Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Cartilage, Articular: A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Joint Prosthesis: Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Bone Cysts: Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Ankle: Replacement of the ANKLE JOINT.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Patella: The flat, triangular bone situated at the anterior part of the KNEE.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Polyethylene: A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Cartilage Diseases: Pathological processes involving the chondral tissue (CARTILAGE).Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Joint DiseasesHip Dislocation: Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.Femur Head Necrosis: Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Stifle: In horses, cattle, and other quadrupeds, the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Elbow: Replacement of the ELBOW JOINT.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Fractures, Stress: Fractures due to the strain caused by repetitive exercise. They are thought to arise from a combination of MUSCLE FATIGUE and bone failure, and occur in situations where BONE REMODELING predominates over repair. The most common sites of stress fractures are the METATARSUS; FIBULA; TIBIA; and FEMORAL NECK.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Finger: Partial or total replacement of one or more FINGERS, or a FINGER JOINT.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Menisci, Tibial: The interarticular fibrocartilages of the superior surface of the tibia.Prosthesis Fitting: The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)Arthroplasty, Subchondral: Surgical techniques used to correct or augment healing of chondral defects in the joints (CARTILAGE, ARTICULAR). These include abrasion, drilling, and microfracture of the subchondral bone to enhance chondral resurfacing via autografts, allografts, or cell transplantation.Bone Malalignment: Displacement of bones out of line in relation to joints. It may be congenital or traumatic in origin.Osteosclerosis: An abnormal hardening or increased density of bone tissue.Bone Marrow DiseasesGlenoid Cavity: A depression in the lateral angle of the scapula that articulates with the head of the HUMERUS.Osteophyte: Bony outgrowth usually found around joints and often seen in conditions such as ARTHRITIS.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Epiphyses: The head of a long bone that is separated from the shaft by the epiphyseal plate until bone growth stops. At that time, the plate disappears and the head and shaft are united.Ankylosis: Fixation and immobility of a joint.Microradiography: Production of a radiographic image of a small or very thin object on fine-grained photographic film under conditions which permit subsequent microscopic examination or enlargement of the radiograph at linear magnifications of up to several hundred and with a resolution approaching the resolving power of the photographic emulsion (about 1000 lines per millimeter).Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Total Disc Replacement: The replacement of intervertebral discs in the spinal column with artificial devices. The procedure is done in the lumbar or cervical spine to relieve severe pain resulting from INTERVERTEBRAL DISC DEGENERATION.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Polyethylenes: Synthetic thermoplastics that are tough, flexible, inert, and resistant to chemicals and electrical current. They are often used as biocompatible materials for prostheses and implants.Osteolysis: Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.Osteonecrosis: Death of a bone or part of a bone, either atraumatic or posttraumatic.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Ossification, Heterotopic: The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.Osteochondritis: Inflammation of a bone and its overlaying CARTILAGE.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Arthrodesis: The surgical fixation of a joint by a procedure designed to accomplish fusion of the joint surfaces by promoting the proliferation of bone cells. (Dorland, 28th ed)Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Operative Blood Salvage: Recovery of blood lost from surgical procedures for reuse by the same patient in AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS. It is collected during (intraoperatively) or after completion of (postoperatively) the surgical procedures.ArthritisChondrocytes: Polymorphic cells that form cartilage.Periprosthetic Fractures: Fractures around joint replacement prosthetics or implants. They can occur intraoperatively or postoperatively.Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Femoral Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.Hip Dislocation, Congenital: Congenital dislocation of the hip generally includes subluxation of the femoral head, acetabular dysplasia, and complete dislocation of the femoral head from the true acetabulum. This condition occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is more common in females than in males.Cartilage: A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Leg Length Inequality: A condition in which one of a pair of legs fails to grow as long as the other, which could result from injury or surgery.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Arthralgia: Pain in the joint.Metatarsophalangeal Joint: The articulation between a metatarsal bone (METATARSAL BONES) and a phalanx.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Blood Transfusion, Autologous: Reinfusion of blood or blood products derived from the patient's own circulation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.Injections, Intra-Articular: Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.Joint Deformities, Acquired: Deformities acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease. The joint deformity is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis and leprosy.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Compressive Strength: The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)Carpus, Animal: The region corresponding to the human WRIST in non-human ANIMALS.Posterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the anterolateral surface of the medial condyle of the femur, passes posteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the posterior intercondylar area of the tibia.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Talus: The second largest of the TARSAL BONES. It articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA to form the ANKLE JOINT.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Arthritis, Experimental: ARTHRITIS that is induced in experimental animals. Immunological methods and infectious agents can be used to develop experimental arthritis models. These methods include injections of stimulators of the immune response, such as an adjuvant (ADJUVANTS, IMMUNOLOGIC) or COLLAGEN.Hyaline Cartilage: A type of CARTILAGE characterized by a homogenous amorphous matrix containing predominately TYPE II COLLAGEN and ground substance. Hyaline cartilage is found in ARTICULAR CARTILAGE; COSTAL CARTILAGE; LARYNGEAL CARTILAGES; and the NASAL SEPTUM.Chromium Alloys: Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.Osteocytes: Mature osteoblasts that have become embedded in the BONE MATRIX. They occupy a small cavity, called lacuna, in the matrix and are connected to adjacent osteocytes via protoplasmic projections called canaliculi.Edema: Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.Transplant Donor Site: The body location or part from which tissue is taken for TRANSPLANTATION.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Collagen Type II: A fibrillar collagen found predominantly in CARTILAGE and vitreous humor. It consists of three identical alpha1(II) chains.Hemiarthroplasty: A partial joint replacement in which only one surface of the joint is replaced with a PROSTHESIS.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Metacarpophalangeal Joint: The articulation between a metacarpal bone and a phalanx.Sclerosis: A pathological process consisting of hardening or fibrosis of an anatomical structure, often a vessel or a nerve.Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Aluminum Oxide: An oxide of aluminum, occurring in nature as various minerals such as bauxite, corundum, etc. It is used as an adsorbent, desiccating agent, and catalyst, and in the manufacture of dental cements and refractories.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Motion Therapy, Continuous Passive: Movement of a body part initiated and maintained by a mechanical or electrical device to restore normal range of motion to joints, muscles, or tendons after surgery, prosthesis implantation, contracture flexion, or long immobilization.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Chromium: A trace element that plays a role in glucose metabolism. It has the atomic symbol Cr, atomic number 24, and atomic weight 52. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP85-002,1985), chromium and some of its compounds have been listed as known carcinogens.Femoral NeoplasmsPhotogrammetry: Making measurements by the use of stereoscopic photographs.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Osteochondritis Dissecans: A type of osteochondritis in which articular cartilage and associated bone becomes partially or totally detached to form joint loose bodies. Affects mainly the knee, ankle, and elbow joints.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Patellofemoral Joint: The articulation between the articular surface of the PATELLA and the patellar surface of the FEMUR.Femoracetabular Impingement: A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.Hallux Rigidus: A condition caused by degenerative arthritis (see OSTEOARTHRITIS) of the METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT of the great toe and characterized by pain and limited dorsiflexion, but relatively unrestricted plantar flexion.Knee: A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Ochronosis: The yellowish discoloration of connective tissue due to deposition of HOMOGENTISIC ACID (a brown-black pigment). This is due to defects in the metabolism of PHENYLALANINE and TYROSINE. Ochronosis occurs in ALKAPTONURIA, but has also been associated with exposure to certain chemicals (e.g., PHENOL, trinitrophenol, BENZENE DERIVATIVES).Microscopy, Ultraviolet: Microscopy in which the image is formed by ultraviolet radiation and is displayed and recorded by means of photographic film.Rotator Cuff: The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the HUMERUS in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the SHOULDER JOINT about its longitudinal axis.Humeral Head: The portion of the upper rounded extremity fitting into the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA. (from Stedman, 27th ed)Finger Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each finger.Iodoacetates: Iodinated derivatives of acetic acid. Iodoacetates are commonly used as alkylating sulfhydryl reagents and enzyme inhibitors in biochemical research.Tranexamic Acid: Antifibrinolytic hemostatic used in severe hemorrhage.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Lameness, Animal: A departure from the normal gait in animals.Alkaptonuria: An inborn error of amino acid metabolism resulting from a defect in the enzyme HOMOGENTISATE 1,2-DIOXYGENASE, an enzyme involved in the breakdown of PHENYLALANINE and TYROSINE. It is characterized by accumulation of HOMOGENTISIC ACID in the urine, OCHRONOSIS in various tissues, and ARTHRITIS.Preoperative Period: The period before a surgical operation.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Arthrography: Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.Osteoblasts: Bone-forming cells which secrete an EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. HYDROXYAPATITE crystals are then deposited into the matrix to form bone.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Coagulants: Agents that cause clotting.Early Ambulation: Procedure to accelerate the ability of a patient to walk or move about by reducing the time to AMBULATION. It is characterized by a shorter period of hospitalization or recumbency than is normally practiced.Ceramics: Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Awards and PrizesLigaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Mandibular Condyle: The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.Hospitals, Low-Volume: Hospitals with a much lower than average utilization by physicians and smaller number of procedures.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Tibial FracturesLength of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Tantalum: Tantalum. A rare metallic element, atomic number 73, atomic weight 180.948, symbol Ta. It is a noncorrosive and malleable metal that has been used for plates or disks to replace cranial defects, for wire sutures, and for making prosthetic devices. (Dorland, 28th ed)Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Cobalt: A trace element that is a component of vitamin B12. It has the atomic symbol Co, atomic number 27, and atomic weight 58.93. It is used in nuclear weapons, alloys, and pigments. Deficiency in animals leads to anemia; its excess in humans can lead to erythrocytosis.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular: Tuberculosis of the bones or joints.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Zygapophyseal Joint: The joint that occurs between facets of the interior and superior articular processes of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Osteoprotegerin: A secreted member of the TNF receptor superfamily that negatively regulates osteoclastogenesis. It is a soluble decoy receptor of RANK LIGAND that inhibits both CELL DIFFERENTIATION and function of OSTEOCLASTS by inhibiting the interaction between RANK LIGAND and RECEPTOR ACTIVATOR OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-KAPPA B.Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Quadriceps Muscle: The quadriceps femoris. A collective name of the four-headed skeletal muscle of the thigh, comprised of the rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis.Matrix Metalloproteinase 13: A secreted matrix metalloproteinase that plays a physiological role in the degradation of extracellular matrix found in skeletal tissues. It is synthesized as an inactive precursor that is activated by the proteolytic cleavage of its N-terminal propeptide.Synovial Membrane: The inner membrane of a joint capsule surrounding a freely movable joint. It is loosely attached to the external fibrous capsule and secretes SYNOVIAL FLUID.Durapatite: The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Hyalin: A clear, homogenous, structureless, eosinophilic substance occurring in pathological degeneration of tissues.Osteochondrosis: Any of a group of bone disorders involving one or more ossification centers (EPIPHYSES). It is characterized by degeneration or NECROSIS followed by revascularization and reossification. Osteochondrosis often occurs in children causing varying degrees of discomfort or pain. There are many eponymic types for specific affected areas, such as tarsal navicular (Kohler disease) and tibial tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter disease).Growth Plate: The area between the EPIPHYSIS and the DIAPHYSIS within which bone growth occurs.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.DislocationsLumbosacral Plexus: The lumbar and sacral plexuses taken together. The fibers of the lumbosacral plexus originate in the lumbar and upper sacral spinal cord (L1 to S3) and innervate the lower extremities.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.

