The surgical fixation of a joint by a procedure designed to accomplish fusion of the joint surfaces by promoting the proliferation of bone cells. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.
The articulations between the various TARSAL BONES. This does not include the ANKLE JOINT which consists of the articulations between the TIBIA; FIBULA; and TALUS.
Formed by the articulation of the talus with the calcaneus.
The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.
The articulation between a metatarsal bone (METATARSAL BONES) and a phalanx.
Replacement of the ANKLE JOINT.
The second largest of the TARSAL BONES. It articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA to form the ANKLE JOINT.
The largest of the TARSAL BONES which is situated at the lower and back part of the FOOT, forming the HEEL.
A condition caused by degenerative arthritis (see OSTEOARTHRITIS) of the METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT of the great toe and characterized by pain and limited dorsiflexion, but relatively unrestricted plantar flexion.
The seven bones which form the tarsus - namely, CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid, navicular, and the internal, middle, and external cuneiforms.
Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the foot.
Chronic progressive degeneration of the stress-bearing portion of a joint, with bizarre hypertrophic changes at the periphery. It is probably a complication of a variety of neurologic disorders, particularly TABES DORSALIS, involving loss of sensation, which leads to relaxation of supporting structures and chronic instability of the joint. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).
A condition in which one or more of the arches of the foot have flattened out.
The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.
External devices which hold wires or pins that are placed through one or both cortices of bone in order to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment. These devices allow easy access to wounds, adjustment during the course of healing, and more functional use of the limbs involved.
Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.
Lateral displacement of the great toe (HALLUX), producing deformity of the first METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT with callous, bursa, or bunion formation over the bony prominence.
Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)
A moon-shaped carpal bone which is located between the SCAPHOID BONE and TRIQUETRUM BONE.
Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.
The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each toe.
The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.
Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.
The point of articulation between the OCCIPITAL BONE and the CERVICAL ATLAS.
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)
Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)
Partial or total replacement of a joint.
A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.
Arthritis caused by BACTERIA; RICKETTSIA; MYCOPLASMA; VIRUSES; FUNGI; or PARASITES.
Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
The forepart of the foot including the metatarsals and the TOES.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.
"Dislocation is a traumatic injury wherein the normal articulation between two bones at a joint is disrupted, resulting in the complete separation of the bone ends and associated soft tissues from their usual position."
The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.
A bone fixation technique using an external fixator (FIXATORS, EXTERNAL) for lengthening limbs, correcting pseudarthroses and other deformities, and assisting the healing of otherwise hopeless traumatic or pathological fractures and infections, such as chronic osteomyelitis. The method was devised by the Russian orthopedic surgeon Gavriil Abramovich Ilizarov (1921-1992). (From Bull Hosp Jt Dis 1992 Summer;52(1):1)
A carpal bone adjacent to the TRAPEZOID BONE.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
The joint involving the CERVICAL ATLAS and axis bones.
Plantar declination of the foot.
The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
A pathologic entity characterized by deossification of a weight-bearing long bone, followed by bending and pathologic fracture, with inability to form normal BONY CALLUS leading to existence of the "false joint" that gives the condition its name. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The articulations extending from the ANKLE distally to the TOES. These include the ANKLE JOINT; TARSAL JOINTS; METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and TOE JOINT.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
The region corresponding to the human WRIST in non-human ANIMALS.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The eight bones of the wrist: SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; TRIQUETRUM BONE; PISIFORM BONE; TRAPEZIUM BONE; TRAPEZOID BONE; CAPITATE BONE; and HAMATE BONE.
The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.
Inflammation of the bone.
A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.
General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.
The toothlike process on the upper surface of the axis, which articulates with the CERVICAL ATLAS above.
The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A degenerative spinal disease that can involve any part of the VERTEBRA, the INTERVERTEBRAL DISK, and the surrounding soft tissue.
Replacement for a knee joint.
'Spinal diseases' is a broad term referring to various medical conditions that affect the structural integrity, function, or health of the spinal column, including degenerative disorders, infections, inflammatory processes, traumatic injuries, neoplasms, and congenital abnormalities.

Ankle arthrodesis using an anterior AO T plate. (1/277)

We describe a surgical technique for ankle arthrodesis using an anterior approach to the ankle and internal fixation with an anteriorly-placed AO T plate. A total of 33 patients who had ankle arthrodeses have been followed retrospectively. Thirty-one (94%) of the ankles fused although two patients developed tibial stress fractures. Four patients had a superficial infection which did not prevent union. The surgical technique is simple, easily reproducible and gives excellent clinical results with a high rate of union.  (+info)

The orthopaedic aspects of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. (2/277)

Five cases of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) were treated from 1985-1996 at the Orthopaedics and Trauma Department of SSK Izmir Educational Hospital. Four patients were female and one was male. The pedigrees of the first two female patients had the same features of inter-related marriages. The patients have been followed up for 5.5-11 years (average of 7.5 years). Surgical operations were mostly required in the lower limbs. Problems in the hips required adductor myotomy, the Soutter procedure, total hip replacement, and pertrochanteric extension osteotomy. Management of the knees required supracondylar shortening and extension osteotomy of the femur, high tibial extension osteotomy, debridement of the knee joint with removal of osteophytes, ogleotomy of the patellar lengthening of the knee flexors and posterior capsulotomy. Interphalangeal arthrodesis for hammer toes, extension osteotomy of the head of the first metatarsals, and Kellers operation were carried out in the foot. In the upper limb decompression and anterior transposition of the ulnar nerve, debridement of the elbow joint, extension and valgus osteotomy of the distal radius, and extension osteotomy of the head of the first metacarpal were required.  (+info)

In vivo and in vitro CT analysis of the occiput. (3/277)

Arguments concerning the best procedure for occipito-cervical fusion have rarely been based upon occipital bone thickness or only based on in vitro studies. To close this gap and to offer an outlook on preoperative evaluation of the patient, 28 patients were analysed in vivo by means of spiral CT. Ten macerated human skulls were measured by means of CT and directly. Measurements were taken according to a matrix of 66 points following a grid with 1 cm spacing based upon McRae's line. Maximum thickness in the patient group was met 4 cm above the reference plane in the median slice (11.87 mm; SD 3.41 mm) and 5 cm above it in the skull group (15.85 mm; SD 1.81 mm). Correlation between CT and direct measurements was good (91.79%). Intra-individual discrepancies from one side to the respective point on the other side are common (difference > 1 mm in 60%). Judging areas suitable for operative fixation using the 10% percentile value (6.68 mm for the maximum value of 11.87 mm) led to the conclusion that screws should only be inserted along the occipital crest in an area extending from 1.5 cm above the posterior margin of the foramen magnum to the external occipital protuberance (EOP). At the level of the EOP screws may also be inserted up to 1 cm lateral of the midline. A reduction of screw length to 7 mm (9 mm for the EOP) is proposed. Preoperative evaluation of the patient should be carried out by spiral CT with 1 mm slicing and sagittal reconstructions.  (+info)

