist in Delhi.
Mr Tim Spalding is a knee surgeon whose interests include arthroscopic anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, meniscal reconstructive surgery, meniscal transplantation, surgery for patello-femoral problems, articular cartilage repair and autologous chondrocyte transplantation, through to osteotomy and joint replacement. For more information about Meniscal
Cartilage damage can lead to joint conditions, causing pain and arthritis. Joint microfracture surgery is one option to help heal cartilage damage, available through Dr. Kerisimasi Reynolds in San Jose.
Cartilage replacement is a surgical procedure performed to replace worn out cartilage. Microfracture surgery is offered by Dr Bauze, knee surgeon in Adelaide.
I had a microfracture surgery in early 2009 to repair a torn meniscus in my left knee and that was the worst decision of my life. I have more pain now than I did before the surgery and it seems like th...
Hi - its been a year since someone commented on this thread and I can only assume that everyone has healed up and all the pain and discomfort has become a distant memory. I hope so in any case.. Im now in week 10 post op and still limping along on one crutch. Every now and then I experience pain related to what feels like the bones rubbing against each other - I dont know how to describe it - its just not muscular pain and I am terrified that all this effort has been wasted and that the op didnt work. My microfracture was relatively small according to the surgeons assistant - essentially the size of a South African 20c piece (about 6mm diameter), so the success rate is fairly high. But with this amount of swelling and pain, it feels like hes just about done the whole kneecap!. Ive been on the CPM once a week since the op and yesterday in the pool did some rotation type movements - Ive been told not to go on the exercise bikes at the gym but Im dying to go back and start shedding some ...
The cartilage regenerative medicine field has evolved during the last decades. The first-generation technology, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) involved the transplantation of in vitro expanded chondrocytes to cartilage defects. The second generation involves the seeding of chondrocytes in a three-dimensional scaffold. The technique has several potential advantages such as the ability of arthroscopic implantation, in vitro pre-differentiation of cells and implant stability among others (Brittberg M, Lindahl A, Nilsson A, Ohlsson C, Isaksson O, Peterson L, N Engl J Med 331(14):889-895, 1994; Henderson I, Francisco R, Oakes B, Cameron J, Knee 12(3):209-216, 2005; Peterson L, Minas T, Brittberg M, Nilsson A, Sjogren-Jansson E, Lindahl A, Clin Orthop (374):212-234, 2000; Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Feyerabend F, Petersen JP, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, et al. Bioprocess Biosyst Eng 27(4):273-280, 2005; Portner R, Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, J Biosci Bioeng 100(3):235-245, 2005;
Management of articular cartilage lesions is based on the concept that providing blood with mesenchymal stem cell precursors access to the lesion encourages healing by formation of fibrocartilage. Several marrow stimulating techniques have been described to achieve this. Abrasion arthroplasty involves uniform removal of subchondral bone until bleeding is achieved. This can be accomplished in the canine elbow by use of either a curette or burr attachment on a small joint shaver. The shaver is usually more rapid and efficient and generally just as accurate. Another marrow stimulating technique is microfracture. In this technique numerous microcracks are created in the subchondral bone plate with a specialized micropick to allow bleeding at the lesion surface.. Arthroplasty and Microfracture. Indications for abrasion arthroplasty or microfracture vary with the size and degree of cartilage loss. In general, lesions small to moderate size (1-2 cm in humans) can be treated with resurfacing techniques. ...
Chondral or osteochondral lesions of the knee eligible for cartilage repair surgery are diagnosed in 5-10 % of all knees subjected to knee
The Cochrane Library and other sources regularly publish new reviews, some of which highlight the Microfracture as the Primary Treatment for lack of good quality studies on which to base Osteochondral Lesions of the Talar Dome. recommendations. This is a good starting point for identifying a new area of research. The second step is Many techniques exist for the treatment of to find out what else has been published. If you OCLs of the talar dome. Good to excellent re- would like a literature search on any of these topics sults can be consistently reached in greater please contact the Library Service on ext 3831. than 80% of patients with arthroscopic de-bridement and microfracture. However, addi-tional prospective trials should be undertaken A systematic evaluation of content, struc- to determine differences in outcome between ture, and efficacy of interventions to im- techniques, size and location of the OCL, and prove patients self-management of cancer other patient quality factors, such as ...
In this article we will present the non-surgical stem cell - comprehensive Prolotherapy alternative to various surgical techniques that are designed to repair or regrow the articular cartilage of the knee.
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I was injured on the job transferring a pt that twisted and started to fall. I twisted my knee and I heard a pop. Through months of physical therapy and not getting any better and MRI showed just that ...
with the PowerPick from Arthrex. Its Ø1.5 mm x 4 mm depth needle removes bone instead of compacting it as is the case with typical microfracture pic
with the PowerPick from Arthrex. Its Ø1.5 mm x 4 mm depth needle removes bone instead of compacting it as is the case with typical microfracture pic
The University of Virginia, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, is seeking adults with articular cartilage defects in the knee. The purpose of this study is to show if using an investigational tissue graft is better than the standard method of microfracture for the treatment of articular cartilage defects. This study will also document changes in knee pain and function after either surgery is performed.. The standard of care for treating articular cartilage defects in the knee is microfracture. This study is being done to observe if a graft is an efficient and more superior treatment option. For eligible participants, the defect will be treated with either microfracture or by using an investigational tissue graft.. This study involves 12 follow up visits over a 5 year period following surgery.. Study related clinic visits, research x-rays and MRI scans are provided free of charge. The study will also cover the costs of physical therapy that are not covered by your insurance up to $4,000 ...
Microfracture surgery is used to repair articular cartilage damage in the knee, is performed by Andrew L DeGruccio in Louisville, Kentucky.
Introduction. The purpose of this study was to observe the difference in healing of chondral and osteochondral defects treated with abrasion arthroplasty versus subchondral microfracture.. Material and methods. 8 rabbits were divided in two groups (4 rabbits in group A and 4 rabbits in group B). In both groups, a 3.0 mm diameter defect was created on medial and lateral femoral condyles. In group A cartilage was shaved without penetrating the subchondral plate. In group B, defects were created into subchondral bone (3.0 mm deep). In each medial epicondyle defects, two 1.0 mm holes were performed into subchondral bone with orthopedic awl until bleeding was observed. Each lateral epicondyle defects underwent a abrasion arthroplasty until punctate bleeding was observed. Joint resurfacing and degenerative changes were evaluated grossly and histologically after 8 and 12 weeks.. Results. On gross observation a greater volume of repair tissue filled treated defects. Degenerative changes in the cartilage ...