International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) and Oswestry macroscopic cartilage evaluation scores validated for use in Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) and microfracture. (1/26)

OBJECTIVE: For young patients with cartilage defects, the emergence of clinically applicable cell therapy for biological joint reconstruction is an appealing prospect. Acceptation of this method as a means of standard care requires proof of being reproducible, having long-lasting mechanical integrity, and having a good clinical outcome. This study evaluates the reliability of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) score and the Oswestry Arthroscopy Score (OAS) in the assessment of regenerative cartilage repair. METHOD: A total of 101 macroscopic images of cartilage repair were made during arthroscopy 12 months post-treatment of either Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) or microfracture. These images were examined by seven independent observers with differing levels of experience. The ICRS and OAS scores were randomly presented twice at a 4-week interval. All observers stated their predicted outcome according to actual treatment and defect size. RESULTS: ICRS and OAS scores showed both good inter- and intra observer reliability (0.62 and 0.56 for ICRS; 0.73 and 0.65 for OAS, respectively). Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was satisfactory for research purposes (0.79 and 0.74, respectively). Correlation (equivalence concordance) between both scoring systems was excellent (r=0.94). All observers were inconsistent in predicting actual treatment. Test-re test reliability of estimated defect size and its correlation to true defect size were poor. These results were also applicable to the sub-analyses of the experience of the observer and the quality of imaging. CONCLUSION: The ICRS and OAS are reliable and relevant scores that are now both validated for macroscopic evaluation of cartilage repair as a research tool.  (+info)

Treatment of focal articular cartilage defects in the knee: a systematic review. (2/26)

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T2 mapping in the knee after microfracture at 3.0 T: correlation of global T2 values and clinical outcome - preliminary results. (3/26)

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Response shift in self-reported functional scores after knee microfracture for full thickness cartilage lesions. (4/26)

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Multimodal approach in the use of clinical scoring, morphological MRI and biochemical T2-mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging in their ability to assess differences between cartilage repair tissue after microfracture therapy and matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation: a pilot study. (5/26)

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Ability of dGEMRIC and T2 mapping to evaluate cartilage repair after microfracture: a goat study. (6/26)

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Prospective evaluation of serum biomarker levels and cartilage repair by autologous chondrocyte transplantation and subchondral drilling in a canine model. (7/26)

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Quality of newly formed cartilaginous tissue in defects of articular surface after transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells in a composite scaffold based on collagen I with chitosan micro- and nanofibres. (8/26)

The aim of this study was to evaluate macroscopically, histologically and immunohistochemically the quality of newly formed tissue in iatrogenic defects of articular cartilage of the femur condyle in miniature pigs treated with the clinically used method of microfractures in comparison with the transplantation of a combination of a composite scaffold with allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or the composite scaffold alone. The newly formed cartilaginous tissue filling the defects of articular cartilage after transplantation of the scaffold with MSCs (Group A) had in 60 % of cases a macroscopically smooth surface. In all lesions after the transplantation of the scaffold alone (Group B) or after the method of microfractures (Group C), erosions/fissures or osteophytes were found on the surface. The results of histological and immunohistochemical examination using the modified scoring system according to O'Driscoll were as follows: 14.7+/-3.82 points after transplantations of the scaffold with MSCs (Group A); 5.3+/-2.88 points after transplantations of the scaffold alone (Group B); and 5.2+/-0.64 points after treatment with microfractures (Group C). The O'Driscoll score in animals of Group A was significantly higher than in animals of Group B or Group C (p<0.0005 both). No significant difference was found in the O'Driscoll score between Groups B and C. The treatment of iatrogenic lesions of the articular cartilage surface on the condyles of femur in miniature pigs using transplantation of MSCs in the composite scaffold led to the filling of defects by a tissue of the appearance of hyaline cartilage. Lesions treated by implantation of the scaffold alone or by the method of microfractures were filled with fibrous cartilage with worse macroscopic, histological and immunohistochemical indicators.  (+info)

AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTE TRANSPLANTATION Melanie McNeal, PT, CSCS, CFT for patients of DAVID LINTNER, MD Articular cartilage (AC) provides a resilient surface for friction free movement of joints. It must bear ...
For the cartilage cell product NOVOCART® 3D plus, which is used in the study described here, the company TETEC AG obtained an expanded production authorization from the medication monitoring authorities in compliance with Section 13, Para. 1 of the Medicinal Products Act in 2003. This entitles TETEC AG to produce the pharmaceutical product and already distribute it. More than 6000 patients were already successfully treated with NOVOCART® 3D in Europe since 2003. In order to obtain a general market authorization for NOVOCART® 3D plus, this control group study is conducted, in which the superiority of the safety and effectiveness of carrier-bound Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation with NOVOCART® 3D plus compared to the standard of care microfracture surgery needs to be proven. This study further aims at developing and validating known and new biologic markers for the quality and clinical efficacy of the product as requested in the context of identity, purity and potency characteristics of ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cartilage failures. Systematic literature review, critical survey analysis, and definition. AU - Filardo, Giuseppe. AU - Andriolo, Luca. AU - Balboni, Federica. AU - Marcacci, Maurilio. AU - Kon, Elizaveta. PY - 2015/12/1. Y1 - 2015/12/1. N2 - Purpose: While midterm results of matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) are now available, less attention has been paid to the evaluation of failures of this surgical approach. Aim of this study was to analyse how "failures" are generally defined in cartilage surgery, in order to understand how the survival rate may change according to different definitions of failure. Methods: A systematic review on MACT in the knee was conducted to report failure rates as well as different failure definitions in the available literature. Afterwards, we analysed the survival curve at 8.5-year follow-up of a survey of 193 patients treated with MACT. Using different definitions to identify failures, we compared how the survival rate ...
The first clinical experience with ACT (autologous chondrocyte transplantation) was reported on in 1994 by Brittberg et al. The primary success rate then stood at over 75% with clinically good and very good outcomes. The new formation of "hyaline-like" articular cartilage was histologically proven. These results were confirmed later by many other authors. The term "hyaline-like" was chosen because following the ACT a zonal structure formation, such as the one which exists in healthy hyaline cartilage had not yet been observed, although the biochemical constitution and the biomechanical weight bearing capacity of the newly formed cartilage basic structure corresponds closely to that of hyaline cartilage ...
Most acute chondral injuries will be treated with arthroscopic surgery as a day case procedure under general anaesthetic.. In general the only repairable injuries of this type are where there is quite a large chunk of articular cartilage with a sliver of bone (an osteochondral fracture) which can be pinned back in place.. If the fragment has to be removed and it leaves behind a crater in an important part of the knee with bare bone in the base, it will not heal up with normal joint surface cartilage. It may heal up with fibrocartilage or scar tissue in the base giving some sort of smooth covering. This type of covering can be encouraged by making some small holes in the bone. By encouraging bleeding into the area, scar tissue will form. This technique is sometimes referred to as microfracture.. If persistent problems arise because of a defect in the articular cartilage, then there are a number of specialised techniques which may be performed, but for which not everybody is ...