Spondyloptosis and multiple-level spondylolysis. (4/277)

An unusual case of a combination of multiple bilateral spondylolyses (L2, 3 and 4), spondylolisthesis at L3/4, spondyloptosis at L4/5 and sacralization of L5 in a teenage female is described. The patient had severely increasing lower back pain radiating to the left lower limb. Radiography identified the abnormalities and myelography revealed complete obstruction and compression of the thecal sac at the L4/5 level. The case was treated surgically by posterior decompression, corpectomy and fusion in a three-stage operation. The follow-up was extended to 2 years with no complications. No similar case has previously been reported.  (+info)

The 'MW' sacropelvic construct: an enhanced fixation of the lumbosacral junction in neuromuscular pelvic obliquity. (5/277)

Fixation to the lumbosacral spine to correct pelvic obliquity in neuromuscular scoliosis has always remained a surgical challenge. The strongest fixation of the lumbosacral junction has been achieved with either a Galveston technique with rods or screws or with iliosacral screws. We have devised a new fixation system, in which iliosacral screws are combined with iliac screws. This is made possible by using the AO Universal Spine System with side opening hooks above and below the iliosacral screws and iliac screws below it. The whole sacropelvis is thus encompassed by a maximum width (MW) fixation, which gives an 'M' appearance on the pelvic radiographs and a 'W' appearance in the axial plane. We report on our surgical technique and the early results where such a technique was used. We feel that this new means of fixation (by combining the strongest fixation systems) is extremely solid and should be included in the wide armamentarium of sacropelvic fixation.  (+info)

Vertical atlantoaxial dislocation. (6/277)

An unusual case of vertical atlantoaxial dislocation without medulla oblongata or spinal cord injury is reported. The pathogenic process suggested occipito-axial dislocation. The case was treated surgically with excellent results on mobility and pain.  (+info)

Subtalar arthrodesis with correction of deformity after fractures of the os calcis. (7/277)

We have reviewed the long-term results of 22 patients (23 fusions) with fractures of the os calcis, who had subtalar arthrodesis with correction of the deformity between 1975 and 1991. The mean follow-up was nine years (5 to 20). All patients were evaluated according to a modified foot score. A radiological assessment was used in which linear and angular variables were measured including the fibulocalcaneal abutment, the height of the heel and fat pad, the angle of the arch and the lateral talocalcaneal and the lateral talar declination angles. The technique used restores the normal relationship between the hindfoot and midfoot and corrects the height of the heel. This leads to better biomechanical balance of the neighbouring joints and gives a favourable clinical outcome. The modified foot score showed a good or excellent result in 51% of the feet. Residual complaints were mostly due to problems with the soft tissues. Subjectively, an excellent or good score was achieved in 78% of the cases. After statistical analysis, except for the height of the heel and the degenerative changes in the calcaneocuboid joint, no significant difference was found in the measured variables between the operated and the contralateral side.  (+info)

A population study in the Province of Ontario of the complications after conversion of hip or knee arthrodesis to total joint replacement. (8/277)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the complication rates after conversion of hip and knee fusions to total joint replacements in the Province of Ontario. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study. PATIENTS: Those who had undergone an elective conversion of a hip or knee fusion to a total joint replacement during fiscal year 1993 through 1996, as captured in the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Ontario Health Insurance Plan databases. OUTCOME MEASURES: Inhospital complications and length of initial hospital stay, revision, infection, amputation and repeat fusion rates within 4 years. RESULTS: Conversion of hip and knee fusion to total joint arthroplasty was generally performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume hospital settings. Forty hip and 18 knee replacements involved conversion of a previous fusion. Conversion of a hip fusion was associated with a 10% infection rate, a 10% revision rate and a 5% resection arthroplasty rate due to infection within 4 years of the conversion. Conversion of a knee fusion was associated with an 11% infection rate, and a more than 5% revision rate at 4 years. Over 16% of patients who underwent conversion of a knee fusion required removal of the components (for various reasons) within the first 4 years. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high rate of complications after conversion of a hip or knee fusion to a total joint arthroplasty. These issues must be carefully considered and discussed with the patient before any conversion procedure.  (+info)

Arthrodesis is a surgical procedure to fuse together the bones of a joint, in order to restrict its movement and provide stability. This procedure is typically performed when a joint has been severely damaged by injury, arthritis, or other conditions, and non-surgical treatments have failed to relieve symptoms such as pain and instability.

During the surgery, the cartilage that normally cushions the ends of the bones is removed, and the bones are realigned and held in place with hardware such as plates, screws, or rods. Over time, the bones grow together, forming a solid fusion that restricts joint motion.

Arthrodesis can be performed on various joints throughout the body, including the spine, wrist, ankle, and knee. While this procedure can provide significant pain relief and improve function, it does limit the range of motion in the fused joint, which may impact mobility and daily activities. Therefore, arthrodesis is typically considered a last resort when other treatments have failed.

Acquired foot deformities refer to structural abnormalities of the foot that develop after birth, as opposed to congenital foot deformities which are present at birth. These deformities can result from various factors such as trauma, injury, infection, neurological conditions, or complications from a medical condition like diabetes or arthritis.

Examples of acquired foot deformities include:

1. Hammertoe - A deformity where the toe bends downward at the middle joint, resembling a hammer.
2. Claw toe - A more severe form of hammertoe where the toe also curls under, forming a claw-like shape.
3. Mallet toe - A condition where the end joint of a toe is bent downward, causing it to resemble a mallet.
4. Bunions - A bony bump that forms on the inside of the foot at the big toe joint, often causing pain and difficulty wearing shoes.
5. Tailor's bunion (bunionette) - A similar condition to a bunion, but it occurs on the outside of the foot near the little toe joint.
6. Charcot foot - A severe deformity that can occur in people with diabetes or other neurological conditions, characterized by the collapse and dislocation of joints in the foot.
7. Cavus foot - A condition where the arch of the foot is excessively high, causing instability and increasing the risk of ankle injuries.
8. Flatfoot (pes planus) - A deformity where the arch of the foot collapses, leading to pain and difficulty walking.
9. Pronation deformities - Abnormal rotation or tilting of the foot, often causing instability and increasing the risk of injury.