BACKGROUND Limited information exists on the clinical use of a synthetic osteochondral scaffold plug for cartilage restoration in the knee. PURPOSE/HYPOTHESIS The purpose of this study was to compare the early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance, including quantitative T2 values, between cartilage defects treated with a scaffold versus a scaffold with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC). The hypothesis was that the addition of PRP or BMAC would result in an improved cartilage appearance. STUDY DESIGN Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS Forty-six patients with full-thickness cartilage defects of the femur were surgically treated with a control scaffold (n = 11), scaffold with PRP (n = 23), or scaffold with BMAC (n = 12) and were followed prospectively. Patients underwent MRI with a qualitative assessment and quantitative T2 mapping at 12 months after surgery. An image assessment was performed retrospectively by a blinded musculoskeletal ...
We evaluated the effect of platelet-rich plasma-incorporated gelatin hydrogel microsphere (PRP/GM) together with subchondral drilling for cartilage regeneration in horses. Cartilage defects (diameter, 4.5 mm; depth, 3.0 mm) were created in both third carpal bones of six Thoroughbred horses. A subchondral hole was drilled at the center of this cartilage defect (diameter, 2.0 mm; depth, 35 mm) in one randomly selected carpal joint (test joint), whereas no subchondral hole was made in the contralateral joint (control joint). ...
We evaluated the effect of platelet-rich plasma-incorporated gelatin hydrogel microsphere (PRP/GM) together with subchondral drilling for cartilage regeneration in horses. Cartilage defects (diameter, 4.5 mm; depth, 3.0 mm) were created in both third carpal bones of six Thoroughbred horses. A subchondral hole was drilled at the center of this cartilage defect (diameter, 2.0 mm; depth, 35 mm) in one randomly selected carpal joint (test joint), whereas no subchondral hole was made in the contralateral joint (control joint). ...
A protective functional solution designed to support regeneration of the knee cartilage during the post-surgical healing phase. It assists in the compliance to the rehabilitation protocol for cartilage repair procedures such as Microfracture, OATS and (M)ACI.
Affiliation (Current):大阪市立大学,大学院医学研究科,講師, Research Field:Orthopaedic surgery,Basic Section 56020:Orthopedics-related, Keywords:半月板,再生医療,半月修復,修復,再生,エストロゲン,軟骨代謝,ノックアウトマウス,cre-loxPシステム,ATDC5, # of Research Projects:8, # of Research Products:101, Ongoing Project:Cartilage repair covered with autologous fibrin sheet on microfracture
Defensive end Victor Abiamiri had microfracture knee surgery and isnt expected to return to running until six months after surgery. The oft-injured Eagle underwent the operation on Feb. 9, according to Eagles trainer Rick Burkholder. - Jeff McLane, Philadelphia Inquirer
Connecticut Sun forward Chiney Ogwumike underwent microfracture surgery Thursday on her right knee and will miss at least part of the WNBA season.
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Through use of an awl, the surgeon creates tiny fractures in the subchondral bone plate. Blood and bone marrow (which contains ... Clin Orthop Relat Res (144):74-83 Johnson LL (1986) Arthroscopic abrasion arthroplasty historical and pathologic perspective: ... However, acute traumatic osteochondral lesions or surgically created lesions extending into subchondral bone, e.g. by Pridie ... how the subchondral bone plate is treated, and the postoperative rehabilitation protocol. The surgery was developed in the late ...
Stage 4 hallux rigidus may be treated via fusion of the joint (arthrodesis) or implant arthroplasty in which both sides of the ... bony proliferation on the metatarsophalangeal head and phalanx and subchondral sclerosis or cyst. Grade III - severe changes ...
The total CMC1 joint replacement is a newer arthroplasty which has developed into a cemented and a non-cemented design. The ... In reaction of this process the joint bones thicken at the surface, resulting in subchondral sclerosis. Also bony outgrowths, ... Weilby A (1988). "Tendon interposition arthroplasty of the first carpo-metacarpal joint". J Hand Surg [Br]. 13 (4): 421-425. ... Very narrow joint space Cystic and sclerotic subchondral bone changes are present Significant erosion of the scaphotrapezial ...
Late radiographic signs also include a radiolucency area following the collapse of subchondral bone (crescent sign) and ringed ... Mansat P, Huser L, Mansat M, Bellumore Y, Rongières M, Bonnevialle P (March 2005). "Shoulder arthroplasty for atraumatic ... Bergman NR, Rand JA (December 1991). "Total knee arthroplasty in osteonecrosis" (Free full text). Clinical Orthopaedics and ...
Li G, Yin J, Gao J, Cheng TS, Pavlos NJ, Zhang C, Zheng MH (2013). "Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: insight into risk ... Daigle ME, Weinstein AM, Katz JN, Losina E (October 2012). "The cost-effectiveness of total joint arthroplasty: a systematic ... The subchondral bone volume increases and becomes less mineralized (hypomineralization). All these changes can cause problems ... The pain in an osteoarthritic joint has been related to thickened synovium and to subchondral bone lesions. Diagnosis is made ...
Synovial fluid and the subchondral bone marrow serve both as nutrition sources for the hyaline cartilage. Lack of at least one ... Kneecapping Kneeling Knésetja Medial collateral ligament Partial knee replacement unicompartmental knee arthroplasty ... Collagen fibres within the articular cartilage have been described by Benninghoff as arising from the subchondral bone in a ...
... for the likelihood that a patient with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee will progress to knee arthroplasty with ... Difficult primary total knee arthroplasty requiring a varus -valgus constrained implant is at higher risk of periprosthetic ... Knee arthroplasty rate was 27% at mean of 4 years of follow-up. Lasso Regression was non-inferior to other models and was ... for the likelihood that a patient with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee will progress to knee arthroplasty with ...
Purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implanted in patients with secondary osteonecrosis (ON) related to corticosteroids have ... Subchondral stem cell therapy versus contralateral total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis following secondary osteonecrosis ... bone marrow aspiration and subchondral injection of concentrated bone marrow versus total knee arthroplasty) was measured. Peri ... Subchondral autologous bone marrow concentrate was an effective procedure for treating young patients with knee osteoarthritis ...
A Comparison of Abrasion Arthroplasty and Subchondral Microfracture in the Treatment of Chondral and Osteochondral Cartilage ... In group A cartilage was shaved without penetrating the subchondral plate. In group B, defects were created into subchondral ... observe the difference in healing of chondral and osteochondral defects treated with abrasion arthroplasty versus subchondral ... Histological evidence at 12 weeks suggests that microfracture technique may result in better repair than abrasion arthroplasty ...
J Arthroplasty. 1995;10(5):679-682.. View this article via: PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar ... Subchondral bone may also be an important source of pain in OA; specifically, subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions ... Active subchondral bone resorption releases excessive active TGF-β1, which recruits mesenchymal stem cells to the subchondral ... may interrupt aberrant subchondral bone remodeling and reduce innervation of CGRP+ sensory fibers in the subchondral bone to ...
Subchondral stem cell therapy versus contralateral total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis following secondary osteonecrosis ... Subchondral stem cell therapy versus contralateral total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis following secondary osteonecrosis ... Purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implanted in patients with secondary osteonecrosis (ON) related to corticosteroids have ... Subchondral autologous bone marrow concentrate was an effective procedure for treating young patients with knee osteoarthritis ...
