A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.
Arthritis is a general term used to describe inflammation in the joints, often resulting in pain, stiffness, and reduced mobility, which can be caused by various conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, or lupus.
ARTHRITIS that is induced in experimental animals. Immunological methods and infectious agents can be used to develop experimental arthritis models. These methods include injections of stimulators of the immune response, such as an adjuvant (ADJUVANTS, IMMUNOLOGIC) or COLLAGEN.
Arthritis caused by BACTERIA; RICKETTSIA; MYCOPLASMA; VIRUSES; FUNGI; or PARASITES.
Arthritis of children, with onset before 16 years of age. The terms juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) refer to classification systems for chronic arthritis in children. Only one subtype of juvenile arthritis (polyarticular-onset, rheumatoid factor-positive) clinically resembles adult rheumatoid arthritis and is considered its childhood equivalent.
A type of inflammatory arthritis associated with PSORIASIS, often involving the axial joints and the peripheral terminal interphalangeal joints. It is characterized by the presence of HLA-B27-associated SPONDYLARTHROPATHY, and the absence of rheumatoid factor.
An aseptic, inflammatory arthritis developing secondary to a primary extra-articular infection, most typically of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT or UROGENITAL SYSTEM. The initiating trigger pathogens are usually SHIGELLA; SALMONELLA; YERSINIA; CAMPYLOBACTER; or CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS. Reactive arthritis is strongly associated with HLA-B27 ANTIGEN.
The inner membrane of a joint capsule surrounding a freely movable joint. It is loosely attached to the external fibrous capsule and secretes SYNOVIAL FLUID.
Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.
The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE. It contains mucin, albumin, fat, and mineral salts and serves to lubricate joints.
Arthritis, especially of the great toe, as a result of gout. Acute gouty arthritis often is precipitated by trauma, infection, surgery, etc. The initial attacks are usually monoarticular but later attacks are often polyarticular.
Antibodies found in adult RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS patients that are directed against GAMMA-CHAIN IMMUNOGLOBULINS.
Inbred DBA mice are a strain of laboratory mice that are genetically identical and share specific characteristics, including a high incidence of deafness, coat color (black and white), and susceptibility to certain diseases, which make them useful for research purposes in biomedical studies.
Inflammation of a synovial membrane. It is usually painful, particularly on motion, and is characterized by a fluctuating swelling due to effusion within a synovial sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.
A fibrillar collagen found predominantly in CARTILAGE and vitreous humor. It consists of three identical alpha1(II) chains.
An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
'Rats, Inbred Lew' is a strain of laboratory rat that is widely used in biomedical research, known for its consistent genetic background and susceptibility to certain diseases, which makes it an ideal model for studying the genetic basis of complex traits and disease processes.
Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.
Measurement of rate of settling of erythrocytes in anticoagulated blood.
Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.
Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.
Disorders of connective tissue, especially the joints and related structures, characterized by inflammation, degeneration, or metabolic derangement.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.
A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of inflammatory or degenerative processes and metabolic derangement of connective tissue structures which pertain to a variety of musculoskeletal disorders, such as arthritis.
A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.
The articulation between a metacarpal bone and a phalanx.
A chronic inflammatory condition affecting the axial joints, such as the SACROILIAC JOINT and other intervertebral or costovertebral joints. It occurs predominantly in young males and is characterized by pain and stiffness of joints (ANKYLOSIS) with inflammation at tendon insertions.
A drug that is used in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases. Its activity is generally considered to lie in its metabolic breakdown product, 5-aminosalicylic acid (see MESALAMINE) released in the colon. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p907)
Peptides whose amino and carboxy ends are linked together with a peptide bond forming a circular chain. Some of them are ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS. Some of them are biosynthesized non-ribosomally (PEPTIDE BIOSYNTHESIS, NON-RIBOSOMAL).
Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
A variable mixture of the mono- and disodium salts of gold thiomalic acid used mainly for its anti-inflammatory action in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It is most effective in active progressive rheumatoid arthritis and of little or no value in the presence of extensive deformities or in the treatment of other forms of arthritis.
The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).
Subcutaneous nodules seen in 20-30% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. They may arise anywhere on the body, but are most frequently found over the bony prominences. The nodules are characterized histologically by dense areas of fibrinoid necrosis with basophilic streaks and granules, surrounded by a palisade of cells, mainly fibroblasts and histiocytes.
A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).
A subtype of HLA-DRB beta chains that includes over one hundred allele variants. The HLA-DRB1 subtype is associated with several of the HLA-DR SEROLOGICAL SUBTYPES.
The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each finger.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The articulations between the various TARSAL BONES. This does not include the ANKLE JOINT which consists of the articulations between the TIBIA; FIBULA; and TALUS.
An infectious disease caused by a spirochete, BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, which is transmitted chiefly by Ixodes dammini (see IXODES) and pacificus ticks in the United States and Ixodes ricinis (see IXODES) in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. The disease was formerly known as Lyme arthritis and first discovered at Old Lyme, Connecticut.
Cell surface receptors that bind TUMOR NECROSIS FACTORS and trigger changes which influence the behavior of cells.
An HLA-DR antigen which is associated with HLA-DRB1 CHAINS encoded by DRB1*04 alleles.
Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.
'Joint diseases' is a broad term that refers to medical conditions causing inflammation, degeneration, or functional impairment in any part of a joint, including the cartilage, bone, ligament, tendon, or bursa, thereby affecting movement and potentially causing pain, stiffness, deformity, or reduced range of motion.
A subclass of HLA-D antigens that consist of alpha and beta chains. The inheritance of HLA-DR antigens differs from that of the HLA-DQ ANTIGENS and HLA-DP ANTIGENS.
Citrulline is an α-amino acid, primarily produced in the urea cycle in the liver and found in some dietary proteins, which functions as a vital intermediator in the nitrogen metabolism and vasodilation, and can be supplemented for potential health benefits in improving blood flow, reducing fatigue, and enhancing exercise performance.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
Heterogeneous group of arthritic diseases sharing clinical and radiologic features. They are associated with the HLA-B27 ANTIGEN and some with a triggering infection. Most involve the axial joints in the SPINE, particularly the SACROILIAC JOINT, but can also involve asymmetric peripheral joints. Subsets include ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS; REACTIVE ARTHRITIS; PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS; and others.
The articulations extending from the ANKLE distally to the TOES. These include the ANKLE JOINT; TARSAL JOINTS; METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and TOE JOINT.
A common genetically determined, chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by rounded erythematous, dry, scaling patches. The lesions have a predilection for nails, scalp, genitalia, extensor surfaces, and the lumbosacral region. Accelerated epidermopoiesis is considered to be the fundamental pathologic feature in psoriasis.
A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.
The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.
A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
A proinflammatory cytokine produced primarily by T-LYMPHOCYTES or their precursors. Several subtypes of interleukin-17 have been identified, each of which is a product of a unique gene.
Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.
An antigen solution emulsified in mineral oil. The complete form is made up of killed, dried mycobacteria, usually M. tuberculosis, suspended in the oil phase. It is effective in stimulating cell-mediated immunity (IMMUNITY, CELLULAR) and potentiates the production of certain IMMUNOGLOBULINS in some animals. The incomplete form does not contain mycobacteria.
The region in the hindlimb of a quadruped, corresponding to the human ANKLE.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
Inflammation of the synovial lining of a tendon sheath. Causes include trauma, tendon stress, bacterial disease (gonorrhea, tuberculosis), rheumatic disease, and gout. Common sites are the hand, wrist, shoulder capsule, hip capsule, hamstring muscles, and Achilles tendon. The tendon sheaths become inflamed and painful, and accumulate fluid. Joint mobility is usually reduced.
A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*27 allele family.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
Organic compounds that contain GOLD as an integral part of the molecule. Some are used as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS. The term chrysotherapy derives from an ancient Greek term for gold.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
The articulations extending from the WRIST distally to the FINGERS. These include the WRIST JOINT; CARPAL JOINTS; METACARPOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and FINGER JOINT.
An aldose-ketose isomerase that catalyzes the reversible interconversion of glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate. In prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms it plays an essential role in glycolytic and gluconeogenic pathways. In mammalian systems the enzyme is found in the cytoplasm and as a secreted protein. This secreted form of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase has been referred to as autocrine motility factor or neuroleukin, and acts as a cytokine which binds to the AUTOCRINE MOTILITY FACTOR RECEPTOR. Deficiency of the enzyme in humans is an autosomal recessive trait, which results in CONGENITAL NONSPHEROCYTIC HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA.
Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. It is of unknown etiology, but is thought to represent a failure of the regulatory mechanisms of the autoimmune system. The disease is marked by a wide range of system dysfunctions, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the formation of LE cells in the blood or bone marrow.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A cytokine that stimulates the growth and differentiation of B-LYMPHOCYTES and is also a growth factor for HYBRIDOMAS and plasmacytomas. It is produced by many different cells including T-LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; and FIBROBLASTS.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A soluble factor produced by MONOCYTES; MACROPHAGES, and other cells which activates T-lymphocytes and potentiates their response to mitogens or antigens. Interleukin-1 is a general term refers to either of the two distinct proteins, INTERLEUKIN-1ALPHA and INTERLEUKIN-1BETA. The biological effects of IL-1 include the ability to replace macrophage requirements for T-cell activation.
A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.
A ligand that binds to but fails to activate the INTERLEUKIN 1 RECEPTOR. It plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of INFLAMMATION and FEVER. Several isoforms of the protein exist due to multiple ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of its mRNA.
A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.
Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It supports research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases; the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress. It was established in 1986.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Azoles with an OXYGEN and a NITROGEN next to each other at the 1,2 positions, in contrast to OXAZOLES that have nitrogens at the 1,3 positions.
Endogenous tissue constituents that have the ability to interact with AUTOANTIBODIES and cause an immune response.
A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.
3-Mercapto-D-valine. The most characteristic degradation product of the penicillin antibiotics. It is used as an antirheumatic and as a chelating agent in Wilson's disease.
A specific species of bacteria, part of the BORRELIA BURGDORFERI GROUP, whose common name is Lyme disease spirochete.
A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.
Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)
Infections with bacteria of the genus YERSINIA.
Pain in the joint.
Inflammation of the joints of the SPINE, the intervertebral articulations.
Process whereby the immune system reacts against the body's own tissues. Autoimmunity may produce or be caused by AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.
Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.
The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each toe.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
A large multinuclear cell associated with the BONE RESORPTION. An odontoclast, also called cementoclast, is cytomorphologically the same as an osteoclast and is involved in CEMENTUM resorption.
A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.
Autoantibodies directed against various nuclear antigens including DNA, RNA, histones, acidic nuclear proteins, or complexes of these molecular elements. Antinuclear antibodies are found in systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease.
The complex formed by the binding of antigen and antibody molecules. The deposition of large antigen-antibody complexes leading to tissue damage causes IMMUNE COMPLEX DISEASES.
A plasma protein that circulates in increased amounts during inflammation and after tissue damage.
Deformities of the hand, or a part of the hand, acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.
Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.
Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).
Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.
An extracellular endopeptidase of vertebrate tissues similar to MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 1. It digests PROTEOGLYCAN; FIBRONECTIN; COLLAGEN types III, IV, V, and IX, and activates procollagenase. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)
An interleukin-1 subtype that is synthesized as an inactive membrane-bound pro-protein. Proteolytic processing of the precursor form by CASPASE 1 results in release of the active form of interleukin-1beta from the membrane.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
A rare complication of rheumatoid arthritis with autoimmune NEUTROPENIA; and SPLENOMEGALY.
The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.
Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.
A double gliding joint formed by the CLAVICLE, superior and lateral parts of the manubrium sterni at the clavicular notch, and the cartilage of the first rib.
The endogenous compounds that mediate inflammation (AUTACOIDS) and related exogenous compounds including the synthetic prostaglandins (PROSTAGLANDINS, SYNTHETIC).
The articulation between a metatarsal bone (METATARSAL BONES) and a phalanx.
An oral chrysotherapeutic agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Its exact mechanism of action is unknown, but it is believed to act via immunological mechanisms and alteration of lysosomal enzyme activity. Its efficacy is slightly less than that of injected gold salts, but it is better tolerated, and side effects which occur are potentially less serious.
Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease in which the salivary and lacrimal glands undergo progressive destruction by lymphocytes and plasma cells resulting in decreased production of saliva and tears. The primary form, often called sicca syndrome, involves both KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS SICCA and XEROSTOMIA. The secondary form includes, in addition, the presence of a connective tissue disease, usually rheumatoid arthritis.
The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)
A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.
A subtype of non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases that is characterized by the presence of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal PROLINE-rich domain. The phosphatase subtype is predominantly expressed in LYMPHOCYTES and plays a key role in the inhibition of downstream T-LYMPHOCYTE activation. Polymorphisms in the gene that encodes this phosphatase subtype are associated with a variety of AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.
Hereditary metabolic disorder characterized by recurrent acute arthritis, hyperuricemia and deposition of sodium urate in and around the joints, sometimes with formation of uric acid calculi.
The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.
Inflammation of the SPINE. This includes both arthritic and non-arthritic conditions.
Inflammation of the bone.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
A species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus ovine-caprine lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, OVINE-CAPRINE), closely related to VISNA-MAEDI VIRUS and causing acute encephalomyelitis; chronic arthritis; PNEUMONIA; MASTITIS; and GLOMERULONEPHRITIS in goats. It is transmitted mainly in the colostrum and milk.
Treatment of diseases with biological materials or biological response modifiers, such as the use of GENES; CELLS; TISSUES; organs; SERUM; VACCINES; and humoral agents.
Complex pharmaceutical substances, preparations, or matter derived from organisms usually obtained by biological methods or assay.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
A transmembrane protein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that specifically binds RECEPTOR ACTIVATOR OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-KAPPA B and OSTEOPROTEGERIN. It plays an important role in regulating OSTEOCLAST differentiation and activation.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Methods to determine in patients the nature of a disease or disorder at its early stage of progression. Generally, early diagnosis improves PROGNOSIS and TREATMENT OUTCOME.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Subset of helper-effector T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22. These cytokines are involved in host defenses and tissue inflammation in autoimmune diseases.
The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.
A thioglucose derivative used as an antirheumatic and experimentally to produce obesity in animals.
Diseases of BONES.
A constitution or condition of the body which makes the tissues react in special ways to certain extrinsic stimuli and thus tends to make the individual more than usually susceptible to certain diseases.
Gram-negative helical bacteria, in the genus BORRELIA, that are the etiologic agents of LYME DISEASE. The group comprises many specific species including Borrelia afzelii, Borellia garinii, and BORRELIA BURGDORFERI proper. These spirochetes are generally transmitted by several species of ixodid ticks.
Glycoproteins which contain sialic acid as one of their carbohydrates. They are often found on or in the cell or tissue membranes and participate in a variety of biological activities.
Glycoproteins which have a very high polysaccharide content.
An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.
The surgical fixation of a joint by a procedure designed to accomplish fusion of the joint surfaces by promoting the proliferation of bone cells. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
Partial or total replacement of a joint.
A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.
Biologically active substances whose activities affect or play a role in the functioning of the immune system.
Combinations of diagnostic or therapeutic substances linked with specific immune substances such as IMMUNOGLOBULINS; MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES; or ANTIGENS. Often the diagnostic or therapeutic substance is a radionuclide. These conjugates are useful tools for specific targeting of DRUGS and RADIOISOTOPES in the CHEMOTHERAPY and RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY of certain cancers.
Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)
Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.
Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.
In horses, cattle, and other quadrupeds, the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee.
Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.
Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)
Tuberculosis of the bones or joints.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.
The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.
A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.
A cytokine produced by a variety of cell types, including T-LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; DENDRITIC CELLS; and EPITHELIAL CELLS that exerts a variety of effects on immunoregulation and INFLAMMATION. Interleukin-10 combines with itself to form a homodimeric molecule that is the biologically active form of the protein.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Specific molecular sites on the surface of various cells, including B-lymphocytes and macrophages, that combine with IMMUNOGLOBULIN Gs. Three subclasses exist: Fc gamma RI (the CD64 antigen, a low affinity receptor), Fc gamma RII (the CD32 antigen, a high affinity receptor), and Fc gamma RIII (the CD16 antigen, a low affinity receptor).
Serum albumin from cows, commonly used in in vitro biological studies. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
The joint involving the CERVICAL ATLAS and axis bones.
PROTEOGLYCANS-associated proteins that are major components of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX of various tissues including CARTILAGE; and INTERVERTEBRAL DISC structures. They bind COLLAGEN fibers and contain protein domains that enable oligomer formation and interaction with other extracellular matrix proteins such as CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN.
The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
Antibodies which react with the individual structural determinants (idiotopes) on the variable region of other antibodies.
The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.
A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.
Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.
Presence of calcium salts, especially calcium pyrophosphate, in the cartilaginous structures of one or more joints. When accompanied by attacks of goutlike symptoms, it is called pseudogout. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A family of zinc-dependent metalloendopeptidases that is involved in the degradation of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX components.
A heterogeneous group of disorders, some hereditary, others acquired, characterized by abnormal structure or function of one or more of the elements of connective tissue, i.e., collagen, elastin, or the mucopolysaccharides.
Mature LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES transported by the blood to the body's extravascular space. They are morphologically distinguishable from mature granulocytic leukocytes by their large, non-lobed nuclei and lack of coarse, heavily stained cytoplasmic granules.
The immovable joint formed by the lateral surfaces of the SACRUM and ILIUM.
The CARPAL BONES; METACARPAL BONES; and FINGER PHALANGES. In each hand there are eight carpal bones, five metacarpal bones, and 14 phalanges.
A class of compounds composed of repeating 5-carbon units of HEMITERPENES.
Large HYALURONAN-containing proteoglycans found in articular cartilage (CARTILAGE, ARTICULAR). They form into aggregates that provide tissues with the capacity to resist high compressive and tensile forces.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
A fluid-filled sac lined with SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE that provides a cushion between bones, tendons and/or muscles around a joint.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.

Prevention of collagen-induced arthritis by gene delivery of soluble p75 tumour necrosis factor receptor. (1/2364)

Collagen type II-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice can be passively transferred to SCID mice with spleen B- and T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we show that infection ex vivo of splenocytes from arthritic DBA/1 mice with a retroviral vector, containing cDNA for the soluble form of human p75 receptor of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-R) before transfer, prevents the development of arthritis, bone erosion and joint inflammation in the SCID recipients. Assessment of IgG subclass levels and studies of synovial histology suggest that down-regulating the effector functions of T helper-type 1 (Th1) cells may, at least in part, explain the inhibition of arthritis in the SCID recipients. In contrast, the transfer of splenocytes infected with mouse TNF-alpha gene construct resulted in exacerbated arthritis and enhancement of IgG2a antibody levels. Intriguingly, infection of splenocytes from arthritic DBA/1 mice with a construct for mouse IL-10 had no modulating effect on the transfer of arthritis. The data suggest that manipulation of the immune system with cytokines, or cytokine inhibitors using gene transfer protocols can be an effective approach to ameliorate arthritis.  (+info)

Modulation of acute and chronic inflammatory processes by cacospongionolide B, a novel inhibitor of human synovial phospholipase A2. (2/2364)

1. Cacospongionolide B is a novel marine metabolite isolated from the sponge Fasciospongia cavernosa. In in vitro studies, this compound inhibited phospholipase A2 (PLA2), showing selectivity for secretory PLA2 (sPLA2) versus cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2), and its potency on the human synovial enzyme (group II) was similar to that of manoalide. 2. This activity was confirmed in vivo in the 8 h zymosan-injected rat air pouch, on the secretory enzyme accumulating in the pouch exudate. Cacospongionolide B, that is bioavailable when is given orally, reduced the elevated levels of sPLA2 present in paw homogenates of rats with adjuvant arthritis. 3. This marine metabolite showed topical anti-inflammatory activity on the mouse ear oedema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) and decreased carrageenin paw oedema in mice after oral administration of 5, 10 or 20 mg kg(-1). 4. In the mouse air pouch injected with zymosan, cacospongionolide B administered into the pouch, induced a dose-dependent reduction in the levels of eicosanoids and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) in the exudates 4 h after the stimulus. It also had a weak effect on cell migration. 5. The inflammatory response of adjuvant arthritis was reduced by cacospongionolide B, which did not significantly affect eicosanoid levels in serum, paw or stomach homogenates and did not induce toxic effects. 6 Cacospongionolide B is a new inhibitor of sPLA2 in vitro and in vivo, with anti-inflammatory properties in acute and chronic inflammation. This marine metabolite was active after oral administration and able to modify TNFalpha levels, and may offer an interesting approach in the search for new anti-inflammatory agents.  (+info)

Localization of non-Mhc collagen-induced arthritis susceptibility loci in DBA/1j mice. (3/2364)

One approach to understanding common human diseases is to determine the genetic defects responsible for similar diseases in animal models and place those defective genes in their corresponding biochemical pathways. Our laboratory is working with an animal model for human rheumatoid arthritis called collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We are particularly interested in determining the location of disease-predisposing loci. To that end, we performed experiments to localize susceptibility loci for CIA in an F2 cross between the highly susceptible mouse strain DBA/1j and the highly resistant mouse strain SWR/j. Specifically, a quantitative trait locus analysis was performed to localize regions of the mouse genome responsible for susceptibility/severity to CIA. One susceptibility locus, Cia1 in the major histocompatibility locus, had been identified previously. Two additional loci were detected in our analysis that contribute to CIA severity (Cia2, Cia3) on chromosomes 2 and 6. A third locus was detected that contributes to the age of onset of the disease. This locus (Cia4) was located on chromosome 2 and was linked to the same region as Cia2. Determining the identity of these loci may provide insights into the etiology of human rheumatoid arthritis.  (+info)

Effects of petrosaspongiolide M, a novel phospholipase A2 inhibitor, on acute and chronic inflammation. (4/2364)

The marine product petrosaspongiolide M is a novel inhibitor of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), showing selectivity for secretory PLA2 versus cytosolic PLA2, with a potency on the human synovial enzyme (group II) similar to that of manoalide. This compound was more potent than manoalide on bee venom PLA2 (group III) and had no effect on group I enzymes (Naja naja and porcine pancreatic PLA2). Inhibition of PLA2 was also observed in vivo in the zymosan-injected rat air pouch, on the secretory enzyme accumulated in the pouch exudate. Petrosaspongiolide M decreased carrageenan paw edema in mice after the oral administration of 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg. This marine metabolite (0.01-1.0 micromol/pouch) induced a dose-dependent reduction in the levels of prostaglandin (PG)E2, leukotriene B4, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the mouse air pouch injected with zymosan 4 h after the stimulus. It also had a weaker effect on cell migration. The inflammatory response of adjuvant arthritis was reduced by petrosaspongiolide M, which also inhibited leukotriene B4 levels in serum and PGE2 levels in paw homogenates. In contrast with indomethacin, this marine compound did not reduce PGE2 levels in stomach homogenates. Petrosaspongiolide M is a new inhibitor of secretory PLA2 in vitro and in vivo, with anti-inflammatory properties in acute and chronic inflammation.  (+info)

Efficacy of sustained blood levels of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in animal models of arthritis: comparison of efficacy in animal models with human clinical data. (5/2364)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the role of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in rat adjuvant arthritis and rat type II collagen-induced arthritis, and to compare the efficacy in rat models with that seen in human clinical trials of IL-1Ra. METHODS: Rats with developing adjuvant arthritis or established collagen-induced arthritis were treated with IL-1Ra by continuous infusion in order to determine and maintain efficacious blood levels of this IL-1 inhibitory protein in the rats for comparison with human clinical data. The effects of treatment in the rats were monitored by sequential caliper measurement of the ankle joints, determination of final paw weights, and histologic evaluation with particular emphasis on bone and cartilage lesions. The effects of IL-1Ra on joint swelling and radiographic bone damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a 6-month trial were compared with the findings in rats. RESULTS: Dramatic differences in the profile of IL-1Ra activity were seen between the 2 groups of rats. Modest antiinflammatory effects were observed in the adjuvant arthritis rats treated with IL-1Ra. However, marked inhibition of bone resorption occurred, even at doses with which antiinflammatory activity was not seen. In contrast, IL-1Ra treatment of rats with established collagen-induced arthritis resulted in nearly complete suppression of all aspects of the disease when adequate blood levels of IL-1Ra were maintained. Treatment of RA patients with IL-1Ra (150 mg daily) resulted in modest inhibition of joint swelling and inhibition of radiographic progression of bone lesions. CONCLUSION: IL-1 appears to be of major importance in mediating the bone resorption that occurs in rat adjuvant arthritis, but is less important in the pathogenesis of periarticular inflammation in this disease. In contrast, IL-1 is of major importance in mediating all aspects of disease progression in rat collagen-induced arthritis. Similar to the response in adjuvant arthritic rats, RA patients treated with IL-1Ra showed only modest antiinflammatory activity, but had evidence of inhibition of progression of bone resorption. However, a comparison of the plasma levels of IL-1Ra in humans and rats suggests that the optimal level of dosing for continuous saturation of IL-1 receptors may not have been achieved in humans, although this was achieved in the rat studies.  (+info)

Somatostatin receptor subtype expression in cells of the rat immune system during adjuvant arthritis. (6/2364)

Somatostatin is a neuropeptide that is widely distributed throughout the body. It acts as a neurohormone and a neurotransmitter and may also have an immunomodulatory role. The genes for five subtypes of somatostatin receptors (sst) have been cloned, suggesting that the diverse effects of the peptide might be mediated by different receptors. We are interested in studying the role of sst ininflammation, using an animal model. Because of the up-regulation of sst expression in inflamed joints in human rheumatoid arthritis, we chose rat adjuvant arthritis as an experimental model. In order to determine which of the sst subtypes might be important in immune modulation, subtype expression in leukocytes isolated from different lymphoid tissues of the rat was studied. Also, the expression levels of the most abundantly expressed sst mRNAs in leukocytes from spleen and blood were compared in rats with adjuvantarthritis and controls, using a semi-quantitative approach. Furthermore, the effect of systemic administration of a long-acting somatostatin analogue, octreotide, which binds selectively to sst subtypes 2 and 5 (sst2 and sst5), on the incidence and the severity of rat adjuvant arthritis, was studied. The main sst expressed in cells of the rat immune system, both resting and activated, were found to be sst3 and sst4. This contrasts with the human and murine situations, in which sst2 appears to be the main subtype expressed in the immune system. No quantitative differences in sst subtype mRNA levels in leukocytes from spleen and blood were found between rats with adjuvant arthritis and controls. Finally, no effect of systemic administration of octreotide on either the incidence or severity of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats was found. As octreotide binds selectively to sst2 and sst5, the absence of an immunomodulatory effect of this analogue in rat adjuvant arthritis corroborates our finding that these sst subtypes are not expressed in cells of the rat immune system. In conclusion, cells of the rat immune system appear to express a spectrum of sst (sst3 and sst4) different from that found in human granulomatous and autoimmune disease (mainly sst2). Therefore, the rat adjuvant arthritis model appears to be suitable only for studying the immunomodulatory effects of somatostatin analogues which have a high affinity for sst3 and sst4, but not for studying the immunomodulatory effects of octreotide, which has a high affinity only for sst2 and sst5.  (+info)

Prevention of collagen-induced arthritis in mice by a polyphenolic fraction from green tea. (7/2364)

Identification of common dietary substances capable of affording protection or modulating the onset and severity of arthritis may have important human health implications. An antioxidant-rich polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (green tea polyphenols, GTPs) has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties in experimental animals. In this study we determined the effect of oral consumption of GTP on collagen-induced arthritis in mice. In three independent experiments mice given GTP in water exhibited significantly reduced incidence of arthritis (33% to 50%) as compared with mice not given GTP in water (84% to 100%). The arthritis index also was significantly lower in GTP-fed animals. Western blot analysis showed a marked reduction in the expression of inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase 2, IFN-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor alpha in arthritic joints of GTP-fed mice. Histologic and immunohistochemical analysis of the arthritic joints in GTP-fed mice demonstrated only marginal joint infiltration by IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha-producing cells as opposed to massive cellular infiltration and fully developed pannus in arthritic joints of non-GTP-fed mice. The neutral endopeptidase activity was approximately 7-fold higher in arthritic joints of non-GTP-fed mice in comparison to nonarthritic joints of unimmunized mice whereas it was only 2-fold higher in the arthritic joints of GTP-fed mice. Additionally, total IgG and type II collagen-specific IgG levels were lower in serum and arthritic joints of GTP-fed mice. Taken together our studies suggest that a polyphenolic fraction from green tea that is rich in antioxidants may be useful in the prevention of onset and severity of arthritis.  (+info)

Specific targeting of activated endothelium in rat adjuvant arthritis with a 99mTc-radiolabeled E-selectin-binding peptide. (8/2364)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the potential of an E-selectin-binding peptide (ESbp) to specifically bind activated endothelium in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) animal models. METHODS: ESbp (KYDGDITWDQLWDLMK; 2,027 daltons) was labeled with biotin and 99mTc. The affinity of ESbp derivatives for E-selectin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The binding of biotin-ESbp was compared with that of an anti-E-selectin antibody, by immunohistochemical analyses of human synovial sections and sections from the Mycoplasma pulmonis MRL-lpr/lpr mouse arthritis model. 99mTc-ESbp was sequentially imaged in vivo with a gamma camera in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model. RESULTS: E-selectin expression was detected in human RA synovium and mouse arthritic synovium using biotin-ESbp. Both biotin-ESbp and 99mTc-labeled ESbp had high affinity for E-selectin (dissociation constant 2-5 nM). In vivo imaging showed specific binding of 99mTc-ESbp to the rat ankle joint prior to clinical manifestations of inflammation. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that activated endothelium can be targeted with 99mTc-ESbp. The specificity of targeting can be used to evaluate up-regulation of E-selectin in RA models, and to follow changes in this up-regulation during treatment trials.  (+info)

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects the joints. It is characterized by persistent inflammation, synovial hyperplasia, and subsequent damage to the articular cartilage and bone. The immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own tissues, specifically targeting the synovial membrane lining the joint capsule. This results in swelling, pain, warmth, and stiffness in affected joints, often most severely in the hands and feet.