Treatment for acquired foot deformities varies depending on the severity and underlying cause but may include orthotics, physical therapy, medication, or surgery.

The tarsal joints are a series of articulations in the foot that involve the bones of the hindfoot and midfoot. There are three main tarsal joints:

1. Talocrural joint (also known as the ankle joint): This is the joint between the talus bone of the lower leg and the tibia and fibula bones of the lower leg, as well as the calcaneus bone of the foot. It allows for dorsiflexion and plantarflexion movements of the foot.
2. Subtalar joint: This is the joint between the talus bone and the calcaneus bone. It allows for inversion and eversion movements of the foot.
3. Tarsometatarsal joints (also known as the Lisfranc joint): These are the joints between the tarsal bones of the midfoot and the metatarsal bones of the forefoot. They allow for flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction movements of the foot.

These joints play an important role in the stability and mobility of the foot, allowing for various movements during activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

The subtalar joint is a joint in the foot that is located between the talus and calcaneus (heel) bones. It is called a "joint" because it allows for movement, specifically inversion and eversion, which are the movements that allow the foot to roll inward or outward. The subtalar joint plays an essential role in the biomechanics of the foot and ankle, helping to absorb shock during walking and running, and contributing to the stability of the foot during standing and walking. Issues with the subtalar joint can lead to various foot and ankle problems, such as flatfoot or chronic ankle instability.

The ankle joint, also known as the talocrural joint, is the articulation between the bones of the lower leg (tibia and fibula) and the talus bone in the foot. It is a synovial hinge joint that allows for dorsiflexion and plantarflexion movements, which are essential for walking, running, and jumping. The ankle joint is reinforced by strong ligaments on both sides to provide stability during these movements.

The metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint is the joint in the foot where the metatarsal bones of the foot (the long bones behind the toes) connect with the proximal phalanges of the toes. It's a synovial joint, which means it's surrounded by a capsule containing synovial fluid to allow for smooth movement. The MTP joint is responsible for allowing the flexion and extension movements of the toes, and is important for maintaining balance and pushing off during walking and running. Issues with the MTP joint can lead to conditions such as hallux valgus (bunions) or hammertoe.

Ankle arthroplasty, also known as ankle replacement surgery, is a surgical procedure in which the damaged or degenerated joint surfaces of the ankle are removed and replaced with artificial components. The goal of this procedure is to relieve pain, restore range of motion, and improve function in patients with severe end-stage arthritis of the ankle joint.

During the surgery, the surgeon makes an incision over the front or side of the ankle to access the damaged joint. The ends of the tibia and talus bones are then prepared by removing any remaining cartilage and a small amount of bone. The artificial components, which typically consist of metal and plastic parts, are then positioned and fixed in place with cement or screws.

After the surgery, patients will need to undergo physical therapy to help regain strength, range of motion, and mobility in the ankle. It is important to follow the surgeon's instructions carefully during the recovery period to ensure proper healing and optimal outcomes.

Ankle arthroplasty is usually recommended for patients who have tried other treatments, such as pain medication, physical therapy, or bracing, but have not found relief from their symptoms. It is typically reserved for older adults with low functional demands, as younger, more active patients may be better suited for ankle fusion surgery, which provides greater stability and durability over time.

The talus is a bone in the foot that articulates with the tibia and fibula to form the ankle joint, also known as the talocrural joint. It is unique because it doesn't have any muscle attachments and gets its blood supply from surrounding vessels. Its main function is to transfer weight and force during movement from the lower leg to the foot.

The calcaneus is the largest tarsal bone in the human foot, and it is commonly known as the heel bone. It articulates with the cuboid bone anteriorly, the talus bone superiorly, and several tendons and ligaments that help to form the posterior portion of the foot's skeletal structure. The calcaneus plays a crucial role in weight-bearing and movement, as it forms the lower part of the leg's ankle joint and helps to absorb shock during walking or running.

Hallux rigidus is a degenerative arthritis condition that affects the joint at the base of the big toe, also known as the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint. This condition is characterized by stiffness and limited motion in the big toe joint, leading to difficulty with walking and pushing off during the gait cycle.

The degenerative changes in the joint can cause bone spurs, or osteophytes, to form on the top of the joint, which can further limit motion and cause pain. The condition may also result in decreased shock absorption and increased stress on other parts of the foot, potentially leading to additional foot problems.

Hallux rigidus is typically caused by wear and tear on the joint over time, although it can also be associated with trauma or injury to the big toe joint. Treatment options for hallux rigidus may include pain relief medications, physical therapy, shoe modifications, orthotics, or in severe cases, surgery.

The tarsal bones are a group of seven articulating bones in the foot that make up the posterior portion of the foot, located between the talus bone of the leg and the metatarsal bones of the forefoot. They play a crucial role in supporting the body's weight and facilitating movement.

There are three categories of tarsal bones:

1. Proximal row: This includes the talus, calcaneus (heel bone), and navicular bones. The talus articulates with the tibia and fibula to form the ankle joint, while the calcaneus is the largest tarsal bone and forms the heel. The navicular bone is located between the talus and the cuneiform bones.

2. Intermediate row: This includes the cuboid bone, which is located laterally (on the outside) to the navicular bone and articulates with the calcaneus, fourth and fifth metatarsals, and the cuneiform bones.

3. Distal row: This includes three cuneiform bones - the medial, intermediate, and lateral cuneiforms - which are located between the navicular bone proximally and the first, second, and third metatarsal bones distally. The medial cuneiform is the largest of the three and articulates with the navicular bone, first metatarsal, and the intermediate cuneiform. The intermediate cuneiform articulates with the medial and lateral cuneiforms and the second metatarsal. The lateral cuneiform articulates with the intermediate cuneiform, cuboid, and fourth metatarsal.

Together, these bones form a complex network of joints that allow for movement and stability in the foot. Injuries or disorders affecting the tarsal bones can result in pain, stiffness, and difficulty walking.