The reigning WNBA Rookie of the Year and top overall pick in the 2014 draft had a small lesion in her articular cartilage. Microfracture involves the setting of a cartilage "matrix" from a donor (i.e., a cadaver) into the lesion, to promote the growth of new cartilage that far more closely approximates the natural material (hyaline cartilage). A gluelike man-made protein is then applied to seal it ...
Following microfracture all patients demonstrated significant and clinically meaningful improvements in outcomes at a mean of 5.7 years, increasing age and BMI are the patient-related factors that may predict a poor outcome.
The video demonstrates the surgical technique for the arthroscopic treatment of an osteochondral lesion of the talus with micronized allograft cartilage matrix (BioCartilage). The lesion is debrided to its base and vertical borders are created. Marrow stimulation is then performed. Next all water is removed from the joint and the lesion is completely dried. The BioCartilage is introduced into the lesion and filled to just under the articular surface. It is contoured appropriately, and fibrin glue is applied to the surface of the lesion. This is allowed to set without manipulation for 5 minutes. ...
Autologous cultured chondrocytes, MACI is an autologous cellularized scaffold product indicated for the repair of symptomatic, single or multiple full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee with or without bone involvement in adults.
Red marrow is present in the fetal skeleton and converts to yellow marrow after birth. In sickle cell anemia (SCA) destruction of RBCs causes anemia which prevents the conversion of red marrow to yellow marrow. The persistent red marrow is seen in all bones of patients with SCA and has pathologic and radiologic consequences. Red marrow stimulation leads to widening of the medullary spaces and cortical thinning which can cause pathologic fractures. Coarse trabeculation and osteopenia may also be seen. Persistent red marrow presents as low signal intensity in osseous structures on T1WI. On skull radiographs the widening of the diploic spaces is a manifestation of bone marrow expansion. The hair on end appearance of the skull is secondary to coarse trabeculation from new bone formation. In the spine, cortical thinning results in biconcave deformities of the vertebral bodies sometimes referred to as the fish-mouth appearance. ...
Intra-articular fracture of the tibial plateau has a risk factor for post traumatic osteoarthritis.Large focal lesions of the tibial plateau resulting from fracture offer fewer management alternatives when compared with their femoral condylar counterparts. Techniques such as mosaicplasty or autologous chondrocyte transplantation have not been as positive for patients with tibial ...
Tissue engineering researchers, including Elisseeff, theorized that the specialized stem cells needed a nourishing scaffold on which to grow, but demonstrating the clinical value of hydrogels has "taken a lot of time," Elisseeff says. By experimenting with various materials, her group eventually developed a promising hydrogel, and then an adhesive that could bind it to the bone.. After testing the combination for several years in the lab and in goats, with promising results, she says, the group and their surgeon collaborators conducted their first clinical study, in which 15 patients with holes in the cartilage of their knees received a hydrogel and adhesive implant along with microfracture. For comparative purposes, another three patients were treated with microfracture alone. After six months, the researchers reported that the implants had caused no major problems, and MRIs showed that patients with implants had new cartilage filling an average 86 percent of the defect in their knees, while ...
Still, there is no getting around that this is a devastating blow to Oden and Portland and that Oden has a lot of rehabilitation work ahead of him before he can be a productive NBA player. If Oden is not able to play this season then he will become just the second number one overall pick since 1966 to not play in the NBA in the year that he was selected; in 1987, David Robinson did not join the San Antonio Spurs because he had to fulfill his commitment to the Navy. However, there have been several number one overall picks whose rookie seasons were impacted in some way by injuries, including future All-Stars Bob Lanier, Doug Collins and Bill Walton. Lanier actually did not miss a game during his first season but he was playing hurt and he told me, "In hindsight, what we should have done--if I had had any sense and if there was some sophistication with the powers that be way back then in Detroit--is have me sit out the first half of the season, at least, and just worked on getting my knee right, ...
im starting this as part of my break from hormones hoping to bulk up 10 lbs in 12 weeks. goin like this. 1-4 mass FX 4 caps ED, 5-8 6 caps ED 1-4 Jw 3
... (Neupogen®, Granocyte®) is only recommended for febrile neutropenia which does not respond to antibiotic treatment, severe neutropenia (granulocytes , 0.5 x 109 /L for more than 1 week), and in cases where it is necessary to administer curative treatment with sufficient dosage intensity.. ...
... (Neupogen®, Granocyte®) is only recommended for febrile neutropenia which does not respond to antibiotic treatment, severe neutropenia (granulocytes , 0.5 x 109 /L for more than 1 week), and in cases where it is necessary to administer curative treatment with sufficient dosage intensity.. ...
In order to be able to use second-generation ACT techniques for the repair of cartilage defects in patients with OA, it is highly important to investigate whether OA chondrocytes have an irreversibly altered phenotype or if these cells can differentiate towards a hyaline cartilage phenotype after in vitro expansion. Today, there are conflicting data whether OA chondrocytes fulfill the prerequisites for ACT treatment or not [12, 13, 15, 21]. This encouraged us to investigate more thoroughly the chondrogenic differentiation potential of human OA chondrocytes using microarray technology in order to determine whether OA chondrocytes might possibly be used in second-generation ACT.. Microarray analysis of human OA and ND chondrocytes cultured in ML indicated that the OA chondrocytes were in a less differentiated state compared with the ND chondrocytes. This is thus in accordance with the differences detected in vivo between OA and ND cartilage [10, 22]. Re-differentiation in scaffold cultures ...
Articular cartilage lesions are commonly occurring. In a prospective study of 1,000 knee arthroscopies focal chondral or osteochondral defects were found in 19% of the patients (Hjelle 2002). Chronic articular cartilage defects do not heal spontaneously. However, acute traumatic osteochondral lesions or surgically inflicted lesions extending into subchondral bone, e.g. by drilling (Pridie 1959), spongialization, abrasion or microfracture with an angled awl (Rodrigo 1994) causing the release of pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow, may heal with repair tissue consisting of fibrous tissue, fibrocartilage or hyaline-like cartilage. The microfracture technique causes little damage to the subchondral bone plate and the risk of heat necroses caused by drilling or abrasion is eliminated. The quality of the repair tissue after these bone marrow stimulating techniques depends on various factors including the species and age of the individual, the size and localization of the defect, ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cell therapy, biomaterials and other options may enhance cartilage repair. AU - Saris, Daniël B.F.. PY - 2013/3/1. Y1 - 2013/3/1. N2 - There are several articular cartilage repair techniques being used, including microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation and mosaicplasty, and orthopaedic surgeons have found they offer some improvement for patients, overall. The physicians who spoke with Orthopaedics Today Europe discussed indications for the major techniques currently used worldwide and noted that results of each approach are somewhat mixed. From their comments it seems that orthopaedic clinicians and researchers are divided over which cartilage repair approaches are optimal and whether developments being worked on now will deliver on the promise of improved outcomes in the future.. AB - There are several articular cartilage repair techniques being used, including microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation and mosaicplasty, and orthopaedic surgeons have found ...
Microfracture is a surgical technique that has been developed to treat chondral defects, which are damaged areas of articular cartilage of the knee. It is a common procedure used to treat patients with full thickness damage to the articular cartilage that goes all the way down to the bone.. This arthroscopic procedure was first introduced about 20 years ago as a treatment method that uses the bodys own healing abilities and provides an enriched environment for tissue regeneration on the chondral surface.. Since its development, the microfracture procedure has been used by its originator to treat more than 2000 patients. Of these patients, 75 to 80% experienced significant pain relief and improvement in the ability to perform daily activities and participate in sports. Fifteen percent noticed no change, and five percent continued to have joint deterioration. Next ...
Option for repair damaged knee cartilage is microfracture procedure. Articular cartilage repair can done by Dr.Raju Easwaran, best knee specialist in Delhi.
Cartilage damage can lead to joint conditions, causing pain and arthritis. Joint microfracture surgery is one option to help heal cartilage damage, available through Dr. Kerisimasi Reynolds in San Jose.
I had a microfracture surgery in early 2009 to repair a torn meniscus in my left knee and that was the worst decision of my life. I have more pain now than I did before the surgery and it seems like th...
Management of articular cartilage lesions is based on the concept that providing blood with mesenchymal stem cell precursors access to the lesion encourages healing by formation of fibrocartilage. Several marrow stimulating techniques have been described to achieve this. Abrasion arthroplasty involves uniform removal of subchondral bone until bleeding is achieved. This can be accomplished in the canine elbow by use of either a curette or burr attachment on a small joint shaver. The shaver is usually more rapid and efficient and generally just as accurate. Another marrow stimulating technique is microfracture. In this technique numerous microcracks are created in the subchondral bone plate with a specialized micropick to allow bleeding at the lesion surface.. Arthroplasty and Microfracture. Indications for abrasion arthroplasty or microfracture vary with the size and degree of cartilage loss. In general, lesions small to moderate size (1-2 cm in humans) can be treated with resurfacing techniques. ...