Subchondral cysts (or geodes) are common in osteoarthritis (OA), usually in association with other typical signs, i.e., joint ... space narrowing, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophytosis. However,... ... Total hip arthroplasty was performed. Pathological analysis of the resected femoral head and of material obtained at curettage ... Subchondral cysts (or geodes) are common in osteoarthritis (OA), usually in association with other typical signs, i.e., joint ...
A Randomized Trial of Static and Articulating Spacers for the Treatment of Infection Following Total Knee Arthroplasty. Nahhas ... Spontaneous Osteonecrosis/Subchondral Insufficiency Fractures of the Knee: High Rates of Conversion to Surgical Treatment and ... Persistent Racial Disparities in Utilization Rates and Perioperative Metrics in Total Joint Arthroplasty in the U.S.: A ... Use of Natural Language Processing Algorithms to Identify Common Data Elements in Operative Notes for Total Hip Arthroplasty. ...
Discrepant hypoxia tolerance aggravates subchondral delamination in osteonecrosis of the femoral head Qian-Hao Yang, Guang-Yi ... A new classification for proximal femur bone defects in conservative hip arthroplasty revisions Filippo Casella, Fabio Favetti ...
Total shoulder arthroplasty was performed in this case. Shoulder RDA occurs as a result of SIF in elderly women; the ... Magnetic resonance imaging showed a bone marrow edema pattern with an associated subchondral low-intensity band, typical of SIF ... Here, we report two cases, with different destruction patterns, which were most probably due to subchondral insufficiency ... The subchondral low-intensity band was histologically shown to be a fracture line. In our case 2, MRI showed these typical ...
Abrasion arthroplasty, subchondral drilling and microfracture are all considered as marrow stimulation techniques, where the ... Temporal subchondral bone repair pattern following subchondral drilling. Interestingly, the repair of the subchondral bone has ... 1996). A comparison of abrasion burr arthroplasty and subchondral drilling in the treatment of full-thickness cartilage lesions ... Subchondral drilling led to the formation of subchondral bone cysts (63%) and intralesional osteophytes (26%). Compared with ...
The methods focus on the prevention, or delayed onset or progression of, subchondral defects such as bone marrow edema or bone ... marrow lesion, and subchondral treatment to prevent the progression of osteoarthritis or degenerative disc disease in the spine ... Adjustable height arthroplasty plate US20140257483A1 (en) * 2013-03-05. 2014-09-11. Karl W. Swann. Method and device for ... The method comprises: identifying a subchondral defect in a subchondral region of a bone of the spine; selecting a subchondral ...
This is a case on a female patient who developed immediate postsurgical NOMI following hip arthroplasty and died. Since ... Aseptic necrosis (avascular) of the left femoral head with flattening of the subchondral bone (arrow).. ... Fulminant Nonocclusive Mesenteric Ischemia Just after Hip Arthroplasty. Maria Auxiliadora-Martins. ,1 Gil Cezar Alkmin-Teixeira ... This is a case on a female patient who developed immediate postsurgical NOMI following hip arthroplasty and died. Since ...
OCOSH Classification: Orthopaedic Procedures: Arthroplasty: Subchondral Arthroplasty View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate ... We report six cases of contralateral limb involvement during total hip arthroplasty including swelling of the gluteal muscle ... Rhabdomyolysis following total hip arthroplasty Location: http://www.jbjs.org.uk/cgi/reprint/73-B/4/576 ...
... and abrasion arthroplasty. These procedures generally involve penetrating the region of vascularization in the subchondral bone ... Joint arthroplasty devices formed in situ. US20080188942 *. 6 Feb 2007. 7 Ago 2008. Zimmer Technology, Inc.. Femoral trochlea ... e. inserting the cartilage implant into the hole so that the lower surface abuts against the prepared subchondral bone and the ... e. inserting the cartilage implant into the hole so that the lower surface abuts against the prepared subchondral bone and the ...
... and abrasion arthroplasty. These procedures generally involve penetrating the region of vascularization in the subchondral bone ... Joint arthroplasty devices formed in situ. US20080188942. 6 Feb 2007. 7 Aug 2008. Zimmer Technology, Inc.. Femoral trochlea ... Orthopaedic implant for arthroplasty of the fingers. US8876901. 13 Apr 2012. 4 Nov 2014. Moirai Orthopaedics, Llc. Articular ... A hole is then formed, i.e., drilled, punched, or broached, through the cartilage and the subchondral bone into the cancellous ...
CT Pelvis - document subchondral bone changes, cartilage resorption, and narrowing of joint space ... Early recommended treatment included corrective osteotomy, bony fusion, or joint arthroplasty. *investigators proposed early ... Usual findings include cystic erosions in subchondral bone and a bloody aspirate. ...
moderate arthrosis: inferior osteophyte between 3-5 mm in length, irregularity of the joint line and subchondral sclerosis; - ... Arthroplasty of the Shoulder. Arthroplasty of the Shoulder. - Discussion: - Total Shoulder Arthroplasty: (considerations: ... total shoulder arthroplasty - video. - technical considerations with fracture. - reverse arthroplasty - Post Operative Rehab:. ... Reverse arthroplasty. - Indications:. - indicated for end stage DJD or RA shoulder involvement; - contra-indications to ...
A bone tamp is utilized to disimpact the cancellous and subchondral bone 1 to 2mm beyond the surrounding subchondral bone to ... Three patients were treated with arthroplasty, one of whom received a total shoulder arthroplasty, with an average score of 75/ ... total shoulder arthroplasty, resection arthroplasty, or arthrodesis. Treatment within 2 years of injury was correlated with ... "Anatomic shoulder arthroplasty as treatment for locked posterior dislocation of the shoulder". J Bone Joint Surg Am. vol. 96. ...
Abrasion arthroplasty involves uniform removal of subchondral bone until bleeding is achieved. This can be accomplished in the ... Arthroplasty and Microfracture. Indications for abrasion arthroplasty or microfracture vary with the size and degree of ... To perform abrasion arthroplasty, insert a hand burr or preferentially a power shaver burr through the instrument portal. ... Grade IV cartilage damage is full thickness loss of cartilage and exposure and, in some cases, eburnation of the subchondral ...
Identifying Patient-Specific Pathology in Osteoarthritis Development Based on MicroCT Analysis of Subchondral Trabecular Bone. ... Hip Replacement Arthroplasty (Total Hip Replacement) 07/2009 - 03/2009. 2. Vena Cava Filters (Inferior Vena Cava Filter) 10/ ... Arthroplasty. 1/2016. Projected Increase in Periprosthetic Joint Infections Secondary to Rise in Diabetes and Obesity.. ... Coronary revascularization and adverse events in joint arthroplasty.. 9/2015. Administration of Aspirin as a Prophylaxis Agent ...