RA can also have extra-articular manifestations, affecting other organs such as the lungs, heart, skin, eyes, and blood vessels. The exact cause of RA remains unknown, but it is believed to involve a complex interplay between genetic susceptibility and environmental triggers. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial in managing rheumatoid arthritis to prevent joint damage, disability, and systemic complications.

Arthritis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation in one or more joints, leading to symptoms such as pain, stiffness, swelling, and reduced range of motion. There are many different types of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, gout, and lupus, among others.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and is caused by wear and tear on the joints over time. Rheumatoid arthritis, on the other hand, is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the joint lining, causing inflammation and damage.

Arthritis can affect people of all ages, including children, although it is more common in older adults. Treatment for arthritis may include medications to manage pain and reduce inflammation, physical therapy, exercise, and in some cases, surgery.

Experimental arthritis refers to the induction of joint inflammation in animal models for the purpose of studying the disease process and testing potential treatments. This is typically achieved through the use of various methods such as injecting certain chemicals or proteins into the joints, genetically modifying animals to develop arthritis-like symptoms, or immunizing animals to induce an autoimmune response against their own joint tissues. These models are crucial for advancing our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of arthritis and for developing new therapies to treat this debilitating disease.

Infectious arthritis, also known as septic arthritis, is a type of joint inflammation that is caused by a bacterial or fungal infection. The infection can enter the joint through the bloodstream or directly into the synovial fluid of the joint, often as a result of a traumatic injury, surgery, or an underlying condition such as diabetes or a weakened immune system.

The most common symptoms of infectious arthritis include sudden onset of severe pain and swelling in the affected joint, fever, chills, and difficulty moving the joint. If left untreated, infectious arthritis can lead to serious complications such as joint damage or destruction, sepsis, and even death. Treatment typically involves antibiotics or antifungal medications to eliminate the infection, along with rest, immobilization, and sometimes surgery to drain the infected synovial fluid.

It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you experience symptoms of infectious arthritis, as early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent long-term complications and improve outcomes.

Juvenile arthritis (JA) is a term used to describe a group of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders that can affect children aged 16 or younger. In JA, the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own tissues, causing inflammation in the joints, which can lead to pain, swelling, stiffness, and damage over time.

There are several types of juvenile arthritis, including:

1. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): This is the most common form of JA, and it includes several subtypes that are classified based on the number of joints affected and the presence or absence of certain symptoms.
2. Juvenile Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (JSLE): This is a type of lupus that affects children, and it can cause inflammation in various parts of the body, including the joints, skin, kidneys, and lungs.
3. Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDM): This is a rare autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation of the blood vessels, leading to muscle weakness, skin rashes, and joint pain.
4. Juvenile Scleroderma: This is a group of disorders that cause hardening and tightening of the skin and connective tissues, which can also affect the joints.
5. Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis (JPsA): This is a type of arthritis that affects children who have psoriasis, a chronic skin condition. JPsA can cause inflammation in the joints and skin.

The causes of juvenile arthritis are not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors. There is no cure for JA, but treatments such as medication, physical therapy, and lifestyle changes can help manage the symptoms and prevent long-term complications.

Psoriatic arthritis is a form of inflammatory arthritis that occurs in some people with psoriasis, a skin condition characterized by scaly, red, and itchy patches. The Arthritis Foundation defines psoriatic arthritis as "a chronic disease characterized by swelling, pain, and stiffness in and around the joints. It usually affects the fingers and toes but can also affect the lower back, knees, ankles, and spine."

Psoriatic arthritis can cause a variety of symptoms, including:

* Joint pain, swelling, and stiffness
* Swollen fingers or toes (dactylitis)
* Tenderness, pain, and swelling where tendons and ligaments attach to bones (enthesitis)
* Changes in nail growth, such as pitting, ridging, or separation from the nail bed
* Fatigue and weakness
* Reduced range of motion and mobility

The exact cause of psoriatic arthritis is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and immune system factors. Treatment typically involves a combination of medications, lifestyle changes, and physical therapy to manage symptoms and prevent joint damage.

Reactive arthritis is a form of inflammatory arthritis that occurs in response to an infection in another part of the body, such as the genitals, urinary tract, or gastrointestinal tract. It is also known as Reiter's syndrome. The symptoms of reactive arthritis include joint pain and swelling, typically affecting the knees, ankles, and feet; inflammation of the eyes, skin, and mucous membranes; and urethritis or cervicitis. It is more common in men than women and usually develops within 1-4 weeks after a bacterial infection. The diagnosis is made based on the symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. Treatment typically includes antibiotics to eliminate the underlying infection and medications to manage the symptoms of arthritis.

The synovial membrane, also known as the synovium, is the soft tissue that lines the inner surface of the capsule of a synovial joint, which is a type of joint that allows for smooth movement between bones. This membrane secretes synovial fluid, a viscous substance that lubricates and nourishes the cartilage and helps to reduce friction within the joint during movement.

The synovial membrane has a highly specialized structure, consisting of two layers: the intima and the subintima. The intima is a thin layer of cells that are in direct contact with the synovial fluid, while the subintima is a more fibrous layer that contains blood vessels and nerves.

The main function of the synovial membrane is to produce and regulate the production of synovial fluid, as well as to provide nutrients to the articular cartilage. It also plays a role in the immune response within the joint, helping to protect against infection and inflammation. However, abnormalities in the synovial membrane can lead to conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, where the membrane becomes inflamed and produces excess synovial fluid, leading to pain, swelling, and joint damage.

A joint is the location at which two or more bones make contact. They are constructed to allow movement and provide support and stability to the body during motion. Joints can be classified in several ways, including structure, function, and the type of tissue that forms them. The three main types of joints based on structure are fibrous (or fixed), cartilaginous, and synovial (or diarthrosis). Fibrous joints do not have a cavity and have limited movement, while cartilaginous joints allow for some movement and are connected by cartilage. Synovial joints, the most common and most movable type, have a space between the articular surfaces containing synovial fluid, which reduces friction and wear. Examples of synovial joints include hinge, pivot, ball-and-socket, saddle, and condyloid joints.

Synovial fluid is a viscous, clear, and straw-colored fluid found in the cavities of synovial joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths. It is produced by the synovial membrane, which lines the inner surface of the capsule surrounding these structures.

The primary function of synovial fluid is to reduce friction between articulating surfaces, providing lubrication for smooth and painless movement. It also acts as a shock absorber, protecting the joints from external forces during physical activities. Synovial fluid contains nutrients that nourish the articular cartilage, hyaluronic acid, which provides its viscoelastic properties, and lubricin, a protein responsible for boundary lubrication.

Abnormalities in synovial fluid composition or volume can indicate joint-related disorders, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, infection, or trauma. Analysis of synovial fluid is often used diagnostically to determine the underlying cause of joint pain, inflammation, or dysfunction.

Gouty arthritis is a type of inflammatory arthritis that occurs due to the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints. Uric acid is a waste product that is formed when the body breaks down purines, which are substances found naturally in the body and in certain foods such as organ meats, anchovies, sardines, and beer.

In people with gouty arthritis, uric acid levels in the blood become elevated, leading to the formation of sharp, needle-like crystals that can accumulate in the joints, causing pain, inflammation, and swelling. The symptoms of gouty arthritis typically occur suddenly and may include:

* Intense pain in the affected joint, often occurring at night
* Redness, warmth, and swelling in the affected area
* Stiffness and limited mobility in the affected joint

The most commonly affected joint is the big toe, but gouty arthritis can also occur in other joints such as the ankles, knees, wrists, and fingers. Over time, repeated episodes of gouty arthritis can lead to joint damage and chronic pain. Treatment typically involves medications to reduce inflammation and manage pain, as well as lifestyle changes to lower uric acid levels in the body.

Rheumatoid factor (RF) is an autoantibody, specifically an immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody, that can be detected in the blood serum of some people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), other inflammatory conditions, and infectious diseases. RF targets the Fc portion of IgG, leading to immune complex formation and subsequent inflammation, which contributes to the pathogenesis of RA. However, not all patients with RA test positive for RF, and its presence does not necessarily confirm a diagnosis of RA. Other conditions can also lead to elevated RF levels, such as infections, liver diseases, and certain malignancies. Therefore, the interpretation of RF results should be considered alongside other clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

'DBA' is an abbreviation for 'Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes,' but in the context of "Inbred DBA mice," it refers to a specific strain of laboratory mice that have been inbred for many generations. The DBA strain is one of the oldest inbred strains, and it was established in 1909 by C.C. Little at the Bussey Institute of Harvard University.

The "Inbred DBA" mice are genetically identical mice that have been produced by brother-sister matings for more than 20 generations. This extensive inbreeding results in a homozygous population, where all members of the strain have the same genetic makeup. The DBA strain is further divided into several sub-strains, including DBA/1, DBA/2, and DBA/J, among others.

DBA mice are known for their black coat color, which can fade to gray with age, and they exhibit a range of phenotypic traits that make them useful for research purposes. For example, DBA mice have a high incidence of retinal degeneration, making them a valuable model for studying eye diseases. They also show differences in behavior, immune response, and susceptibility to various diseases compared to other inbred strains.

In summary, "Inbred DBA" mice are a specific strain of laboratory mice that have been inbred for many generations, resulting in a genetically identical population with distinct phenotypic traits. They are widely used in biomedical research to study various diseases and biological processes.

Synovitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane, which is the soft tissue that lines the inner surface of joint capsules and tendon sheaths. The synovial membrane produces synovial fluid, which lubricates the joint and allows for smooth movement.

Inflammation of the synovial membrane can cause it to thicken, redden, and become painful and swollen. This can lead to stiffness, limited mobility, and discomfort in the affected joint or tendon sheath. Synovitis may occur as a result of injury, overuse, infection, or autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

If left untreated, synovitis can cause irreversible damage to the joint and surrounding tissues, including cartilage loss and bone erosion. Treatment typically involves a combination of medications, physical therapy, and lifestyle modifications to reduce inflammation and manage pain.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a type of joint disease that is characterized by the breakdown and eventual loss of cartilage - the tissue that cushions the ends of bones where they meet in the joints. This breakdown can cause the bones to rub against each other, causing pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility. OA can occur in any joint, but it most commonly affects the hands, knees, hips, and spine. It is often associated with aging and can be caused or worsened by obesity, injury, or overuse.

The medical definition of osteoarthritis is: "a degenerative, non-inflammatory joint disease characterized by the loss of articular cartilage, bone remodeling, and the formation of osteophytes (bone spurs). It is often associated with pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion in the affected joint."

Collagen Type II is a specific type of collagen that is a major component of the extracellular matrix in articular cartilage, which is the connective tissue that covers and protects the ends of bones in joints. It is also found in other tissues such as the vitreous humor of the eye and the inner ear.

Collagen Type II is a triple helix molecule composed of three polypeptide chains that contain a high proportion of the amino acids proline and hydroxyproline. This type of collagen provides structural support and elasticity to tissues, and it also plays a role in the regulation of cell behavior and signaling.

Collagen Type II is a target for autoimmune responses in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, where the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own collagen, leading to joint inflammation and damage. It is also a common component of various dietary supplements and therapies used to support joint health and treat osteoarthritis.

Methotrexate is a medication used in the treatment of certain types of cancer and autoimmune diseases. It is an antimetabolite that inhibits the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase, which is necessary for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines, essential components of DNA and RNA. By blocking this enzyme, methotrexate interferes with cell division and growth, making it effective in treating rapidly dividing cells such as cancer cells.

In addition to its use in cancer treatment, methotrexate is also used to manage autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In these conditions, methotrexate modulates the immune system and reduces inflammation.

It's important to note that methotrexate can have significant side effects and should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider. Regular monitoring of blood counts, liver function, and kidney function is necessary during treatment with methotrexate.

A Severity of Illness Index is a measurement tool used in healthcare to assess the severity of a patient's condition and the risk of mortality or other adverse outcomes. These indices typically take into account various physiological and clinical variables, such as vital signs, laboratory values, and co-morbidities, to generate a score that reflects the patient's overall illness severity.

Examples of Severity of Illness Indices include the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) system, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), and the Mortality Probability Model (MPM). These indices are often used in critical care settings to guide clinical decision-making, inform prognosis, and compare outcomes across different patient populations.

It is important to note that while these indices can provide valuable information about a patient's condition, they should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decision-making. Rather, they should be considered in conjunction with other factors, such as the patient's overall clinical presentation, treatment preferences, and goals of care.

I'm happy to help! "Rats, Inbred Lew" is a specific strain of laboratory rats that have been inbred for research purposes. The "Lew" part of the name refers to the location where they were first developed, the Lewis Institute in Lake Bluff, Illinois, USA.

Inbreeding is a process of mating closely related individuals over many generations to create a genetically homogeneous population. This results in a high degree of genetic similarity among members of the strain, making them ideal for use as experimental models because any differences observed between individuals are more likely to be due to the experimental manipulation rather than genetic variation.

Inbred Lew rats have been widely used in biomedical research, particularly in studies related to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. They exhibit a number of unique characteristics that make them useful for these types of studies, including their susceptibility to developing high blood pressure when fed a high-salt diet or given certain drugs.

It's important to note that while inbred strains like Lew rats can be very useful tools for researchers, they are not perfect models for human disease. Because they have been bred in a controlled environment and selected for specific traits, they may not respond to experimental manipulations in the same way that humans or other animals would. Therefore, it's important to interpret findings from these studies with caution and consider multiple lines of evidence before drawing any firm conclusions.

Autoantibodies are defined as antibodies that are produced by the immune system and target the body's own cells, tissues, or organs. These antibodies mistakenly identify certain proteins or molecules in the body as foreign invaders and attack them, leading to an autoimmune response. Autoantibodies can be found in various autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and thyroiditis. The presence of autoantibodies can also be used as a diagnostic marker for certain conditions.

Blood sedimentation, also known as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), is a medical test that measures the rate at which red blood cells settle at the bottom of a tube of unclotted blood over a specific period of time. The test is used to detect and monitor inflammation in the body.

During an acute inflammatory response, certain proteins in the blood, such as fibrinogen, increase in concentration. These proteins cause red blood cells to stick together and form rouleaux (stacks of disc-shaped cells). As a result, the red blood cells settle more quickly, leading to a higher ESR.

The ESR test is a non-specific test, meaning that it does not identify the specific cause of inflammation. However, it can be used as an indicator of underlying conditions such as infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. The test is also used to monitor the effectiveness of treatment for these conditions.

The ESR test is usually performed by drawing a sample of blood into a special tube and allowing it to sit undisturbed for one hour. The distance that the red blood cells have settled is then measured and recorded as the ESR. Normal values for ESR vary depending on age and gender, with higher values indicating greater inflammation.

Intra-articular injections refer to the administration of medication directly into a joint space. This route of administration is used for treating various joint conditions such as inflammation, pain, and arthritis. Commonly injected medications include corticosteroids, local anesthetics, and viscosupplementation agents. The procedure is usually performed using imaging guidance, like ultrasound or fluoroscopy, to ensure accurate placement of the medication within the joint.

Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a cytokine, a type of small signaling protein involved in immune response and inflammation. It is primarily produced by activated macrophages, although other cell types such as T-cells, natural killer cells, and mast cells can also produce it.

TNF-α plays a crucial role in the body's defense against infection and tissue injury by mediating inflammatory responses, activating immune cells, and inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death) in certain types of cells. It does this by binding to its receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2, which are found on the surface of many cell types.

In addition to its role in the immune response, TNF-α has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis, as well as cancer, where it can promote tumor growth and metastasis.

Therapeutic agents that target TNF-α, such as infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept, have been developed to treat these conditions. However, these drugs can also increase the risk of infections and other side effects, so their use must be carefully monitored.

Rheumatic diseases are a group of disorders that cause pain, stiffness, and swelling in the joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, or bones. They include conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), gout, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and many others. These diseases can also affect other body systems including the skin, eyes, lungs, heart, kidneys, and nervous system. Rheumatic diseases are often chronic and may be progressive, meaning they can worsen over time. They can cause significant pain, disability, and reduced quality of life if not properly diagnosed and managed. The exact causes of rheumatic diseases are not fully understood, but genetics, environmental factors, and immune system dysfunction are believed to play a role in their development.

Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a type of antibody, which is a protective protein produced by the immune system in response to foreign substances like bacteria or viruses. IgG is the most abundant type of antibody in human blood, making up about 75-80% of all antibodies. It is found in all body fluids and plays a crucial role in fighting infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and toxins.

IgG has several important functions:

1. Neutralization: IgG can bind to the surface of bacteria or viruses, preventing them from attaching to and infecting human cells.
2. Opsonization: IgG coats the surface of pathogens, making them more recognizable and easier for immune cells like neutrophils and macrophages to phagocytose (engulf and destroy) them.
3. Complement activation: IgG can activate the complement system, a group of proteins that work together to help eliminate pathogens from the body. Activation of the complement system leads to the formation of the membrane attack complex, which creates holes in the cell membranes of bacteria, leading to their lysis (destruction).
4. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC): IgG can bind to immune cells like natural killer (NK) cells and trigger them to release substances that cause target cells (such as virus-infected or cancerous cells) to undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death).
5. Immune complex formation: IgG can form immune complexes with antigens, which can then be removed from the body through various mechanisms, such as phagocytosis by immune cells or excretion in urine.

IgG is a critical component of adaptive immunity and provides long-lasting protection against reinfection with many pathogens. It has four subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) that differ in their structure, function, and distribution in the body.

Arthrography is a medical imaging technique used to diagnose problems within joints. It involves the injection of a contrast agent, such as a radiopaque dye or air, into the joint space, followed by the use of fluoroscopy or X-ray imaging to visualize the internal structures of the joint. This can help to identify injuries, tears, or other abnormalities in the cartilage, ligaments, tendons, or bones within the joint.

The procedure is typically performed on an outpatient basis and may be used to diagnose conditions such as shoulder dislocations, rotator cuff tears, meniscal tears in the knee, or hip labral injuries. It is a relatively safe and minimally invasive procedure, although there may be some temporary discomfort or swelling at the injection site. Patients are usually advised to avoid strenuous activity for a day or two following the procedure to allow the contrast agent to fully dissipate from the joint.

Rheumatology is a subspecialty of internal medicine that deals with the diagnosis and management of more than 200 diseases affecting the joints, muscles, and bones. These diseases are often complex, chronic, and systemic, meaning they can affect the whole body. Some common rheumatic diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, lupus, gout, osteoporosis, and various forms of vasculitis and connective tissue disorders.

Rheumatologists are medical doctors who have completed additional training in this field, becoming experts in the non-surgical treatment of musculoskeletal diseases. They use a combination of physical examination, patient history, laboratory testing, and imaging to diagnose and manage these conditions. Treatment may involve medications, lifestyle changes, physical therapy, or a combination of these approaches.

The knee joint, also known as the tibiofemoral joint, is the largest and one of the most complex joints in the human body. It is a synovial joint that connects the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia). The patella (kneecap), which is a sesamoid bone, is located in front of the knee joint and helps in the extension of the leg.

The knee joint is made up of three articulations: the femorotibial joint between the femur and tibia, the femoropatellar joint between the femur and patella, and the tibiofibular joint between the tibia and fibula. These articulations are surrounded by a fibrous capsule that encloses the synovial membrane, which secretes synovial fluid to lubricate the joint.

The knee joint is stabilized by several ligaments, including the medial and lateral collateral ligaments, which provide stability to the sides of the joint, and the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, which prevent excessive forward and backward movement of the tibia relative to the femur. The menisci, which are C-shaped fibrocartilaginous structures located between the femoral condyles and tibial plateaus, also help to stabilize the joint by absorbing shock and distributing weight evenly across the articular surfaces.

The knee joint allows for flexion, extension, and a small amount of rotation, making it essential for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and sitting.

The metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint is the joint that connects the bones of the hand (metacarpals) to the bones of the fingers and thumb (phalanges). It's also commonly referred to as the "knuckle" joint. The MCP joint allows for flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction movements of the fingers and thumb. It is a synovial joint, which means it contains a lubricating fluid called synovial fluid that helps reduce friction during movement.

Ankylosing spondylitis is a type of inflammatory arthritis that primarily affects the spine, although other joints can also be involved. It causes swelling in the spinal joints (vertebrae) that can lead to stiffness and pain. Over time, some of these joints may grow together, causing new bone formation and resulting in a rigid spine. This fusion of the spine is called ankylosis.

The condition typically begins in the sacroiliac joints, where the spine connects to the pelvis. From there, it can spread up the spine and potentially involve other areas of the body such as the eyes, heart, lungs, and gastrointestinal system.

Ankylosing spondylitis has a strong genetic link, with most people carrying the HLA-B27 gene. However, not everyone with this gene will develop the condition. It primarily affects males more often than females and tends to start in early adulthood.

Treatment usually involves a combination of medication, physical therapy, and exercise to help manage pain, maintain mobility, and prevent deformity. In severe cases, surgery may be considered.

Sulfasalazine is defined as a medication that is commonly used to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. It is also used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Sulfasalazine has an anti-inflammatory effect, which helps to reduce inflammation in the gut or joints.

The medication contains two components: sulfapyridine and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA). The sulfapyridine component is an antibiotic that may help to reduce the number of harmful bacteria in the gut, while the 5-ASA component is responsible for the anti-inflammatory effect.

Sulfasalazine works by being broken down into its two components after it is ingested. The 5-ASA component then acts directly on the lining of the gut to reduce inflammation, while the sulfapyridine component is absorbed into the bloodstream and excreted in the urine.

Common side effects of sulfasalazine include nausea, vomiting, heartburn, headache, and loss of appetite. Less common but more serious side effects may include allergic reactions, liver or kidney problems, and blood disorders. It is important to take sulfasalazine exactly as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any concerning symptoms promptly.

Cyclic peptides are a type of peptides in which the N-terminus and C-terminus of the peptide chain are linked to form a circular structure. This is in contrast to linear peptides, which have a straight peptide backbone with a free N-terminus and C-terminus. The cyclization of peptides can occur through various mechanisms, including the formation of an amide bond between the N-terminal amino group and the C-terminal carboxylic acid group (head-to-tail cyclization), or through the formation of a bond between side chain functional groups.

Cyclic peptides have unique structural and chemical properties that make them valuable in medical and therapeutic applications. For example, they are more resistant to degradation by enzymes compared to linear peptides, which can increase their stability and half-life in the body. Additionally, the cyclic structure allows for greater conformational rigidity, which can enhance their binding affinity and specificity to target molecules.

Cyclic peptides have been explored as potential therapeutics for a variety of diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and neurological disorders. They have also been used as tools in basic research to study protein-protein interactions and cell signaling pathways.

Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders in which the immune system, which normally protects the body from foreign invaders like bacteria and viruses, mistakenly attacks the body's own cells and tissues. This results in inflammation and damage to various organs and tissues in the body.

In autoimmune diseases, the body produces autoantibodies that target its own proteins or cell receptors, leading to their destruction or malfunction. The exact cause of autoimmune diseases is not fully understood, but it is believed that a combination of genetic and environmental factors contribute to their development.

There are over 80 different types of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Graves' disease, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Symptoms can vary widely depending on the specific autoimmune disease and the organs or tissues affected. Treatment typically involves managing symptoms and suppressing the immune system to prevent further damage.