Foot deformities refer to abnormal changes in the structure and/or alignment of the bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, or tendons in the foot, leading to a deviation from the normal shape and function of the foot. These deformities can occur in various parts of the foot, such as the toes, arch, heel, or ankle, and can result in pain, difficulty walking, and reduced mobility. Some common examples of foot deformities include:

1. Hammertoes: A deformity where the toe bends downward at the middle joint, resembling a hammer.
2. Mallet toes: A condition where the end joint of the toe is bent downward, creating a mallet-like shape.
3. Claw toes: A combination of both hammertoes and mallet toes, causing all three joints in the toe to bend abnormally.
4. Bunions: A bony bump that forms on the inside of the foot at the base of the big toe, caused by the misalignment of the big toe joint.
5. Tailor's bunion (bunionette): A similar condition to a bunion but occurring on the outside of the foot, at the base of the little toe.
6. Flat feet (pes planus): A condition where the arch of the foot collapses, causing the entire sole of the foot to come into contact with the ground when standing or walking.
7. High arches (pes cavus): An excessively high arch that doesn't provide enough shock absorption and can lead to pain and instability.
8. Cavus foot: A condition characterized by a very high arch and tight heel cord, often leading to an imbalance in the foot structure and increased risk of ankle injuries.
9. Haglund's deformity: A bony enlargement on the back of the heel, which can cause pain and irritation when wearing shoes.
10. Charcot foot: A severe deformity that occurs due to nerve damage in the foot, leading to weakened bones, joint dislocations, and foot collapse.

Foot deformities can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired (develop later in life) due to various factors such as injury, illness, poor footwear, or abnormal biomechanics. Proper diagnosis, treatment, and management are essential for maintaining foot health and preventing further complications.

Neurogenic arthropathy is a joint disease that occurs as a result of nerve damage or dysfunction. Also known as Charcot joint, this condition is characterized by joint destruction and deformity due to the loss of sensation and proprioception, which normally help protect the joint from excessive stress and injury.

Neurogenic arthropathy often affects people with diabetes, syphilis, leprosy, spinal cord injuries, or other conditions that damage nerves. The damage impairs the ability to feel pain, temperature, and position, making it difficult for individuals to notice or respond to joint injuries. Over time, this can lead to joint degeneration, fractures, dislocations, and severe deformities if left untreated.

Treatment typically involves managing the underlying nerve condition, immobilizing the affected joint with a brace or cast, and in some cases, surgical intervention to repair or replace damaged joints. Regular exercise, physical therapy, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle can also help manage symptoms and prevent further complications.

The wrist joint, also known as the radiocarpal joint, is a condyloid joint that connects the distal end of the radius bone in the forearm to the proximal row of carpal bones in the hand (scaphoid, lunate, and triquetral bones). It allows for flexion, extension, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation movements of the hand. The wrist joint is surrounded by a capsule and reinforced by several ligaments that provide stability and strength to the joint.

Medical professionals define "flatfoot" or "pes planus" as a postural deformity in which the arch of the foot collapses, leading to the entire sole of the foot coming into complete or near-complete contact with the ground. This condition can be classified as flexible (the arch reappears when the foot is not bearing weight) or rigid (the arch does not reappear). Flatfoot can result from various factors such as genetics, injury, aging, or certain medical conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and cerebral palsy. In some cases, flatfoot may not cause any symptoms or problems; however, in other instances, it can lead to pain, discomfort, or difficulty walking. Treatment options for flatfoot depend on the severity of the condition and associated symptoms and may include physical therapy, orthotics, bracing, or surgery.

The fibula is a slender bone located in the lower leg of humans and other vertebrates. It runs parallel to the larger and more robust tibia, and together they are known as the bones of the leg or the anterior tibial segment. The fibula is the lateral bone in the leg, positioned on the outside of the tibia.

In humans, the fibula extends from the knee joint proximally to the ankle joint distally. Its proximal end, called the head of the fibula, articulates with the lateral condyle of the tibia and forms part of the inferior aspect of the knee joint. The narrowed portion below the head is known as the neck of the fibula.

The shaft of the fibula, also called the body of the fibula, is a long, thin structure that descends from the neck and serves primarily for muscle attachment rather than weight-bearing functions. The distal end of the fibula widens to form the lateral malleolus, which is an important bony landmark in the ankle region. The lateral malleolus articulates with the talus bone of the foot and forms part of the ankle joint.

The primary functions of the fibula include providing attachment sites for muscles that act on the lower leg, ankle, and foot, as well as contributing to the stability of the ankle joint through its articulation with the talus bone. Fractures of the fibula can occur due to various injuries, such as twisting or rotational forces applied to the ankle or direct trauma to the lateral aspect of the lower leg.

An external fixator is a type of orthopedic device used in the treatment of severe fractures or deformities of bones. It consists of an external frame that is attached to the bone with pins or wires that pass through the skin and into the bone. This provides stability to the injured area while allowing for alignment and adjustment of the bone during the healing process.

External fixators are typically used in cases where traditional casting or internal fixation methods are not feasible, such as when there is extensive soft tissue damage, infection, or when a limb needs to be gradually stretched or shortened. They can also be used in reconstructive surgery for bone defects or deformities.

The external frame of the fixator is made up of bars and clamps that are adjustable, allowing for precise positioning and alignment of the bones. The pins or wires that attach to the bone are carefully inserted through small incisions in the skin, and are held in place by the clamps on the frame.

External fixators can be used for a period of several weeks to several months, depending on the severity of the injury and the individual's healing process. During this time, the patient may require regular adjustments and monitoring by an orthopedic surgeon or other medical professional. Once the bone has healed sufficiently, the external fixator can be removed in a follow-up procedure.

I believe you are referring to "bone pins" or "bone nails" rather than "bone nails." These terms are used in the medical field to describe surgical implants made of metal or biocompatible materials that are used to stabilize and hold together fractured bones during the healing process. They can also be used in spinal fusion surgery to provide stability and promote bone growth between vertebrae.

Bone pins or nails typically have a threaded or smooth shaft, with a small diameter that allows them to be inserted into the medullary canal of long bones such as the femur or tibia. They may also have a head or eyelet on one end that allows for attachment to external fixation devices or other surgical instruments.

The use of bone pins and nails has revolutionized orthopedic surgery, allowing for faster healing times, improved stability, and better functional outcomes for patients with fractures or spinal deformities.