Calipered Kineatic Alignment for Total Knee Arthroplasty Stephen M. Howell, MD, UNITED STATES David A. Parker, MBBS, BMedSc, ... Young Patient with Femoral Head Limited Subchondral Collapse and Possible Impingement Symptoms. Iftach Hetsroni, MD, Associate ...
total knee arthroplasty [27]. Even when a subchondral insufficiency fracture is diagnosed on a conventional radiograph, MRI may ... 7 Imaging After Total Knee Arthroplasty Variant 12: Pain after total knee arthroplasty. Suspect periprosthetic soft-tissue ... Imaging After Total Knee Arthroplasty not appropriate; 4,5,6 May be appropriate; 7,8,9 Usually appropriate *Relative Radiation ...
Subchondral bone lesions may be clinically important, treatable with bone substitute. December 6, 2019. Subchondroplasty, an ... Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) profoundly influences knee biomechanics. Using an arbitrary (often 3° to 5°) posterior tibial ... A newly accepted study in The Journal of Arthroplasty describes a genome-wide analysis to identify the genetic loci responsible ... has received FDA 510(k) clearance of its TSolution One Total Knee Application for use in total knee arthroplasty, according to ...
Computed tomography of subchondral bone and osteophytes in hip osteoarthritis: the shape of things to come? Front Endocrinol ... In Australia, there is universal health insurance, so arthroplasty is available to all. We did not have accurate arthroplasty ... and more fit for undergoing hip arthroplasty. The rate of total hip arthroplasty for OA was similar regardless of education ... and type and reason for arthroplasty, with almost complete arthroplasty data13. Matching of MCCS participants using first name ...
The patient is applying for disability and is not interested in having a knee arthroplasty at this time. (R. 175-76). The ... Walcott noted that plaintiff may need bone grafting of his subchondral cyst with arthroscopy, and a later ACL reconstruction. ( ... Potter wrote: The patient was advised to have a total knee arthroplasty. He needs no significant treatment for his lumbosacral ... Hall indicated that plaintiff would need a total knee arthroplasty for complete relief of pain. Dr. Hall released plaintiff to ...
Tibial cartilage volume, subchondral bone cysts, and BMLs were measured by using validated methods. Knee arthroplasty over a 4- ... to subchondral bone cysts present, the risk of knee replacement was increased (odds ratio, 1.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), ... To examine the natural history of subchondral bone cysts and to determine whether knee cartilage loss and risk of joint ... Tibial cartilage volume, subchondral bone cysts, and BMLs were measured by using validated methods. Knee arthroplasty over a 4- ...
Subchondral bone cysts regress after correction of malalignment in knee osteoarthritis: comply with Wolffs law. Weiguo Wang, ... Platelet-rich plasma injections delay the need for knee arthroplasty: a retrospective study and survival analysis. Mikel ... Subchondral bone or intra-articular injection of bone marrow concentrate mesenchymal stem cells in bilateral knee ... Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell injection in subchondral lesions of knee osteoarthritis: a prospective randomized study ...
Total ankle arthroplasty cases are often challenging but post-op complications can lead the course in an even more complicated ... Total ankle arthroplasty cases are often challenging but post-op complications can lead the course in an even more complicated ... One of the implanted metallic screws was within the subchondral plate of the talus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed ... Clough TM, Alvi F, Majeed H. Total ankle arthroplasty: what are the risks?: a guide to surgical consent and a review of the ...
Response to Letter to the Editor: Subchondral tibial bone texture predicts the incidence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis: ... Arthroplasty Arthroplasty is a surgical procedure to restore the integrity and function of a joint. A joint can be restored by ... arthroplasty would improve post-operative pain control. Patients were randomised in the operating room to receive either a ... Home » Topics » Arthroplasty » Research » Study to Test the Efficacy of Periarticular Levo Bupivicaine Injection Following ...
J Arthroplasty. 2015 Sep 21. [Epub ahead of print].. Triantafyllopoulos GK, Elpers ME, Burket JC, Esposito CI, Padgett DE, ... In vivo cyclic compression causes cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone changes in mouse tibiae. Arthritis and Rheumatism ... Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis*Investigating Metal-on-Metal Joint Implants Selected ... Heyse TJ, Ries M, Bellemans J, Goodman S, Scott R, Wright TM, Lipman J, Figgie, M. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with ...
  • Following a meticulous removal of the calcified cartilage layer, the exposed subchondral bone plate on the base of the defect is penetrated by the custom-made cutting tip of the instrument to a certain depth at a high speed of approximately 10,000 to 400,000 rpm ( Fincham and Jaeblon, 2011 ). (biologists.org)
  • Subchondral cysts (or geodes) are common in osteoarthritis (OA), usually in association with other typical signs, i.e., joint space narrowing, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophytosis. (springer.com)
  • CT arthrography, by demonstrating a communication between the femoral head and ischiatic cysts and the joint space allowed us to definitively rule out malignant conditions and to make the diagnosis of subchondral bone cysts. (springer.com)
  • This case illustrates an atypical bifocal location of giant subchondral cysts in the hip joint mimicking lytic tumors, in the absence of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, and highlights the role of CT arthrography in identifying this condition. (springer.com)
  • Resnick D, Niwayama G, Coutts RD. Subchondral cysts (geodes) in arthritic disorders: pathologic and radiographic appearance of the hip joint. (springer.com)
  • Rees RJ, Hill SO, Cassar-Pullicino V, Cool P. The incidence, location and distribution of degenerative subchondral acetabular cysts in primary osteoarthrosis of the hip. (springer.com)
  • Within the 12 studies, considerable subchondral bone changes were observed, including subchondral bone cysts and intralesional osteophytes. (biologists.org)
  • To examine the natural history of subchondral bone cysts and to determine whether knee cartilage loss and risk of joint replacement is higher in knees with cysts, compared with those with bone marrow lesions (BMLs) only or those with neither BMLs nor cysts. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Tibial cartilage volume, subchondral bone cysts, and BMLs were measured by using validated methods. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To our knowledge, the relationship between subchondral bone cysts and change in knee structure has been examined by only one study. (biomedcentral.com)
  • No study has examined the presence of subchondral bone cysts at baseline as a risk factor for structural changes in the knee. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It may be that subchondral bone cysts indicate those with severe BMLs and more advanced disease. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Subchondral bone cysts are a widely observed, but poorly understood, feature in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). (biomedcentral.com)
  • The objective of this study was to use QCT-based image-processing techniques to characterize subchondral tibial cysts in patients with knee OA and to explore relationships between proximal tibial subchondral cyst parameters and subchondral bone density as well as clinical characteristics of OA (alignment, joint space narrowing (JSN), OA severity, pain) in patients with knee OA. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This is the first study to use clinical QCT to explore subchondral tibial cysts in patients with knee OA and provides further evidence of the relationships between subchondral cysts and clinical OA characteristics. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The follow up MR 2 months later (2 d-f) demonstrates a fluid filled subchondral fracture (arrows 2d), and a serpentine subcortical "double line sign" (arrowheads 2e), subcortical cysts, and cortical collapse, demonstrated on both MRI and the radiograph (short arrows). (radsource.us)