Monoclonal antibodies are a type of antibody that are identical because they are produced by a single clone of cells. They are laboratory-produced molecules that act like human antibodies in the immune system. They can be designed to attach to specific proteins found on the surface of cancer cells, making them useful for targeting and treating cancer. Monoclonal antibodies can also be used as a therapy for other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions.

Monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing a single type of immune cell, called a B cell, with a tumor cell to create a hybrid cell, or hybridoma. This hybrid cell is then able to replicate indefinitely, producing a large number of identical copies of the original antibody. These antibodies can be further modified and engineered to enhance their ability to bind to specific targets, increase their stability, and improve their effectiveness as therapeutic agents.

Monoclonal antibodies have several mechanisms of action in cancer therapy. They can directly kill cancer cells by binding to them and triggering an immune response. They can also block the signals that promote cancer growth and survival. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies can be used to deliver drugs or radiation directly to cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of these treatments while minimizing their side effects on healthy tissues.

Monoclonal antibodies have become an important tool in modern medicine, with several approved for use in cancer therapy and other diseases. They are continuing to be studied and developed as a promising approach to treating a wide range of medical conditions.

Gold sodium thiomalate is a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) that contains gold, which can help reduce pain, swelling, and stiffness in joints caused by rheumatoid arthritis. It works by possibly inhibiting certain enzymes involved in inflammation and modulating the immune system's response to reduce tissue damage.

This medication is given as an intramuscular injection and requires medical supervision due to its potential side effects, including kidney and liver problems, skin rashes, mouth sores, and changes in blood cell counts. Regular monitoring of blood and urine tests is necessary during treatment with gold sodium thiomalate.

It's important to note that the use of this medication has declined over time due to the availability of newer and more effective treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, as well as its potential side effects.

The wrist joint, also known as the radiocarpal joint, is a condyloid joint that connects the distal end of the radius bone in the forearm to the proximal row of carpal bones in the hand (scaphoid, lunate, and triquetral bones). It allows for flexion, extension, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation movements of the hand. The wrist joint is surrounded by a capsule and reinforced by several ligaments that provide stability and strength to the joint.

A Rheumatoid nodule is defined as a type of non-suppurative inflammatory lesion that occurs in the subcutaneous tissue, commonly associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). These nodules are firm, round to oval shaped, and usually range from 0.5 to 5 cm in size. They are typically found over bony prominences such as the elbow, heel, or fingers, but can occur in various locations throughout the body.

Histologically, rheumatoid nodules are characterized by a central area of fibrinoid necrosis surrounded by palisading histiocytes and fibroblasts, with an outer layer of chronic inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes and plasma cells. Rheumatoid nodules can be asymptomatic or cause pain and discomfort, depending on their size and location. They are more common in patients with severe RA and are associated with a poorer prognosis.

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, and it is a major component of connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. Collagen provides structure and strength to these tissues and helps them to withstand stretching and tension. It is made up of long chains of amino acids, primarily glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, which are arranged in a triple helix structure. There are at least 16 different types of collagen found in the body, each with slightly different structures and functions. Collagen is important for maintaining the integrity and health of tissues throughout the body, and it has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in various medical conditions.

HLA-DRB1 chains are part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules in the human body. The MHC class II molecules play a crucial role in the immune system by presenting pieces of foreign proteins to CD4+ T cells, which then stimulate an immune response.

HLA-DRB1 chains are one of the two polypeptide chains that make up the HLA-DR heterodimer, the other chain being the HLA-DRA chain. The HLA-DRB1 chain contains specific regions called antigen-binding sites, which bind to and present foreign peptides to CD4+ T cells.

The HLA-DRB1 gene is highly polymorphic, meaning that there are many different variations or alleles of this gene in the human population. These variations can affect an individual's susceptibility or resistance to certain diseases, including autoimmune disorders and infectious diseases. Therefore, the identification and characterization of HLA-DRB1 alleles have important implications for disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

A finger joint, also known as an articulation, is the point where two bones in a finger connect and allow for movement. The majority of finger joints are classified as hinge joints, permitting flexion and extension movements. These joints consist of several components:

1. Articular cartilage: Smooth tissue that covers the ends of the bones, enabling smooth movement and protecting the bones from friction.
2. Joint capsule: A fibrous sac enclosing the joint, providing stability and producing synovial fluid for lubrication.
3. Synovial membrane: Lines the inner surface of the joint capsule and produces synovial fluid to lubricate the joint.
4. Volar plate (palmar ligament): A strong band of tissue located on the palm side of the joint, preventing excessive extension and maintaining alignment.
5. Collateral ligaments: Two bands of tissue located on each side of the joint, providing lateral stability and limiting radial and ulnar deviation.
6. Flexor tendons: Tendons that attach to the bones on the palmar side of the finger joints, facilitating flexion movements.
7. Extensor tendons: Tendons that attach to the bones on the dorsal side of the finger joints, enabling extension movements.

Finger joints are essential for hand function and enable activities such as grasping, holding, writing, and manipulating objects.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

The tarsal joints are a series of articulations in the foot that involve the bones of the hindfoot and midfoot. There are three main tarsal joints:

1. Talocrural joint (also known as the ankle joint): This is the joint between the talus bone of the lower leg and the tibia and fibula bones of the lower leg, as well as the calcaneus bone of the foot. It allows for dorsiflexion and plantarflexion movements of the foot.
2. Subtalar joint: This is the joint between the talus bone and the calcaneus bone. It allows for inversion and eversion movements of the foot.
3. Tarsometatarsal joints (also known as the Lisfranc joint): These are the joints between the tarsal bones of the midfoot and the metatarsal bones of the forefoot. They allow for flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction movements of the foot.

These joints play an important role in the stability and mobility of the foot, allowing for various movements during activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

Lyme disease is not a "medical definition" itself, but it is a medical condition named after the town of Lyme, Connecticut, where it was first identified in 1975. Medical definitions for this disease are provided by authoritative bodies such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). According to the CDC, Lyme disease is a "infection caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks."

The WHO defines Lyme borreliosis (LB), also known as Lyme disease, as "an infectious disease caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Ixodes spp. ticks."

Both definitions highlight that Lyme disease is a bacterial infection spread by tick bites, specifically from black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis in the United States and Ixodes pacificus on the Pacific Coast) or deer ticks (Ixodes ricinus in Europe). The primary cause of the disease is the spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.

Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptors are cell surface receptors that bind to tumor necrosis factor cytokines. They play crucial roles in the regulation of a variety of immune cell functions, including inflammation, immunity, and cell survival or death (apoptosis).

There are two major types of TNF receptors: TNFR1 (also known as p55 or CD120a) and TNFR2 (also known as p75 or CD120b). TNFR1 is widely expressed in most tissues, while TNFR2 has a more restricted expression pattern and is mainly found on immune cells.

TNF receptors have an intracellular domain called the death domain, which can trigger signaling pathways leading to apoptosis when activated by TNF ligands. However, they can also activate other signaling pathways that promote cell survival, differentiation, and inflammation. Dysregulation of TNF receptor signaling has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions.

HLA-DR4 is a type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II histocompatibility antigen, which is found on the surface of white blood cells. It is encoded by the HLA-DRA and HLA-DRB1 genes, located on chromosome 6. The HLA-DR4 antigen includes several subtypes, such as DRB1*04:01, DRB1*04:02, DRB1*04:03, DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:05, DRB1*04:06, DRB1*04:07, DRB1*04:08, DRB1*04:09, DRB1*04:10, DRB1*04:11, and DRB1*04:12.

The HLA-DR4 antigen plays a crucial role in the immune system by presenting peptides to CD4+ T cells, which then stimulate an immune response. This antigen is associated with several autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. However, it's important to note that having the HLA-DR4 antigen does not necessarily mean that a person will develop one of these conditions, as other genetic and environmental factors also contribute to their development.

Anti-inflammatory agents are a class of drugs or substances that reduce inflammation in the body. They work by inhibiting the production of inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes, which are released during an immune response and contribute to symptoms like pain, swelling, redness, and warmth.

There are two main types of anti-inflammatory agents: steroidal and nonsteroidal. Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs) include corticosteroids, which mimic the effects of hormones produced by the adrenal gland. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a larger group that includes both prescription and over-the-counter medications, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While both types of anti-inflammatory agents can be effective in reducing inflammation and relieving symptoms, they differ in their mechanisms of action, side effects, and potential risks. Long-term use of NSAIDs, for example, can increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, kidney damage, and cardiovascular events. Corticosteroids can have significant side effects as well, particularly with long-term use, including weight gain, mood changes, and increased susceptibility to infections.

It's important to use anti-inflammatory agents only as directed by a healthcare provider, and to be aware of potential risks and interactions with other medications or health conditions.

Joint diseases is a broad term that refers to various conditions affecting the joints, including but not limited to:

1. Osteoarthritis (OA): A degenerative joint disease characterized by the breakdown of cartilage and underlying bone, leading to pain, stiffness, and potential loss of function.
2. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): An autoimmune disorder causing inflammation in the synovial membrane lining the joints, resulting in swelling, pain, and joint damage if left untreated.
3. Infectious Arthritis: Joint inflammation caused by bacterial, viral, or fungal infections that spread through the bloodstream or directly enter the joint space.
4. Gout: A type of arthritis resulting from the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, typically affecting the big toe and characterized by sudden attacks of severe pain, redness, and swelling.
5. Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA): An inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis, causing symptoms such as pain, stiffness, and swelling in the joints and surrounding tissues.
6. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): A group of chronic arthritis conditions affecting children, characterized by joint inflammation, pain, and stiffness.
7. Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of arthritis primarily affecting the spine, causing inflammation, pain, and potential fusion of spinal vertebrae.
8. Bursitis: Inflammation of the fluid-filled sacs (bursae) that cushion joints, leading to pain and swelling.
9. Tendinitis: Inflammation or degeneration of tendons, which connect muscles to bones, often resulting in pain and stiffness near joints.

These conditions can impact the function and mobility of affected joints, causing discomfort and limiting daily activities. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential for managing joint diseases and preserving joint health.

HLA-DR antigens are a type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule that plays a crucial role in the immune system. They are found on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes. HLA-DR molecules present peptide antigens to CD4+ T cells, also known as helper T cells, thereby initiating an immune response.

HLA-DR antigens are highly polymorphic, meaning that there are many different variants of these molecules in the human population. This diversity allows for a wide range of potential peptide antigens to be presented and recognized by the immune system. HLA-DR antigens are encoded by genes located on chromosome 6 in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region.

In transplantation, HLA-DR compatibility between donor and recipient is an important factor in determining the success of the transplant. Incompatibility can lead to a heightened immune response against the transplanted organ or tissue, resulting in rejection. Additionally, certain HLA-DR types have been associated with increased susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

L-Citrulline is a non-essential amino acid that plays a role in the urea cycle, which is the process by which the body eliminates toxic ammonia from the bloodstream. It is called "non-essential" because it can be synthesized by the body from other compounds, such as L-Ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate.

Citrulline is found in some foods, including watermelon, bitter melon, and certain types of sausage. It is also available as a dietary supplement. In the body, citrulline is converted to another amino acid called L-Arginine, which is involved in the production of nitric oxide, a molecule that helps dilate blood vessels and improve blood flow.

Citrulline has been studied for its potential benefits on various aspects of health, including exercise performance, cardiovascular function, and immune system function. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits and establish safe and effective dosages.

Cytokines are a broad and diverse category of small signaling proteins that are secreted by various cells, including immune cells, in response to different stimuli. They play crucial roles in regulating the immune response, inflammation, hematopoiesis, and cellular communication.

Cytokines mediate their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, which triggers intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately result in changes in gene expression, cell behavior, and function. Some key functions of cytokines include:

1. Regulating the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and macrophages.
2. Coordinating the inflammatory response by recruiting immune cells to sites of infection or tissue damage and modulating their effector functions.
3. Regulating hematopoiesis, the process of blood cell formation in the bone marrow, by controlling the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.
4. Modulating the development and function of the nervous system, including neuroinflammation, neuroprotection, and neuroregeneration.

Cytokines can be classified into several categories based on their structure, function, or cellular origin. Some common types of cytokines include interleukins (ILs), interferons (IFNs), tumor necrosis factors (TNFs), chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), and transforming growth factors (TGFs). Dysregulation of cytokine production and signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Spondylarthropathies is a term used to describe a group of interrelated inflammatory diseases that primarily affect the joints of the spine (vertebral column) and the sites where the ligaments and tendons attach to the bones (entheses). These conditions also often have associations with extra-articular features, such as skin, eye, and intestinal manifestations. The most common spondylarthropathies are ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis (formerly known as Reiter's syndrome), enteropathic arthritis (associated with inflammatory bowel disease), and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathies.

The primary hallmark of these conditions is enthesitis, which is an inflammation at the sites where ligaments or tendons attach to bones. This can lead to pain, stiffness, and limited mobility in the affected areas, particularly in the spine and sacroiliac joints (the joints that connect the base of the spine to the pelvis).

Spondylarthropathies have a strong genetic association with the human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) gene. However, not all individuals with this gene will develop spondylarthropathies, and many people without the gene can still be affected by these conditions.

Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of spondylarthropathies are essential to help manage symptoms, prevent joint damage, and maintain mobility and quality of life. Treatment options typically include a combination of medications, physical therapy, and lifestyle modifications.

"Foot joints" is a general term that refers to the various articulations or connections between the bones in the foot. There are several joints in the foot, including:

1. The ankle joint (tibiotalar joint): This is the joint between the tibia and fibula bones of the lower leg and the talus bone of the foot.
2. The subtalar joint (talocalcaneal joint): This is the joint between the talus bone and the calcaneus (heel) bone.
3. The calcaneocuboid joint: This is the joint between the calcaneus bone and the cuboid bone, which is one of the bones in the midfoot.
4. The tarsometatarsal joints (Lisfranc joint): These are the joints that connect the tarsal bones in the midfoot to the metatarsal bones in the forefoot.
5. The metatarsophalangeal joints: These are the joints between the metatarsal bones and the phalanges (toes) in the forefoot.
6. The interphalangeal joints: These are the joints between the phalanges within each toe.

Each of these foot joints plays a specific role in supporting the foot, absorbing shock, and allowing for movement and flexibility during walking and other activities.

Psoriasis is a chronic skin disorder that is characterized by recurrent episodes of red, scaly patches on the skin. The scales are typically silvery-white and often occur on the elbows, knees, scalp, and lower back, but they can appear anywhere on the body. The exact cause of psoriasis is unknown, but it is believed to be related to an immune system issue that causes skin cells to grow too quickly.

There are several types of psoriasis, including plaque psoriasis (the most common form), guttate psoriasis, inverse psoriasis, pustular psoriasis, and erythrodermic psoriasis. The symptoms and severity of the condition can vary widely from person to person, ranging from mild to severe.

While there is no cure for psoriasis, various treatments are available that can help manage the symptoms and improve quality of life. These may include topical medications, light therapy, and systemic medications such as biologics. Lifestyle measures such as stress reduction, quitting smoking, and avoiding triggers (such as certain foods or alcohol) may also be helpful in managing psoriasis.

Articular cartilage is the smooth, white tissue that covers the ends of bones where they come together to form joints. It provides a cushion between bones and allows for smooth movement by reducing friction. Articular cartilage also absorbs shock and distributes loads evenly across the joint, protecting the bones from damage. It is avascular, meaning it does not have its own blood supply, and relies on the surrounding synovial fluid for nutrients. Over time, articular cartilage can wear down or become damaged due to injury or disease, leading to conditions such as osteoarthritis.

The ankle joint, also known as the talocrural joint, is the articulation between the bones of the lower leg (tibia and fibula) and the talus bone in the foot. It is a synovial hinge joint that allows for dorsiflexion and plantarflexion movements, which are essential for walking, running, and jumping. The ankle joint is reinforced by strong ligaments on both sides to provide stability during these movements.

Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. It is characterized by the following signs: rubor (redness), tumor (swelling), calor (heat), dolor (pain), and functio laesa (loss of function). The process involves the activation of the immune system, recruitment of white blood cells, and release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to the elimination of the injurious stimuli and initiation of the healing process. However, uncontrolled or chronic inflammation can also lead to tissue damage and diseases.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the adaptive immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several different types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs).

CD4+ helper T-cells assist in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages. They also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response. CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells directly kill infected cells by releasing toxic substances. Regulatory T-cells help maintain immune tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases by suppressing the activity of other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes are important in the immune response to viral infections, cancer, and other diseases. Dysfunction or depletion of T-cells can lead to immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to infections. On the other hand, an overactive T-cell response can contribute to autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation.

Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a type of cytokine, which are proteins that play a crucial role in cell signaling and communication during the immune response. IL-17 is primarily produced by a subset of T helper cells called Th17 cells, although other cell types like neutrophils, mast cells, natural killer cells, and innate lymphoid cells can also produce it.

IL-17 has several functions in the immune system, including:

1. Promoting inflammation: IL-17 stimulates the production of various proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and enzymes from different cell types, leading to the recruitment of immune cells like neutrophils to the site of infection or injury.
2. Defending against extracellular pathogens: IL-17 plays a critical role in protecting the body against bacterial and fungal infections by enhancing the recruitment and activation of neutrophils, which can engulf and destroy these microorganisms.
3. Regulating tissue homeostasis: IL-17 helps maintain the balance between immune tolerance and immunity in various tissues by regulating the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and other structural components.

However, dysregulated IL-17 production or signaling has been implicated in several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, such as psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, targeting the IL-17 pathway with specific therapeutics has emerged as a promising strategy for treating these conditions.

Edema is the medical term for swelling caused by excess fluid accumulation in the body tissues. It can affect any part of the body, but it's most commonly noticed in the hands, feet, ankles, and legs. Edema can be a symptom of various underlying medical conditions, such as heart failure, kidney disease, liver disease, or venous insufficiency.

The swelling occurs when the capillaries leak fluid into the surrounding tissues, causing them to become swollen and puffy. The excess fluid can also collect in the cavities of the body, leading to conditions such as pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs) or ascites (fluid in the abdominal cavity).

The severity of edema can vary from mild to severe, and it may be accompanied by other symptoms such as skin discoloration, stiffness, and pain. Treatment for edema depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, lifestyle changes, or medical procedures.

Freund's adjuvant is not a medical condition but a substance used in laboratory research to enhance the body's immune response to an antigen or vaccine. It is named after its developer, Jules T. Freund.

There are two types of Freund's adjuvants: complete and incomplete. Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) contains killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria, which causes a strong inflammatory response when injected into the body. This makes it an effective adjuvant for experimental vaccines, as it helps to stimulate the immune system and promote a stronger and longer-lasting immune response.

Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA) is similar to FCA but does not contain Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is less potent than FCA but still useful for boosting the immune response to certain antigens.

It is important to note that Freund's adjuvants are not used in human vaccines due to their potential to cause adverse reactions, including granulomas and other inflammatory responses. They are primarily used in laboratory research with animals.

In animal anatomy, the tarsus is the section of the lower limb that is equivalent to the human ankle and rearfoot. It is the part of the leg between the metatarsus, which contains the bones of the toes, and the crus (the lower leg), which contains the tibia and fibula bones. The tarsus is made up of several bones, including the talus, calcaneus, cuboid, navicular, and three cuneiform bones in humans. In animals, these bones may be fused or partially fused, depending on the species. The tarsus plays a crucial role in weight-bearing and movement, providing stability and support for the animal's body.

An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is a type of analytical biochemistry assay used to detect and quantify the presence of a substance, typically a protein or peptide, in a liquid sample. It takes its name from the enzyme-linked antibodies used in the assay.

In an ELISA, the sample is added to a well containing a surface that has been treated to capture the target substance. If the target substance is present in the sample, it will bind to the surface. Next, an enzyme-linked antibody specific to the target substance is added. This antibody will bind to the captured target substance if it is present. After washing away any unbound material, a substrate for the enzyme is added. If the enzyme is present due to its linkage to the antibody, it will catalyze a reaction that produces a detectable signal, such as a color change or fluorescence. The intensity of this signal is proportional to the amount of target substance present in the sample, allowing for quantification.

ELISAs are widely used in research and clinical settings to detect and measure various substances, including hormones, viruses, and bacteria. They offer high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility, making them a reliable choice for many applications.

Tenosynovitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the lining (synovium) surrounding a tendon, which is a cord-like structure that attaches muscle to bone. This inflammation can cause pain, swelling, and difficulty moving the affected joint. Tenosynovitis often affects the hands, wrists, feet, and ankles, and it can result from various causes, including infection, injury, overuse, or autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of tenosynovitis are essential to prevent complications such as tendon rupture or chronic pain.

HLA-B27 antigen is a type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) found on the surface of white blood cells. HLAs are proteins that help the body's immune system distinguish its own cells from foreign substances such as viruses and bacteria.

HLA-B27 is a specific type of HLA-B antigen, which is part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. The presence of HLA-B27 antigen can be inherited from parents to their offspring.

While most people with the HLA-B27 antigen do not develop any health problems, this antigen is associated with an increased risk of developing certain inflammatory diseases, particularly spondyloarthritis, a group of disorders that affect the joints and spine. Examples of these conditions include ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and enteropathic arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. However, not everyone with HLA-B27 will develop these diseases, and many people without the antigen can still develop spondyloarthritis.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

Organogold compounds are chemical compounds that contain carbon-gold bonds, where gold is bonded directly to carbon atoms. These compounds have been synthesized and studied for their unique properties and potential applications in various fields, including medicine, catalysis, and materials science. In the medical context, organogold compounds have been explored as potential therapeutic agents, particularly in the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Some organogold compounds have shown promising antitumor and antibacterial activities, although their clinical use is still under investigation.

Combination drug therapy is a treatment approach that involves the use of multiple medications with different mechanisms of action to achieve better therapeutic outcomes. This approach is often used in the management of complex medical conditions such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases. The goal of combination drug therapy is to improve efficacy, reduce the risk of drug resistance, decrease the likelihood of adverse effects, and enhance the overall quality of life for patients.

In combining drugs, healthcare providers aim to target various pathways involved in the disease process, which may help to:

1. Increase the effectiveness of treatment by attacking the disease from multiple angles.
2. Decrease the dosage of individual medications, reducing the risk and severity of side effects.
3. Slow down or prevent the development of drug resistance, a common problem in chronic diseases like HIV/AIDS and cancer.
4. Improve patient compliance by simplifying dosing schedules and reducing pill burden.

Examples of combination drug therapy include:

1. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV treatment, which typically involves three or more drugs from different classes to suppress viral replication and prevent the development of drug resistance.
2. Chemotherapy regimens for cancer treatment, where multiple cytotoxic agents are used to target various stages of the cell cycle and reduce the likelihood of tumor cells developing resistance.
3. Cardiovascular disease management, which may involve combining medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, diuretics, and statins to control blood pressure, heart rate, fluid balance, and cholesterol levels.
4. Treatment of tuberculosis, which often involves a combination of several antibiotics to target different aspects of the bacterial life cycle and prevent the development of drug-resistant strains.

When prescribing combination drug therapy, healthcare providers must carefully consider factors such as potential drug interactions, dosing schedules, adverse effects, and contraindications to ensure safe and effective treatment. Regular monitoring of patients is essential to assess treatment response, manage side effects, and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

A hand joint, also known as an articulation, is the location at which two or more bones connect. Specifically, in the context of the hand, there are several types of joints:

1. **Metacarpophalangeal (MCP) Joints:** These are the joints located between the metacarpal bones of the hand and the proximal phalanges of the fingers. The MCP joints allow for flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and circumduction movements.
2. **Proximal Interphalangeal (PIP) Joints:** These are the joints located between the proximal and middle phalanges of the fingers. The PIP joints allow for flexion, extension, and a limited amount of abduction and adduction movements.
3. **Distal Interphalangeal (DIP) Joints:** These are the joints located between the middle and distal phalanges of the fingers. The DIP joints mainly allow for flexion and extension movements.
4. **Carpometacarpal (CMC) Joints:** These are the joints located between the carpal bones of the wrist and the metacarpal bones of the hand. The CMC joints, particularly the first CMC joint at the base of the thumb, allow for a wide range of movements, including flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and opposition (the ability to touch the tip of the thumb to each of the other fingers).

These hand joints are supported by various structures such as ligaments, tendons, muscles, and cartilage, which provide stability, enable movement, and absorb shock during daily activities.

Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) is an enzyme involved in the glycolytic and gluconeogenesis pathways. It catalyzes the interconversion of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and fructose-6-phosphate (F6P), which are key metabolic intermediates in these pathways. This reaction is a reversible step that helps maintain the balance between the breakdown and synthesis of glucose in the cell.

In glycolysis, GPI converts G6P to F6P, which subsequently gets converted to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F1,6BP) by the enzyme phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1). In gluconeogenesis, the reaction is reversed, and F6P is converted back to G6P.

Deficiency or dysfunction of Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase can lead to various metabolic disorders, such as glycogen storage diseases and hereditary motor neuropathies.

Disability Evaluation is the process of determining the nature and extent of a person's functional limitations or impairments, and assessing their ability to perform various tasks and activities in order to determine eligibility for disability benefits or accommodations. This process typically involves a medical examination and assessment by a licensed healthcare professional, such as a physician or psychologist, who evaluates the individual's symptoms, medical history, laboratory test results, and functional abilities. The evaluation may also involve input from other professionals, such as vocational experts, occupational therapists, or speech-language pathologists, who can provide additional information about the person's ability to perform specific tasks and activities in a work or daily living context. Based on this information, a determination is made about whether the individual meets the criteria for disability as defined by the relevant governing authority, such as the Social Security Administration or the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. It is a complex phenomenon that can result from various stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical, or chemical irritation, and it can be acute or chronic. The perception of pain involves the activation of specialized nerve cells called nociceptors, which transmit signals to the brain via the spinal cord. These signals are then processed in different regions of the brain, leading to the conscious experience of pain. It's important to note that pain is a highly individual and subjective experience, and its perception can vary widely among individuals.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease that can affect almost any organ or system in the body. In SLE, the immune system produces an exaggerated response, leading to the production of autoantibodies that attack the body's own cells and tissues, causing inflammation and damage. The symptoms and severity of SLE can vary widely from person to person, but common features include fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes (particularly a "butterfly" rash across the nose and cheeks), fever, hair loss, and sensitivity to sunlight.

Systemic lupus erythematosus can also affect the kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, blood vessels, and other organs, leading to a wide range of symptoms such as kidney dysfunction, chest pain, shortness of breath, seizures, and anemia. The exact cause of SLE is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors. Treatment typically involves medications to suppress the immune system and manage symptoms, and may require long-term management by a team of healthcare professionals.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a cytokine, a type of protein that plays a crucial role in communication between cells, especially in the immune system. It is produced by various cells including T-cells, B-cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells in response to infection, injury, or inflammation.