Hallux Valgus is a medical condition that affects the foot, specifically the big toe joint. It is characterized by the deviation of the big toe (hallux) towards the second toe, resulting in a prominent bump on the inner side of the foot at the base of the big toe. This bump is actually the metatarsal head of the first bone in the foot that becomes exposed due to the angulation.

The deformity can lead to pain, stiffness, and difficulty wearing shoes. In severe cases, it can also cause secondary arthritis in the joint. Hallux Valgus is more common in women than men and can be caused by genetic factors, foot shape, or ill-fitting shoes that put pressure on the big toe joint.

Spinal fusion is a surgical procedure where two or more vertebrae in the spine are fused together to create a solid bone. The purpose of this procedure is to restrict movement between the fused vertebrae, which can help reduce pain and stabilize the spine. This is typically done using bone grafts or bone graft substitutes, along with hardware such as rods, screws, or cages to hold the vertebrae in place while they heal together. The procedure may be recommended for various spinal conditions, including degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, scoliosis, or fractures.

The lunate bone is a carpal bone located in the wrist, more specifically in the proximal row of carpals. It is shaped like a crescent moon, hence the name "lunate" which is derived from the Latin word "luna" meaning moon. The lunate bone articulates with the radius bone in the forearm and forms part of the wrist joint. It also articulates with the triquetral bone proximally, and the scaphoid and capitate bones distally. The blood supply to the lunate bone is mainly derived from the dorsal carpal branch of the radial artery, making it susceptible to avascular necrosis (Kienböck's disease) in case of trauma or reduced blood flow.

Bone screws are medical devices used in orthopedic and trauma surgery to affix bone fracture fragments or to attach bones to other bones or to metal implants such as plates, rods, or artificial joints. They are typically made of stainless steel or titanium alloys and have a threaded shaft that allows for purchase in the bone when tightened. The head of the screw may have a hexagonal or star-shaped design to allow for precise tightening with a screwdriver. Bone screws come in various shapes, sizes, and designs, including fully threaded, partially threaded, cannulated (hollow), and headless types, depending on their intended use and location in the body.

A toe joint, also known as a metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint, is the articulation between the bones in the foot (metatarsals) and the bones in the toes (phalanges). There are five MTP joints in each foot, one for each toe except for the big toe, which has its own separate joint called the first metatarsophalangeal joint.

The MTP joints allow for movement and flexibility of the toes, enabling activities such as walking, running, and standing. Problems with these joints can lead to pain, stiffness, and difficulty moving, making it important to maintain their health and mobility through proper foot care and exercise.

Bone transplantation, also known as bone grafting, is a surgical procedure in which bone or bone-like material is transferred from one part of the body to another or from one person to another. The graft may be composed of cortical (hard outer portion) bone, cancellous (spongy inner portion) bone, or a combination of both. It can be taken from different sites in the same individual (autograft), from another individual of the same species (allograft), or from an animal source (xenograft). The purpose of bone transplantation is to replace missing bone, provide structural support, and stimulate new bone growth. This procedure is commonly used in orthopedic, dental, and maxillofacial surgeries to repair bone defects caused by trauma, tumors, or congenital conditions.

Arthroplasty is a surgical procedure to restore the integrity and function of a joint. The term is derived from two Greek words: "arthro" meaning joint, and "plasty" meaning to mold or form. There are several types of arthroplasty, but most involve resurfacing the damaged joint cartilage with artificial materials such as metal, plastic, or ceramic.

The goal of arthroplasty is to relieve pain, improve mobility, and restore function in a joint that has been damaged by arthritis, injury, or other conditions. The most common types of arthroplasty are total joint replacement (TJR) and partial joint replacement (PJR).

In TJR, the surgeon removes the damaged ends of the bones in the joint and replaces them with artificial components called prostheses. These prostheses can be made of metal, plastic, or ceramic materials, and are designed to mimic the natural movement and function of the joint.

In PJR, only one side of the joint is resurfaced, typically because the damage is less extensive. This procedure is less invasive than TJR and may be recommended for younger patients who are still active or have a higher risk of complications from a full joint replacement.

Other types of arthroplasty include osteotomy, in which the surgeon cuts and reshapes the bone to realign the joint; arthrodesis, in which the surgeon fuses two bones together to create a stable joint; and resurfacing, in which the damaged cartilage is removed and replaced with a smooth, artificial surface.

Arthroplasty is typically recommended for patients who have tried other treatments, such as physical therapy, medication, or injections, but have not found relief from their symptoms. While arthroplasty can be highly effective in relieving pain and improving mobility, it is not without risks, including infection, blood clots, and implant failure. Patients should discuss the benefits and risks of arthroplasty with their healthcare provider to determine if it is the right treatment option for them.

The Atlanto-Occipital Joint, also known as the AO joint or the craniocervical joint, is the articulation between the occiput (the base of the skull) and the atlas (the first cervical vertebra). This joint allows for movements such as nodding your head "yes" and tilting your head from side to side. It is a crucial joint in maintaining the alignment and stability of the head and neck.

Articular Range of Motion (AROM) is a term used in physiotherapy and orthopedics to describe the amount of movement available in a joint, measured in degrees of a circle. It refers to the range through which synovial joints can actively move without causing pain or injury. AROM is assessed by measuring the degree of motion achieved by active muscle contraction, as opposed to passive range of motion (PROM), where the movement is generated by an external force.

Assessment of AROM is important in evaluating a patient's functional ability and progress, planning treatment interventions, and determining return to normal activities or sports participation. It is also used to identify any restrictions in joint mobility that may be due to injury, disease, or surgery, and to monitor the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs.

Bone plates are medical devices used in orthopedic surgery to stabilize and hold together fractured or broken bones during the healing process. They are typically made of surgical-grade stainless steel, titanium, or other biocompatible materials. The plate is shaped to fit the contour of the bone and is held in place with screws that are inserted through the plate and into the bone on either side of the fracture. This provides stability and alignment to the broken bones, allowing them to heal properly. Bone plates can be used to treat a variety of fractures, including those that are complex or unstable. After healing is complete, the bone plate may be left in place or removed, depending on the individual's needs and the surgeon's recommendation.