  • Large lesion size (≥109 mm(2)) and the existence of subchondral cysts were significant predictors of unsatisfactory clinical outcomes in group A (P = .04 and .03, respectively). (nih.gov)
  • 05). Patient age (≥46.1 years), large lesion size (≥151.2 mm(2)), and the presence of subchondral cysts were associated with a worse MOCART score in the conventional group (P = .015, .004, and .013, respectively) but not in the MSC group. (nih.gov)
  • Therefore, an injection of an SVF containing MSCs with marrow stimulation should be considered as a treatment for OLTs, even when poor prognostic factors, including older age, large-sized lesion, or the presence of subchondral cysts, exist. (nih.gov)
  • Subchondral Cysts in OA The Open Orthopaedics Journal, 2014, Volume 8 9 supported by the presence of a communication between joint cavities and the subchondral cyst. (appsis.com.br)
  • 6] proposed that stress-induced microfractures of the subchondral bone may be primary events in the development of subchondral bone cysts in OA. (appsis.com.br)
  • 0.0001), and the opposite was true for subchondral cysts. (ocd.nu)
  • At earlier stages (stage 1 to 4), a number of options exist including: In osteoarthritis, the overloading and the vascular obstruction within the subchondral bone leads to subchondral sclerosis, bone marrow edema and bleeding, and subchondral cysts. (ocd.nu)
  • There are two generally accepted theories on the etiology of subchondral cysts. (ocd.nu)
  • Radiologic evidence for osteoarthritis of the knee includes the presence of osteophytes, joint space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, subchondral cysts, and malalignment. (jomi.com)
  • With the hypothesis that subchondral bone marrow injection might improve knees in these patients, we evaluated 30 patients who had bilateral knee osteoarthritis with severe joint space narrowing and received TKA in one knee and subchondral bone marrow concentrate injection in the contralateral knee. (springer.com)
  • Subchondral autologous bone marrow concentrate was an effective procedure for treating young patients with knee osteoarthritis following secondary ON of the knee related to corticosteroids with a lower complication rate and a quicker recovery as compared with TKA. (springer.com)
  • Subchondral drilling, proposed for the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans by Smillie in 1957 ( Smillie, 1957 ) and osteoarthritis by Pridie in 1959 ( Pridie and Gordon, 1959 ), is a widely used marrow stimulation technique for articular cartilage repair in the clinical setting. (biologists.org)
  • Identifying Patient-Specific Pathology in Osteoarthritis Development Based on MicroCT Analysis of Subchondral Trabecular Bone. (curehunter.com)
  • The aim of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether dairy product consumption was associated with the incidence of total hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis (OA). (jrheum.org)
  • Subchondral bone or intra-articular injection of bone marrow concentrate mesenchymal stem cells in bilateral knee osteoarthritis: what better postpone knee arthroplasty at fifteen years? (springermedizin.de)
  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease, which affects multiple tissues, namely the subchondral bone, articular cartilage and synovial membrane. (wellnessresources.com)
  • In the osteoarthritis of knee, the subchondral bone marrow lesion (BML) was significantly associated with the severity of pain. (isakos.com)
  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by articular cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone sclerosis. (springer.com)
  • Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful and debilitating disease characterized by cartilage deterioration and altered subchondral bone. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We performed knee arthroscopy and it revealed severe osteoarthritis of the PF joint, bone attrition and exposure of subchondral bone of the medial part of the lateral condyle together with severe synovitis. (eurekamag.com)
  • The Romanian Knee disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score for Joint Replacement (KOOSJR) is a valid, reliable, consistent and reproducible clinical score for patients with OA requiring arthroplasty. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common joint disorder worldwide, 1 is a chronic arthropathy in which cartilage loss, osteophyte formation and subchondral bone sclerosis lead to pain, disability and a reduction in quality of life. (bmj.com)
  • Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating and painful disease characterized by changes in cartilage and subchondral bone. (biomedcentral.com)
  • One of the most common challenges faced by orthopaedic surgeons is the patient with knee osteoarthritis (OA) that is not yet bad enough to warrant a knee arthroplasty. (advection.net)
  • A comprehensive study of femoral heads of patients and cadavers with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteonecrosis, and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease allows insight into the radiographic and pathologic appearance of subchondral radiolucencies in these disorders. (appsis.com.br)
  • An association has been identified between subchondral pathology and knee osteoarthritis (OA), according to a study recently published in Arthritis & Rheumatology. (appsis.com.br)
  • The purpose of this study was to observe the difference in healing of chondral and osteochondral defects treated with abrasion arthroplasty versus subchondral microfracture. (vin.com)
  • Each lateral epicondyle defects underwent a abrasion arthroplasty until punctate bleeding was observed. (vin.com)
  • In chondral defects, defects undergoing microfracture technique had increased repair score than defects treated with abrasion arthroplasty. (vin.com)
  • Histological evidence at 12 weeks suggests that microfracture technique may result in better repair than abrasion arthroplasty in the treatment of chondral cartilage defect. (vin.com)
  • Subchondral drilling led to improved repair outcome compared with defects that were untreated or treated with abrasion arthroplasty for cartilage repair in multiple translational models. (biologists.org)
  • Abrasion arthroplasty involves uniform removal of subchondral bone until bleeding is achieved. (vin.com)
  • Indications for abrasion arthroplasty or microfracture vary with the size and degree of cartilage loss. (vin.com)
  • Larger areas of Grade II cartilage disease can be treated with abrasion arthroplasty or microfracture. (vin.com)
  • Combining abrasion and microfracture may help increase subchondral bleeding. (vin.com)
  • To perform abrasion arthroplasty, insert a hand burr or preferentially a power shaver burr through the instrument portal. (vin.com)
  • Objective evidence documenting the efficiency of abrasion arthroplasty or microfracture is not available in the dog. (vin.com)
  • In humans, microfracture appears to be more effective than abrasion arthroplasty and is the marrow stimulating technique of choice. (vin.com)
  • Overall, the results of abrasion arthroplasty have been unpredictable and symptoms often recur 2-3 years after surgery. (vin.com)
  • Abrasion Arthroplasty - is similar to drilling, but instead of drills or wires, speed burns are used to remove the damaged cartilage and reach the subchondral bone. (mainlinehealth.org)
  • Abrasion arthroplasty is also done with an arthroscope. (mainlinehealth.org)
  • Carticel ® is indicated for the repair of symptomatic cartilage defects of the femoral condyle (medial, lateral or trochlea), caused by acute or repetitive trauma, in patients who have had an inadequate response to a prior arthroscopic or other surgical repair procedure (e.g., debridement, microfracture, drilling/abrasion arthroplasty, or osteochondral allograft/autograft). (drugs.com)