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I was injured on the job transferring a pt that twisted and started to fall. I twisted my knee and I heard a pop. Through months of physical therapy and not getting any better and MRI showed just that ...
with the PowerPick from Arthrex. Its Ø1.5 mm x 4 mm depth needle removes bone instead of compacting it as is the case with typical microfracture pic
with the PowerPick from Arthrex. Its Ø1.5 mm x 4 mm depth needle removes bone instead of compacting it as is the case with typical microfracture pic
The University of Virginia, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, is seeking adults with articular cartilage defects in the knee. The purpose of this study is to show if using an investigational tissue graft is better than the standard method of microfracture for the treatment of articular cartilage defects. This study will also document changes in knee pain and function after either surgery is performed.. The standard of care for treating articular cartilage defects in the knee is microfracture. This study is being done to observe if a graft is an efficient and more superior treatment option. For eligible participants, the defect will be treated with either microfracture or by using an investigational tissue graft.. This study involves 12 follow up visits over a 5 year period following surgery.. Study related clinic visits, research x-rays and MRI scans are provided free of charge. The study will also cover the costs of physical therapy that are not covered by your insurance up to $4,000 ...
Microfracture surgery is used to repair articular cartilage damage in the knee, is performed by Andrew L DeGruccio in Louisville, Kentucky.
Introduction. The purpose of this study was to observe the difference in healing of chondral and osteochondral defects treated with abrasion arthroplasty versus subchondral microfracture.. Material and methods. 8 rabbits were divided in two groups (4 rabbits in group A and 4 rabbits in group B). In both groups, a 3.0 mm diameter defect was created on medial and lateral femoral condyles. In group A cartilage was shaved without penetrating the subchondral plate. In group B, defects were created into subchondral bone (3.0 mm deep). In each medial epicondyle defects, two 1.0 mm holes were performed into subchondral bone with orthopedic awl until bleeding was observed. Each lateral epicondyle defects underwent a abrasion arthroplasty until punctate bleeding was observed. Joint resurfacing and degenerative changes were evaluated grossly and histologically after 8 and 12 weeks.. Results. On gross observation a greater volume of repair tissue filled treated defects. Degenerative changes in the cartilage ...
BACKGROUND Limited information exists on the clinical use of a synthetic osteochondral scaffold plug for cartilage restoration in the knee. PURPOSE/HYPOTHESIS The purpose of this study was to compare the early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance, including quantitative T2 values, between cartilage defects treated with a scaffold versus a scaffold with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC). The hypothesis was that the addition of PRP or BMAC would result in an improved cartilage appearance. STUDY DESIGN Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS Forty-six patients with full-thickness cartilage defects of the femur were surgically treated with a control scaffold (n = 11), scaffold with PRP (n = 23), or scaffold with BMAC (n = 12) and were followed prospectively. Patients underwent MRI with a qualitative assessment and quantitative T2 mapping at 12 months after surgery. An image assessment was performed retrospectively by a blinded musculoskeletal ...
We evaluated the effect of platelet-rich plasma-incorporated gelatin hydrogel microsphere (PRP/GM) together with subchondral drilling for cartilage regeneration in horses. Cartilage defects (diameter, 4.5 mm; depth, 3.0 mm) were created in both third carpal bones of six Thoroughbred horses. A subchondral hole was drilled at the center of this cartilage defect (diameter, 2.0 mm; depth, 35 mm) in one randomly selected carpal joint (test joint), whereas no subchondral hole was made in the contralateral joint (control joint). ...
We evaluated the effect of platelet-rich plasma-incorporated gelatin hydrogel microsphere (PRP/GM) together with subchondral drilling for cartilage regeneration in horses. Cartilage defects (diameter, 4.5 mm; depth, 3.0 mm) were created in both third carpal bones of six Thoroughbred horses. A subchondral hole was drilled at the center of this cartilage defect (diameter, 2.0 mm; depth, 35 mm) in one randomly selected carpal joint (test joint), whereas no subchondral hole was made in the contralateral joint (control joint). ...
A protective functional solution designed to support regeneration of the knee cartilage during the post-surgical healing phase. It assists in the compliance to the rehabilitation protocol for cartilage repair procedures such as Microfracture, OATS and (M)ACI.
Affiliation (Current):大阪市立大学,大学院医学研究科,講師, Research Field:Orthopaedic surgery,Basic Section 56020:Orthopedics-related, Keywords:半月板,再生医療,半月修復,修復,再生,エストロゲン,軟骨代謝,ノックアウトマウス,cre-loxPシステム,ATDC5, # of Research Projects:8, # of Research Products:101, Ongoing Project:Cartilage repair covered with autologous fibrin sheet on microfracture
Defensive end Victor Abiamiri had microfracture knee surgery and isnt expected to return to running until six months after surgery. The oft-injured Eagle underwent the operation on Feb. 9, according to Eagles trainer Rick Burkholder. - Jeff McLane, Philadelphia Inquirer
Connecticut Sun forward Chiney Ogwumike underwent microfracture surgery Thursday on her right knee and will miss at least part of the WNBA season.
CKX-CCSW confluency checker software enables users to accurately estimate the proper timing for cell passage while minimizing human error.
Repair of cartilage damage with autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has become popular in clinical use during the past few years. Although clinical results have mostly been successful, several unanswered questions remain regarding the biological mechanism of the repair process. The aim of this study was to develop a goat model for ACT. The repair was not successful due to the graft delamination, but we characterize the subchondral changes seen after the procedure. A chondral lesion was created in 14 goat knees, operated on 1 month later with ACT, and covered with periosteum or a bioabsorbable poly-L/D-lactide scaffold. After 3 months, only two of the five lesions repaired with ACT showed partly hyaline-like repair tissue, and all lesions (n = 4) with the scaffold failed. Even though the lesions did not extend through the calcified cartilage, the bone volume and collagen organization of bone structure were decreased when assessed by quantitative polarized light microscopy. There was a ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Current Concepts of Articular Cartilage Restoration Techniques in the Knee. AU - Camp, Christopher L.. AU - Stuart, Michael J.. AU - Krych, Aaron. PY - 2014/1/1. Y1 - 2014/1/1. N2 - Context:Articular cartilage injuries are common in patients presenting to surgeons with primary complaints of knee pain or mechanical symptoms. Treatment options include comprehensive nonoperative management, palliative surgery, joint preservation operations, and arthroplasty.Evidence Acquisition:A MEDLINE search on articular cartilage restoration techniques of the knee was conducted to identify outcome studies published from 1993 to 2013. Special emphasis was given to Level 1 and 2 published studies.Study Design:Clinical review.Level of Evidence:Level 3.Results:Current surgical options with documented outcomes in treating chondral injuries in the knee include the following: microfracture, osteochondral autograft transfer, osteochondral allograft transplant, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. ...
Twenty-six consecutive patients (19 men and 7 women) with a mean age of 31.5 years (range 19-52 years) who suffered from an isolated full-thickness cartilage defect of the patella (area ranged from 0.75 to 20.0 cm2) and disabling knee pain were treated with autologous periosteal transplantation (without any chondrocytes). The duration of symptoms was 59 months (range 11-144 months). During the first 5 postoperative days all patients were treated with continuous passive motion (CPM). This was followed by active motion, slowly progressive strength training, and slowly progressive weight-bearing. After a mean follow-up of 42 months (range 24-76 months), 17 patients (65%) were graded as excellent (were painfree), 8 patients (31%) as good (had pain with strenuous knee-loading activities), and 1 patient as poor (had pain at rest). Twenty-two patients (85%) had returned to their previous occupation. Twelve patients (46%) had resumed sports or recreational activities at their former level. Repeated ...
Cartilage Repair/ Regeneration Market Size, Market Share, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Growth Trends, Key Players, Competitive Strategies And Forecasts, 2017 To 2025. Cartilage Repair/ Regeneration Market - Growth, Future Prospects and Competitive Analysis, 2017 - 2025 the global cartilage repair/ regeneration market was valued at US$ 1.90 Bn in 2016, and is expected to reach US$ 3.11 Bn by 2025, expanding at a CAGR of 5.6% from 2017 to 2025.. View Full Report with TOC @ http://www.acutemarketreports.com/report/cartilage-repair-regeneration-market. Market Insights. Cartilage is smooth elastic tissue that protects the bone joints by preventing friction between the bones, cartilage damage generally caused by injury or trauma, congenital abnormalities or hormonal disorders. For the purpose of study, global cartilage repair/ regeneration market is segmented on the basis of treatment modalities such as cell-based approaches (chondrocyte transplantation and growth factor technology) and ...
Articular hyaline cartilage is avascular tissue that provides joints with a low-friction and wear-resistant surface that provides shock absorption and high-load-bearing capabilities.4 Unfortunately, this tissue has limited regenerative capacity due to the absence of blood vessels and the low mitogenic potency of the chondrocytes. When treating cartilage defects and chondral lesions, surgeons have traditionally performed microfracture surgery to replace and create new cartilage on the articular surface.. The problem is that the cartilage created as a result of microfracture is not the same as the patients native hyaline cartilage. Studies have shown that the main tissue formed after microfracture is fibrocartilage1,2, which does not dissipate compressive force to the same degree as the original hyaline cartilage. As a result, this production of fibrocartilage may have an effect on durability and eventual failure.1 In fact, many researchers have observed that the long term results after ...