A joint prosthesis, also known as an artificial joint or a replacement joint, is a surgical implant used to replace all or part of a damaged or diseased joint. The most common types of joint prostheses are total hip replacements and total knee replacements. These prostheses typically consist of a combination of metal, plastic, and ceramic components that are designed to replicate the movement and function of a natural joint.

Joint prostheses are usually recommended for patients who have severe joint pain or mobility issues that cannot be adequately managed with other treatments such as physical therapy, medication, or lifestyle changes. The goal of joint replacement surgery is to relieve pain, improve joint function, and enhance the patient's quality of life.

Joint prostheses are typically made from materials such as titanium, cobalt-chrome alloys, stainless steel, polyethylene plastic, and ceramics. The choice of material depends on a variety of factors, including the patient's age, activity level, weight, and overall health.

While joint replacement surgery is generally safe and effective, there are risks associated with any surgical procedure, including infection, blood clots, implant loosening or failure, and nerve damage. Patients who undergo joint replacement surgery typically require several weeks of rehabilitation and physical therapy to regain strength and mobility in the affected joint.

Arthroplasty, replacement, is a surgical procedure where a damaged or diseased joint surface is removed and replaced with an artificial implant or device. The goal of this surgery is to relieve pain, restore function, and improve the quality of life for patients who have severe joint damage due to arthritis or other conditions.

During the procedure, the surgeon removes the damaged cartilage and bone from the joint and replaces them with a metal, plastic, or ceramic component that replicates the shape and function of the natural joint surface. The most common types of joint replacement surgery are hip replacement, knee replacement, and shoulder replacement.

The success rate of joint replacement surgery is generally high, with many patients experiencing significant pain relief and improved mobility. However, as with any surgical procedure, there are risks involved, including infection, blood clots, implant loosening or failure, and nerve damage. Therefore, it's essential to discuss the potential benefits and risks of joint replacement surgery with a healthcare provider before making a decision.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a type of joint disease that is characterized by the breakdown and eventual loss of cartilage - the tissue that cushions the ends of bones where they meet in the joints. This breakdown can cause the bones to rub against each other, causing pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility. OA can occur in any joint, but it most commonly affects the hands, knees, hips, and spine. It is often associated with aging and can be caused or worsened by obesity, injury, or overuse.

The medical definition of osteoarthritis is: "a degenerative, non-inflammatory joint disease characterized by the loss of articular cartilage, bone remodeling, and the formation of osteophytes (bone spurs). It is often associated with pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion in the affected joint."

Infectious arthritis, also known as septic arthritis, is a type of joint inflammation that is caused by a bacterial or fungal infection. The infection can enter the joint through the bloodstream or directly into the synovial fluid of the joint, often as a result of a traumatic injury, surgery, or an underlying condition such as diabetes or a weakened immune system.

The most common symptoms of infectious arthritis include sudden onset of severe pain and swelling in the affected joint, fever, chills, and difficulty moving the joint. If left untreated, infectious arthritis can lead to serious complications such as joint damage or destruction, sepsis, and even death. Treatment typically involves antibiotics or antifungal medications to eliminate the infection, along with rest, immobilization, and sometimes surgery to drain the infected synovial fluid.

It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you experience symptoms of infectious arthritis, as early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent long-term complications and improve outcomes.

Ankle injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur in the ankle joint and its surrounding structures, including bones, ligaments, tendons, and muscles. The ankle joint is a complex structure composed of three bones: the tibia (shinbone), fibula (lower leg bone), and talus (a bone in the foot). These bones are held together by various strong ligaments that provide stability and enable proper movement.

There are several types of ankle injuries, with the most common being sprains, strains, and fractures:

1. Ankle Sprain: A sprain occurs when the ligaments surrounding the ankle joint get stretched or torn due to sudden twisting, rolling, or forced movements. The severity of a sprain can range from mild (grade 1) to severe (grade 3), with partial or complete tearing of the ligament(s).
2. Ankle Strain: A strain is an injury to the muscles or tendons surrounding the ankle joint, often caused by overuse, excessive force, or awkward positioning. This results in pain, swelling, and difficulty moving the ankle.
3. Ankle Fracture: A fracture occurs when one or more bones in the ankle joint break due to high-impact trauma, such as a fall, sports injury, or vehicle accident. Fractures can vary in severity, from small cracks to complete breaks that may require surgery and immobilization for proper healing.

Symptoms of ankle injuries typically include pain, swelling, bruising, tenderness, and difficulty walking or bearing weight on the affected ankle. Immediate medical attention is necessary for severe injuries, such as fractures, dislocations, or significant ligament tears, to ensure appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Treatment options may include rest, ice, compression, elevation (RICE), immobilization with a brace or cast, physical therapy, medication, or surgery, depending on the type and severity of the injury.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

The forefoot is the front part of the human foot that contains the toes and the associated bones, muscles, ligaments, and tendons. It is made up of five long bones called metatarsals and fourteen phalanges, which are the bones in the toes. The forefoot plays a crucial role in weight-bearing, balance, and propulsion during walking and running. The joints in the forefoot allow for flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction of the toes, enabling us to maintain our footing on various surfaces and adapt to different terrain.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Internal fixators are medical devices that are implanted into the body through surgery to stabilize and hold broken or fractured bones in the correct position while they heal. These devices can be made from various materials, such as metal (stainless steel or titanium) or bioabsorbable materials. Internal fixators can take many forms, including plates, screws, rods, nails, wires, or cages, depending on the type and location of the fracture.

The main goal of using internal fixators is to promote bone healing by maintaining accurate reduction and alignment of the fractured bones, allowing for early mobilization and rehabilitation. This can help reduce the risk of complications such as malunion, nonunion, or deformity. Internal fixators are typically removed once the bone has healed, although some bioabsorbable devices may not require a second surgery for removal.

It is important to note that while internal fixators provide stability and support for fractured bones, they do not replace the need for proper immobilization, protection, or rehabilitation during the healing process. Close follow-up with an orthopedic surgeon is essential to ensure appropriate healing and address any potential complications.

A dislocation is a condition in which a bone slips out of its normal position in a joint. This can happen as a result of trauma or injury, such as a fall or direct blow to the body. Dislocations can cause pain, swelling, and limited mobility in the affected area. In some cases, a dislocation may also damage surrounding tissues, such as ligaments, tendons, and nerves.