IL-6 has diverse effects on different cell types. In the immune system, it stimulates the growth and differentiation of B-cells into plasma cells that produce antibodies. It also promotes the activation and survival of T-cells. Moreover, IL-6 plays a role in fever induction by acting on the hypothalamus to raise body temperature during an immune response.

In addition to its functions in the immune system, IL-6 has been implicated in various physiological processes such as hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells), bone metabolism, and neural development. However, abnormal levels of IL-6 have also been associated with several diseases, including autoimmune disorders, chronic inflammation, and cancer.

A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often progresses slowly over a period of years and requires ongoing management and care. These diseases are typically not fully curable, but symptoms can be managed to improve quality of life. Common chronic diseases include heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They are often associated with advanced age, although they can also affect children and younger adults. Chronic diseases can have significant impacts on individuals' physical, emotional, and social well-being, as well as on healthcare systems and society at large.

Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a type of cytokine, which are proteins that play a crucial role in cell signaling. Specifically, IL-1 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is involved in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses in the body. It is produced by various cells, including monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, in response to infection or injury.

IL-1 exists in two forms, IL-1α and IL-1β, which have similar biological activities but are encoded by different genes. Both forms of IL-1 bind to the same receptor, IL-1R, and activate intracellular signaling pathways that lead to the production of other cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory mediators.

IL-1 has a wide range of biological effects, including fever induction, activation of immune cells, regulation of hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells), and modulation of bone metabolism. Dysregulation of IL-1 production or activity has been implicated in various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, IL-1 is an important target for the development of therapies aimed at modulating the immune response and reducing inflammation.

Genetic predisposition to disease refers to an increased susceptibility or vulnerability to develop a particular illness or condition due to inheriting specific genetic variations or mutations from one's parents. These genetic factors can make it more likely for an individual to develop a certain disease, but it does not guarantee that the person will definitely get the disease. Environmental factors, lifestyle choices, and interactions between genes also play crucial roles in determining if a genetically predisposed person will actually develop the disease. It is essential to understand that having a genetic predisposition only implies a higher risk, not an inevitable outcome.

Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Protein (IL-1Ra) is a naturally occurring protein that acts as a competitive inhibitor of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor. IL-1 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in various physiological processes, including the immune response and inflammation. The binding of IL-1 to its receptor triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the activation of inflammatory genes and cellular responses.

IL-1Ra shares structural similarities with IL-1 but does not initiate the downstream signaling pathway. Instead, it binds to the same receptor site as IL-1, preventing IL-1 from interacting with its receptor and thus inhibiting the inflammatory response.

Increased levels of IL-1Ra have been found in various inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and sepsis, where it acts to counterbalance the pro-inflammatory effects of IL-1. Recombinant IL-1Ra (Anakinra) is used clinically as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

Cartilage is a type of connective tissue that is found throughout the body in various forms. It is made up of specialized cells called chondrocytes, which are embedded in a firm, flexible matrix composed of collagen fibers and proteoglycans. This unique structure gives cartilage its characteristic properties of being both strong and flexible.

There are three main types of cartilage in the human body: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage, and fibrocartilage.

1. Hyaline cartilage is the most common type and is found in areas such as the articular surfaces of bones (where they meet to form joints), the nose, trachea, and larynx. It has a smooth, glassy appearance and provides a smooth, lubricated surface for joint movement.
2. Elastic cartilage contains more elastin fibers than hyaline cartilage, which gives it greater flexibility and resilience. It is found in structures such as the external ear and parts of the larynx and epiglottis.
3. Fibrocartilage has a higher proportion of collagen fibers and fewer chondrocytes than hyaline or elastic cartilage. It is found in areas that require high tensile strength, such as the intervertebral discs, menisci (found in joints like the knee), and the pubic symphysis.

Cartilage plays a crucial role in supporting and protecting various structures within the body, allowing for smooth movement and providing a cushion between bones to absorb shock and prevent wear and tear. However, cartilage has limited capacity for self-repair and regeneration, making damage or degeneration of cartilage tissue a significant concern in conditions such as osteoarthritis.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

Isoxazoles are not a medical term, but a chemical compound. They are organic compounds containing a five-membered ring consisting of one nitrogen atom, one oxygen atom, and three carbon atoms. Isoxazoles have various applications in the pharmaceutical industry as they can be used to synthesize different drugs. Some isoxazole derivatives have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects. However, isoxazoles themselves are not a medical diagnosis or treatment.

Autoantigens are substances that are typically found in an individual's own body, but can stimulate an immune response because they are recognized as foreign by the body's own immune system. In autoimmune diseases, the immune system mistakenly attacks and damages healthy tissues and organs because it recognizes some of their components as autoantigens. These autoantigens can be proteins, DNA, or other molecules that are normally present in the body but have become altered or exposed due to various factors such as infection, genetics, or environmental triggers. The immune system then produces antibodies and activates immune cells to attack these autoantigens, leading to tissue damage and inflammation.

Prednisolone is a synthetic glucocorticoid drug, which is a class of steroid hormones. It is commonly used in the treatment of various inflammatory and autoimmune conditions due to its potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Prednisolone works by binding to specific receptors in cells, leading to changes in gene expression that reduce the production of substances involved in inflammation, such as cytokines and prostaglandins.

Prednisolone is available in various forms, including tablets, syrups, and injectable solutions. It can be used to treat a wide range of medical conditions, including asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, allergies, skin conditions, and certain types of cancer.

Like other steroid medications, prednisolone can have significant side effects if used in high doses or for long periods of time. These may include weight gain, mood changes, increased risk of infections, osteoporosis, diabetes, and adrenal suppression. As a result, the use of prednisolone should be closely monitored by a healthcare professional to ensure that its benefits outweigh its risks.

Penicillamine is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called chelating agents. It works by binding to heavy metals in the body, such as lead, mercury, or copper, and forming a compound that can be excreted in the urine. This helps to remove these harmful substances from the body.

Penicillamine is also used to treat certain medical conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Wilson's disease (a genetic disorder that causes copper accumulation in the body), and cystinuria (a genetic disorder that causes an amino acid called cystine to accumulate in the kidneys and form stones).

It is important to note that penicillamine can have serious side effects, including kidney damage, so it should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

'Borrelia burgdorferi' is a species of spirochete bacteria that is the primary cause of Lyme disease in humans. The bacteria are transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis in the northeastern, midwestern, and eastern parts of the United States; Ixodes pacificus on the Pacific Coast).

The bacterium was first identified and named after Willy Burgdorfer, who discovered the spirochete in the mid-1980s. The infection can lead to a variety of symptoms, including fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, the infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system, leading to more severe complications.

Antibiotic treatment is usually effective in eliminating the bacteria and resolving symptoms, especially when initiated early in the course of the disease. However, some individuals may experience persistent symptoms even after treatment, a condition known as post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). The exact cause of PTLDS remains unclear, with ongoing research investigating potential factors such as residual bacterial infection, autoimmune responses, or tissue damage.

Immunoglobulin M (IgM) is a type of antibody that is primarily found in the blood and lymph fluid. It is the first antibody to be produced in response to an initial exposure to an antigen, making it an important part of the body's primary immune response. IgM antibodies are large molecules that are composed of five basic units, giving them a pentameric structure. They are primarily found on the surface of B cells as membrane-bound immunoglobulins (mlgM), where they function as receptors for antigens. Once an mlgM receptor binds to an antigen, it triggers the activation and differentiation of the B cell into a plasma cell that produces and secretes large amounts of soluble IgM antibodies.

IgM antibodies are particularly effective at agglutination (clumping) and complement activation, which makes them important in the early stages of an immune response to help clear pathogens from the bloodstream. However, they are not as stable or long-lived as other types of antibodies, such as IgG, and their levels tend to decline after the initial immune response has occurred.

In summary, Immunoglobulin M (IgM) is a type of antibody that plays a crucial role in the primary immune response to antigens by agglutination and complement activation. It is primarily found in the blood and lymph fluid, and it is produced by B cells after they are activated by an antigen.

A hindlimb, also known as a posterior limb, is one of the pair of extremities that are located distally to the trunk in tetrapods (four-legged vertebrates) and include mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. In humans and other primates, hindlimbs are equivalent to the lower limbs, which consist of the thigh, leg, foot, and toes.

The primary function of hindlimbs is locomotion, allowing animals to move from one place to another. However, they also play a role in other activities such as balance, support, and communication. In humans, the hindlimbs are responsible for weight-bearing, standing, walking, running, and jumping.

In medical terminology, the term "hindlimb" is not commonly used to describe human anatomy. Instead, healthcare professionals use terms like lower limbs or lower extremities to refer to the same region of the body. However, in comparative anatomy and veterinary medicine, the term hindlimb is still widely used to describe the corresponding structures in non-human animals.

Yersinia infections are caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia, with Y. pestis (causing plague), Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis being the most common species associated with human illness. These bacteria can cause a range of symptoms depending on the site of infection.

Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis primarily infect the gastrointestinal tract, causing yersiniosis. Symptoms may include diarrhea (often containing blood), abdominal pain, fever, vomiting, and inflammation of the lymph nodes in the abdomen. In severe cases, these bacteria can spread to other parts of the body, leading to more serious complications such as sepsis or meningitis.

Y. pestis is infamous for causing plague, which can manifest as bubonic, septicemic, or pneumonic forms. Bubonic plague results from the bite of an infected flea and causes swollen, painful lymph nodes (buboes) in the groin, armpits, or neck. Septicemic plague occurs when Y. pestis spreads through the bloodstream, causing fever, chills, extreme weakness, and potential organ failure. Pneumonic plague is a severe respiratory infection caused by inhaling infectious droplets from an infected person or animal; it can lead to rapidly progressing pneumonia, sepsis, and respiratory failure if left untreated.

Proper diagnosis of Yersinia infections typically involves laboratory testing of bodily fluids (e.g., blood, stool) or tissue samples to identify the bacteria through culture, PCR, or serological methods. Treatment usually consists of antibiotics such as doxycycline, fluoroquinolones, or aminoglycosides, depending on the severity and type of infection. Preventive measures include good hygiene practices, prompt treatment of infected individuals, and vector control to reduce the risk of transmission.

Arthralgia is a medical term that refers to pain in the joints. It does not involve inflammation, which would be referred to as arthritis. The pain can range from mild to severe and may occur in one or multiple joints. Arthralgia can have various causes, including injuries, infections, degenerative conditions, or systemic diseases. In some cases, the underlying cause of arthralgia remains unknown. Treatment typically focuses on managing the pain and addressing the underlying condition if it can be identified.

Spondylarthritis is a term used to describe a group of interrelated inflammatory diseases that primarily affect the spine and sacroiliac joints (where the spine connects to the pelvis), but can also involve other joints, ligaments, tendons, and entheses (sites where tendons or ligaments attach to bones). These conditions share common genetic, clinical, and imaging features.

The most common forms of spondylarthritis include:

1. Ankylosing spondylitis - a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects the spine and sacroiliac joints, causing pain and stiffness. In some cases, it can lead to fusion of the spine's vertebrae.
2. Psoriatic arthritis - a form of arthritis that occurs in people with psoriasis, an autoimmune skin condition. It can cause inflammation in the joints, tendons, and entheses.
3. Reactive arthritis - a type of arthritis that develops as a reaction to an infection in another part of the body, often the urinary or gastrointestinal tract.
4. Enteropathic arthritis - a form of arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
5. Undifferentiated spondylarthritis - when a patient presents with features of spondylarthritis but does not meet the criteria for any specific subtype.

Common symptoms of spondylarthritis include:

- Back pain and stiffness, often worse in the morning or after periods of inactivity
- Peripheral joint pain and swelling
- Enthesitis (inflammation at tendon or ligament insertion points)
- Dactylitis (swelling of an entire finger or toe)
- Fatigue
- Uveitis (inflammation of the eye)
- Skin rashes, such as psoriasis
- Inflammatory bowel disease symptoms

Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies. Treatment often includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), biologic agents, and lifestyle modifications to manage symptoms and prevent joint damage.

Autoimmunity is a medical condition in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy tissues within the body. In normal function, the immune system recognizes and fights off foreign substances such as bacteria, viruses, and toxins. However, when autoimmunity occurs, the immune system identifies self-molecules or tissues as foreign and produces an immune response against them.

This misguided response can lead to chronic inflammation, tissue damage, and impaired organ function. Autoimmune diseases can affect various parts of the body, including the joints, skin, glands, muscles, and blood vessels. Some common examples of autoimmune diseases are rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and Graves' disease.

The exact cause of autoimmunity is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors that trigger an abnormal immune response in susceptible individuals. Treatment for autoimmune diseases typically involves managing symptoms, reducing inflammation, and suppressing the immune system's overactive response using medications such as corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, and biologics.

Pain measurement, in a medical context, refers to the quantification or evaluation of the intensity and/or unpleasantness of a patient's subjective pain experience. This is typically accomplished through the use of standardized self-report measures such as numerical rating scales (NRS), visual analog scales (VAS), or categorical scales (mild, moderate, severe). In some cases, physiological measures like heart rate, blood pressure, and facial expressions may also be used to supplement self-reported pain ratings. The goal of pain measurement is to help healthcare providers better understand the nature and severity of a patient's pain in order to develop an effective treatment plan.

A toe joint, also known as a metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint, is the articulation between the bones in the foot (metatarsals) and the bones in the toes (phalanges). There are five MTP joints in each foot, one for each toe except for the big toe, which has its own separate joint called the first metatarsophalangeal joint.

The MTP joints allow for movement and flexibility of the toes, enabling activities such as walking, running, and standing. Problems with these joints can lead to pain, stiffness, and difficulty moving, making it important to maintain their health and mobility through proper foot care and exercise.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Fibroblasts are specialized cells that play a critical role in the body's immune response and wound healing process. They are responsible for producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, providing structural support and biochemical signals for surrounding cells.

Fibroblasts produce various ECM proteins such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins, forming a complex network of fibers that give tissues their strength and flexibility. They also help in the regulation of tissue homeostasis by controlling the turnover of ECM components through the process of remodeling.

In response to injury or infection, fibroblasts become activated and start to proliferate rapidly, migrating towards the site of damage. Here, they participate in the inflammatory response, releasing cytokines and chemokines that attract immune cells to the area. Additionally, they deposit new ECM components to help repair the damaged tissue and restore its functionality.

Dysregulation of fibroblast activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis (excessive scarring), cancer (where they can contribute to tumor growth and progression), and autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis).

Osteoclasts are large, multinucleated cells that are primarily responsible for bone resorption, a process in which they break down and dissolve the mineralized matrix of bones. They are derived from monocyte-macrophage precursor cells of hematopoietic origin and play a crucial role in maintaining bone homeostasis by balancing bone formation and bone resorption.

Osteoclasts adhere to the bone surface and create an isolated microenvironment, called the "resorption lacuna," between their cell membrane and the bone surface. Here, they release hydrogen ions into the lacuna through a process called proton pumping, which lowers the pH and dissolves the mineral component of the bone matrix. Additionally, osteoclasts secrete proteolytic enzymes, such as cathepsin K, that degrade the organic components, like collagen, in the bone matrix.

An imbalance in osteoclast activity can lead to various bone diseases, including osteoporosis and Paget's disease, where excessive bone resorption results in weakened and fragile bones.

Glucocorticoids are a class of steroid hormones that are naturally produced in the adrenal gland, or can be synthetically manufactured. They play an essential role in the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats, and have significant anti-inflammatory effects. Glucocorticoids suppress immune responses and inflammation by inhibiting the release of inflammatory mediators from various cells, such as mast cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes. They are frequently used in medical treatment for a wide range of conditions, including allergies, asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatological disorders, and certain cancers. Prolonged use or high doses of glucocorticoids can lead to several side effects, such as weight gain, mood changes, osteoporosis, and increased susceptibility to infections.

Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are a type of autoantibody that target structures found in the nucleus of a cell. These antibodies are produced by the immune system and attack the body's own cells and tissues, leading to inflammation and damage. The presence of ANA is often used as a marker for certain autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Sjogren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and polymyositis.

ANA can be detected through a blood test called the antinuclear antibody test. A positive result indicates the presence of ANA in the blood, but it does not necessarily mean that a person has an autoimmune disease. Further testing is usually needed to confirm a diagnosis and determine the specific type of autoantibodies present.

It's important to note that ANA can also be found in healthy individuals, particularly as they age. Therefore, the test results should be interpreted in conjunction with other clinical findings and symptoms.

An antigen-antibody complex is a type of immune complex that forms when an antibody binds to a specific antigen. An antigen is any substance that triggers an immune response, while an antibody is a protein produced by the immune system to neutralize or destroy foreign substances like antigens.

When an antibody binds to an antigen, it forms a complex that can be either soluble or insoluble. Soluble complexes are formed when the antigen is small and can move freely through the bloodstream. Insoluble complexes, on the other hand, are formed when the antigen is too large to move freely, such as when it is part of a bacterium or virus.

The formation of antigen-antibody complexes plays an important role in the immune response. Once formed, these complexes can be recognized and cleared by other components of the immune system, such as phagocytes, which help to prevent further damage to the body. However, in some cases, the formation of large numbers of antigen-antibody complexes can lead to inflammation and tissue damage, contributing to the development of certain autoimmune diseases.

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a protein produced by the liver in response to inflammation or infection in the body. It is named after its ability to bind to the C-polysaccharide of pneumococcus, a type of bacteria. CRP levels can be measured with a simple blood test and are often used as a marker of inflammation or infection. Elevated CRP levels may indicate a variety of conditions, including infections, tissue damage, and chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. However, it is important to note that CRP is not specific to any particular condition, so additional tests are usually needed to make a definitive diagnosis.

Acquired hand deformities refer to structural changes in the hand or fingers that occur after birth, as a result of injury, illness, or other external factors. These deformities can affect any part of the hand, including the bones, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves. Common causes of acquired hand deformities include trauma, infection, degenerative diseases such as arthritis, tumors, and neurological conditions.

The symptoms of acquired hand deformities can vary depending on the severity and location of the deformity. They may include pain, stiffness, swelling, decreased range of motion, loss of function, and changes in appearance. Treatment for acquired hand deformities may involve a combination of medical interventions, such as medication, physical therapy, or splinting, as well as surgical procedures to correct the underlying structural problem. The goal of treatment is to relieve symptoms, improve function, and restore normal appearance and movement to the hand.

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-produced proteins that mimic the immune system's ability to fight off harmful antigens such as viruses and cancer cells. They are created by fusing a single B cell (the type of white blood cell responsible for producing antibodies) with a tumor cell, resulting in a hybrid cell called a hybridoma. This hybridoma can then be cloned to produce a large number of identical cells, all producing the same antibody, hence "monoclonal."

Humanized monoclonal antibodies are a type of monoclonal antibody that have been genetically engineered to include human components. This is done to reduce the risk of an adverse immune response in patients receiving the treatment. In this process, the variable region of the mouse monoclonal antibody, which contains the antigen-binding site, is grafted onto a human constant region. The resulting humanized monoclonal antibody retains the ability to bind to the target antigen while minimizing the immunogenicity associated with murine (mouse) antibodies.

In summary, "antibodies, monoclonal, humanized" refers to a type of laboratory-produced protein that mimics the immune system's ability to fight off harmful antigens, but with reduced immunogenicity due to the inclusion of human components in their structure.

Lymphocyte activation is the process by which B-cells and T-cells (types of lymphocytes) become activated to perform effector functions in an immune response. This process involves the recognition of specific antigens presented on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells or macrophages.

The activation of B-cells leads to their differentiation into plasma cells that produce antibodies, while the activation of T-cells results in the production of cytotoxic T-cells (CD8+ T-cells) that can directly kill infected cells or helper T-cells (CD4+ T-cells) that assist other immune cells.

Lymphocyte activation involves a series of intracellular signaling events, including the binding of co-stimulatory molecules and the release of cytokines, which ultimately result in the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and effector functions. The activation process is tightly regulated to prevent excessive or inappropriate immune responses that can lead to autoimmunity or chronic inflammation.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, such as a bacterium or virus. They are capable of identifying and binding to specific antigens (foreign substances) on the surface of these invaders, marking them for destruction by other immune cells. Antibodies are also known as immunoglobulins and come in several different types, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM, each with a unique function in the immune response. They are composed of four polypeptide chains, two heavy chains and two light chains, that are held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains form the antigen-binding site, which is specific to a particular antigen.

Immunosuppressive agents are medications that decrease the activity of the immune system. They are often used to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs and to treat autoimmune diseases, where the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own tissues. These drugs work by interfering with the immune system's normal responses, which helps to reduce inflammation and damage to tissues. However, because they suppress the immune system, people who take immunosuppressive agents are at increased risk for infections and other complications. Examples of immunosuppressive agents include corticosteroids, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and sirolimus.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Bone resorption is the process by which bone tissue is broken down and absorbed into the body. It is a normal part of bone remodeling, in which old or damaged bone tissue is removed and new tissue is formed. However, excessive bone resorption can lead to conditions such as osteoporosis, in which bones become weak and fragile due to a loss of density. This process is carried out by cells called osteoclasts, which break down the bone tissue and release minerals such as calcium into the bloodstream.

Matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), also known as stromelysin-1, is a member of the matrix metalloproteinase family. These are a group of enzymes involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix, the network of proteins and other molecules that provides structural and biochemical support to surrounding cells. MMP-3 is secreted by various cell types, including fibroblasts, synovial cells, and chondrocytes, in response to inflammatory cytokines.

MMP-3 has the ability to degrade several extracellular matrix components, such as proteoglycans, laminin, fibronectin, and various types of collagen. It also plays a role in processing and activating other MMPs, thereby contributing to the overall breakdown of the extracellular matrix. This activity is crucial during processes like tissue remodeling, wound healing, and embryonic development; however, uncontrolled or excessive MMP-3 activation can lead to pathological conditions, including arthritis, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases.

In summary, Matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) is a proteolytic enzyme involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix and the activation of other MMPs. Its dysregulation has been implicated in several diseases.

Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a member of the interleukin-1 cytokine family and is primarily produced by activated macrophages in response to inflammatory stimuli. It is a crucial mediator of the innate immune response and plays a key role in the regulation of various biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. IL-1β is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and atherosclerosis. It exerts its effects by binding to the interleukin-1 receptor, which triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the activation of various transcription factors and the expression of target genes.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Felty syndrome is a rare complication that can occur in people with long-standing chronic inflammatory arthritis, specifically those with rheumatoid arthritis. It is characterized by the triad of rheumatoid arthritis, an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly), and a decrease in white blood cell count (neutropenia). The neutropenia can lead to an increased risk of infections. Additionally, some people with Felty syndrome may also develop other symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, fever, and a purple rash on the legs (purpura).

The exact cause of Felty syndrome is not fully understood, but it is thought to be related to an abnormal immune response in people with rheumatoid arthritis. Treatment typically involves medications to manage the symptoms and control the underlying rheumatoid arthritis, such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and/or immunosuppressive therapies. In some cases, removal of the spleen (splenectomy) may be recommended to help improve the neutropenia and reduce the risk of infections.

In medical terms, the foot is the part of the lower limb that is distal to the leg and below the ankle, extending from the tarsus to the toes. It is primarily responsible for supporting body weight and facilitating movement through push-off during walking or running. The foot is a complex structure made up of 26 bones, 33 joints, and numerous muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves that work together to provide stability, balance, and flexibility. It can be divided into three main parts: the hindfoot, which contains the talus and calcaneus (heel) bones; the midfoot, which includes the navicular, cuboid, and cuneiform bones; and the forefoot, which consists of the metatarsals and phalanges that form the toes.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

In medical terms, a hand is the part of the human body that is attached to the forearm and consists of the carpus (wrist), metacarpus, and phalanges. It is made up of 27 bones, along with muscles, tendons, ligaments, and other soft tissues. The hand is a highly specialized organ that is capable of performing a wide range of complex movements and functions, including grasping, holding, manipulating objects, and communicating through gestures. It is also richly innervated with sensory receptors that provide information about touch, temperature, pain, and proprioception (the sense of the position and movement of body parts).

B-lymphocytes, also known as B-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the immune system's response to infection. They are responsible for producing antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy pathogens such as bacteria and viruses.

When a B-lymphocyte encounters a pathogen, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies specific to the antigens on the surface of the pathogen. These antibodies bind to the pathogen, marking it for destruction by other immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages.

B-lymphocytes also have a role in presenting antigens to T-lymphocytes, another type of white blood cell involved in the immune response. This helps to stimulate the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes, which can then go on to destroy infected cells or help to coordinate the overall immune response.

Overall, B-lymphocytes are an essential part of the adaptive immune system, providing long-lasting immunity to previously encountered pathogens and helping to protect against future infections.

The sternoclavicular joint is the joint where the clavicle (collarbone) meets the sternum (breastbone). It is the only joint that connects the upper limb to the trunk of the body. This joint allows for movement in multiple directions, including elevation and depression of the shoulder, as well as some degree of protraction and retraction. The sternoclavicular joint is supported by several ligaments, which provide stability and strength to the joint.

Inflammation mediators are substances that are released by the body in response to injury or infection, which contribute to the inflammatory response. These mediators include various chemical factors such as cytokines, chemokines, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and histamine, among others. They play a crucial role in regulating the inflammatory process by attracting immune cells to the site of injury or infection, increasing blood flow to the area, and promoting the repair and healing of damaged tissues. However, an overactive or chronic inflammatory response can also contribute to the development of various diseases and conditions, such as autoimmune disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

The metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint is the joint in the foot where the metatarsal bones of the foot (the long bones behind the toes) connect with the proximal phalanges of the toes. It's a synovial joint, which means it's surrounded by a capsule containing synovial fluid to allow for smooth movement. The MTP joint is responsible for allowing the flexion and extension movements of the toes, and is important for maintaining balance and pushing off during walking and running. Issues with the MTP joint can lead to conditions such as hallux valgus (bunions) or hammertoe.

Auranofin is a medication that contains gold and is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It belongs to a class of drugs called gold-containing compounds, which are used to reduce inflammation and joint damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis.

Auranofin works by inhibiting certain enzymes that play a role in the inflammatory response, which can help to reduce swelling, pain, and stiffness in the joints. It is taken orally, usually in the form of a tablet, and is typically prescribed for use in combination with other medications used to treat rheumatoid arthritis.

It's important to note that auranofin can have serious side effects, including kidney damage, mouth sores, and skin rashes, and it should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider. Additionally, regular monitoring of blood and urine tests is necessary while taking this medication to ensure that it is not causing any harmful effects on the body.

Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks its own moisture-producing glands, particularly the tear and salivary glands. This can lead to symptoms such as dry eyes, dry mouth, and dryness in other areas of the body. In some cases, it may also affect other organs, leading to a variety of complications.

There are two types of Sjögren's syndrome: primary and secondary. Primary Sjögren's syndrome occurs when the condition develops on its own, while secondary Sjögren's syndrome occurs when it develops in conjunction with another autoimmune disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus.

The exact cause of Sjögren's syndrome is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Treatment typically focuses on relieving symptoms and may include artificial tears, saliva substitutes, medications to stimulate saliva production, and immunosuppressive drugs in more severe cases.

Macrophages are a type of white blood cell that are an essential part of the immune system. They are large, specialized cells that engulf and destroy foreign substances, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi, as well as damaged or dead cells. Macrophages are found throughout the body, including in the bloodstream, lymph nodes, spleen, liver, lungs, and connective tissues. They play a critical role in inflammation, immune response, and tissue repair and remodeling.

Macrophages originate from monocytes, which are a type of white blood cell produced in the bone marrow. When monocytes enter the tissues, they differentiate into macrophages, which have a larger size and more specialized functions than monocytes. Macrophages can change their shape and move through tissues to reach sites of infection or injury. They also produce cytokines, chemokines, and other signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response and recruit other immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

Macrophages have a variety of surface receptors that allow them to recognize and respond to different types of foreign substances and signals from other cells. They can engulf and digest foreign particles, bacteria, and viruses through a process called phagocytosis. Macrophages also play a role in presenting antigens to T cells, which are another type of immune cell that helps coordinate the immune response.

Overall, macrophages are crucial for maintaining tissue homeostasis, defending against infection, and promoting wound healing and tissue repair. Dysregulation of macrophage function has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory conditions.

"Bone" is the hard, dense connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrate animals. It provides support and protection for the body's internal organs, and serves as a attachment site for muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Bone is composed of cells called osteoblasts and osteoclasts, which are responsible for bone formation and resorption, respectively, and an extracellular matrix made up of collagen fibers and mineral crystals.

Bones can be classified into two main types: compact bone and spongy bone. Compact bone is dense and hard, and makes up the outer layer of all bones and the shafts of long bones. Spongy bone is less dense and contains large spaces, and makes up the ends of long bones and the interior of flat and irregular bones.

The human body has 206 bones in total. They can be further classified into five categories based on their shape: long bones, short bones, flat bones, irregular bones, and sesamoid bones.

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 22 (PTPN22) is a gene that encodes a protein tyrosine phosphatase, which is an enzyme that regulates various cellular processes by removing phosphate groups from tyrosine residues on proteins. This particular phosphatase is a non-receptor type, meaning it does not have a transmembrane domain and is found in the cytoplasm.

The PTPN22 protein plays a crucial role in regulating immune cell function, particularly T cells, by modulating signaling pathways that are important for their activation and differentiation. Variations in the PTPN22 gene have been associated with an increased risk of developing several autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, and systemic lupus erythematosus. These genetic variations may lead to altered enzymatic activity or expression levels of the PTPN22 protein, resulting in dysregulated immune responses and increased susceptibility to autoimmune diseases.

Gout is a type of inflammatory arthritis that occurs when urate crystals accumulate in and around the joints, causing sudden attacks of severe pain, swelling, redness, and tenderness. Urate crystals can form when there are high levels of uric acid in the blood. Uric acid is a waste product that is produced when the body breaks down purines, substances that are found naturally in certain foods, such as steak, organ meats, and seafood. Other foods also promote higher levels of uric acid, such as alcoholic beverages, especially beer, and drinks sweetened with fruit sugar (fructose).

Normally, uric acid dissolves in the blood and passes through the kidneys and out of the body in urine. But sometimes either the body produces too much uric acid or the kidneys excrete too little uric acid. When this happens, uric acid can build up, forming sharp, needle-like urate crystals in a joint or surrounding tissue that cause pain, inflammation and swelling.

Gout most commonly affects the big toe but can also occur in any joint in the body. The symptoms of gout are often acute, occurring suddenly without warning and frequently at night. The attacks are characterized by a rapid onset of pain, swelling, warmth, and redness in the affected joint. An attack of gout can be so painful that it wakes you up from sleep.

Over time, gout can cause permanent damage to the joints and surrounding tissue, resulting in chronic arthritis. If left untreated, gout also can lead to an accumulation of uric acid crystals in the kidneys, which can result in kidney stones.

Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a soluble cytokine that is primarily produced by the activation of natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes, especially CD4+ Th1 cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. It plays a crucial role in the regulation of the immune response against viral and intracellular bacterial infections, as well as tumor cells. IFN-γ has several functions, including activating macrophages to enhance their microbicidal activity, increasing the presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules on antigen-presenting cells, stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of T cells and NK cells, and inducing the production of other cytokines and chemokines. Additionally, IFN-γ has direct antiproliferative effects on certain types of tumor cells and can enhance the cytotoxic activity of immune cells against infected or malignant cells.

Spondylitis is a term used to describe inflammation in the spinal vertebrae, often leading to stiffness and pain. The most common form is Ankylosing Spondylitis, which is a chronic autoimmune disease where the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the joints in the spine. This can cause the bones in the spine to grow together, resulting in a rigid and inflexible spine. Other forms of spondylitis include reactive spondylitis, infectious spondylitis, and seronegative spondyloarthropathies. Symptoms may also include pain and stiffness in the neck, lower back, hips, and small joints of the body.

Osteitis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of bone tissue. It can occur as a result of various conditions, such as infection (osteomyelitis), trauma, or autoimmune disorders. The symptoms of osteitis may include pain, swelling, warmth, and redness in the affected area, as well as fever and general malaise. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the inflammation, which may involve antibiotics for infection or anti-inflammatory medications for other causes. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove infected or damaged bone tissue.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

I apologize, but there is no medical definition for "Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus, Caprine." The term "Caprine" refers to something related to or derived from goats. Arthritis-Encephalitis Viruses (AEV) are a group of viruses that can affect various animal species and cause joint inflammation (arthritis) and brain inflammation (encephalitis). However, I couldn't find any specific virus named "Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus, Caprine" in the medical literature.

There are several viruses that can affect goats and cause arthritis and encephalitis, such as CAEV (Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus) or PPRV (Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus). If you have any specific concerns about a particular virus affecting goats, please provide more context so I can give you a more accurate and helpful response.

Biological therapy, also known as biotherapy or immunotherapy, is a type of medical treatment that uses biological agents (such as substances derived from living organisms or laboratory-made versions of these substances) to identify and modify specific targets in the body to treat diseases, including cancer. These therapies can work by boosting the body's natural defenses to fight illness, interfering with the growth and spread of abnormal cells, or replacing absent or faulty proteins in the body. Examples of biological therapies include monoclonal antibodies, cytokines, and vaccines.

According to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), biological products are "products that are made from or contain a living organism or its derivatives, such as vaccines, blood and blood components, cells, genes, tissues, and proteins." These products can be composed of sugars, proteins, nucleic acids, or complex combinations of these substances, and they can come from many sources, including humans, animals, microorganisms, or plants.

Biological products are often used to diagnose, prevent, or treat a wide range of medical conditions, and they can be administered in various ways, such as through injection, inhalation, or topical application. Because biological products are derived from living organisms, their manufacturing processes can be complex and must be tightly controlled to ensure the safety, purity, and potency of the final product.

It's important to note that biological products are not the same as drugs, which are chemically synthesized compounds. While drugs are designed to interact with specific targets in the body, such as enzymes or receptors, biological products can have more complex and varied mechanisms of action, making them potentially more difficult to characterize and regulate.

Nonparametric statistics is a branch of statistics that does not rely on assumptions about the distribution of variables in the population from which the sample is drawn. In contrast to parametric methods, nonparametric techniques make fewer assumptions about the data and are therefore more flexible in their application. Nonparametric tests are often used when the data do not meet the assumptions required for parametric tests, such as normality or equal variances.

Nonparametric statistical methods include tests such as the Wilcoxon rank-sum test (also known as the Mann-Whitney U test) for comparing two independent groups, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for comparing two related groups, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for comparing more than two independent groups. These tests use the ranks of the data rather than the actual values to make comparisons, which allows them to be used with ordinal or continuous data that do not meet the assumptions of parametric tests.

Overall, nonparametric statistics provide a useful set of tools for analyzing data in situations where the assumptions of parametric methods are not met, and can help researchers draw valid conclusions from their data even when the data are not normally distributed or have other characteristics that violate the assumptions of parametric tests.

REceptor Activator of NF-kB (RANK) Ligand is a type of protein that plays a crucial role in the immune system and bone metabolism. It belongs to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily and is primarily produced by osteoblasts, which are cells responsible for bone formation.

RANK Ligand binds to its receptor RANK, which is found on the surface of osteoclasts, a type of cell involved in bone resorption or breakdown. The binding of RANK Ligand to RANK activates signaling pathways that promote the differentiation, activation, and survival of osteoclasts, thereby increasing bone resorption.

Abnormalities in the RANKL-RANK signaling pathway have been implicated in various bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and certain types of cancer that metastasize to bones. Therefore, targeting this pathway with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising approach for the treatment of these conditions.

Health status is a term used to describe the overall condition of an individual's health, including physical, mental, and social well-being. It is often assessed through various measures such as medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and self-reported health assessments. Health status can be used to identify health disparities, track changes in population health over time, and evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare interventions.

An epitope is a specific region on the surface of an antigen (a molecule that can trigger an immune response) that is recognized by an antibody, B-cell receptor, or T-cell receptor. It is also commonly referred to as an antigenic determinant. Epitopes are typically composed of linear amino acid sequences or conformational structures made up of discontinuous amino acids in the antigen. They play a crucial role in the immune system's ability to differentiate between self and non-self molecules, leading to the targeted destruction of foreign substances like viruses and bacteria. Understanding epitopes is essential for developing vaccines, diagnostic tests, and immunotherapies.

Transgenic mice are genetically modified rodents that have incorporated foreign DNA (exogenous DNA) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA technology, where a specific gene or genetic sequence of interest is isolated and then introduced into the mouse embryo. The resulting transgenic mice can then express the protein encoded by the foreign gene, allowing researchers to study its function in a living organism.

The process of creating transgenic mice usually involves microinjecting the exogenous DNA into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg, which is then implanted into a surrogate mother. The offspring that result from this procedure are screened for the presence of the foreign DNA, and those that carry the desired genetic modification are used to establish a transgenic mouse line.

Transgenic mice have been widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function, and test new therapies. They provide a valuable tool for understanding complex biological processes and developing new treatments for a variety of medical conditions.

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream where they circulate and are able to move quickly to sites of infection or inflammation in the body. Neutrophils are capable of engulfing and destroying bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances through a process called phagocytosis. They are also involved in the release of inflammatory mediators, which can contribute to tissue damage in some cases. Neutrophils are characterized by the presence of granules in their cytoplasm, which contain enzymes and other proteins that help them carry out their immune functions.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

Genotype, in genetics, refers to the complete heritable genetic makeup of an individual organism, including all of its genes. It is the set of instructions contained in an organism's DNA for the development and function of that organism. The genotype is the basis for an individual's inherited traits, and it can be contrasted with an individual's phenotype, which refers to the observable physical or biochemical characteristics of an organism that result from the expression of its genes in combination with environmental influences.

It is important to note that an individual's genotype is not necessarily identical to their genetic sequence. Some genes have multiple forms called alleles, and an individual may inherit different alleles for a given gene from each parent. The combination of alleles that an individual inherits for a particular gene is known as their genotype for that gene.

Understanding an individual's genotype can provide important information about their susceptibility to certain diseases, their response to drugs and other treatments, and their risk of passing on inherited genetic disorders to their offspring.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Early diagnosis refers to the identification and detection of a medical condition or disease in its initial stages, before the appearance of significant symptoms or complications. This is typically accomplished through various screening methods, such as medical history reviews, physical examinations, laboratory tests, and imaging studies. Early diagnosis can allow for more effective treatment interventions, potentially improving outcomes and quality of life for patients, while also reducing the overall burden on healthcare systems.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

T helper 17 (Th17) cells are a subset of CD4+ T cells, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the immune response. Th17 cells are characterized by their production of certain cytokines, including interleukin-17 (IL-17), IL-21, and IL-22. They are involved in the inflammatory response and play a key role in protecting the body against extracellular bacteria and fungi. However, an overactive Th17 response has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Therefore, understanding the regulation of Th17 cells is important for developing new therapies to treat these conditions.

Activities of Daily Living (ADL) are routine self-care activities that individuals usually do every day without assistance. These activities are widely used as a measure to determine the functional status and independence of a person, particularly in the elderly or those with disabilities or chronic illnesses. The basic ADLs include:

1. Personal hygiene: Bathing, washing hands and face, brushing teeth, grooming, and using the toilet.
2. Dressing: Selecting appropriate clothes and dressing oneself.
3. Eating: Preparing and consuming food, either independently or with assistive devices.
4. Mobility: Moving in and out of bed, chairs, or wheelchairs, walking independently or using mobility aids.
5. Transferring: Moving from one place to another, such as getting in and out of a car, bath, or bed.

There are also more complex Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) that assess an individual's ability to manage their own life and live independently. These include managing finances, shopping for groceries, using the telephone, taking medications as prescribed, preparing meals, and housekeeping tasks.

Aurothioglucose is a gold-containing medication that has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It works by modulating the immune system and reducing inflammation in the joints. The medication is administered via injection, usually into a muscle (intramuscularly).

The use of aurothioglucose has declined in recent years due to the availability of newer and more effective medications for rheumatoid arthritis. Additionally, aurothioglucose can have significant side effects, including kidney damage, skin reactions, and blood disorders. It is important to be monitored by a healthcare provider while taking this medication to ensure that it is safe and effective for use.

Bone diseases is a broad term that refers to various medical conditions that affect the bones. These conditions can be categorized into several groups, including:

1. Developmental and congenital bone diseases: These are conditions that affect bone growth and development before or at birth. Examples include osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease), achondroplasia (dwarfism), and cleidocranial dysostosis.
2. Metabolic bone diseases: These are conditions that affect the body's ability to maintain healthy bones. They are often caused by hormonal imbalances, vitamin deficiencies, or problems with mineral metabolism. Examples include osteoporosis, osteomalacia, and Paget's disease of bone.
3. Inflammatory bone diseases: These are conditions that cause inflammation in the bones. They can be caused by infections, autoimmune disorders, or other medical conditions. Examples include osteomyelitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
4. Degenerative bone diseases: These are conditions that cause the bones to break down over time. They can be caused by aging, injury, or disease. Examples include osteoarthritis, avascular necrosis, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH).
5. Tumors and cancers of the bone: These are conditions that involve abnormal growths in the bones. They can be benign or malignant. Examples include osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and Ewing sarcoma.
6. Fractures and injuries: While not strictly a "disease," fractures and injuries are common conditions that affect the bones. They can result from trauma, overuse, or weakened bones. Examples include stress fractures, compound fractures, and dislocations.

Overall, bone diseases can cause a wide range of symptoms, including pain, stiffness, deformity, and decreased mobility. Treatment for these conditions varies depending on the specific diagnosis but may include medication, surgery, physical therapy, or lifestyle changes.

Disease susceptibility, also known as genetic predisposition or genetic susceptibility, refers to the increased likelihood or risk of developing a particular disease due to inheriting specific genetic variations or mutations. These genetic factors can make an individual more vulnerable to certain diseases compared to those who do not have these genetic changes.

It is important to note that having a genetic predisposition does not guarantee that a person will definitely develop the disease. Other factors, such as environmental exposures, lifestyle choices, and additional genetic variations, can influence whether or not the disease will manifest. In some cases, early detection and intervention may help reduce the risk or delay the onset of the disease in individuals with a known genetic susceptibility.

The Borrelia burgdorferi group, also known as the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) complex, refers to a genetically related group of spirochetal bacteria that cause Lyme disease and other related diseases worldwide. The group includes several species, with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), B. afzelii, and B. garinii being the most common and best studied. These bacteria are transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis in the United States and Ixodes pacificus on the West Coast; Ixodes ricinus in Europe).

Lyme disease is a multisystem disorder that can affect the skin, joints, nervous system, and heart. Early symptoms typically include a characteristic expanding rash called erythema migrans, fever, fatigue, headache, and muscle and joint pain. If left untreated, the infection can spread to other parts of the body and cause more severe complications, such as arthritis, neurological problems, and carditis.

Diagnosis of Lyme disease is based on a combination of clinical symptoms, exposure history, and laboratory tests. Treatment usually involves antibiotics, such as doxycycline, amoxicillin, or ceftriaxone, and is generally most effective when initiated early in the course of the illness. Preventive measures, such as using insect repellent, checking for ticks after being outdoors, and promptly removing attached ticks, can help reduce the risk of Lyme disease and other tick-borne infections.

Sialglycoproteins are a type of glycoprotein that have sialic acid as the terminal sugar in their oligosaccharide chains. These complex molecules are abundant on the surface of many cell types and play important roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, cell-cell interactions, and protection against proteolytic degradation.

The presence of sialic acid on the outermost part of these glycoproteins makes them negatively charged, which can affect their interaction with other molecules such as lectins, antibodies, and enzymes. Sialglycoproteins are also involved in the regulation of various physiological functions, including blood coagulation, inflammation, and immune response.

Abnormalities in sialglycoprotein expression or structure have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions. Therefore, understanding the biology of sialoglycoproteins is important for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for these diseases.

Proteoglycans are complex, highly negatively charged macromolecules that are composed of a core protein covalently linked to one or more glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains. They are a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell signaling, regulation of growth factor activity, and maintenance of tissue structure and function.

The GAG chains, which can vary in length and composition, are long, unbranched polysaccharides that are composed of repeating disaccharide units containing a hexuronic acid (either glucuronic or iduronic acid) and a hexosamine (either N-acetylglucosamine or N-acetylgalactosamine). These GAG chains can be sulfated to varying degrees, which contributes to the negative charge of proteoglycans.

Proteoglycans are classified into four major groups based on their core protein structure and GAG composition: heparan sulfate/heparin proteoglycans, chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans, and hyaluronan-binding proteoglycans. Each group has distinct functions and is found in specific tissues and cell types.

In summary, proteoglycans are complex macromolecules composed of a core protein and one or more GAG chains that play important roles in the ECM and various biological processes, including cell signaling, growth factor regulation, and tissue structure maintenance.

The spleen is an organ in the upper left side of the abdomen, next to the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays multiple supporting roles in the body:

1. It fights infection by acting as a filter for the blood. Old red blood cells are recycled in the spleen, and platelets and white blood cells are stored there.
2. The spleen also helps to control the amount of blood in the body by removing excess red blood cells and storing platelets.
3. It has an important role in immune function, producing antibodies and removing microorganisms and damaged red blood cells from the bloodstream.

The spleen can be removed without causing any significant problems, as other organs take over its functions. This is known as a splenectomy and may be necessary if the spleen is damaged or diseased.

Arthrodesis is a surgical procedure to fuse together the bones of a joint, in order to restrict its movement and provide stability. This procedure is typically performed when a joint has been severely damaged by injury, arthritis, or other conditions, and non-surgical treatments have failed to relieve symptoms such as pain and instability.

During the surgery, the cartilage that normally cushions the ends of the bones is removed, and the bones are realigned and held in place with hardware such as plates, screws, or rods. Over time, the bones grow together, forming a solid fusion that restricts joint motion.

Arthrodesis can be performed on various joints throughout the body, including the spine, wrist, ankle, and knee. While this procedure can provide significant pain relief and improve function, it does limit the range of motion in the fused joint, which may impact mobility and daily activities. Therefore, arthrodesis is typically considered a last resort when other treatments have failed.

Articular Range of Motion (AROM) is a term used in physiotherapy and orthopedics to describe the amount of movement available in a joint, measured in degrees of a circle. It refers to the range through which synovial joints can actively move without causing pain or injury. AROM is assessed by measuring the degree of motion achieved by active muscle contraction, as opposed to passive range of motion (PROM), where the movement is generated by an external force.

Assessment of AROM is important in evaluating a patient's functional ability and progress, planning treatment interventions, and determining return to normal activities or sports participation. It is also used to identify any restrictions in joint mobility that may be due to injury, disease, or surgery, and to monitor the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs.

Arthroplasty, replacement, is a surgical procedure where a damaged or diseased joint surface is removed and replaced with an artificial implant or device. The goal of this surgery is to relieve pain, restore function, and improve the quality of life for patients who have severe joint damage due to arthritis or other conditions.

During the procedure, the surgeon removes the damaged cartilage and bone from the joint and replaces them with a metal, plastic, or ceramic component that replicates the shape and function of the natural joint surface. The most common types of joint replacement surgery are hip replacement, knee replacement, and shoulder replacement.

The success rate of joint replacement surgery is generally high, with many patients experiencing significant pain relief and improved mobility. However, as with any surgical procedure, there are risks involved, including infection, blood clots, implant loosening or failure, and nerve damage. Therefore, it's essential to discuss the potential benefits and risks of joint replacement surgery with a healthcare provider before making a decision.

CD4-positive T-lymphocytes, also known as CD4+ T cells or helper T cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the immune response. They express the CD4 receptor on their surface and help coordinate the immune system's response to infectious agents such as viruses and bacteria.

CD4+ T cells recognize and bind to specific antigens presented by antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells or macrophages. Once activated, they can differentiate into various subsets of effector cells, including Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg cells, each with distinct functions in the immune response.

CD4+ T cells are particularly important in the immune response to HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), which targets and destroys these cells, leading to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. The number of CD4+ T cells is often used as a marker of disease progression in HIV infection, with lower counts indicating more advanced disease.

Immunologic factors refer to the elements of the immune system that contribute to the body's defense against foreign substances, infectious agents, and cancerous cells. These factors include various types of white blood cells (such as lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, and eosinophils), antibodies, complement proteins, cytokines, and other molecules involved in the immune response.

Immunologic factors can be categorized into two main types: innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Innate immunity is the non-specific defense mechanism that provides immediate protection against pathogens through physical barriers (e.g., skin, mucous membranes), chemical barriers (e.g., stomach acid, enzymes), and inflammatory responses. Adaptive immunity, on the other hand, is a specific defense mechanism that develops over time as the immune system learns to recognize and respond to particular pathogens or antigens.

Abnormalities in immunologic factors can lead to various medical conditions, such as autoimmune disorders, immunodeficiency diseases, and allergies. Therefore, understanding immunologic factors is crucial for diagnosing and treating these conditions.

Immunoconjugates are biomolecules created by the conjugation (coupling) of an antibody or antibody fragment with a cytotoxic agent, such as a drug, radionuclide, or toxin. This coupling is designed to direct the cytotoxic agent specifically to target cells, usually cancer cells, against which the antibody is directed, thereby increasing the effectiveness and reducing the side effects of the therapy.

The antibody part of the immunoconjugate recognizes and binds to specific antigens (proteins or other molecules) on the surface of the target cells, while the cytotoxic agent part enters the cell and disrupts its function, leading to cell death. The linker between the two parts is designed to be stable in circulation but can release the cytotoxic agent once inside the target cell.

Immunoconjugates are a promising area of research in targeted cancer therapy, as they offer the potential for more precise and less toxic treatments compared to traditional chemotherapy. However, their development and use also pose challenges, such as ensuring that the immunoconjugate binds specifically to the target cells and not to normal cells, optimizing the dose and schedule of treatment, and minimizing the risk of resistance to the therapy.

A joint prosthesis, also known as an artificial joint or a replacement joint, is a surgical implant used to replace all or part of a damaged or diseased joint. The most common types of joint prostheses are total hip replacements and total knee replacements. These prostheses typically consist of a combination of metal, plastic, and ceramic components that are designed to replicate the movement and function of a natural joint.

Joint prostheses are usually recommended for patients who have severe joint pain or mobility issues that cannot be adequately managed with other treatments such as physical therapy, medication, or lifestyle changes. The goal of joint replacement surgery is to relieve pain, improve joint function, and enhance the patient's quality of life.

Joint prostheses are typically made from materials such as titanium, cobalt-chrome alloys, stainless steel, polyethylene plastic, and ceramics. The choice of material depends on a variety of factors, including the patient's age, activity level, weight, and overall health.

While joint replacement surgery is generally safe and effective, there are risks associated with any surgical procedure, including infection, blood clots, implant loosening or failure, and nerve damage. Patients who undergo joint replacement surgery typically require several weeks of rehabilitation and physical therapy to regain strength and mobility in the affected joint.

Monocytes are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system. They are large cells with a round or oval shape and a nucleus that is typically indented or horseshoe-shaped. Monocytes are produced in the bone marrow and then circulate in the bloodstream, where they can differentiate into other types of immune cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells.

Monocytes play an important role in the body's defense against infection and tissue damage. They are able to engulf and digest foreign particles, microorganisms, and dead or damaged cells, which helps to clear them from the body. Monocytes also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help to coordinate the immune response.

Elevated levels of monocytes in the bloodstream can be a sign of an ongoing infection, inflammation, or other medical conditions such as cancer or autoimmune disorders.

An allele is a variant form of a gene that is located at a specific position on a specific chromosome. Alleles are alternative forms of the same gene that arise by mutation and are found at the same locus or position on homologous chromosomes.

Each person typically inherits two copies of each gene, one from each parent. If the two alleles are identical, a person is said to be homozygous for that trait. If the alleles are different, the person is heterozygous.

For example, the ABO blood group system has three alleles, A, B, and O, which determine a person's blood type. If a person inherits two A alleles, they will have type A blood; if they inherit one A and one B allele, they will have type AB blood; if they inherit two B alleles, they will have type B blood; and if they inherit two O alleles, they will have type O blood.

Alleles can also influence traits such as eye color, hair color, height, and other physical characteristics. Some alleles are dominant, meaning that only one copy of the allele is needed to express the trait, while others are recessive, meaning that two copies of the allele are needed to express the trait.

The term "stifle" is commonly used in veterinary medicine to refer to the joint in the leg of animals, specifically the knee joint in quadrupeds such as dogs and horses. In human anatomy, this joint is called the patellofemoral joint or knee joint. The stifle is a complex joint made up of several bones, including the femur, tibia, and patella (kneecap), as well as various ligaments, tendons, and cartilage that provide stability and support. Injuries or diseases affecting the stifle can cause lameness, pain, and decreased mobility in animals.

Arthroplasty is a surgical procedure to restore the integrity and function of a joint. The term is derived from two Greek words: "arthro" meaning joint, and "plasty" meaning to mold or form. There are several types of arthroplasty, but most involve resurfacing the damaged joint cartilage with artificial materials such as metal, plastic, or ceramic.