One such unholy alliance has emerged between environmentalists and some utilities in the context of the Environmental Protection Agencys recent Utility Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (Utility MACT) rule.. Those unfamiliar with the Bootleggers and Baptists theory may conclude that those compliant energy companies are enlightened at long last. But those who know the theory will take a more cynical view.. Shakespeare once wrote, "Misery acquaints a man with strange bed-fellows." Apparently, so does Utility MACT.. Overview: Utility MACT. The EPA is required under the Clean Air Act of 1990 to regulate hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). At the end of the Clinton administration in December of 2000, the EPA determined that it was "appropriate and necessary" to regulate coal- and oil-fired electric generation units (EGUs) under the Clean Air Acts stringent section 112 for HAPs, including mercury.. However, the agencys first attempt to do so was not until 2005, under the George W. Bush administration. ...
Find the best cartilage repair doctors in Delhi NCR. Get guidance from medical experts to select cartilage repair specialist in Delhi NCR from trusted hospitals - credihealth.com
Issues Concerning Clinical Outcomes in Long-Term Trials of Cellular Therapies for Cartilage Repair. May 15, 2009. Gunnar Knutsen MD, PhD University Hospital North Norway. Universities in Norway. Norwegian RCT ACI versus Microfracture. Northern most University Hospital in the world. Tromsø. Slideshow 176423 by Antony
November 1, 2014. Injury started with a sports hernia after Crossfit in 09, then spiraled to hip issues soon after. Had right hip done on Jan-2011 for FAI, labrum, also performed microfracture for damaged cartilage. Left hip done Nov-2012 same procedure.. This past May both hips failed one month apart. Seems the microfracture did not hold up. So now I am in the state of WOW two failed hip surgeries. I have pain sitting and lost some range of motion. I can still bike and do some exercise, pain is constant 24-7. I am 43 and just tired of 5 years of chronic pain, injuries doctors, etc.. I have a lot of joint space still based on my x-rays. I sent them to Dr. Gross and he said I would be a candidate. I think I would like to visit him and speak to him about it. I am in Miami so he is not too far. I also researched stem cell/prp injections, not sure if this will buy me some time or just throwing money away. My bad spot is on the most weight bearing part of the hip joint, so not sure how the injections ...
The rapid growth in emerging economies and technological advancement in cartilage repair and regeneration products is expected to create opportunities for the manufacturers of cartilage repair products across the globe.
Learn the latest news on cartilage repair from world-renowned orthopaedic surgeon Kevin R. Stone, MD before you choose to go under the knife.
Rarely has an NBA head coach seemed less enthusiastic about the prospect of having a bunch of injured players get healthy.. Greetings. Kent Youngblood here. Ill be covering the game with Jerry Zgoda getting a much-deserved day away from the team. Heres the news: Shooting guard Martell Webster and center Brad Miller are available to play tonight. Point guard Luke Ridnour, who missed the Dallas game with a sore knee, is also ready to return. Michael Beasley (mid-foot sprain) will be a game-time decision. J.J. Barea (hamstring) and Malcolm Lee (knee) are both out.. This is a big moment for Webster and Miller, both of whom are coming back from off-season surgery. Webster has been rehabbing from a second microdiscectomy surgery in two years while Miller is coming back from microfracture surgery in his knee.. So, for a Wolves team that has been dreadfully shorthanded for the last couple games, this is great news, right? Well, it would probably be better if coach Rick Adelman had, say, one full ...
The only reminders that Baltimore's Kelly Gregg missed all of last season after microfracture surgery were the scars on the nose tackle's left knee. Gregg has been physically dominating offensive linemen at training camp, an indication that the surgery was a complete success. He is building an...
Discussion. Chondral cartilage lesions do not heal spontaneously and may progress to severe osteoarthritis. For cartilage repair, a variety of surgical techniques have been established over the years. Further research led to the development of current new one-step cell-free scaffold-assisted cartilage repair approaches based on the experience with scaffold materials in previous two-step autologous chondrocyte implantation procedures. Commercially available scaffold-based products for one-step chondral cartilage repair have been recently tested in first case series and showed promising clinical outcome in the short-term follow-up; however, medium- and long-term comparative studies are necessary to evaluate the regenerative potential of this new one-step cartilage repair procedure and to demonstrate its superiority over or adequacy to traditional approaches.. Conclusion. This critical review summarises the development from two-step cell-based autologous chondrocyte implantation procedures to new ...
Cartilage Repair/ Cartilage Regeneration Market by Treatment modalities (Chondrocyte Transplantation, Growth Factor Technology, Tissue Scaffolds, Cell-free composites), Application (Hyaline Cartilage, Fibrocartilage), Region - Forecast to 2021 ...
PITTSBURGH -- It looks as if Pirates outfielder Brandon Moss should be ready to take the field with no limitations in Spring Training after all. Moss traveled to Vail, Colo., late last week, expecting to undergo a microfracture procedure. An end-of-the-season MRI had revealed cartilage being separated from the bones in his left knee, and both Dr. Patrick DeMeo in Pittsburgh and Dr. Richard Steadman in Vail agreed that a microfracture procedure would be the best course of action. Such a procedure typically requires two months of rest, followed by four to six months of rehabilitation. On Friday, however, Steadman did a diagnostic scope on Moss knee and reported back to the Pirates that he felt arthroscopy was the best course of action at this time. A scope involves a much smaller incision than open surgery and involves a much shorter recovery time. In this type of procedure, a surgeon removes or repairs damaged tissue with surgical instruments inserted through small incisions in the knee. ...
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an effective and noninvasive means by which to evaluate articular cartilage within the knee. Existing techniques can be utilized to detect and monitor longitudinal changes in cartilage status due to injury or progression of degenerative disease. Quantitative MRI (qMRI) techniques can provide a metric by which to evaluate the efficacy of cartilage repair techniques and offer insight into the composition of cartilage and cartilage repair tissue. In this review, we provide background on MR signal generation and decay, the utility of morphologic MRI assessment, and qMRI techniques for the biochemical assessment of cartilage (dGEMRIC, T2, T2*, T1ρ, sodium, gagCEST ...
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2016) Treatment of articular cartilage defects with microfracture and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis leads to extensive subchondral bone cyst formation in a sheep model. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 44 (10). pp. 2629-2643. Smith, R.L., Murphy, D.J., Day, R.E. and Lester, G.D. ...
{use-layout:ORTHOSEC} Workshop held in November 2000, manuscripts published as a supplement to the October 2001 issue of Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR) Issue Table of Contents The Classic - Age Changes in Articular Cartilage Symptomati
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Cartilage Repair and Regeneration. Edited by: Alessandro R. Zorzi and Joao Batista de Miranda. ISBN 978-953-51-3788-7, eISBN 978-953-51-3789-4, PDF ISBN 978-953-51-4020-7, Published 2018-02-14
HOUSTON--(EON: Enhanced Online News)--Medical Metrics Inc, (MMI), an experienced provider of medical imaging core lab services for global clinical trials, has
Articular cartilage lesions occur commonly. Cartilage is relatively avascular and is unable to self-repair. A chondral lesion may become symptomatic. It may lead to osteoarthritis and increased morbidity. The aim of cartilage repair is to restore hyaline cartilage. There are many types of cartilage repair surgery, most of which result in fibrocartilage repair tissue that is suboptimal. Autologous chondrocyte implantation has been shown to produce hyaline-type repair tissue. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is performed preoperatively to define the ulcer and postoperatively to evaluate the technical success of implantation and the state of cartilage healing and to identify potential complications. Features of the autologous chondrocyte implantation graft that are assessed include the degree of filling by repair tissue, its integration with native cartilage and subchondral bone, the character of the graft substance and surface, and the underlying bone. MR arthrography is superior to unenhanced MR ...
The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of cartilage loss and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint (PFJ) to knee pain. The location of full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs in the PFJ on knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) and Framingham Osteoarthritis (FOA) Studies were categorized as no damage, isolated medial, isolated lateral, or both medial and lateral (mixed). The relationship of MRI lesions in each PFJ region to prevalent knee pain were determined. Differences in knee pain severity were compared among categories of PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs using quantile regression. In MOST (n=1137 knees), compared with knees without full-thickness cartilage loss, knees with isolated lateral or mixed PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss had 1.9 (1.3, 2.8) and 1.9 (1.2, 2.9) times the odds of knee pain, respectively, while isolated medial cartilage loss had no relationship to knee ...
Joint, or articular, cartilage covers the ends of bones and allows for joints to glide smoothly with minimal friction. Cartilage damage, or chondral defects, can be caused by acute trauma, such as a bad fall or sports-related injury, or by repetitive trauma, such as general wear over time. Unlike other tissues in the body, joint cartilage has no innate ability to repair itself, making any injury permanent. Left untreated, knee cartilage damage can deteriorate into debilitating osteoarthritis and chronic pain, ultimately necessitating a joint replacement procedure.. We estimate, based on internal research, that over 500,000 knee cartilage procedures are performed annually in the United States primarily in the form of debridement, microfracture, conventional autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and osteochondral grafting. Debridement and microfracture procedures are the most frequently performed surgical procedures for the treatment of cartilage damage, accounting for an estimated 90% of all ...