Dislocations are typically treated by reducing the dislocation, which means putting the bone back into its normal position. This is usually done with the help of medication to relieve pain and relaxation techniques to help the person stay still during the reduction. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair damaged tissues or if the dislocation cannot be reduced through other methods. After the dislocation has been reduced, the joint may be immobilized with a splint or sling to allow it to heal properly.

It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect that you have a dislocation. If left untreated, a dislocation can lead to further complications, such as joint instability and chronic pain.

The metacarpal bones are the long slender bones that make up the middle part of the hand, located between the carpals (wrist bones) and the phalanges (finger bones). There are five metacarpal bones in total, with one for each finger and thumb. Each bone has a base attached to the carpals, a shaft, and a head that connects to the phalanges. The metacarpal bones play a crucial role in hand function, providing stability and support during gripping and manipulation movements.

The Ilizarov technique is a surgical method used for limb lengthening and reconstruction. It involves the use of an external fixation device, which consists of rings connected by adjustable rods and wires that are attached to the bone. This apparatus allows for gradual distraction (slow, steady stretching) of the bone, allowing new bone tissue to grow in the gap created by the distraction. The Ilizarov technique can be used to treat various conditions such as limb length discrepancies, bone deformities, and nonunions (failed healing of a fracture). It is named after its developer, Gavriil Abramovich Ilizarov, a Soviet orthopedic surgeon.

The trapezium bone is a carpal bone located in the wrist, more specifically in the proximal row of carpals. It is situated at the radial side (thumb side) of the wrist and articulates with the Scaphoid bone proximally, the First Metacarpal bone distally, and the Trapezoid and Capitate bones laterally. Its unique shape resembles that of a trapezoid, hence its name. The trapezium plays a crucial role in wrist movements, particularly in thumb abduction and opposition.

A reoperation is a surgical procedure that is performed again on a patient who has already undergone a previous operation for the same or related condition. Reoperations may be required due to various reasons, such as inadequate initial treatment, disease recurrence, infection, or complications from the first surgery. The nature and complexity of a reoperation can vary widely depending on the specific circumstances, but it often carries higher risks and potential complications compared to the original operation.

The atlanto-axial joint is the joint between the first and second cervical vertebrae, also known as C1 (atlas) and C2 (axis). It consists of two separate joints: the median atlanto-axial joint, which is a pivot joint that allows for rotation of the head, and the paired lateral atlanto-axial joints, which are plane joints that allow for limited gliding movements.

The atlanto-axial joint is surrounded by several ligaments that provide stability and limit excessive movement. The transverse ligament, located on the anterior aspect of the joint, is particularly important as it prevents excessive movement of the atlas on the axis and helps to protect the spinal cord.

Abnormalities or injuries to the atlanto-axial joint can result in instability and potentially serious neurological complications.

Equinus deformity is a condition in which the ankle remains in a permanently plantarflexed position, meaning that the toes are pointing downward. This limitation in motion can occur in one or both feet and can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired. Acquired equinus deformity can result from conditions such as cerebral palsy, stroke, trauma, or prolonged immobilization. The limited range of motion in the ankle can cause difficulty walking, pain, and abnormalities in gait. Treatment options for equinus deformity may include physical therapy, bracing, orthotic devices, or surgery.

The cervical vertebrae are the seven vertebrae that make up the upper part of the spine, also known as the neck region. They are labeled C1 to C7, with C1 being closest to the skull and C7 connecting to the thoracic vertebrae in the chest region. The cervical vertebrae have unique structures to allow for a wide range of motion in the neck while also protecting the spinal cord and providing attachment points for muscles and ligaments.

"Recovery of function" is a term used in medical rehabilitation to describe the process in which an individual regains the ability to perform activities or tasks that were previously difficult or impossible due to injury, illness, or disability. This can involve both physical and cognitive functions. The goal of recovery of function is to help the person return to their prior level of independence and participation in daily activities, work, and social roles as much as possible.

Recovery of function may be achieved through various interventions such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language therapy, and other rehabilitation strategies. The specific approach used will depend on the individual's needs and the nature of their impairment. Recovery of function can occur spontaneously as the body heals, or it may require targeted interventions to help facilitate the process.

It is important to note that recovery of function does not always mean a full return to pre-injury or pre-illness levels of ability. Instead, it often refers to the person's ability to adapt and compensate for any remaining impairments, allowing them to achieve their maximum level of functional independence and quality of life.

Pseudarthrosis is a medical term that refers to a false joint or a nonunion of bones, meaning that the broken bone ends do not heal properly and continue to move at the fracture site. This condition can cause pain, instability, and deformity in the affected limb. It may require additional treatment such as surgery to promote bone healing and stabilization.

"Foot joints" is a general term that refers to the various articulations or connections between the bones in the foot. There are several joints in the foot, including:

1. The ankle joint (tibiotalar joint): This is the joint between the tibia and fibula bones of the lower leg and the talus bone of the foot.
2. The subtalar joint (talocalcaneal joint): This is the joint between the talus bone and the calcaneus (heel) bone.
3. The calcaneocuboid joint: This is the joint between the calcaneus bone and the cuboid bone, which is one of the bones in the midfoot.
4. The tarsometatarsal joints (Lisfranc joint): These are the joints that connect the tarsal bones in the midfoot to the metatarsal bones in the forefoot.
5. The metatarsophalangeal joints: These are the joints between the metatarsal bones and the phalanges (toes) in the forefoot.
6. The interphalangeal joints: These are the joints between the phalanges within each toe.

Each of these foot joints plays a specific role in supporting the foot, absorbing shock, and allowing for movement and flexibility during walking and other activities.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

The carpus is the region of the forelimb in animals that corresponds to the wrist in humans. It is located between the radius and ulna bones of the forearm and the metacarpal bones of the paw. The carpus is made up of several small bones called carpals, which provide flexibility and support for movement of the limb. The number and arrangement of these bones can vary among different animal species.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Carpal bones are the eight small bones that make up the wrist joint in humans and other primates. These bones are arranged in two rows, with four bones in each row. The proximal row includes the scaphoid, lunate, triquetral, and pisiform bones, while the distal row includes the trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and hamate bones.

The carpal bones play an essential role in the function of the wrist joint by providing stability, support, and mobility. They allow for a wide range of movements, including flexion, extension, radial deviation, ulnar deviation, and circumduction. The complex structure of the carpal bones also helps to absorb shock and distribute forces evenly across the wrist during activities such as gripping or lifting objects.