The goal of arthroplasty is to relieve pain, improve mobility, and restore function in a joint that has been damaged by arthritis, injury, or other conditions. The most common types of arthroplasty are total joint replacement (TJR) and partial joint replacement (PJR).

In TJR, the surgeon removes the damaged ends of the bones in the joint and replaces them with artificial components called prostheses. These prostheses can be made of metal, plastic, or ceramic materials, and are designed to mimic the natural movement and function of the joint.

In PJR, only one side of the joint is resurfaced, typically because the damage is less extensive. This procedure is less invasive than TJR and may be recommended for younger patients who are still active or have a higher risk of complications from a full joint replacement.

Other types of arthroplasty include osteotomy, in which the surgeon cuts and reshapes the bone to realign the joint; arthrodesis, in which the surgeon fuses two bones together to create a stable joint; and resurfacing, in which the damaged cartilage is removed and replaced with a smooth, artificial surface.

Arthroplasty is typically recommended for patients who have tried other treatments, such as physical therapy, medication, or injections, but have not found relief from their symptoms. While arthroplasty can be highly effective in relieving pain and improving mobility, it is not without risks, including infection, blood clots, and implant failure. Patients should discuss the benefits and risks of arthroplasty with their healthcare provider to determine if it is the right treatment option for them.

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a degenerative joint disease that affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the knee joint. It is characterized by the breakdown and eventual loss of the smooth, cushioning cartilage that covers the ends of bones and allows for easy movement within joints. As the cartilage wears away, the bones rub against each other, causing pain, stiffness, and limited mobility. Osteoarthritis of the knee can also lead to the formation of bone spurs (osteophytes) and cysts in the joint. This condition is most commonly found in older adults, but it can also occur in younger people as a result of injury or overuse. Risk factors include obesity, family history, previous joint injuries, and repetitive stress on the knee joint. Treatment options typically include pain management, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery.

Osteoarticular tuberculosis is a form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) that involves the bones and joints. It is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The infection can spread to the bones and joints through the bloodstream or from nearby infected organs, such as the lungs.

The most commonly affected sites are the spine (Pott's disease), hip, knee, wrist, and small bones of the hands and feet. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, stiffness, and decreased range of motion in the affected joint or bone. In some cases, the infection can lead to deformity, chronic disability, or even death if left untreated.

Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies (such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI), and laboratory tests (such as blood tests, sputum cultures, or biopsy). Treatment usually consists of a long course of antibiotics (usually for at least six months) to kill the bacteria. Surgery may also be necessary in some cases to remove infected tissue or stabilize damaged joints.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Acquired foot deformities refer to structural abnormalities of the foot that develop after birth, as opposed to congenital foot deformities which are present at birth. These deformities can result from various factors such as trauma, injury, infection, neurological conditions, or complications from a medical condition like diabetes or arthritis.

Examples of acquired foot deformities include:

1. Hammertoe - A deformity where the toe bends downward at the middle joint, resembling a hammer.
2. Claw toe - A more severe form of hammertoe where the toe also curls under, forming a claw-like shape.
3. Mallet toe - A condition where the end joint of a toe is bent downward, causing it to resemble a mallet.
4. Bunions - A bony bump that forms on the inside of the foot at the big toe joint, often causing pain and difficulty wearing shoes.
5. Tailor's bunion (bunionette) - A similar condition to a bunion, but it occurs on the outside of the foot near the little toe joint.
6. Charcot foot - A severe deformity that can occur in people with diabetes or other neurological conditions, characterized by the collapse and dislocation of joints in the foot.
7. Cavus foot - A condition where the arch of the foot is excessively high, causing instability and increasing the risk of ankle injuries.
8. Flatfoot (pes planus) - A deformity where the arch of the foot collapses, leading to pain and difficulty walking.
9. Pronation deformities - Abnormal rotation or tilting of the foot, often causing instability and increasing the risk of injury.

Treatment for acquired foot deformities varies depending on the severity and underlying cause but may include orthotics, physical therapy, medication, or surgery.

Antibody formation, also known as humoral immune response, is the process by which the immune system produces proteins called antibodies in response to the presence of a foreign substance (antigen) in the body. This process involves several steps:

1. Recognition: The antigen is recognized and bound by a type of white blood cell called a B lymphocyte or B cell, which then becomes activated.
2. Differentiation: The activated B cell undergoes differentiation to become a plasma cell, which is a type of cell that produces and secretes large amounts of antibodies.
3. Antibody production: The plasma cells produce and release antibodies, which are proteins made up of four polypeptide chains (two heavy chains and two light chains) arranged in a Y-shape. Each antibody has two binding sites that can recognize and bind to specific regions on the antigen called epitopes.
4. Neutralization or elimination: The antibodies bind to the antigens, neutralizing them or marking them for destruction by other immune cells. This helps to prevent the spread of infection and protect the body from harmful substances.

Antibody formation is an important part of the adaptive immune response, which allows the body to specifically recognize and respond to a wide variety of pathogens and foreign substances.

The elbow joint, also known as the cubitus joint, is a hinge joint that connects the humerus bone of the upper arm to the radius and ulna bones of the forearm. It allows for flexion and extension movements of the forearm, as well as some degree of rotation. The main articulation occurs between the trochlea of the humerus and the trochlear notch of the ulna, while the radial head of the radius also contributes to the joint's stability and motion. Ligaments, muscles, and tendons surround and support the elbow joint, providing strength and protection during movement.

Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that plays a crucial role in the modulation of immune responses. It is produced by various cell types, including T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. IL-10 inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-12, and downregulates the expression of costimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells. This results in the suppression of T cell activation and effector functions, which ultimately helps to limit tissue damage during inflammation and promote tissue repair. Dysregulation of IL-10 has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

IgG receptors, also known as Fcγ receptors (Fc gamma receptors), are specialized protein molecules found on the surface of various immune cells, such as neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and some lymphocytes. These receptors recognize and bind to the Fc region of IgG antibodies, one of the five classes of immunoglobulins in the human body.

IgG receptors play a crucial role in immune responses by mediating different effector functions, including:

1. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC): IgG receptors on natural killer (NK) cells and other immune cells bind to IgG antibodies coated on the surface of virus-infected or cancer cells, leading to their destruction.
2. Phagocytosis: When IgG antibodies tag pathogens or foreign particles, phagocytes like neutrophils and macrophages recognize and bind to these immune complexes via IgG receptors, facilitating the engulfment and removal of the targeted particles.
3. Antigen presentation: IgG receptors on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) can internalize immune complexes, process the antigens, and present them to T cells, thereby initiating adaptive immune responses.
4. Inflammatory response regulation: IgG receptors can modulate inflammation by activating or inhibiting downstream signaling pathways in immune cells, depending on the specific type of Fcγ receptor and its activation state.

There are several types of IgG receptors (FcγRI, FcγRII, FcγRIII, and FcγRIV) with varying affinities for different subclasses of IgG antibodies (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4). The distinct functions and expression patterns of these receptors contribute to the complexity and fine-tuning of immune responses in the human body.

Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is not a medical term per se, but a biochemical term. It is widely used in medical and biological research. Here's the definition:

Bovine Serum Albumin is a serum albumin protein derived from cows. It is often used as a stabilizer, an emulsifier, or a protein source in various laboratory and industrial applications, including biochemical experiments, cell culture media, and diagnostic kits. BSA has a high solubility in water and can bind to many different types of molecules, making it useful for preventing unwanted interactions between components in a solution. It also has a consistent composition and is relatively inexpensive compared to human serum albumin, which are factors that contribute to its widespread use.

The atlanto-axial joint is the joint between the first and second cervical vertebrae, also known as C1 (atlas) and C2 (axis). It consists of two separate joints: the median atlanto-axial joint, which is a pivot joint that allows for rotation of the head, and the paired lateral atlanto-axial joints, which are plane joints that allow for limited gliding movements.

The atlanto-axial joint is surrounded by several ligaments that provide stability and limit excessive movement. The transverse ligament, located on the anterior aspect of the joint, is particularly important as it prevents excessive movement of the atlas on the axis and helps to protect the spinal cord.

Abnormalities or injuries to the atlanto-axial joint can result in instability and potentially serious neurological complications.

Matrilin proteins are a group of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that are predominantly found in cartilaginous tissues, such as articular cartilage, costal cartilage, and intervertebral discs. They belong to the von Willebrand factor A (vWF-A) domain-containing protein family and play important roles in maintaining the structural integrity and organization of the ECM.

Matrilin proteins are composed of multiple domains, including vWF-A domains, coiled-coil domains, and calcium-binding epidermal growth factor (cbEGF)-like domains. They can form multimeric complexes through their coiled-coil domains, which helps to stabilize the ECM network.

There are four known matrilin proteins in humans, designated as Matrilin-1, Matrilin-2, Matrilin-3, and Matrilin-4. Each of these proteins has distinct tissue distribution patterns and functions. For example, Matrilin-1 is primarily found in hyaline cartilage and is involved in regulating chondrocyte differentiation and matrix assembly. Matrilin-2 is widely expressed in various tissues, including cartilage, tendon, and ligament, and plays a role in maintaining the organization of collagen fibrils. Matrilin-3 is specifically expressed in articular cartilage and is involved in regulating the formation and maintenance of the cartilaginous matrix. Matrilin-4 is found in both hyaline and fibrocartilage, as well as in tendons and ligaments, and has been implicated in regulating collagen fibrillogenesis and tissue development.

Mutations in matrilin genes have been associated with various musculoskeletal disorders, such as multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) and spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD). These genetic defects can lead to abnormalities in the structure and organization of the ECM, resulting in joint pain, stiffness, and reduced mobility.

The hip joint, also known as the coxal joint, is a ball-and-socket type synovial joint that connects the femur (thigh bone) to the pelvis. The "ball" is the head of the femur, while the "socket" is the acetabulum, a concave surface on the pelvic bone.

The hip joint is surrounded by a strong fibrous capsule and is reinforced by several ligaments, including the iliofemoral, ischiofemoral, and pubofemoral ligaments. The joint allows for flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, medial and lateral rotation, and circumduction movements, making it one of the most mobile joints in the body.

The hip joint is also supported by various muscles, including the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, iliopsoas, and other hip flexors and extensors. These muscles provide stability and strength to the joint, allowing for weight-bearing activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

Quality of Life (QOL) is a broad, multidimensional concept that usually includes an individual's physical health, psychological state, level of independence, social relationships, personal beliefs, and their relationship to salient features of their environment. It reflects the impact of disease and treatment on a patient's overall well-being and ability to function in daily life.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines QOL as "an individual's perception of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns." It is a subjective concept, meaning it can vary greatly from person to person.

In healthcare, QOL is often used as an outcome measure in clinical trials and other research studies to assess the impact of interventions or treatments on overall patient well-being.

Anti-idiotypic antibodies are a type of immune protein that recognizes and binds to the unique identifying region (idiotype) of another antibody. These antibodies are produced by the immune system as part of a regulatory feedback mechanism, where they can modulate or inhibit the activity of the original antibody. They have been studied for their potential use in immunotherapy and vaccine development.

The "age of onset" is a medical term that refers to the age at which an individual first develops or displays symptoms of a particular disease, disorder, or condition. It can be used to describe various medical conditions, including both physical and mental health disorders. The age of onset can have implications for prognosis, treatment approaches, and potential causes of the condition. In some cases, early onset may indicate a more severe or progressive course of the disease, while late-onset symptoms might be associated with different underlying factors or etiologies. It is essential to provide accurate and precise information regarding the age of onset when discussing a patient's medical history and treatment plan.

Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) is a type of genetic variation that occurs when a single nucleotide (A, T, C, or G) in the DNA sequence is altered. This alteration must occur in at least 1% of the population to be considered a SNP. These variations can help explain why some people are more susceptible to certain diseases than others and can also influence how an individual responds to certain medications. SNPs can serve as biological markers, helping scientists locate genes that are associated with disease. They can also provide information about an individual's ancestry and ethnic background.

HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen) antigens are a group of proteins found on the surface of cells in our body. They play a crucial role in the immune system's ability to differentiate between "self" and "non-self." HLA antigens are encoded by a group of genes located on chromosome 6, known as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC).

There are three types of HLA antigens: HLA class I, HLA class II, and HLA class III. HLA class I antigens are found on the surface of almost all cells in the body and help the immune system recognize and destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells. They consist of three components: HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C.

HLA class II antigens are primarily found on the surface of immune cells, such as macrophages, B cells, and dendritic cells. They assist in the presentation of foreign particles (like bacteria and viruses) to CD4+ T cells, which then activate other parts of the immune system. HLA class II antigens include HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR.

HLA class III antigens consist of various molecules involved in immune responses, such as cytokines and complement components. They are not directly related to antigen presentation.

The genetic diversity of HLA antigens is extensive, with thousands of variations or alleles. This diversity allows for a better ability to recognize and respond to a wide range of pathogens. However, this variation can also lead to compatibility issues in organ transplantation, as the recipient's immune system may recognize the donor's HLA antigens as foreign and attack the transplanted organ.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure where an orthopedic surgeon uses an arthroscope (a thin tube with a light and camera on the end) to diagnose and treat problems inside a joint. The surgeon makes a small incision, inserts the arthroscope into the joint, and then uses the attached camera to view the inside of the joint on a monitor. They can then insert other small instruments through additional incisions to repair or remove damaged tissue.

Arthroscopy is most commonly used for joints such as the knee, shoulder, hip, ankle, and wrist. It offers several advantages over traditional open surgery, including smaller incisions, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and reduced risk of infection. The procedure can be used to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions, including torn ligaments or cartilage, inflamed synovial tissue, loose bone or cartilage fragments, and joint damage caused by arthritis.

Chondrocalcinosis is a medical condition characterized by the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals in the fibrous cartilage (also known as chondral or articular cartilage) and/or the joint cavity (synovial fluid). This cartilage is present in various parts of the body, including the ears, nose, respiratory tract, and connective tissues such as those found in joints.

Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals are normally present in small amounts within the body; however, an overabundance of these crystals can lead to chondrocalcinosis. The condition is often associated with osteoarthritis and can affect people of all ages but is more common in older adults.

Chondrocalcinosis may not always cause symptoms, but when it does, they can include joint pain, stiffness, swelling, and warmth. These symptoms are similar to those seen in other forms of arthritis, making chondrocalcinosis difficult to diagnose based on symptoms alone. Diagnosis typically involves imaging techniques such as X-rays or ultrasounds, as well as joint fluid analysis to identify the presence of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals.

Treatment for chondrocalcinosis is generally focused on managing symptoms and addressing any underlying conditions that may contribute to the development or progression of the disease. This can include medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to reduce pain and inflammation, joint aspiration to remove excess fluid and crystals from the affected area, and physical therapy to maintain joint mobility and strength. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair or replace damaged joints.

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a group of enzymes responsible for the degradation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix, the structural framework of most tissues in the body. These enzymes play crucial roles in various physiological processes such as tissue repair, wound healing, and embryonic development. They also participate in pathological conditions like tumor invasion, metastasis, and inflammatory diseases by breaking down the components of the extracellular matrix, including collagens, elastins, proteoglycans, and gelatins. MMPs are zinc-dependent endopeptidases that require activation from their proenzyme form to become fully functional. Their activity is tightly regulated at various levels, including gene expression, protein synthesis, and enzyme inhibition by tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Dysregulation of MMPs has been implicated in several diseases, making them potential therapeutic targets for various clinical interventions.

Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a group of disorders that involve the abnormal production and accumulation of abnormal connective tissues in various parts of the body. Connective tissues are the structural materials that support and bind other tissues and organs together. They include tendons, ligaments, cartilage, fat, and the material that fills the spaces between cells, called the extracellular matrix.

Connective tissue diseases can affect many different systems in the body, including the skin, joints, muscles, lungs, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and blood vessels. Some CTDs are autoimmune disorders, meaning that the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy connective tissues. Others may be caused by genetic mutations or environmental factors.

Some examples of connective tissue diseases include:

* Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
* Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)
* Scleroderma
* Dermatomyositis/Polymyositis
* Mixed Connective Tissue Disease (MCTD)
* Sjogren's syndrome
* Ehlers-Danlos syndrome
* Marfan syndrome
* Osteogenesis imperfecta

The specific symptoms and treatment of connective tissue diseases vary depending on the type and severity of the condition. Treatment may include medications to reduce inflammation, suppress the immune system, or manage pain. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair or replace damaged tissues or organs.

Mononuclear leukocytes are a type of white blood cells (leukocytes) that have a single, large nucleus. They include lymphocytes (B-cells, T-cells, and natural killer cells), monocytes, and dendritic cells. These cells play important roles in the body's immune system, including defending against infection and disease, and participating in immune responses and surveillance. Mononuclear leukocytes can be found in the bloodstream as well as in tissues throughout the body. They are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity, providing specific and nonspecific defense mechanisms to protect the body from harmful pathogens and other threats.

The sacroiliac (SI) joint is the joint that connects the iliac bone (part of the pelvis) and the sacrum (the triangular bone at the base of the spine). There are two sacroiliac joints, one on each side of the spine. The primary function of these joints is to absorb shock between the upper body and lower body and distribute the weight of the upper body to the lower body. They also provide a small amount of movement to allow for flexibility when walking or running. The SI joints are supported and stabilized by strong ligaments, muscles, and bones.

The term "hand bones" refers to the skeletal components that make up the human hand. These bones are divided into three categories: carpals, metacarpals, and phalanges.

1. Carpals: There are eight carpal bones arranged in two rows in the wrist region. The proximal row consists of the scaphoid, lunate, triquetral, and pisiform bones, while the distal row includes the trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and hamate bones.

2. Metacarpals: There are five metacarpal bones, one for each finger, located in the middle part of the hand between the carpals and phalanges. They are numbered 1 to 5 from the thumb side to the little finger side.

3. Phalanges: These are the bones found in the fingers and thumb. Each finger has three phalanges (proximal, middle, and distal), while the thumb only has two (proximal and distal). In total, there are 14 phalangeal bones in the hand.

Together, these hand bones provide structure, support, and mobility to the hand, enabling various complex movements essential for daily activities.

Terpenes are a large and diverse class of organic compounds produced by a variety of plants, including cannabis. They are responsible for the distinctive aromas and flavors found in different strains of cannabis. Terpenes have been found to have various therapeutic benefits, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial properties. Some terpenes may also enhance the psychoactive effects of THC, the main psychoactive compound in cannabis. It's important to note that more research is needed to fully understand the potential medical benefits and risks associated with terpenes.

Aggrecan is a large, complex proteoglycan molecule found in the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage and other connective tissues. It is a key component of the structural framework of these tissues, helping to provide resiliency, cushioning, and protection to the cells within. Aggrecan contains numerous glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, which are negatively charged molecules that attract water and ions, creating a swelling pressure that contributes to the tissue's load-bearing capacity.

The medical definition of 'Aggrecans' can be described as:

1. A large proteoglycan molecule found in articular cartilage and other connective tissues.
2. Composed of a core protein with attached glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, primarily chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate.
3. Plays a crucial role in the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage by attracting water and ions, creating a swelling pressure that contributes to the tissue's load-bearing capacity.
4. Aggrecan degradation or loss is associated with various joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis, due to reduced structural integrity and shock-absorbing capabilities of articular cartilage.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

A bursa is a small fluid-filled sac that provides a cushion between bones and other moving parts, such as muscles, tendons, or skin. A synovial bursa is a type of bursa that contains synovial fluid, which is produced by the synovial membrane that lines the inside of the bursa. Synovial bursae are found in various locations throughout the body, particularly near joints that experience a lot of movement or friction. They help to reduce wear and tear on the bones and other tissues, and can become inflamed or irritated due to overuse, injury, or infection, leading to a condition called bursitis.

An acute disease is a medical condition that has a rapid onset, develops quickly, and tends to be short in duration. Acute diseases can range from minor illnesses such as a common cold or flu, to more severe conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, or a heart attack. These types of diseases often have clear symptoms that are easy to identify, and they may require immediate medical attention or treatment.

Acute diseases are typically caused by an external agent or factor, such as a bacterial or viral infection, a toxin, or an injury. They can also be the result of a sudden worsening of an existing chronic condition. In general, acute diseases are distinct from chronic diseases, which are long-term medical conditions that develop slowly over time and may require ongoing management and treatment.

Examples of acute diseases include:

* Acute bronchitis: a sudden inflammation of the airways in the lungs, often caused by a viral infection.
* Appendicitis: an inflammation of the appendix that can cause severe pain and requires surgical removal.
* Gastroenteritis: an inflammation of the stomach and intestines, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
* Migraine headaches: intense headaches that can last for hours or days, and are often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.
* Myocardial infarction (heart attack): a sudden blockage of blood flow to the heart muscle, often caused by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries.
* Pneumonia: an infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Sinusitis: an inflammation of the sinuses, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

It's important to note that while some acute diseases may resolve on their own with rest and supportive care, others may require medical intervention or treatment to prevent complications and promote recovery. If you are experiencing symptoms of an acute disease, it is always best to seek medical attention to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

T-lymphocyte subsets refer to distinct populations of T-cells, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. The two main types of T-lymphocytes are CD4+ and CD8+ cells, which are defined by the presence or absence of specific proteins called cluster differentiation (CD) molecules on their surface.

CD4+ T-cells, also known as helper T-cells, play a crucial role in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages, to mount an immune response against pathogens. They also produce cytokines that help regulate the immune response.

CD8+ T-cells, also known as cytotoxic T-cells, directly kill infected cells or tumor cells by releasing toxic substances such as perforins and granzymes.

The balance between these two subsets of T-cells is critical for maintaining immune homeostasis and mounting effective immune responses against pathogens while avoiding excessive inflammation and autoimmunity. Therefore, the measurement of T-lymphocyte subsets is essential in diagnosing and monitoring various immunological disorders, including HIV infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped organs that are part of the immune system. They are found throughout the body, especially in the neck, armpits, groin, and abdomen. Lymph nodes filter lymph fluid, which carries waste and unwanted substances such as bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells. They contain white blood cells called lymphocytes that help fight infections and diseases by attacking and destroying the harmful substances found in the lymph fluid. When an infection or disease is present, lymph nodes may swell due to the increased number of immune cells and fluid accumulation as they work to fight off the invaders.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Vasculitis is a group of disorders characterized by inflammation of the blood vessels, which can cause changes in the vessel walls including thickening, narrowing, or weakening. These changes can restrict blood flow, leading to organ and tissue damage. The specific symptoms and severity of vasculitis depend on the size and location of the affected blood vessels and the extent of inflammation. Vasculitis can affect any organ system in the body, and its causes can vary, including infections, autoimmune disorders, or exposure to certain medications or chemicals.

"Yersinia enterocolitica" is a gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that is capable of causing gastrointestinal infections in humans. It is commonly found in the environment, particularly in water and soil, as well as in animals such as pigs, cattle, and birds.

Infection with Yersinia enterocolitica can cause a range of symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and vomiting. The infection is typically transmitted through the consumption of contaminated food or water, although it can also be spread through person-to-person contact.

Yersinia enterocolitica infections are more common in young children and older adults, and they tend to occur more frequently during colder months of the year. The bacterium is able to survive at low temperatures, which may contribute to its prevalence in cooler climates.

Diagnosis of Yersinia enterocolitica infection typically involves the detection of the bacterium in stool samples or other clinical specimens. Treatment usually involves antibiotics and supportive care to manage symptoms. Prevention measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing hands thoroughly after using the bathroom and before handling food, as well as cooking meats thoroughly and avoiding consumption of raw or undercooked foods.

Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a type of antibody that plays a crucial role in the immune function of the human body. It is primarily found in external secretions, such as saliva, tears, breast milk, and sweat, as well as in mucous membranes lining the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. IgA exists in two forms: a monomeric form found in serum and a polymeric form found in secretions.

The primary function of IgA is to provide immune protection at mucosal surfaces, which are exposed to various environmental antigens, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and allergens. By doing so, it helps prevent the entry and colonization of pathogens into the body, reducing the risk of infections and inflammation.

IgA functions by binding to antigens present on the surface of pathogens or allergens, forming immune complexes that can neutralize their activity. These complexes are then transported across the epithelial cells lining mucosal surfaces and released into the lumen, where they prevent the adherence and invasion of pathogens.

In summary, Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a vital antibody that provides immune defense at mucosal surfaces by neutralizing and preventing the entry of harmful antigens into the body.

Longitudinal studies are a type of research design where data is collected from the same subjects repeatedly over a period of time, often years or even decades. These studies are used to establish patterns of changes and events over time, and can help researchers identify causal relationships between variables. They are particularly useful in fields such as epidemiology, psychology, and sociology, where the focus is on understanding developmental trends and the long-term effects of various factors on health and behavior.

In medical research, longitudinal studies can be used to track the progression of diseases over time, identify risk factors for certain conditions, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. For example, a longitudinal study might follow a group of individuals over several decades to assess their exposure to certain environmental factors and their subsequent development of chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease. By comparing data collected at multiple time points, researchers can identify trends and correlations that may not be apparent in shorter-term studies.

Longitudinal studies have several advantages over other research designs, including their ability to establish temporal relationships between variables, track changes over time, and reduce the impact of confounding factors. However, they also have some limitations, such as the potential for attrition (loss of participants over time), which can introduce bias and affect the validity of the results. Additionally, longitudinal studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, requiring significant resources and a long-term commitment from both researchers and study participants.

Serum Amyloid A (SAA) protein is an acute phase protein produced primarily in the liver, although it can also be produced by other cells in response to inflammation. It is a member of the apolipoprotein family and is found in high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in the blood. SAA protein levels increase rapidly during the acute phase response to infection, trauma, or tissue damage, making it a useful biomarker for inflammation.

In addition to its role as an acute phase protein, SAA has been implicated in several disease processes, including atherosclerosis and amyloidosis. In amyloidosis, SAA can form insoluble fibrils that deposit in various tissues, leading to organ dysfunction. There are four subtypes of SAA in humans (SAA1, SAA2, SAA3, and SAA4), with SAA1 and SAA2 being the most responsive to inflammatory stimuli.

Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell that is an essential part of the immune system. They are responsible for recognizing and responding to potentially harmful substances such as viruses, bacteria, and other foreign invaders. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells).

B-lymphocytes produce antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy foreign substances. When a B-cell encounters a foreign substance, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies. These antibodies bind to the foreign substance, marking it for destruction by other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes, on the other hand, are involved in cell-mediated immunity. They directly attack and destroy infected cells or cancerous cells. T-cells can also help to regulate the immune response by producing chemical signals that activate or inhibit other immune cells.

Lymphocytes are produced in the bone marrow and mature in either the bone marrow (B-cells) or the thymus gland (T-cells). They circulate throughout the body in the blood and lymphatic system, where they can be found in high concentrations in lymph nodes, the spleen, and other lymphoid organs.