Cell therapeutics to treat cartilage defects include autologous chondrocyte implantation products. However, little is known on the correlation of cartilage cell transplant properties before implantation and their potency to regenerate cartilage tissue after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed, consisting of human condyle chips in which a standardized subchondral cartilage defect was manually set, being representative of cartilage defects as treated in the clinic. This model was used to test the potency of a cartilage cell transplant. To do so, cartilage cell transplants (spheroids) were implanted into these defects in a clinical relevant dosage and the defect filling and tissue regeneration process was followed ex vivo for 12 weeks. Most importantly, before implantation, characteristics of spheroids from the same batch as used for the implantation were determined with respect to general spheroid characteristics, gene expression of the chondrogenic ...
This is a long term follow-up study to investigate the safety and efficacy of CARTISTEM, human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells, in repair of
This review analyzes the outcomes and technical aspects of in vivo studies published in the past decade using gels and hydrogels for cartilage repair. Using PubMed search engine, original research publications during the period of 2002/01/01 to 2015/04/30 identifi ed 115 published papers. Of these, 3 studies failed to fi nd a statistically significant improvement of treatment group as compared to control and 18 studies did not clearly identify hyaline-like cartilage formation in the treated groups. The most frequent repaired lesion was the rabbit acute full thickness trochlear defect, using a scaff old combining a gel or hydrogel and other material. One third of the scaff olds were cell-free (35%) and the majority of the studies did not use growth factors (71%). The present review may constitute a useful tool in design of future studies, as limitations of study designs are pointed and results in terms of translation to human application is discussed ...
Cartilage is flexible outer covering of bone, when it is damaged it affects the movement and causes pain. Kasturi hospitals Hyderabad provides affordable cartilage surgery.
After 8 weeks:static bike without resistance After 6 months:Light jogging. After 12 months:Skiing. After 12-18 months: contact sports. ...
Presented by Guest Speaker: Riley J. Williams III, MD Professor of Clinical Orthopaedic Surgery Weill Cornell Medical College Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon Hospital for Special Surgery
The cartilage experts at UK Center for Cartilage Repair & Restoration offer advanced treatment options for issues affecting the cartilage of the joints, such as ACL tears.
RESTORE (User-centred smart 3D nanobiomaterial-based scaffold for chondral repair) project aims to develop smart and functional 3D matrices based on nanomaterials providing effective repair of chondr
Older research outputs will score higher simply because theyve had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 308,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries ...
This patent search tool allows you not only to search the PCT database of about 2 million International Applications but also the worldwide patent collections. This search facility features: flexible search syntax; automatic word stemming and relevance ranking; as well as graphical results.
Sigma-Aldrich offers abstracts and full-text articles by [Vivian H M Mouser, Noël M M Dautzenberg, Riccardo Levato, Mattie H P van Rijen, Wouter J A Dhert, Jos Malda, Debby Gawlitta].
Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) may help you avoid complex knee surgery. Learn more by booking a consultation at Silicon Valley Orthopaedics today.
Dr. Deepak Goyal Volume 4 | Issue 1 | Jan - April 2019 | Page 2-3 Author: Deepak Goyal Consultant Cartilage and Sports Knee Surgeon, Saumya Arthroscopy & Sports Knee Clinic, Ahmedabad, India. Address of Correspondence Dr. Deepak Goyal, Consultant Cartilage and Sports Knee Surgeon Saumya Arthroscopy & Sports Knee Clinic, Ahmedabad, India. Email: [email protected] Abstract Hunter in AD 1742 had observed, Cartilage once damaged cannot heal and the orthopedic community continued to believe in his statement for over 200 years. There were some scattered attempts and observations to heal the cartilage in the later-half of the twentieth century. We have seen an enthusiastic interest with many new modalities showing varying degrees of cartilage repair success in the last 25 years. While traveling across Asian countries, I come across many surgeons who have an active interest in the cartilage repair. Young enthusiast surgeons are keen to learn techniques and develop skills for various cartilage repair procedures.
Our main finding was that the AMIC technique with MaioRegen implant failed in 31% of our patients who required re-intervention with implantation of ankle prostheses, although we found a progressive significant improvement of AOFAS, VAS and MOCART scores overall.. It is not easy to compare our results to those of previous studies focusing on other surgical treatments of OLTs, since different criteria for considering successful outcomes can be encountered. Chuckpaiwong et al. studied 105 patients with OLT treated with arthroscopic debridement with osteochondral bone stimulation (microfracture) [23]. They observed a successful rate of 70% with all unsuccessful treatments involving patients with lesions greater than 15 mm [23]. Ferkel and colleagues evaluated the long-term (average follow-up: 71 months) results of patients with chronic symptomatic OLT treated predominantly by arthroscopic excision and drilling ankle. They reported good to excellent results in 64% of patients based on the modified ...
Genome editing is revolutionising biomedical research. It enables the introduction of targeted genomic sequence changes in isolated cells or whole organisms, and as such is an extremely powerful research tool with huge therapeutic potential. Cas9 is a nuclease guided by small RNAs (sgRNAs) to complementary sites in the genome. It induces double stranded breaks (DSBs) which repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), or in the presence of a suitable DNA template, by homology-directed repair (HDR). The CRISPR-Cas9 system thus enables highly specific gene editing giving it great potential for correction of genetic (particularly monogenic) diseases or for revolutionising current cell therapies, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation, where the cells could be edited in vitro before re-implantation back in the body. In the present proposal we will apply genome editing techniques recently developed with our collaborators (1) with the aim of creating modified populations of human chondrocytes ...
Daniel Grande is associate investigator and director of orthopaedic research at the Feinstein Institute for Medical research. He is also associate professor at the newly accredited Hofstra School of Medicine. He completed his PhD at New York University and his post-doctoral fellowship ion biomechanics at the Hospital for Special Surgery. He has worked extensively in the area of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. His early work developed the first use of cell based therapy for cartilage repair, currently known as autologus chondrocyte transplantation. He has served on committees with the Orthopaedic Research Society as spine topic chair and the basic science committee.. Dr. Grande is significantly involved in mentoring and teaching of orthopaedic residents for his department. He has been a reviewer for a number of journals including: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Clinical Orthopaedics, Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, American Journal of Sports Medicine, Nature Reviews Rheumatology and ...
This article investigates the clinical and radiological results of bilayer matrix autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) membrane technique in the treatment of shallow osteochondral defects. An analysis was made of eight patients who were operated on using the bilayer MACI (Genzyme Biosurgery, Cambridge, MA) technique (mean age: 20.2 years, mean defect size: 3.8 cm2, mean defect depth: 6.2 ± 0.9 mm, and mean follow-up time: 22.1 ± 5.3 [14-26.1] months). According to the defect, the first membrane was secured to the base of the defect with the cells facing up, and the second membrane was implanted on top of the first membrane with the cells facing down using fibrin glue ...
Cartilage restoration is a surgical procedure where orthopaedic surgeons stimulate the growth of new cartilage that restores the normal function. Dr Shane Barton treats cartilage damage by using cartilage repair and transplantation in Shreveport, Bossier City and Monroe, Louisiana.
The global cartilage repair/regeneration market size was valued at USD 4.2 billion in 2016 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 5.4% during the forecast period. Rising prevalence of bone and joint disorders, such as Osteoarthritis (OA) or arthritis, and technological advancements in cartilage regeneration are the key drivers expected to nurture market growth worldwide
Fortune Business Insights has stated that the Market in North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America, and Middle East & Africa will emerge leading in the forecast period. North America is likely to exhibit the highest CAGR in the forecast period. Fortune Business Insights has profiled some of the leading companies that are operating in the global Knee Cartilage Repair Market.. The advent of digitalization has completely transformed the face of Knee Cartilage Repair Market. Increasing demand for simplified treatment options has led to the growth of the global Knee Cartilage Repair Market.. There has been an increasing need of protecting health information and other confidential data private organizations, hospitals, and other healthcare institutions. Incorporation of technologies such as cloud and Internet of Things (IoT) have boosted the global Knee Cartilage Repair Market and are likely to favour growth of the market in the forecast period.. Key questions answered in the Knee Cartilage ...
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The International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) is a unique forum dedicated to research and education on cartilage repair and regeneration as well as joint preservation. This years world congress takes place in Macau from 9-12 April 2018.
Injectable photoreactive gel and biological adhesive help new cartilage grow. Music. Introduction. This is a production of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health. Host-Margot Kern: Every year, hundreds of thousands of Americans undergo surgery to repair torn hyaline cartilage-that is the tough, flexible tissue that acts as a shock absorber between bones. Yet, outcomes for cartilage repair are typically poor. The reason is that unlike other tissues in the body, cartilage lacks its own blood supply, which normally bathes damaged tissue and provide factors that promote regeneration.. Host-Margot Kern: Currently, the first-line therapy for cartilage repair is a technique called microfracture surgery in which tiny holes are drilled into the bone located directly below missing cartilage in order to release bone marrow into the damaged space. Because bone marrow contains a mixture of stem cells and blood, the resulting clot provides an ...
The two main moving parts of the knee are between the thigh bone and the shin bone (femur and tibia) and between the kneecap and the front of the thigh bone (patella and trochlea). The first part takes load and forces when walking and landing and the second part takes load on squatting, standing up and activities such as going up and down stairs. Understanding which parts of the joint are loaded in which movements is key to helping the rehabilitation process while the new surface heals ...