  • However, acute traumatic osteochondral lesions or surgically created lesions extending into subchondral bone, e.g. by Pridie drilling, spongialization abrasion or microfracture causing the release of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow, may heal with repair tissue consisting of fibrous tissue, fibrocartilage or hyaline-like cartilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many people do very well with Microfracture knee surgery or Arthroscopic abrasion arthroplasty procedures. (caringmedical.com)
  • These include abrasion, drilling, and microfracture of the subchondral bone to enhance chondral resurfacing via autografts, allografts, or cell transplantation. (bvsalud.org)
  • What is Abrasion Arthroplasty? (animasorthopedics.com)
  • Abrasion arthroplasty is a minimally invasive multiple tissue debridement (removal) procedure performed to stimulate the growth of new healthy cartilage. (animasorthopedics.com)
  • Abrasion arthroplasty is performed to relieve knee pain and is an alternative intervention to total knee replacement. (animasorthopedics.com)
  • Abrasion arthroplasty surgery can be performed in a minimally invasive manner through small incisions with the use of an arthroscope, a tubular device with a camera on the end that is inserted into the joint for your surgeon to view the treatment area. (animasorthopedics.com)
  • After abrasion arthroplasty, your surgeon will wash the operated area with saline to prevent infection and close the incision. (animasorthopedics.com)
  • Guven M, Ozler T, Kocadal O, Ozkan F, Altintas F. An atypically located large subchondral cyst in an osteoarthritic hip joint: a case report. (springer.com)
  • Dr. Walcott ordered an MRI, which was performed on December 13, 2002 and which showed that plaintiff had a torn anterior cruciate ligament, medial and lateral miniscal tears, some arthritis and a "large 2-cm subchondral cyst" in the center of his tibial plateau. (justia.com)
  • Dr. Walcott noted that plaintiff may need bone grafting of his subchondral cyst with arthroscopy, and a later ACL reconstruction. (justia.com)
  • Injection of MSCs with marrow stimulation treatment was encouraging in patients older than 50 years compared with patients treated with marrow stimulation treatment alone, especially when the lesion size was larger than 109 mm(2) or a subchondral cyst existed. (nih.gov)
  • The humeral head component is resting on subchondral bone with underlying erosions (red arrows) and subchondral cyst formation (white arrow). (cedars-sinai.edu)
  • Subchondral cyst is formed as a result of that. (appsis.com.br)
  • Subchondral cyst is a pocket filled with synovial fluid protruding from the joint causing discomfort and limiting joint flexibility. (appsis.com.br)
  • A vacuum phenomenon can be a sign of degenerative disease and in this casethe intrusion of the air into the subchondral cyst could be through fissured or ulcerated cartilage(1st theory)or it can be a sign of osteonecrosis (2nd theory). (appsis.com.br)
  • What Is a Subchondral Bone Cyst? (ocd.nu)
  • Frequently, these lesions occur with ligamentous injury and one should thoroughly examine for instability.One may obtain radiographic imaging to evaluate for cystic or chondral changes, but bear in mind that these studies are insufficient for complete diag… The synovial fluid intrusion theory suggests that elevated intra-articular pressure forces joint fluid into the subchondral bone via fissured or ulcerated cartilage,, creating a cyst. (ocd.nu)
  • Subchondral bone involvement can be manifested by bone marrow edema (BME), fracture, sclerosis and/or cyst formation. (ocd.nu)
  • A subchondral cyst without superficial cartilage damage is rare and requires a different approach. (ocd.nu)
  • Grade II - moderate changes with narrowing of joint space, bony proliferation on the metatarsophalangeal head and phalanx and subchondral sclerosis or cyst. (wikipedia.org)
  • AbstractPurposeThe purpose of this study was to create a predictive model utilizing baseline demographic and radiographic characteristics for the likelihood that a patient with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee will progress to knee arthroplasty with emphasis on clinical interpretability and usability.MethodsA retrospective review of baseline and final radiographs in addition to MRIs were reviewed for evaluation of insufficiency fractures and associated injuries. (medworm.com)
  • The initial study (2a-c) demonstrates a crescentic subchondral fracture (arrowheads), inseparable from the subchondral bone plate, surrounded by marrow edema (asterisks), with medial extrusion of the meniscal body (short arrow). (radsource.us)
  • Subchondral fracture with progression to osteonecrosis. (radsource.us)
  • The index cases demonstrate a subchondral fracture, which progresses to osteonecrosis and cortical collapse. (radsource.us)
  • As a result, the diagnosis of "spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee" has been abandoned and is now recognized as osteonecrosis developing following a subchondral fracture ( see Web clinic February 2004 ). (radsource.us)
  • This is an important distinction, because a subchondral fracture may completely resolve and never be associated with osteonecrosis. (radsource.us)
  • Certain MRI findings have been linked to more favorable or unfavorable outcomes following the initial fracture, so MRI can be used to assist in guiding treatment plans which range from joint sparing conservative treatment to total joint arthroplasty. (radsource.us)
  • What was previously referred to as spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK) has been demonstrated to represent a subchondral fracture, with the future development of osteonecrosis being uncertain. (radsource.us)
  • A subchondral fracture refers to a fracture subjacent to the cortex and the subchondral bone plate, without cortical contour abnormality or disruption. (radsource.us)
  • An osteochondral fracture involves cartilage and the subchondral bone plate, and may demonstrate cortical disruption, cortical depression, fragmentation or a combination of these findings. (radsource.us)
  • A subchondral fracture may also be due to chronic low intensity stress. (radsource.us)
  • When the process occurs in the epiphysis of a weight bearing bone such as the femoral condyle, impaction forces on the reactive hypervascularized zone may cause cleavage from overlying cortex and cartilage, resulting in a subchondral fracture plane, which heralds articular collapse and irreversible injury. (radsource.us)
  • The etiology of SONK is unclear, but it may originate from subchondral insufficiency or stress fracture [10,11]. (issuu.com)
  • In secondary osteonecrosis, ischemia and osteonecrosis lead to subchondral fracture, cartilage degeneration, and eventual subchondral collapse of the affected condyles [9,12]. (issuu.com)
  • Subchondral fracture to inflammatory response, urgent open top dose. (thesteki.com)
  • Based on the combination of MRI and CBCT findings the diagnosis of a subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) was made. (ocd.nu)
  • To perform microfracture, insert an appropriately angled micropick into the joint and press the tip against the subchondral bone surface. (vin.com)
  • It is characterized by erosion of the articular cartilage, hypertrophy of bone at the margins (i.e., osteophytes), and subchondral sclerosis. (aafp.org)
  • Myers TG, Cui Q, Kuskowski M, Mihalko WM, Saleh KJ (2006) Outcomes of total and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty for secondary and spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee. (springer.com)
  • In this report, we present a case of a 64-year-old woman who underwent revision of knee arthroplasty after failed unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). (eurekamag.com)
  • Unsatisfactory outcomes following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in patients with partial thickness cartilage loss: a medium-term follow-up. (ox.ac.uk)