Abnormalities in the number or function of lymphocytes can lead to a variety of immune-related disorders, including immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

Monoclonal murine-derived antibodies are a type of laboratory-produced antibody that is identical in structure, having been derived from a single clone of cells. These antibodies are created using mouse cells and are therefore composed entirely of mouse immune proteins. They are designed to bind specifically to a particular target protein or antigen, making them useful tools for research, diagnostic testing, and therapeutic applications.

Monoclonal antibodies offer several advantages over polyclonal antibodies (which are derived from multiple clones of cells and can recognize multiple epitopes on an antigen). Monoclonal antibodies have a consistent and uniform structure, making them more reliable for research and diagnostic purposes. They also have higher specificity and affinity for their target antigens, allowing for more sensitive detection and measurement.

However, there are some limitations to using monoclonal murine-derived antibodies in therapeutic applications. Because they are composed entirely of mouse proteins, they can elicit an immune response in humans, leading to the production of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) that can neutralize their effectiveness. To overcome this limitation, researchers have developed chimeric and humanized monoclonal antibodies that incorporate human protein sequences, reducing the risk of an immune response.

Antibody specificity refers to the ability of an antibody to bind to a specific epitope or antigenic determinant on an antigen. Each antibody has a unique structure that allows it to recognize and bind to a specific region of an antigen, typically a small portion of the antigen's surface made up of amino acids or sugar residues. This highly specific binding is mediated by the variable regions of the antibody's heavy and light chains, which form a pocket that recognizes and binds to the epitope.

The specificity of an antibody is determined by its unique complementarity-determining regions (CDRs), which are loops of amino acids located in the variable domains of both the heavy and light chains. The CDRs form a binding site that recognizes and interacts with the epitope on the antigen. The precise fit between the antibody's binding site and the epitope is critical for specificity, as even small changes in the structure of either can prevent binding.

Antibody specificity is important in immune responses because it allows the immune system to distinguish between self and non-self antigens. This helps to prevent autoimmune reactions where the immune system attacks the body's own cells and tissues. Antibody specificity also plays a crucial role in diagnostic tests, such as ELISA assays, where antibodies are used to detect the presence of specific antigens in biological samples.

Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble decoy receptor for the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). It is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily and plays a crucial role in regulating bone metabolism. By binding to RANKL, OPG prevents it from interacting with its signaling receptor RANK on the surface of osteoclast precursor cells, thereby inhibiting osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. This results in reduced bone resorption and increased bone mass.

In addition to its role in bone homeostasis, OPG has also been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, including immune regulation, cancer progression, and cardiovascular disease.

Iritis is a medical condition that refers to the inflammation of the iris, which is the colored part of the eye. The iris controls the size of the pupil and thus regulates the amount of light that enters the eye. Iritis can cause symptoms such as eye pain, redness, photophobia (sensitivity to light), blurred vision, and headaches. It is often treated with anti-inflammatory medications and may require prompt medical attention to prevent complications such as glaucoma or vision loss. The underlying cause of iritis can vary and may include infections, autoimmune diseases, trauma, or other conditions.

CD (cluster of differentiation) antigens are cell-surface proteins that are expressed on leukocytes (white blood cells) and can be used to identify and distinguish different subsets of these cells. They are important markers in the field of immunology and hematology, and are commonly used to diagnose and monitor various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases.

CD antigens are designated by numbers, such as CD4, CD8, CD19, etc., which refer to specific proteins found on the surface of different types of leukocytes. For example, CD4 is a protein found on the surface of helper T cells, while CD8 is found on cytotoxic T cells.

CD antigens can be used as targets for immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibody therapy, in which antibodies are designed to bind to specific CD antigens and trigger an immune response against cancer cells or infected cells. They can also be used as markers to monitor the effectiveness of treatments and to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) after treatment.

It's important to note that not all CD antigens are exclusive to leukocytes, some can be found on other cell types as well, and their expression can vary depending on the activation state or differentiation stage of the cells.

The adrenal cortex hormones are a group of steroid hormones produced and released by the outer portion (cortex) of the adrenal glands, which are located on top of each kidney. These hormones play crucial roles in regulating various physiological processes, including:

1. Glucose metabolism: Cortisol helps control blood sugar levels by increasing glucose production in the liver and reducing its uptake in peripheral tissues.
2. Protein and fat metabolism: Cortisol promotes protein breakdown and fatty acid mobilization, providing essential building blocks for energy production during stressful situations.
3. Immune response regulation: Cortisol suppresses immune function to prevent overactivation and potential damage to the body during stress.
4. Cardiovascular function: Aldosterone regulates electrolyte balance and blood pressure by promoting sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion in the kidneys.
5. Sex hormone production: The adrenal cortex produces small amounts of sex hormones, such as androgens and estrogens, which contribute to sexual development and function.
6. Growth and development: Cortisol plays a role in normal growth and development by influencing the activity of growth-promoting hormones like insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1).

The main adrenal cortex hormones include:

1. Glucocorticoids: Cortisol is the primary glucocorticoid, responsible for regulating metabolism and stress response.
2. Mineralocorticoids: Aldosterone is the primary mineralocorticoid, involved in electrolyte balance and blood pressure regulation.
3. Androgens: Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate derivative (DHEAS) are the most abundant adrenal androgens, contributing to sexual development and function.
4. Estrogens: Small amounts of estrogens are produced by the adrenal cortex, mainly in women.

Disorders related to impaired adrenal cortex hormone production or regulation can lead to various clinical manifestations, such as Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism), and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH).

Regulatory T-lymphocytes (Tregs), also known as suppressor T cells, are a subpopulation of T-cells that play a critical role in maintaining immune tolerance and preventing autoimmune diseases. They function to suppress the activation and proliferation of other immune cells, thereby regulating the immune response and preventing it from attacking the body's own tissues.

Tregs constitutively express the surface markers CD4 and CD25, as well as the transcription factor Foxp3, which is essential for their development and function. They can be further divided into subsets based on their expression of other markers, such as CD127 and CD45RA.

Tregs are critical for maintaining self-tolerance by suppressing the activation of self-reactive T cells that have escaped negative selection in the thymus. They also play a role in regulating immune responses to foreign antigens, such as those encountered during infection or cancer, and can contribute to the immunosuppressive microenvironment found in tumors.

Dysregulation of Tregs has been implicated in various autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis, as well as in cancer and infectious diseases. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that regulate Treg function is an important area of research with potential therapeutic implications.

Th1 cells, or Type 1 T helper cells, are a subset of CD4+ T cells that play a crucial role in the cell-mediated immune response. They are characterized by the production of specific cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 (IL-2). Th1 cells are essential for protecting against intracellular pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. They activate macrophages to destroy ingested microorganisms, stimulate the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells that produce antibodies, and recruit other immune cells to the site of infection. Dysregulation of Th1 cell responses has been implicated in various autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 1 diabetes.

Phenylbutazone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that was commonly used in the past to treat pain and inflammation associated with conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and gout. It works by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that mediate inflammation and pain.

However, due to its potential for serious side effects, including bone marrow suppression, liver toxicity, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke, phenylbutazone is no longer commonly used in human medicine in many countries, including the United States. It may still be used in veterinary medicine under strict supervision.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Immunoglobulins (Igs), also known as antibodies, are glycoprotein molecules produced by the immune system's B cells in response to the presence of foreign substances, such as bacteria, viruses, and toxins. These Y-shaped proteins play a crucial role in identifying and neutralizing pathogens and other antigens, thereby protecting the body against infection and disease.

Immunoglobulins are composed of four polypeptide chains: two identical heavy chains and two identical light chains, held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of these chains form the antigen-binding sites, which recognize and bind to specific epitopes on antigens. Based on their heavy chain type, immunoglobulins are classified into five main isotypes or classes: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has distinct functions in the immune response, such as providing protection in different body fluids and tissues, mediating hypersensitivity reactions, and aiding in the development of immunological memory.

In medical settings, immunoglobulins can be administered therapeutically to provide passive immunity against certain diseases or to treat immune deficiencies, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions that may benefit from immunomodulation.

An antigen is a substance (usually a protein) that is recognized as foreign by the immune system and stimulates an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies or activation of T-cells. Antigens can be derived from various sources, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, and tumor cells. They can also come from non-living substances such as pollen, dust mites, or chemicals.

Antigens contain epitopes, which are specific regions on the antigen molecule that are recognized by the immune system. The immune system's response to an antigen depends on several factors, including the type of antigen, its size, and its location in the body.

In general, antigens can be classified into two main categories:

1. T-dependent antigens: These require the help of T-cells to stimulate an immune response. They are typically larger, more complex molecules that contain multiple epitopes capable of binding to both MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells and T-cell receptors on CD4+ T-cells.
2. T-independent antigens: These do not require the help of T-cells to stimulate an immune response. They are usually smaller, simpler molecules that contain repetitive epitopes capable of cross-linking B-cell receptors and activating them directly.

Understanding antigens and their properties is crucial for developing vaccines, diagnostic tests, and immunotherapies.

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to and interact with the cytokine interleukin-6. IL-6 is a signaling molecule involved in various physiological processes, including immune response, inflammation, and hematopoiesis.

The IL-6 receptor complex consists of two main components: an 80 kDa ligand-binding alpha chain (IL-6Rα) and a signal-transducing beta chain (gp130). The IL-6Rα is responsible for binding to IL-6, while gp130 is shared by several cytokine receptors and activates downstream signaling pathways.

IL-6 receptors can be found on a variety of cell types, including hepatocytes, immune cells, and endothelial cells. The binding of IL-6 to its receptor initiates a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to the regulation of gene expression and various cellular responses, such as the production of acute phase proteins in the liver, the activation of immune cells, and the induction of fever.

Dysregulation of IL-6 signaling has been implicated in several diseases, including autoimmune disorders, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, targeting IL-6 receptors with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for treating these conditions.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

Oral administration is a route of giving medications or other substances by mouth. This can be in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids, pastes, or other forms that can be swallowed. Once ingested, the substance is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract and enters the bloodstream to reach its intended target site in the body. Oral administration is a common and convenient route of medication delivery, but it may not be appropriate for all substances or in certain situations, such as when rapid onset of action is required or when the patient has difficulty swallowing.

Anterior uveitis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of the front portion of the uvea, which is the middle layer of the eye. The uvea includes the iris (the colored part of the eye), the ciliary body (a structure behind the iris that helps focus light onto the retina), and the choroid (a layer of blood vessels that supplies oxygen and nutrients to the retina).

Anterior uveitis is characterized by inflammation of the iris and/or the ciliary body, leading to symptoms such as redness, pain, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, and a small pupil. The condition can be caused by various factors, including infections, autoimmune diseases, trauma, or unknown causes (idiopathic).

Treatment of anterior uveitis typically involves the use of topical corticosteroids to reduce inflammation and cycloplegics to relieve pain and prevent spasms of the ciliary muscle. In some cases, oral medications may be necessary to control the inflammation. Prompt treatment is important to prevent complications such as glaucoma, cataracts, or permanent vision loss.

'C3H' is the name of an inbred strain of laboratory mice that was developed at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. The mice are characterized by their uniform genetic background and have been widely used in biomedical research for many decades.

The C3H strain is particularly notable for its susceptibility to certain types of cancer, including mammary tumors and lymphomas. It also has a high incidence of age-related macular degeneration and other eye diseases. The strain is often used in studies of immunology, genetics, and carcinogenesis.

Like all inbred strains, the C3H mice are the result of many generations of brother-sister matings, which leads to a high degree of genetic uniformity within the strain. This makes them useful for studying the effects of specific genes or environmental factors on disease susceptibility and other traits. However, it also means that they may not always be representative of the genetic diversity found in outbred populations, including humans.

Interleukins (ILs) are a group of naturally occurring proteins that are important in the immune system. They are produced by various cells, including immune cells like lymphocytes and macrophages, and they help regulate the immune response by facilitating communication between different types of cells. Interleukins can have both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects, depending on the specific interleukin and the context in which it is produced. They play a role in various biological processes, including the development of immune responses, inflammation, and hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells).

There are many different interleukins that have been identified, and they are numbered according to the order in which they were discovered. For example, IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, etc. Each interleukin has a specific set of functions and targets certain types of cells. Dysregulation of interleukins has been implicated in various diseases, including autoimmune disorders, infections, and cancer.

The Predictive Value of Tests, specifically the Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and Negative Predictive Value (NPV), are measures used in diagnostic tests to determine the probability that a positive or negative test result is correct.

Positive Predictive Value (PPV) is the proportion of patients with a positive test result who actually have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true positives divided by the total number of positive results (true positives + false positives). A higher PPV indicates that a positive test result is more likely to be a true positive, and therefore the disease is more likely to be present.

Negative Predictive Value (NPV) is the proportion of patients with a negative test result who do not have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true negatives divided by the total number of negative results (true negatives + false negatives). A higher NPV indicates that a negative test result is more likely to be a true negative, and therefore the disease is less likely to be present.

The predictive value of tests depends on the prevalence of the disease in the population being tested, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of the test. A test with high sensitivity and specificity will generally have higher predictive values than a test with low sensitivity and specificity. However, even a highly sensitive and specific test can have low predictive values if the prevalence of the disease is low in the population being tested.

Foot diseases refer to various medical conditions that affect the foot, including its structures such as the bones, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, and nerves. These conditions can cause symptoms like pain, swelling, numbness, difficulty walking, and skin changes. Examples of foot diseases include:

1. Plantar fasciitis: inflammation of the band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes.
2. Bunions: a bony bump that forms on the joint at the base of the big toe.
3. Hammertoe: a deformity in which the toe is bent at the middle joint, resembling a hammer.
4. Diabetic foot: a group of conditions that can occur in people with diabetes, including nerve damage, poor circulation, and increased risk of infection.
5. Athlete's foot: a fungal infection that affects the skin between the toes and on the soles of the feet.
6. Ingrown toenails: a condition where the corner or side of a toenail grows into the flesh of the toe.
7. Gout: a type of arthritis that causes sudden, severe attacks of pain, swelling, redness, and tenderness in the joints, often starting with the big toe.
8. Foot ulcers: open sores or wounds that can occur on the feet, especially in people with diabetes or poor circulation.
9. Morton's neuroma: a thickening of the tissue around a nerve between the toes, causing pain and numbness.
10. Osteoarthritis: wear and tear of the joints, leading to pain, stiffness, and reduced mobility.

Foot diseases can affect people of all ages and backgrounds, and some may be prevented or managed with proper foot care, hygiene, and appropriate medical treatment.

Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a extracellular matrix protein that is found in high concentrations in cartilaginous tissues, such as articular cartilage and intervertebral discs. It is a member of the thrombospondin family and plays a role in the organization and stability of the extracellular matrix.
It is also known to be involved in the process of osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease. High levels of COMP are found in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis, and it is thought to contribute to the breakdown of cartilage. Additionally, genetic variations in the COMP gene have been associated with an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis.
It also plays a role in bone development and repair, as well as in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation.

Chondrocytes are the specialized cells that produce and maintain the extracellular matrix of cartilage tissue. They are responsible for synthesizing and secreting the collagen fibers, proteoglycans, and other components that give cartilage its unique properties, such as elasticity, resiliency, and resistance to compression. Chondrocytes are located within lacunae, or small cavities, in the cartilage matrix, and they receive nutrients and oxygen through diffusion from the surrounding tissue fluid. They are capable of adapting to changes in mechanical stress by modulating the production and organization of the extracellular matrix, which allows cartilage to withstand various loads and maintain its structural integrity. Chondrocytes play a crucial role in the development, maintenance, and repair of cartilaginous tissues throughout the body, including articular cartilage, costal cartilage, and growth plate cartilage.

Uveitis is the inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye between the retina and the white of the eye (sclera). The uvea consists of the iris, ciliary body, and choroid. Uveitis can cause redness, pain, and vision loss. It can be caused by various systemic diseases, infections, or trauma. Depending on the part of the uvea that's affected, uveitis can be classified as anterior (iritis), intermediate (cyclitis), posterior (choroiditis), or pan-uveitis (affecting all layers). Treatment typically includes corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive drugs to control inflammation.

The shoulder joint, also known as the glenohumeral joint, is the most mobile joint in the human body. It is a ball and socket synovial joint that connects the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) to the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade). The shoulder joint allows for a wide range of movements including flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. It is surrounded by a group of muscles and tendons known as the rotator cuff that provide stability and enable smooth movement of the joint.

Mycoplasma infections refer to illnesses caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Mycoplasma. These are among the smallest free-living organisms, lacking a cell wall and possessing a unique molecular structure. They can cause various respiratory tract infections (like pneumonia, bronchitis), urogenital infections, and other systemic diseases in humans, animals, and birds.

The most common Mycoplasma species that infect humans include M. pneumoniae, M. genitalium, M. hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum. Transmission usually occurs through respiratory droplets or sexual contact. Symptoms can vary widely depending on the site of infection but may include cough, chest pain, difficulty breathing, fatigue, joint pain, rash, and genital discharge or pelvic pain in women. Diagnosis often requires specific laboratory tests due to their unique growth requirements and resistance to many common antibiotics. Treatment typically involves macrolide or fluoroquinolone antibiotics.

HLA-DQ antigens are a type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) that are found on the surface of cells in our body. They are a part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, which play a crucial role in the immune system by presenting pieces of proteins from outside the cell to CD4+ T cells, also known as helper T cells. This presentation process is essential for initiating an appropriate immune response against potentially harmful pathogens such as bacteria and viruses.

HLA-DQ antigens are encoded by genes located on chromosome 6p21.3 in the HLA region. Each individual inherits a pair of HLA-DQ genes, one from each parent, which can result in various combinations of HLA-DQ alleles. These genetic variations contribute to the diversity of immune responses among different individuals.

HLA-DQ antigens consist of two noncovalently associated polypeptide chains: an alpha (DQA) chain and a beta (DQB) chain. There are several isotypes of HLA-DQ antigens, including DQ1, DQ2, DQ3, DQ4, DQ5, DQ6, DQ7, DQ8, and DQ9, which are determined by the specific combination of DQA and DQB alleles.

Certain HLA-DQ genotypes have been associated with an increased risk of developing certain autoimmune diseases, such as celiac disease (DQ2 and DQ8), type 1 diabetes (DQ2, DQ8), and rheumatoid arthritis (DQ4). Understanding the role of HLA-DQ antigens in these conditions can provide valuable insights into disease pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets.

Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are a group of structural and functional molecules that provide support, organization, and regulation to the cells in tissues and organs. The ECM is composed of a complex network of proteins, glycoproteins, and carbohydrates that are secreted by the cells and deposited outside of them.

ECM proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, including:

1. Collagens: These are the most abundant ECM proteins and provide strength and stability to tissues. They form fibrils that can withstand high tensile forces.
2. Proteoglycans: These are complex molecules made up of a core protein and one or more glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains. The GAG chains attract water, making proteoglycans important for maintaining tissue hydration and resilience.
3. Elastin: This is an elastic protein that allows tissues to stretch and recoil, such as in the lungs and blood vessels.
4. Fibronectins: These are large glycoproteins that bind to cells and ECM components, providing adhesion, migration, and signaling functions.
5. Laminins: These are large proteins found in basement membranes, which provide structural support for epithelial and endothelial cells.
6. Tenascins: These are large glycoproteins that modulate cell adhesion and migration, and regulate ECM assembly and remodeling.

Together, these ECM proteins create a microenvironment that influences cell behavior, differentiation, and function. Dysregulation of ECM proteins has been implicated in various diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and degenerative disorders.

Immunization is defined medically as the process where an individual is made immune or resistant to an infectious disease, typically through the administration of a vaccine. The vaccine stimulates the body's own immune system to recognize and fight off the specific disease-causing organism, thereby preventing or reducing the severity of future infections with that organism.

Immunization can be achieved actively, where the person is given a vaccine to trigger an immune response, or passively, where antibodies are transferred to the person through immunoglobulin therapy. Immunizations are an important part of preventive healthcare and have been successful in controlling and eliminating many infectious diseases worldwide.

Zymosan is a type of substance that is derived from the cell walls of yeast and some types of fungi. It's often used in laboratory research as an agent to stimulate inflammation, because it can activate certain immune cells (such as neutrophils) and cause them to release pro-inflammatory chemicals.

In medical terms, Zymosan is sometimes used as a tool for studying the immune system and inflammation in experimental settings. It's important to note that Zymosan itself is not a medical condition or disease, but rather a research reagent with potential applications in understanding human health and disease.

Clinical trials are research studies that involve human participants and are designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new medical treatments, drugs, devices, or behavioral interventions. The purpose of clinical trials is to determine whether a new intervention is safe, effective, and beneficial for patients, as well as to compare it with currently available treatments. Clinical trials follow a series of phases, each with specific goals and criteria, before a new intervention can be approved by regulatory authorities for widespread use.

Clinical trials are conducted according to a protocol, which is a detailed plan that outlines the study's objectives, design, methodology, statistical analysis, and ethical considerations. The protocol is developed and reviewed by a team of medical experts, statisticians, and ethicists, and it must be approved by an institutional review board (IRB) before the trial can begin.

Participation in clinical trials is voluntary, and participants must provide informed consent before enrolling in the study. Informed consent involves providing potential participants with detailed information about the study's purpose, procedures, risks, benefits, and alternatives, as well as their rights as research subjects. Participants can withdraw from the study at any time without penalty or loss of benefits to which they are entitled.

Clinical trials are essential for advancing medical knowledge and improving patient care. They help researchers identify new treatments, diagnostic tools, and prevention strategies that can benefit patients and improve public health. However, clinical trials also pose potential risks to participants, including adverse effects from experimental interventions, time commitment, and inconvenience. Therefore, it is important for researchers to carefully design and conduct clinical trials to minimize risks and ensure that the benefits outweigh the risks.

Polymyalgia Rheumatica (PMR) is a geriatric rheumatic disease characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and stiffness, particularly affecting the neck, shoulders, hips, and thighs. It is often accompanied by symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, loss of appetite, and low-grade fever. The onset of PMR can be sudden or gradual, and it tends to affect individuals over 50 years of age, more commonly women than men.

The exact cause of Polymyalgia Rheumatica remains unknown; however, it is believed to involve an autoimmune response leading to inflammation in the affected areas. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, laboratory tests (such as elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein), and sometimes imaging studies. Treatment usually includes corticosteroids to reduce inflammation and manage symptoms, along with monitoring for potential side effects from long-term steroid use. In many cases, PMR can be successfully managed with appropriate treatment, allowing individuals to return to their normal activities.

Gout suppressants are a type of medication used to treat acute gout attacks and reduce the risk of future episodes. They work by decreasing the production of uric acid in the body or improving its elimination, thereby reducing the formation of uric acid crystals that cause inflammation and pain in the joints. Common examples of gout suppressants include:

1. Colchicine: This medication is often used to treat acute gout attacks by reducing inflammation and swelling in the affected joint. It should be taken as soon as possible after the onset of symptoms for best results.

2. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): These medications, such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib, can help alleviate pain and inflammation during an acute gout attack. They are usually more effective when taken at the first sign of an attack.

3. Corticosteroids: In some cases, corticosteroid medications like prednisone may be prescribed to treat severe gout attacks that do not respond to other treatments. These drugs can be administered orally or injected directly into the affected joint.

4. Allopurinol and febuxostat: These medications are called xanthine oxidase inhibitors, which reduce uric acid production in the body. They are typically used for chronic gout management to prevent future attacks and lower the risk of complications such as kidney stones and joint damage.

It is important to note that some gout suppressants may have side effects or interact with other medications, so it is crucial to discuss any concerns with a healthcare provider before starting treatment. Additionally, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy weight, following a low-purine diet, and staying hydrated can help manage gout symptoms and lower the risk of future attacks.

A leukocyte count, also known as a white blood cell (WBC) count, is a laboratory test that measures the number of leukocytes in a sample of blood. Leukocytes are a vital part of the body's immune system and help fight infection and inflammation. A high or low leukocyte count may indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a bone marrow disorder. The normal range for a leukocyte count in adults is typically between 4,500 and 11,000 cells per microliter (mcL) of blood. However, the normal range can vary slightly depending on the laboratory and the individual's age and sex.

A "Drug Administration Schedule" refers to the plan for when and how a medication should be given to a patient. It includes details such as the dose, frequency (how often it should be taken), route (how it should be administered, such as orally, intravenously, etc.), and duration (how long it should be taken) of the medication. This schedule is often created and prescribed by healthcare professionals, such as doctors or pharmacists, to ensure that the medication is taken safely and effectively. It may also include instructions for missed doses or changes in the dosage.

Health status indicators are measures used to assess and monitor the health and well-being of a population. They provide information about various aspects of health, such as mortality rates, morbidity rates, prevalence of chronic diseases, lifestyle factors, environmental exposures, and access to healthcare services. These indicators can be used to identify trends and disparities in health outcomes, inform policy decisions, allocate resources, and evaluate the effectiveness of public health interventions. Examples of health status indicators include life expectancy, infant mortality rate, prevalence of diabetes, smoking rates, and access to primary care.

Congenic animals are genetically identical organisms, except for a specific genetic locus or region that has been intentionally altered. In the context of animal research, congenic animals are created through selective breeding to transfer a particular gene or genes from one strain to another while keeping the rest of the genetic background as similar as possible.

The process involves repeatedly backcrossing the offspring of the initial cross between two strains to one of the parental strains for several generations, followed by brother-sister mating to establish a congenic strain. The resulting congenic animals share more than 99% of their genetic material with the recipient strain but carry the donor strain's gene(s) at the specific locus of interest.

Congenic animal models are essential tools in biomedical research, as they allow researchers to study the effects of a particular gene or genetic variant while minimizing the influence of other genetic factors. These models help isolate the contribution of a single gene to a phenotype, disease susceptibility, or drug response, facilitating a better understanding of complex biological processes and potential therapeutic interventions.

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the articulation between the mandible (lower jaw) and the temporal bone of the skull. It's a complex joint that involves the movement of two bones, several muscles, and various ligaments. The TMJ allows for movements like rotation and translation, enabling us to open and close our mouth, chew, speak, and yawn. Dysfunction in this joint can lead to temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), which can cause pain, discomfort, and limited jaw movement.

Bacterial antibodies are a type of antibodies produced by the immune system in response to an infection caused by bacteria. These antibodies are proteins that recognize and bind to specific antigens on the surface of the bacterial cells, marking them for destruction by other immune cells. Bacterial antibodies can be classified into several types based on their structure and function, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE. They play a crucial role in the body's defense against bacterial infections and provide immunity to future infections with the same bacteria.