Brian caught the running bug in high school and never looked back. Over the last 30 years, hes completed more than 80 marathons, including Boston, Chicago and New York and more than 200 other races like 10Ks, triathlons, etc. Hes run the Marine Corps Marathon 19 times in row. When hes not training for his next race, this 48-year-old Arlington father of three is a distinguished dentist with a thriving practice in Washington, DC.. As a career endurance athlete, Brian is used to the occasional injury. But when he tore cartilage in his knee while training for the Canadian Ironman in 2005, he knew he needed a surgeons expertise. A friend recommended Ben Kittredge, MD, at OrthoVirginia, and Brian felt an instant rapport. "I liked that Bens a marathon runner, too. He understood my athletes mindset and took my injury as seriously as I did," he says.. Dr. Kittredge performed an arthroscopy of the knee, including a microfracture treatment to remove significant cartilage damage from behind Brians ...
The Athletics, Marlins, Mets, Nationals, and Giants are the key teams likely to seek center field help this offseason, and theyll be best served by the trade market.. Starting Center Fielders Available In Free Agency. Coco Crisp is likely to sign a multiyear deal, as hes the one viable everyday center fielder on the free agent market. This was his healthiest year since 07, but if his on-base percentage doesnt bounce back hes not an asset at the top of a batting order. MLB.coms Jordan Bastian tweets that the Indians are expected to choose a $500K buyout over Grady Sizemores $9MM club option Monday. That implies that Sizemore has little trade value on a one-year, $8.5MM deal. If nothing else, Sizemore showed some pop in 71 games this year, but his health is a huge concern. Since 2009 Sizemore has missed time due to injuries to his elbow, abdominal wall, and left knee, the last of which required microfracture surgery in June of 2010. He had surgery for a sports hernia this year, and a right ...
MACT BILL POSSIBLE THIS WEEK - House Energy and Commerce Democrats are expecting their GOP colleagues to circulate legislation aimed at EPAs finalization and implementation of rules to curb toxic air pollution from industrial boilers, utilities and cement plants prior to a committee hearing Friday on the so-called MACT rules. GOP committee staff declined to comment on the prospects of a roll out this week ...
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NICE guidance is designed and developed for the NHS in England and is therefore not automatically applicable to Northern Ireland. On 1 July 2006 the Department established links with NICE whereby all technology appraisals and clinical guidelines published from that date are locally reviewed for applicability to Northern Ireland and, where appropriate, are endorsed for implementation in health and social care. THE LOCAL REVIEW DOES NOT REASSESS THE CLINICAL AND COST EVIDENCE USED BY NICE IN FORMING ITS ADVICE. This link has ensured that Northern Ireland has access to up-to-date, independent, professional, evidence-based guidance on the value of health care interventions.
Complex cartilage lesions of the knee including large cartilage defects, kissing lesions, and osteoarthritis (OA) represent a common problem in orthopaedic surgery and a challenging task for the orthopaedic surgeon. As there is only limited data, we performed a prospective clinical study to investigate the benefit of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for this demanding patient population. Fifty-one patients displaying at least one of the criteria were included in the present retrospective study: (1.) defect size larger than 10 cm2; (2.) multiple lesions; (3.) kissing lesions, cartilage lesions Outerbridge grade III-IV, and/or (4.) mild/moderate osteoarthritis (OA). For outcome measurements, the International Cartilage Societys International Knee Documentation Committees (IKDC) questionnaire, as well as the Cincinnati, Tegner, Lysholm and Noyes scores were used. Radiographic evaluation for OA was done using the Kellgren score. Patients age was 36 years (13-61), defects size 7.25 (3-17.5) cm2,
Through use of an awl, the surgeon creates tiny fractures in the subchondral bone plate. Blood and bone marrow (which contains ... Clin Orthop Relat Res (144):74-83 Johnson LL (1986) Arthroscopic abrasion arthroplasty historical and pathologic perspective: ... However, acute traumatic osteochondral lesions or surgically created lesions extending into subchondral bone, e.g. by Pridie ... how the subchondral bone plate is treated, and the postoperative rehabilitation protocol. The surgery was developed in the late ...
Stage 4 hallux rigidus may be treated via fusion of the joint (arthrodesis) or implant arthroplasty in which both sides of the ... bony proliferation on the metatarsophalangeal head and phalanx and subchondral sclerosis or cyst. Grade III - Severe changes ...
Elbow Arthroplasty." The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals in the United States will grade elbow X-rays of dogs intended for ... which in turn arises from failed blood flow in the subchondral bone. Other common causes of elbow dysplasia included ununited ...
Late radiographic signs also include a radiolucency area following the collapse of subchondral bone (crescent sign) and ringed ... Mansat, P; Huser, L; Mansat, M; Bellumore, Y; Rongières, M; Bonnevialle, P (Mar 2005). "Shoulder arthroplasty for atraumatic ... Bergman, Nr; Rand, Ja (Dec 1991). "Total knee arthroplasty in osteonecrosis" (Free full text). Clinical orthopaedics and ...
The total CMC1 joint replacement is a newer arthroplasty which has developed into a cemented and a non-cemented design. The ... In reaction of this process the joint bones thicken at the surface, resulting in subchondral sclerosis. Also bony outgrowths, ... 2012 Mar;37(3):411-7. Weilby A (1988). "Tendon interposition arthroplasty of the first carpo-metacarpal joint". J Hand Surg [Br ... Very narrow joint space Cystic and sclerotic subchondral bone changes are present Significant erosion of the scaphotrapezial ...
Li G, Yin J, Gao J, Cheng TS, Pavlos NJ, Zhang C, Zheng MH (2013). "Subchondral bone in osteoarthritis: insight into risk ... Daigle ME, Weinstein AM, Katz JN, Losina E (2012). "The cost-effectiveness of total joint arthroplasty: A systematic review of ... The subchondral bone volume increases and becomes less mineralized (hypomineralization). All these changes can cause problems ... The pain in an osteoarthritic joint has been related to thickened synovium and subchondral bone lesions. Diagnosis is made with ...
... for the likelihood that a patient with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee will progress to knee arthroplasty with ... Difficult primary total knee arthroplasty requiring a varus -valgus constrained implant is at higher risk of periprosthetic ... Knee arthroplasty rate was 27% at mean of 4 years of follow-up. Lasso Regression was non-inferior to other models and was ... for the likelihood that a patient with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee will progress to knee arthroplasty with ...
Purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implanted in patients with secondary osteonecrosis (ON) related to corticosteroids have ... Subchondral stem cell therapy versus contralateral total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis following secondary osteonecrosis ... bone marrow aspiration and subchondral injection of concentrated bone marrow versus total knee arthroplasty) was measured. Peri ... Subchondral autologous bone marrow concentrate was an effective procedure for treating young patients with knee osteoarthritis ...
A Comparison of Abrasion Arthroplasty and Subchondral Microfracture in the Treatment of Chondral and Osteochondral Cartilage ... In group A cartilage was shaved without penetrating the subchondral plate. In group B, defects were created into subchondral ... observe the difference in healing of chondral and osteochondral defects treated with abrasion arthroplasty versus subchondral ... Histological evidence at 12 weeks suggests that microfracture technique may result in better repair than abrasion arthroplasty ...
Discrepant hypoxia tolerance aggravates subchondral delamination in osteonecrosis of the femoral head Qian-Hao Yang, Guang-Yi ... A new classification for proximal femur bone defects in conservative hip arthroplasty revisions Filippo Casella, Fabio Favetti ...
Subchondral cysts (or geodes) are common in osteoarthritis (OA), usually in association with other typical signs, i.e., joint ... space narrowing, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophytosis. However,... ... Total hip arthroplasty was performed. Pathological analysis of the resected femoral head and of material obtained at curettage ... Subchondral cysts (or geodes) are common in osteoarthritis (OA), usually in association with other typical signs, i.e., joint ...
A Randomized Trial of Static and Articulating Spacers for the Treatment of Infection Following Total Knee Arthroplasty. Nahhas ... Spontaneous Osteonecrosis/Subchondral Insufficiency Fractures of the Knee: High Rates of Conversion to Surgical Treatment and ... Persistent Racial Disparities in Utilization Rates and Perioperative Metrics in Total Joint Arthroplasty in the U.S.: A ... Use of Natural Language Processing Algorithms to Identify Common Data Elements in Operative Notes for Total Hip Arthroplasty. ...
This is a case on a female patient who developed immediate postsurgical NOMI following hip arthroplasty and died. Since ... Aseptic necrosis (avascular) of the left femoral head with flattening of the subchondral bone (arrow).. ... Fulminant Nonocclusive Mesenteric Ischemia Just after Hip Arthroplasty. Maria Auxiliadora-Martins. ,1 Gil Cezar Alkmin-Teixeira ... This is a case on a female patient who developed immediate postsurgical NOMI following hip arthroplasty and died. Since ...
The methods focus on the prevention, or delayed onset or progression of, subchondral defects such as bone marrow edema or bone ... marrow lesion, and subchondral treatment to prevent the progression of osteoarthritis or degenerative disc disease in the spine ... Adjustable height arthroplasty plate US20140257483A1 (en) * 2013-03-05. 2014-09-11. Karl W. Swann. Method and device for ... The method comprises: identifying a subchondral defect in a subchondral region of a bone of the spine; selecting a subchondral ...