Injuries to the carpal bones, such as fractures or dislocations, can be painful and may require medical treatment to ensure proper healing and prevent long-term complications. Additionally, degenerative conditions such as arthritis can affect the carpal bones, leading to pain, stiffness, and decreased mobility in the wrist joint.

The tibia, also known as the shin bone, is the larger of the two bones in the lower leg and part of the knee joint. It supports most of the body's weight and is a major insertion point for muscles that flex the foot and bend the leg. The tibia articulates with the femur at the knee joint and with the fibula and talus bone at the ankle joint. Injuries to the tibia, such as fractures, are common in sports and other activities that put stress on the lower leg.

Osteitis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of bone tissue. It can occur as a result of various conditions, such as infection (osteomyelitis), trauma, or autoimmune disorders. The symptoms of osteitis may include pain, swelling, warmth, and redness in the affected area, as well as fever and general malaise. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the inflammation, which may involve antibiotics for infection or anti-inflammatory medications for other causes. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove infected or damaged bone tissue.

The knee joint, also known as the tibiofemoral joint, is the largest and one of the most complex joints in the human body. It is a synovial joint that connects the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia). The patella (kneecap), which is a sesamoid bone, is located in front of the knee joint and helps in the extension of the leg.

The knee joint is made up of three articulations: the femorotibial joint between the femur and tibia, the femoropatellar joint between the femur and patella, and the tibiofibular joint between the tibia and fibula. These articulations are surrounded by a fibrous capsule that encloses the synovial membrane, which secretes synovial fluid to lubricate the joint.

The knee joint is stabilized by several ligaments, including the medial and lateral collateral ligaments, which provide stability to the sides of the joint, and the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, which prevent excessive forward and backward movement of the tibia relative to the femur. The menisci, which are C-shaped fibrocartilaginous structures located between the femoral condyles and tibial plateaus, also help to stabilize the joint by absorbing shock and distributing weight evenly across the articular surfaces.

The knee joint allows for flexion, extension, and a small amount of rotation, making it essential for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and sitting.

Foot injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the various structures of the foot, including the bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, and nerves. These injuries can result from various causes such as accidents, sports activities, falls, or repetitive stress. Common types of foot injuries include fractures, sprains, strains, contusions, dislocations, and overuse injuries like plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. Symptoms may vary depending on the type and severity of the injury but often include pain, swelling, bruising, difficulty walking, and reduced range of motion. Proper diagnosis and treatment are crucial to ensure optimal healing and prevent long-term complications.

The odontoid process, also known as the dens, is a tooth-like projection from the second cervical vertebra (axis). It fits into a ring formed by the first vertebra (atlas), allowing for movement between these two vertebrae. The odontoid process helps to support the head and facilitates movements such as nodding and shaking. It is an essential structure in maintaining stability and mobility of the upper spine.

Osteotomy is a surgical procedure in which a bone is cut to shorten, lengthen, or change its alignment. It is often performed to correct deformities or to realign bones that have been damaged by trauma or disease. The bone may be cut straight across (transverse osteotomy) or at an angle (oblique osteotomy). After the bone is cut, it can be realigned and held in place with pins, plates, or screws until it heals. This procedure is commonly performed on bones in the leg, such as the femur or tibia, but can also be done on other bones in the body.

Spondylosis is a general term that refers to degenerative changes in the spine, particularly in the joints (facets) between vertebrae and/or intervertebral discs. It's a common age-related condition, which can also be caused by stresses on the spine due to poor posture, repetitive movements, or injury.

The degenerative process often involves loss of hydration and elasticity in the intervertebral discs, leading to decreased disc height and potential disc herniation. This can cause narrowing of the spinal canal (spinal stenosis) or nerve root canal (foraminal stenosis), resulting in pressure on the spinal cord and/or nerves.

Spondylosis can occur throughout the spine, but it is most commonly found in the cervical (neck) and lumbar (lower back) regions. Symptoms may include pain, stiffness, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the neck, arms, legs, or back, depending on the location and severity of the degeneration. However, it's worth noting that many people with spondylosis might not experience any symptoms at all. Treatment options typically include pain management, physical therapy, and, in severe cases, surgery.

A knee prosthesis, also known as a knee replacement or artificial knee joint, is a medical device used to replace the damaged or diseased weight-bearing surfaces of the knee joint. It typically consists of three components: the femoral component (made of metal) that fits over the end of the thighbone (femur), the tibial component (often made of metal and plastic) that fits into the top of the shinbone (tibia), and a patellar component (usually made of plastic) that replaces the damaged surface of the kneecap.

The primary goal of knee prosthesis is to relieve pain, restore function, and improve quality of life for individuals with advanced knee joint damage due to conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or traumatic injuries. The procedure to implant a knee prosthesis is called knee replacement surgery or total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Spinal diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the spinal column, which is made up of vertebrae (bones), intervertebral discs, facet joints, nerves, ligaments, and muscles. These diseases can cause pain, discomfort, stiffness, numbness, weakness, or even paralysis, depending on the severity and location of the condition. Here are some examples of spinal diseases:

1. Degenerative disc disease: This is a condition where the intervertebral discs lose their elasticity and height, leading to stiffness, pain, and decreased mobility.
2. Herniated disc: This occurs when the inner material of the intervertebral disc bulges or herniates out through a tear in the outer layer, causing pressure on the spinal nerves and resulting in pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the affected area.
3. Spinal stenosis: This is a narrowing of the spinal canal or the neural foramen (the openings where the spinal nerves exit the spinal column), which can cause pressure on the spinal cord or nerves and result in pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness.
4. Scoliosis: This is a curvature of the spine that can occur in children or adults, leading to an abnormal posture, back pain, and decreased lung function.
5. Osteoarthritis: This is a degenerative joint disease that affects the facet joints in the spine, causing pain, stiffness, and decreased mobility.
6. Ankylosing spondylitis: This is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the spine and sacroiliac joints, leading to pain, stiffness, and fusion of the vertebrae.
7. Spinal tumors: These are abnormal growths that can occur in the spinal column, which can be benign or malignant, causing pain, neurological symptoms, or even paralysis.
8. Infections: Bacterial or viral infections can affect the spine, leading to pain, fever, and other systemic symptoms.
9. Trauma: Fractures, dislocations, or sprains of the spine can occur due to accidents, falls, or sports injuries, causing pain, neurological deficits, or even paralysis.

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