  • AIMS: While medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is indicated for patients with full-thickness cartilage loss, it is occasionally used to treat those with partial-thickness loss. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Knees with cell therapy had improvement on cartilage and bone marrow lesions observed at the site of bone marrow subchondral injection. (springer.com)
  • The best candidates are young patients with single lesions and healthy subchondral bone. (aaos.org)
  • In refractory SONK and secondary osteonecrotic lesions larger than 5 cm2, necrotic segments may result in subchondral collapse or extension of the lesion [14,15]. (issuu.com)
  • Dilisio MF , Warner JJ, Walch G. Accuracy of the Subchondral Smile and Surface Referencing Techniques in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty. (creighton.edu)
  • As this case of a 59-year-old patient with right shoulder weakness and pain illustrates, partial repair with tuberoplasty can restore function while relieving pain in patients younger than age 60, buying time until they are at a better age for reverse shoulder arthroplasty to manage a massive rotator cuff tear. (icjr.net)
  • Dr. Mark Frankle will present on "Biomechanics of the RSA: Influence of Prosthetic Design," and "Factors That Predict Postoperative Motion in Patients Treated with Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty. (foreonline.org)
  • Dr. Peter Simon will deliver a presentation on "Scapular Neck Length Measurement and Distribution in the Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty (RSA) Patient Population," and "Glenoid Subchondral Bone Density Distribution in the Male Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (TSA) Subjects. (foreonline.org)
  • Past Fellow, Dr. Matthew Teusink will speak on "Results of Closed Management of Acute Dislocation Following Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty," and "What Is the Effect of Postoperative Scapula Fractures on Outcomes Following Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty? (foreonline.org)
  • Andres Cabezas will deliver a presentation discussing the "Quantification of the Existing Glenohumeral Relationships in Patients Undergoing Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty. (foreonline.org)
  • We prepared primary human Ob using the subchondral bone plate of tibial plateaus of OA patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, or tibial plateaus of normal individuals at autopsy. (wellnessresources.com)
  • Although the effect of preoperative BML on postoperative outcomes after knee arthroplasty, including total knee arthroplasty and unicompratmental knee arthroplasty was reported, little is known about the influence of preoperative BML on postoperative outcome after Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy (MOWHTO). (isakos.com)
  • We used three-dimensional image processing techniques to assess tibial epiphyseal trabecular BMD between the epiphyseal line and 7.5 mm from the subchondral surface and tibial metaphyseal trabecular BMD 10 mm distal from the epiphyseal line. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here, we report two cases, with different destruction patterns, which were most probably due to subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIFs). (hindawi.com)
  • Subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) are considered to cause the femoral head collapse associated with hip RDA. (hindawi.com)
  • Although the literature describing osteonecrosis of the knee and femoral head commonly refers to the initial fractures as subchondral insufficiency fractures, osteoporosis is not generally a diagnosis reliably made with MRI, so these injuries are referred to as subchondral fractures in this discussion. (radsource.us)
  • Subchondral insufficiency fractures are more common in elderly women 1,4,6. (ocd.nu)
  • Acoustic impedance changes in cartilage and subchondral bone due to primary arthrosis. (uni-halle.de)
  • AbstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic progressive, painful disease of synovial joints, characterized by cartilage degradation, subchondral bone remodeling, osteophyte formation, and synovitis. (medworm.com)
  • It is accepted that OA is a disease of the entire joint, affecting the cartilage, subchondral bone and synovial tissue [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This study compares silicone implant and tendon interposition arthroplasty with respect to their effects on articular cartilage, subchondral bone, joint mobility and synovial inflammation in the canine model. (surrey.ac.uk)
  • High-speed motorized burrs are used to drill through the degenerated cartilage to reach the subchondral bone, which is vascularised (has blood supply). (animasorthopedics.com)
  • Through use of an awl, the surgeon creates tiny fractures in the subchondral bone plate. (wikipedia.org)
  • He suggested the removal of subchondral bone and to impact the articular cartilage with a punch to recreate a central sulcus. (icjr.net)
  • In this technique numerous microcracks are created in the subchondral bone plate with a specialized micropick to allow bleeding at the lesion surface. (vin.com)
  • Spin the burr to remove subchondral bone over the area of the lesion. (vin.com)
  • Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a condition that corresponds to an idiopathic focal lesion affecting the subchondral bone with possible compromise of the stability of the adjacent cartilage. (kstudy.com)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a lesion of 2 cm 2 in the medial femoral condyle that compromised the subchondral bone, compatible with OCD. (kstudy.com)
  • Moderate to large areas of osteonecrosis may lead to subchondral collapse and subsequent need for total hip arthroplasty, often in young adults. (aaos.org)
  • Dr. Wheeless enjoys and performs all types of orthopaedic surgery but is renowned for his expertise in total joint arthroplasty (Hip and Knee replacement) as well as complex joint infections. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Coronary revascularization and adverse events in joint arthroplasty. (curehunter.com)
  • In-Hospital Morbidity and Mortality Following Total Joint Arthroplasty in Patients with Hemoglobinopathies. (curehunter.com)
  • How accurate are orthopedic surgeons in diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection after total knee arthroplasty? (curehunter.com)
  • The incidence of total hip arthroplasty for OA during 2001-2013 was determined by linking cohort records to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. (jrheum.org)
  • Surgical options for the treatment of severe ankle arthritis vary from arthroscopic synovectomy to total joint arthroplasty. (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Total joint arthroplasty of the knee should be considered when conservative symptomatic management is ineffective. (aafp.org)
  • Advantages of the procedure include arthroscopic ability to readily assess and localize the overlying articular cartilage, manage coexisting intra-articular pathology, facilitate accurate guide pin placement and osteonecrotic bone removal without joint penetration, and protect against early subchondral collapse. (aaos.org)
  • Arthroplasty refers to replacement of a joint. (nursingcrib.com)
  • They are graded using a semiquantitative system where grade 0 is normal cartilage and grade 4 is a cartilage defect extending from the joint surface to subchondral bone 13 . (jrheum.org)
  • As the joint surface degenerates, the subchondral bone remodels, losing its sphericity and congruity. (aafp.org)
  • and a previously failed joint-sparing surgery or total shoulder arthroplasty. (aafp.org)
  • Stage 4 hallux rigidus may be treated via fusion of the joint (arthrodesis) or implant arthroplasty in which both sides of the joint are resurfaced or a hinged implant is used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aseptic necrosis (avascular) of the left femoral head with flattening of the subchondral bone (arrow). (hindawi.com)
  • Femoral nerve palsy after total hip arthroplasty is an uncommon complication. (koreamed.org)
  • Anatomical knowledge dictates that regional anaesthesia after total hip arthroplasty requires blockade of the hip articular branches of the femoral and obturator nerves. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Radiological mid-term results of total knee arthroplasty with femoral components of different materials]. (uni-halle.de)
  • Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) Using The Evolisä Total Knee Replacement System (All-In-One Femoral Cutting Guide). (moa-home.com)
  • Primary arthroplasty in healed osteoarticular allograft in patients with history of primary femoral bone tumors. (harvard.edu)
  • In each medial epicondyle defects, two 1.0 mm holes were performed into subchondral bone with orthopedic awl until bleeding was observed. (vin.com)
  • At the most recent follow-up (average of 12 years, range 8 to 16 years), clinical outcomes of the patient (Knee Society score) were obtained along with radiological imaging outcomes (MRIs for knees with subchondral bone marrow injection). (springer.com)
  • PURPOSE: This study was performed to assess potential improvements in clinical outcomes when applying recent advanced hip arthroplasty surgical techniques and understand the potential relationship between bone mineral density (BMD). (koreamed.org)
  • Anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty with an inlay glenoid component and a stemless, ovoid humeral head led to a high rate of return to occupational and sporting activities and improved clinical outcomes, according to published results. (healio.com)
  • Cvetanovich and colleagues' study regarding outcomes following shoulder arthroplasty with inlay glenoid components in 27 shoulders is timely given the recent increase in shoulder arthroplasty procedures, especially in younger patients. (healio.com)
  • Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are therefore an integral part of routine clinical evaluation as well as national arthroplasty registries [ 3 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • He recommended open biopsy with bone grafting of the proximal tibia and "restricted weightbearing secondary to involvement of subchondral bone of the articular surface. (justia.com)
  • Note that the cystic changes are subchondral at the proximal ulnar portion of the lunate (L). Unable to process the form. (ocd.nu)
  • Although there was no association between subchondral BML and PRO at postoperative 2 years, our results suggest that increasing severity of BML is correlated with worse preoperative and postoperative 1 year WOMAC pain, function and total scores. (isakos.com)
  • for the other knee, a bone marrow graft containing an average of 6500 MSCs/mL (counted as CFU-F, range 3420 to 9830) was delivered to the subchondral bone of the femur and tibia. (springer.com)
  • The length of anesthesia related to each procedure (bone marrow aspiration and subchondral injection of concentrated bone marrow versus total knee arthroplasty) was measured. (springer.com)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging showed a bone marrow edema pattern with an associated subchondral low-intensity band, typical of SIF. (hindawi.com)
  • The quality of the repair tissue after these "bone marrow stimulating techniques" depends on various factors including the species and age of the individual, the size and localization of the articular cartilage defect, the surgical technique, e.g., how the subchondral bone plate is treated, and the postoperative rehabilitation protocol. (wikipedia.org)
  • Total shoulder arthroplasty was performed in this case. (hindawi.com)
  • Gregory P. Nicholson, MD , an associate professor in the department of orthopedic surgery at Rush University Medical Center, and colleagues analyzed information for 27 shoulders in a retrospective review of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) with an inlay glenoid component, specifically in young, active patients with a minimum 2-year follow-up. (healio.com)
  • Results showed 92.59% of patients returned to work after undergoing total shoulder arthroplasty with an inlay glenoid component. (healio.com)
  • Axial and sagittal T1 weighted images in patient with shoulder arthroplasty demonstrates marked fatty atrophy of right rotator cuff musculature. (cedars-sinai.edu)
  • Surgical options include arthroscopic debridement, arthroscopic capsular release, and, in the most severe instances, hemiarthroplasty or total shoulder arthroplasty. (aafp.org)
  • A 49-year-old female patient presents with full-thickness cartilage loss of the tibia and focal subchondral edema that has failed years of non-operative management. (icjr.net)
  • MRI findings of full thickness cartilage loss, subchondral oedema, synovitis or effusion did not provide additional prognostic information. (ox.ac.uk)
  • For mobility-preserving surgery of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the second through fifth fingers, silicone implant arthroplasty remains the gold standard. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Subchondral drilling, a widely applied clinical technique to treat small cartilage defects, does not yield cartilage regeneration. (biologists.org)
  • These results have important implications for future investigations aimed at an enhanced translation into clinical settings for the treatment of cartilage defects, highlighting the importance of considering specific aspects of modifiable variables such as improvements in the design and reporting of preclinical studies, together with the need to better understand the underlying mechanisms of cartilage repair following subchondral drilling. (biologists.org)
  • Indication for arthroplasty was based on clinical and radiographic criteria (Kellgren-Lawrence grades III-IV). (biomedcentral.com)
  • On the basis of the aforementioned symptoms, the subject was submitted to hip arthroplasty for introduction of prosthesis in the left femur. (hindawi.com)
  • Patient and radiographic factors were used in building predictive models for progression to arthroplasty with Train: Validation: Test subsets. (medworm.com)
  • Here, we performed a systematic review of the outcome of subchondral drilling for knee cartilage repair in translational animal models. (biologists.org)
  • The data from this systematic review indicate that subchondral drilling yields improved short-term structural articular cartilage repair compared with spontaneous repair in multiple small and large animal models. (biologists.org)
  • Drilling the subchondral bone (bone underlying the cartilage) initiates the bleeding and healing response. (animasorthopedics.com)
  • This work describes the case of an elderly female patient with a history of systemic arterial hypertension that developed fulminant NOMI in the immediate postoperative period of hip arthroplasty. (hindawi.com)
  • The olecranon osteotomy should be elevated carefully, as existing fibrosis can tear the trochlear hyaline cartilage off the subchondral bone 11 . (orthogate.org)
  • Eventually, arthroplasty or an osteotomy might be inevitable, but a cure remains to be found for OA. (bmj.com)
  • In order of importance, predictors for progression to arthroplasty included lateral meniscus extrusion, Kellgren-Lawrence Grade 4, SIFK on MFC, lateral meniscus root tear, and medi al meniscus extrusion. (medworm.com)
  • Here, the standard procedure is routinely performed with either a surgical twist drill bit or a Kirschner wire to introduce several holes of a defined circular cross-section in the subchondral bone plate ( Pridie and Gordon, 1959 ) ( Fig. 1 ). (biologists.org)
  • We decided to perform a total ankle arthroplasty and performed the procedure in January 2017 (see third image above). (podiatrytoday.com)
  • Furthermore, extensive alterations of the subchondral bone microarchitecture appeared in a temporal pattern in small and large animal models, together with specific topographic aspects of repair. (biologists.org)
  • Alterations of the subchondral bone include an increased, yet under mineralized osteoid matrix, abnormal osteoblast cell phenotype including elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, increased release of osteocalcin (OC) and transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1). (wellnessresources.com)
  • Nearly 70 % of patients who undergo MOWHTO have subchondral BMLs on preoperative MRI. (isakos.com)