... and abrasion arthroplasty. These procedures generally involve penetrating the region of vascularization in the subchondral bone ... Joint arthroplasty devices formed in situ. US20080188942 *. 6 Feb 2007. 7 Ago 2008. Zimmer Technology, Inc.. Femoral trochlea ... e. inserting the cartilage implant into the hole so that the lower surface abuts against the prepared subchondral bone and the ... e. inserting the cartilage implant into the hole so that the lower surface abuts against the prepared subchondral bone and the ...
... and abrasion arthroplasty. These procedures generally involve penetrating the region of vascularization in the subchondral bone ... Joint arthroplasty devices formed in situ. US20080188942. 6 Feb 2007. 7 Aug 2008. Zimmer Technology, Inc.. Femoral trochlea ... Orthopaedic implant for arthroplasty of the fingers. US8876901. 13 Apr 2012. 4 Nov 2014. Moirai Orthopaedics, Llc. Articular ... A hole is then formed, i.e., drilled, punched, or broached, through the cartilage and the subchondral bone into the cancellous ...
OCOSH Classification: Orthopaedic Procedures: Arthroplasty: Subchondral Arthroplasty View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate ... We report six cases of contralateral limb involvement during total hip arthroplasty including swelling of the gluteal muscle ... Rhabdomyolysis following total hip arthroplasty Location: http://www.jbjs.org.uk/cgi/reprint/73-B/4/576 ...
CT Pelvis - document subchondral bone changes, cartilage resorption, and narrowing of joint space ... Early recommended treatment included corrective osteotomy, bony fusion, or joint arthroplasty. *investigators proposed early ... Usual findings include cystic erosions in subchondral bone and a bloody aspirate. ...
Identifying Patient-Specific Pathology in Osteoarthritis Development Based on MicroCT Analysis of Subchondral Trabecular Bone. ... Hip Replacement Arthroplasty (Total Hip Replacement) 07/2009 - 03/2009. 2. Vena Cava Filters (Inferior Vena Cava Filter) 10/ ... Arthroplasty. 1/2016. Projected Increase in Periprosthetic Joint Infections Secondary to Rise in Diabetes and Obesity.. ... Coronary revascularization and adverse events in joint arthroplasty.. 9/2015. Administration of Aspirin as a Prophylaxis Agent ...
total knee arthroplasty [27]. Even when a subchondral insufficiency fracture is diagnosed on a conventional radiograph, MRI may ... 7 Imaging After Total Knee Arthroplasty Variant 12: Pain after total knee arthroplasty. Suspect periprosthetic soft-tissue ... Imaging After Total Knee Arthroplasty not appropriate; 4,5,6 May be appropriate; 7,8,9 Usually appropriate *Relative Radiation ...
Computed tomography of subchondral bone and osteophytes in hip osteoarthritis: the shape of things to come? Front Endocrinol ... In Australia, there is universal health insurance, so arthroplasty is available to all. We did not have accurate arthroplasty ... and more fit for undergoing hip arthroplasty. The rate of total hip arthroplasty for OA was similar regardless of education ... and type and reason for arthroplasty, with almost complete arthroplasty data13. Matching of MCCS participants using first name ...
Arthroplasty has been used widely in the treatment of late-stage articular cartilage lesions, with replacement usually being of ... Despite subchondral cysts, osteophytes, bone marrow edema, and other common side effects, ACI still has an excellent clinical ... M. B. Goldring and S. R. Goldring, "Articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis," Annals of ... T. A. Stupina, M. A. Stepanov, and M. P. Teplenkii, "Role of subchondral bone in the restoration of articular cartilage," ...
A bone tamp is utilized to disimpact the cancellous and subchondral bone 1 to 2mm beyond the surrounding subchondral bone to ... Three patients were treated with arthroplasty, one of whom received a total shoulder arthroplasty, with an average score of 75/ ... total shoulder arthroplasty, resection arthroplasty, or arthrodesis. Treatment within 2 years of injury was correlated with ... "Anatomic shoulder arthroplasty as treatment for locked posterior dislocation of the shoulder". J Bone Joint Surg Am. vol. 96. ...
Abrasion arthroplasty involves uniform removal of subchondral bone until bleeding is achieved. This can be accomplished in the ... Arthroplasty and Microfracture. Indications for abrasion arthroplasty or microfracture vary with the size and degree of ... To perform abrasion arthroplasty, insert a hand burr or preferentially a power shaver burr through the instrument portal. ... Grade IV cartilage damage is full thickness loss of cartilage and exposure and, in some cases, eburnation of the subchondral ...
Response to Letter to the Editor: Subchondral tibial bone texture predicts the incidence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis: ... Arthroplasty Arthroplasty is a surgical procedure to restore the integrity and function of a joint. A joint can be restored by ... arthroplasty would improve post-operative pain control. Patients were randomised in the operating room to receive either a ... Home » Topics » Arthroplasty » Research » Study to Test the Efficacy of Periarticular Levo Bupivicaine Injection Following ...
The patient is applying for disability and is not interested in having a knee arthroplasty at this time. (R. 175-76). The ... Walcott noted that plaintiff may need bone grafting of his subchondral cyst with arthroscopy, and a later ACL reconstruction. ( ... Potter wrote: The patient was advised to have a total knee arthroplasty. He needs no significant treatment for his lumbosacral ... Hall indicated that plaintiff would need a total knee arthroplasty for complete relief of pain. Dr. Hall released plaintiff to ...
MODERN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY by Richard D. Komistek, Mohamed R. Mahfouz, Phani K. Nukala, William R. Hamel, Kevin M. Kit, ... subchondral bone in articular cartilage repair: current problems in the surgical management (Article begins on next page) The ... subchondral bone in articular cartilage repair: current problems in the surgical management (Article begins on next page) The ... "Development of a computational model to predict the in vivo contact mechanics of modern total knee arthroplasty. " I have ...
Total joint arthroplasty of the knee should be considered when conservative symptomatic management is ineffective. ... Total joint arthroplasty of the knee should be considered when conservative symptomatic management is ineffective. ... and subchondral sclerosis.1 Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States,2 and osteoarthritis is the most ... According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, the main indication for total knee arthroplasty is relief of pain ...
... speed burns are used to remove the damaged cartilage and reach the subchondral bone. Abrasion arthroplasty is also done with an ... Multiple holes are made through the injured area in the subchondral bone with a surgical drill or wire. The subchondral bone is ... The graft is a cylindrical plug of cartilage and subchondral bone. It is then matched to the surface area of the defect and ... Microfracture - damaged cartilage is removed; an awl is used to make holes in the subchondral bones beneath the cartilage; ...
Subchondral bone lesions may be clinically important, treatable with bone substitute. December 6, 2019. Subchondroplasty, an ... Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) profoundly influences knee biomechanics. Using an arbitrary (often 3° to 5°) posterior tibial ... A newly accepted study in The Journal of Arthroplasty describes a genome-wide analysis to identify the genetic loci responsible ... has received FDA 510(k) clearance of its TSolution One Total Knee Application for use in total knee arthroplasty, according to ...
Tibial cartilage volume, subchondral bone cysts, and BMLs were measured by using validated methods. Knee arthroplasty over a 4- ... to subchondral bone cysts present, the risk of knee replacement was increased (odds ratio, 1.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), ... To examine the natural history of subchondral bone cysts and to determine whether knee cartilage loss and risk of joint ... Tibial cartilage volume, subchondral bone cysts, and BMLs were measured by using validated methods. Knee arthroplasty over a 4- ...
  • Elevation of the lateral trochlear facet was first described by Albee in 1915, followed by deepening trochleoplasty [2, 4 -which tries to create a new sulcus by removing subchondral bone. (icjr.net)
  • Although there was no association between subchondral BML and PRO at postoperative 2 years, our results suggest that increasing severity of BML is correlated with worse preoperative and postoperative 1 year WOMAC pain, function and total scores. (isakos.com)
  • Importantly, young adult patients would in many cases require more than one arthroplasty procedure in their lifetime [ 7 , 8 ] and as such interest in less invasive techniques aimed at slowing or preventing disease progression have gained the interest of clinicians involved in the management of AVN. (biomedcentral.com)
  • MRI is the best imaging modality: a focal subchondral area of low signal intensity adjacent to the subchondral bone plate and representing local ischaemia, this area does not enhance due to lack of blood flow. (wordpress.com)
  • For mobility-preserving surgery of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the second through fifth fingers, silicone implant arthroplasty remains the gold standard. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • It is evident that prior to arthroplasty, the surgeon should have a detailed information about the patient′s bone quality for planning and choosing the optimal implant and determining the postoperative weight bearing. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Stage 4 hallux rigidus may be treated via fusion of the joint (arthrodesis) or implant arthroplasty in which both sides of the joint are resurfaced or a hinged implant is used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patient and radiographic factors were used in building predictive models for progression to arthroplasty with Train: Validation: Test subsets. (medworm.com)
  • In order of importance, predictors for progression to arthroplasty included lateral meniscus extrusion, Kellgren-Lawrence Grade 4, SIFK on MFC, lateral meniscus root tear, and medi al meniscus extrusion. (medworm.com)