A joint capsule is the fibrous sac that encloses a synovial joint, which is a type of joint characterized by the presence of a cavity filled with synovial fluid. The joint capsule provides stability and strength to the joint, while also allowing for a range of motion. It consists of two layers: an outer fibrous layer and an inner synovial membrane. The fibrous layer is made up of dense connective tissue that helps to stabilize the joint, while the synovial membrane produces synovial fluid, which lubricates the joint and reduces friction during movement.

Chemokines are a family of small cytokines, or signaling proteins, that are secreted by cells and play an important role in the immune system. They are chemotactic, meaning they can attract and guide the movement of various immune cells to specific locations within the body. Chemokines do this by binding to G protein-coupled receptors on the surface of target cells, initiating a signaling cascade that leads to cell migration.

There are four main subfamilies of chemokines, classified based on the arrangement of conserved cysteine residues near the amino terminus: CXC, CC, C, and CX3C. Different chemokines have specific roles in inflammation, immune surveillance, hematopoiesis, and development. Dysregulation of chemokine function has been implicated in various diseases, including autoimmune disorders, infections, and cancer.

In summary, Chemokines are a group of signaling proteins that play a crucial role in the immune system by directing the movement of immune cells to specific locations within the body, thus helping to coordinate the immune response.

Tripterygium is not a medical term itself, but it refers to a genus of plants also known as thunder god vine. The root and bark extracts of this plant have been used in traditional Chinese medicine for various inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. Some compounds derived from Tripterygium species, such as triptolide and celastrol, have attracted interest in modern medical research due to their potential immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the use of Tripterygium extracts is associated with several side effects, and further studies are required to establish their safety and efficacy for therapeutic purposes.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Gene frequency, also known as allele frequency, is a measure in population genetics that reflects the proportion of a particular gene or allele (variant of a gene) in a given population. It is calculated as the number of copies of a specific allele divided by the total number of all alleles at that genetic locus in the population.

For example, if we consider a gene with two possible alleles, A and a, the gene frequency of allele A (denoted as p) can be calculated as follows:

p = (number of copies of allele A) / (total number of all alleles at that locus)

Similarly, the gene frequency of allele a (denoted as q) would be:

q = (number of copies of allele a) / (total number of all alleles at that locus)

Since there are only two possible alleles for this gene in this example, p + q = 1. These frequencies can help researchers understand genetic diversity and evolutionary processes within populations.

Osteomyelitis is a medical condition characterized by an infection that involves the bone or the bone marrow. It can occur as a result of a variety of factors, including bacterial or fungal infections that spread to the bone from another part of the body, or direct infection of the bone through trauma or surgery.

The symptoms of osteomyelitis may include pain and tenderness in the affected area, fever, chills, fatigue, and difficulty moving the affected limb. In some cases, there may also be redness, swelling, and drainage from the infected area. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis typically involves imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans, as well as blood tests and cultures to identify the underlying cause of the infection.

Treatment for osteomyelitis usually involves a combination of antibiotics or antifungal medications to eliminate the infection, as well as pain management and possibly surgical debridement to remove infected tissue. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary to monitor and manage the condition.

A haplotype is a group of genes or DNA sequences that are inherited together from a single parent. It refers to a combination of alleles (variant forms of a gene) that are located on the same chromosome and are usually transmitted as a unit. Haplotypes can be useful in tracing genetic ancestry, understanding the genetic basis of diseases, and developing personalized medical treatments.

In population genetics, haplotypes are often used to study patterns of genetic variation within and between populations. By comparing haplotype frequencies across populations, researchers can infer historical events such as migrations, population expansions, and bottlenecks. Additionally, haplotypes can provide information about the evolutionary history of genes and genomic regions.

In clinical genetics, haplotypes can be used to identify genetic risk factors for diseases or to predict an individual's response to certain medications. For example, specific haplotypes in the HLA gene region have been associated with increased susceptibility to certain autoimmune diseases, while other haplotypes in the CYP450 gene family can affect how individuals metabolize drugs.

Overall, haplotypes provide a powerful tool for understanding the genetic basis of complex traits and diseases, as well as for developing personalized medical treatments based on an individual's genetic makeup.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Prognosis is a medical term that refers to the prediction of the likely outcome or course of a disease, including the chances of recovery or recurrence, based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. It is an important aspect of clinical decision-making and patient communication, as it helps doctors and patients make informed decisions about treatment options, set realistic expectations, and plan for future care.

Prognosis can be expressed in various ways, such as percentages, categories (e.g., good, fair, poor), or survival rates, depending on the nature of the disease and the available evidence. However, it is important to note that prognosis is not an exact science and may vary depending on individual factors, such as age, overall health status, and response to treatment. Therefore, it should be used as a guide rather than a definitive forecast.

Delayed hypersensitivity, also known as type IV hypersensitivity, is a type of immune response that takes place several hours to days after exposure to an antigen. It is characterized by the activation of T cells (a type of white blood cell) and the release of various chemical mediators, leading to inflammation and tissue damage. This reaction is typically associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, such as contact dermatitis, granulomatous disorders (e.g. tuberculosis), and certain autoimmune diseases.

The reaction process involves the following steps:

1. Sensitization: The first time an individual is exposed to an antigen, T cells are activated and become sensitized to it. This process can take several days.
2. Memory: Some of the activated T cells differentiate into memory T cells, which remain in the body and are ready to respond quickly if the same antigen is encountered again.
3. Effector phase: Upon subsequent exposure to the antigen, the memory T cells become activated and release cytokines, which recruit other immune cells (e.g. macrophages) to the site of inflammation. These cells cause tissue damage through various mechanisms, such as phagocytosis, degranulation, and the release of reactive oxygen species.
4. Chronic inflammation: The ongoing immune response can lead to chronic inflammation, which may result in tissue destruction and fibrosis (scarring).

Examples of conditions associated with delayed hypersensitivity include:

* Contact dermatitis (e.g. poison ivy, nickel allergy)
* Tuberculosis
* Leprosy
* Sarcoidosis
* Rheumatoid arthritis
* Type 1 diabetes mellitus
* Multiple sclerosis
* Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis)

Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology. 28 (3): 333-40. PMID 20406616. Harrison's Rheumatology, Second Edition [Anthony Fauci, ... Reactive arthritis, also known as Reiter's syndrome, is a form of inflammatory arthritis that develops in response to an ... Arthritis occurring alone following sexual exposure or enteric infection is also known as reactive arthritis. Patients can also ... "Arthritis and Rheumatism". Retrieved 16 May 2011. eMedicine/Medscape (5 January 2010). "Reactive Arthritis". Retrieved 16 May ...
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 764. pp. 151-158. doi:10.1002/14651858.cd008331.pub2. PMID 23654064. Osiri ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis at Curlie "Rheumatoid Arthritis". MedlinePlus ... psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis: Is all inflammation the same?". Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism. 46 (3): ... "Pain management for inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and other ...
Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology. 16 (3): 277-281X. PMID 9631749. "Post Traumatic Wrist Arthritis , Orthopaedic Surgery ... such as rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis. The symptoms of post-traumatic arthritis are similar to the ones occurring ... Post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) is a form of osteoarthritis following an injury to a joint. Post-traumatic arthritis is a form ... Since post-traumatic arthritis usually occurs after injuring a joint, the risk of having post-traumatic arthritis after such an ...
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 764. pp. 151-8. doi:10.1007/978-1-4614-4726-9_12. ISBN 978-1-4614-4725-2. ... Arthritis mutilans has also been called chronic absorptive arthritis, and may be seen in rheumatoid arthritis as well. ... reactive arthritis, gouty arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthritis. In ... Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a long-term inflammatory arthritis that occurs in people affected by the autoimmune disease ...
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Unlike rheumatoid arthritis, lupus arthritis is less disabling and usually does not cause severe destruction of the joints. ... There is no cure for SLE, but there are experimental and symptomatic treatments. Treatments may include NSAIDs, corticosteroids ... Arthritis: nonerosive arthritis of two or more peripheral joints, with tenderness, swelling, or effusion; sensitivity = 86%; ... Fewer than ten percent of people with lupus arthritis will develop deformities of the hands and feet. People with SLE are at ...
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... , sold under the brand Xeljanz among others, is a medication used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis ... "Why Pfizer's Biggest Experimental Drug Got A Name Change". Forbes. Retrieved 3 March 2011. Moisan A, Lee YK, Zhang JD, Hudak CS ... FDA approves Boxed Warning about increased risk of blood clots and death with higher dose of arthritis and ulcerative colitis ... "FDA approves Boxed Warning about increased risk of blood clots and death with higher dose of arthritis and ulcerative colitis ...
The joints involved tend to be the ankles, knees, and elbows, but arthritis in the hands and feet is possible; the arthritis is ... 2002). "Problems of classification of Henoch Schonlein purpura: an Indian perspective". Clinical and Experimental Dermatology. ... Purpura, arthritis, and abdominal pain are known as the "classic triad" of Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Purpura occur in all cases ... Schönlein associated the purpura and arthritis, and Henoch the purpura and gastrointestinal involvement. The English physician ...
Most experimental progress has been made with gene transfer to a convenient intra-articular tissue, such as the hyaline ... "Osteoarthritis (OA) , Arthritis , CDC". www.cdc.gov. 2020-08-04. Retrieved 2023-07-23. West CR, Bedard NA, Duchman KR, ... "Osteoarthritis (OA) , Arthritis , CDC". www.cdc.gov. 2020-08-04. Retrieved 2023-07-23. Shane Anderson A, Loeser RF (February ... August 2005). "Osteoarthritis: an overview of the disease and its treatment strategies". Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism. ...
Experimental studies have shown that certain mutated viruses may be able to trigger JIA. The disease appears to be more common ... "Is juvenile rheumatoid arthritis/juvenile idiopathic arthritis different from rheumatoid arthritis?". Arthritis Research. 4 ( ... Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), formerly known as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), is the most common chronic ... Arthritis Australia, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis JIA@NRAS (UK) JIA - NIH Medline Plus. (Articles with short description, ...
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Disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis can commence with insufficient ... Experimental Cell Research. 383 (2): 111513. doi:10.1016/j.yexcr.2019.111513. PMID 31362000. S2CID 198998443. Kalampokis I, ... Yoshizaki A, Tedder TF (2013-02-11). "IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (B10 cells) in autoimmune disease". Arthritis Research ...
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Specifically, individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren syndrome have increased rates of bronchiectasis. In these ... Clinical and Experimental Allergy. 43 (8): 850-873. doi:10.1111/cea.12141. PMID 23889240. S2CID 24077597. Wilczynska, Maria M ... Chatzidionisyou, Aikaterini; Catrina, Anca I. (January 2016). "The lung in rheumatoid arthritis, cause or consequence?". ... The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine. 222 (4): 237-242. doi:10.1620/tjem.222.237. PMID 21127394. Kim, C. K.; Chung, C. Y ...
It has been observed that genetic inactivation of ZCCHC 6 suppresses IL‐6 expression and reduces the severity of experimental ... The first FDA approved anti-IL-6 treatment was for rheumatoid arthritis. Anti-IL-6 therapy was initially developed for ... The first such is tocilizumab, which has been approved for rheumatoid arthritis, Castleman's disease and systemic juvenile ... Smolen JS, Maini RN (2006). "Interleukin-6: a new therapeutic target". Arthritis Research & Therapy. 8 (Suppl 2): S5. doi: ...
The Effect of Salicylates on Experimental Arthritis in Rabbits. Chicago: American Medical Association, 1917. Fantus, Bernard. ... to strengthen New Jersey's competitive position for business and industry The effect of salicylates on experimental arthritis ... Tolu and sugar coating in the disguising of medicines Tungstates of alkaloids-An experimental pharmacologic study X‐Ray ... "Tungstates of alkaloids-An Experimental Pharmacologic Study." The Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine 3, no. 3 (1917): ...
... s have been implicated in the progression of arthritis. The main involvement of rheumatoid arthritis is its ... 2023). "Platelet-derived TLT-1 promotes tumor progression by suppressing CD8+ T cells". Journal of Experimental Medicine. 220 ( ... It is also studied that the production of cytokines by the CD8+ cells may accelerate the progresses of the arthritis disease. ... Cope AP, Schulze-Koops H, Aringer M (September 2007). "The central role of T cells in rheumatoid arthritis". Clinical and ...
"Novel suppressive function of transitional 2 B cells in experimental arthritis". Journal of Immunology. 178 (12): 7868-78. doi: ... By contrast, mouse Bregs in model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were mainly CD21 and CD23 positive. Bregs were found in ... Then a role of Bregs was found in many mouse models of autoimmune diseases as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus ... Mauri C, Gray D, Mushtaq N, Londei M (February 2003). "Prevention of arthritis by interleukin 10-producing B cells". The ...
"The oncoprotein TBX3 is controlling severity in experimental arthritis". Arthritis Research & Therapy. 21 (1): 16. doi:10.1186/ ... KLF12 as a risk locus for rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility". Arthritis and Rheumatism. 58 (8): 2275-86. doi:10.1002/art. ... TBX3 has been implicated in human diseases including the ulnar mammary syndrome, obesity, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. In ... Genome wide association studies also causally linked TBX3 to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility and a recent study ...
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 735. pp. 55-81. doi:10.1007/978-1-4614-4118-2_4. ISBN 978-1-4614-4117-5. ... Arthritis and Rheumatism. 30 (9): 961-6. doi:10.1002/art.1780300901. PMID 2959289. Hourcade D, Miesner DR, Atkinson JP, Holers ... The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 173 (5): 1159-63. doi:10.1084/jem.173.5.1159. PMC 2118866. PMID 1708809. Khera R, Das N ( ... The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 168 (5): 1699-717. doi:10.1084/jem.168.5.1699. PMC 2189104. PMID 2972794. Hing S, Day AJ ...
... a unique inflammatory cytokine with roles in bone biology and arthritis". Arthritis Research & Therapy. 6 (6): 240-7. doi: ... In experimental pneumonia models, IL-17A or IL-17RA knock mice have increased susceptibility to various Gram-negative bacteria ... Lubberts E, Koenders MI, van den Berg WB (2006). "The role of T-cell interleukin-17 in conducting destructive arthritis: ... Th17 cells is also strongly associated rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic disorder with symptoms include chronic joint ...
May 2017). "Response of human rheumatoid arthritis osteoblasts and osteoclasts to adiponectin". Clinical and Experimental ... Adiponectin is a protein hormone that has been shown to be upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis disease pathology, causing the ... bone growth by osteoblasts is a partial cause of the abnormal degradation of bone seen in osteoporosis or rheumatoid arthritis ...
"Serum procalcitonin for discrimination between septic and non-septic arthritis". Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology. 26 (3 ... The study also concluded that PCT outperforms C-reactive protein in differentiating septic arthritis from non-septic arthritis ... PCT at a cutoff value of .5 ng/mL was effective at ruling in septic arthritis in an analysis of over 8000 patients across 10 ... May 2005). "Diagnostic value of serum and synovial procalcitonin in acute arthritis: a prospective study of 42 patients". ...
"Dead Sea bath salts for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis". Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology. 8 (4): 353-357. PMID ... Researchers have also studied their use in treating arthritis. Bath fizzies are material products designed to effervesce in ...
The RAQoL is a self-assessment questionnaire, meaning patients fill out the survey themselves in order to avoid experimental ... and Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life (RAQoL)". Arthritis Care & Research. 63 (Supplement S11): S4-S13. doi:10.1002/acr. ... The Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RAQoL) is a disease-specific patient-reported outcome measure which ... The RAQoL has been used in clinical studies in order to confirm the efficacy of proposed treatments of rheumatoid arthritis. It ...
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Hilkens CM, Isaacs JD (May 2013). "Tolerogenic dendritic cell therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: where are we now?". Clinical ... The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 195 (1): 15-21. doi:10.1084/jem.20011341. PMC 2196016. PMID 11781361. Monney L, Sabatos ... and Experimental Immunology. 172 (2): 148-57. doi:10.1111/cei.12038. PMC 3628318. PMID 23574312. Mannie MD, Curtis AD (May 2013 ... regulatory T cells play a critical role in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced suppression of experimental ...
... injection of cell walls or whole-cell sonicates and correlated well with the development of the chronic stage of arthritis ... Summary Experimental arthritis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intraarticular injectionof whole-cell sonicates, heat- ... nitrosoguanidine-derived mutant and the naturally occurring Lowry strain induced a similar but less severe form of arthritis. ... Dalldorf F. G., Cromartie W. J., Anderle S. K., Clark R. L., Schwab J. H. 1980; The relation of experimental arthritis to the ...
Impact of IL-1 signalling on experimental uveitis and arthritis.. Authors:. Planck, SR Woods, A Clowers, JS Nicklin, MJ ... Only show annotations with direct experimental evidence (0 objects hidden). Term. Qualifier. Evidence. With. Reference. Notes. ... OBJECTIVE: To seek possible links between arthritis and uveitis pathogenesis related to IL-1 signalling. METHODS: The eyes of ... RESULTS: Deficiency in IL-1Ra predisposes to spontaneous arthritis, which is exacerbated by previous systemic LPS exposure. The ...
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune, inflammatory disease, characterized by synovitis in small- and medium-sized ... Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune, inflammatory disease, characterized by synovitis in small- and medium-sized ... Experimental Workflow. Cryopreserved PBMCs were thawed, rapidly transferred to warm X-VIVO™ containing a nuclease (Benzonase® ... Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by synovial inflammation that, if not treated early and ...
Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology. 28 (3): 333-40. PMID 20406616. Harrisons Rheumatology, Second Edition [Anthony Fauci, ... Reactive arthritis, also known as Reiters syndrome, is a form of inflammatory arthritis that develops in response to an ... Arthritis occurring alone following sexual exposure or enteric infection is also known as reactive arthritis. Patients can also ... "Arthritis and Rheumatism". Retrieved 16 May 2011. eMedicine/Medscape (5 January 2010). "Reactive Arthritis". Retrieved 16 May ...
... and stiffness of arthritis can limit your movement. Medicines can help manage your symptoms so that you can continue to lead an ... and stiffness of arthritis can limit your movement. Medicines can help manage your symptoms so that you can continue to lead an ... These treatments are quite new and mostly experimental. Please talk with your provider first before having them. ... The results have shown it to be safe and perhaps helpful for people with early arthritis. Blood is drawn from your veins and is ...
Arthritis, Experimental / pathology * Arthritis, Experimental / prevention & control* * Body Weight * Bone and Bones / ... In the current study, we investigated the effects of WBM and shiitake mushrooms (SM) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using ... White button and shiitake mushrooms reduce the incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis in dilute brown non-agouti ... To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a possible health benefit of WBM in arthritis treatment. ...
Water extracts of Tibetan medicine Wuweiganlu attenuates experimental arthritis via induci Water extracts of Tibetan medicine ... Artrite Experimental; Artrite Reumatoide; Ratos; Animais; Bovinos; Artrite Experimental/patologia; Fator de Necrose Tumoral ... A rat model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was established by injecting an emulsion of bovine type II collagen mixed with ... Artrite Experimental / Artrite Reumatoide Tipo de estudo: Prognostic_studies Limite: Animais Idioma: Inglês Revista: J ...
Experimental drug for rheumatoid arthritis prevents side effect of stem cell transplants An investigational drug in clinical ... trials for rheumatoid arthritis prevents a common, life-threatening side effect of stem cell transplants, new research from ...
An experimental model for the rational design of immunomodulatory treatments of rheumatoid arthritis. Advances in experimental ... An experimental model for the rational design of immunomodulatory treatments of rheumatoid arthritis. Advances in experimental ... An experimental model for the rational design of immunomodulatory treatments of rheumatoid arthritis, Advances in experimental ... Nabozny, G. H. ; David, C. S. / The immunogenetic basis of collagen induced arthritis in mice : An experimental model for the ...
... liposome formulation for systemic delivery of small interfering RNA silencing tumor necrosis factor α in experimental arthritis ... liposome formulation for systemic delivery of small interfering RNA silencing tumor necrosis factor α in experimental arthritis ...
DUSP-1-/- mice exhibited higher penetrance, earlier onset, and increased severity of experimental arthritis, accompanied by ... is a critical regulator of osteoclast activity and limits bone destruction in an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis. ... METHODS: Penetrance, onset, and severity of collagen-induced arthritis were recorded in DUSP-1+/+ and DUSP-1-/- mice. Bone ... in the expression or activity of DUSP1 in humans may correlate with a propensity to develop osteolytic lesions in arthritis. ...
The relationship between depression, clinical pain, and experimental pain in a chronic pain cohort. Arthritis Rheum. 2005 May. ... Self-efficacy for arthritis pain: relationship to perception of thermal laboratory pain stimuli. Arthritis Care Res. 1997 Jun. ... Pain and arthritis. N C Med J. 2007 Nov-Dec. 68(6):444-6. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... Arthritis Res Ther. 2015 Sep 26. 17:272. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. [Full Text]. ...
1. Tissue destruction in arthritis : experimental studies. Författare :Esbjörn Larsson; Karolinska Institutet; Karolinska ... Sammanfattning : Destruction of joint cartilage and bone is one of the most serious consequences of chronic arthritis. ...
Clinical Chair in Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology, University of Aberdeen. Honorary Consultant Rheumatologist, NHS ...
Role of Lipocalin-Type Prostaglandin D Synthase in Experimental Osteoarthritis. Najar M, et al. Arthritis Rheumatol, 2020 Sep. ... Role of Lipocalin-Type Prostaglandin D Synthase in Experimental Osteoarthritis. Title: Role of Lipocalin-Type Prostaglandin D ...
Referral delays for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology 2003, 21(4), 532. ... in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology 2003, 21(4), 537. ... Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2014, 175(1), 59-67. * Rensing-Ehl A, Volkl S, Speckmann C, Lorenz MR, Ritter J, Janda A, ... In: Arthritis & Rheumatism: 67th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology. 2003, Orlando, Florida, USA ...
Nanomicelles Inhibit Articular Cartilage Deterioration and Reduce Disease Severity in Experimental Inflammatory Arthritis. ... Rheumatoid arthritis and mitochondrial homeostasis: The crossroads of metabolism and immunity. Rheumatoid arthritis is an ... Experimental pain, such as heat pain, can help us better understand the pain experience, as it induces transient, but robust ... These biological processes are involved in the onset and development of rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we found that in ...
Arthritis, Arthritis, Experimental, Rheumatoid Factor, Sulfasalazine. in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. volume. 82. issue. ... Arthritis, Experimental; Rheumatoid Factor; Sulfasalazine}}, language = {{eng}}, month = {{11}}, number = {{11}}, pages = {{ ... article{28cfd49e-aa35-457a-8181-79601e30c1b9, author = {{Wollheim, Frank A.}}, issn = {{0003-4967}}, keywords = {{Arthritis; ...
Arthritis, Experimental. 1. 2022. 291. 0.170. Why? Mice, Knockout. 6. 2022. 14554. 0.170. Why? ...
Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory condition that involves pain in the joints and other symptoms. Natural remedies and ... Experimental drug could reduce levels of bad blood fats to lower heart disease risk ... www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/arthritis-diet/anti-inflammatory/the-arthritis-diet.php. ... The Arthritis Foundation suggests that ginger may help people with rheumatoid arthritis, another inflammatory type of arthritis ...
... including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies have focussed ... Effect of a cocoa flavonoid-enriched diet on experimental autoimmune arthritis. Br. J. Nutr. 2011, 107, 523-532. [Google ... Diet and Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms: Survey Results From a Rheumatoid Arthritis Registry. Arthritis Rheum. 2017, 69, 1920- ... Silman, A.J.; Pearson, J.E. Epidemiology and genetics of rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Res. 2002, 4, S265-S272. [Google ...
Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology. Sep-Oct 2017;35(5):791-798. OBJECTIVES:. We assessed the level of maintained ... Effectiveness and healthcare costs among stabilised rheumatoid arthritis patients with dose reduction of adalimumab or ... effectiveness and associated healthcare costs in stabilised rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who reduced doses of adalimumab ...
Effect of bee venom on experimental arthritis. (1 September, 1973) R B Zurier, H Mitnick, D Bloomgarden, G Weissmann ... Effect of hepatic injury on adjuvant arthritis. (1 September, 1973) R S Pinals ... Clinical trial of pentazocine in rheumatoid arthritis. Observations on the value of potent analgesics and placebos. (1 ...
Emerging role of leptin in rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical and Experimental Immunology. 177: 557-570. ... Experimental Biology and Medicine. 233: 259-276.. *Laake et al. Influence of fermented milk on clinical state, fecal bacterial ...
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that causes pain and tissue destruction in people worldwide. An accurate ... The experiments were approved by the Danish Experimental Inspectorate (J. no. 2014-15-0201-00001) and housing of the mice were ... Folate-targeted nanoparticles show efficacy in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis. Arthritis & Rheumatism 63, 2671-2680, ... Folate-targeted imaging of activated macrophages in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis. Arthritis & Rheumatism 46, 1947-1955 ...
arthritis, experimental, arthritis, rheumatoid, autoantibodies, autoimmunity, inflammation National Category Immunology in the ... immediately before arthritis onset. Transfer of anti-GPI293-307 IgG antibodies induced arthritis in mice. Moreover, anti-GPI293 ... Open this publication in new window or tab ,,Oral microbiota identifies patients in early onset rheumatoid arthritis. Esberg, ... Open this publication in new window or tab ,,Association between inflammasome-related polymorphisms and psoriatic arthritis. ...
Collagen Induced Arthritis. * ARTHRITIS that is induced in experimental animals. Immunological and infectious agents can be ...
a biotechnology company, said one of its key experimental drugs failed as a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.. When it comes ...
... in the rat rheumatoid arthritis models in both the low (57.71 ± 0.99, p < 0.01) and high dose groups (54.45 ± 1.30, p < ... Further, Drynaria quercifolia rhizome methanolic extract (DME) significantly ameliorated rheumatoid arthritis as indicated by ... Experimental design for anti-arthritic property of DME in FCA-induced inflammatory arthritis model. Experimental groups. A ... somnifera root ameliorates arthritis via regulation of key immune mediators of inflammation in experimental model of arthritis ...
  • In the current study, we investigated the effects of WBM and shiitake mushrooms (SM) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using a 2 x 3 factorial design in 8-wk-old female dilute brown non-agouti mice that were fed a control diet (n = 37) or the same diet supplemented with 5% lyophilized WBM or SM (n = 27) for 6 wk. (nih.gov)
  • A rat model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was established by injecting an emulsion of bovine type II collagen mixed with an equal volume of incomplete Freund's adjuvant into the tail , paw and back of rats . (bvsalud.org)
  • Nabozny, GH & David, CS 1994, ' The immunogenetic basis of collagen induced arthritis in mice: An experimental model for the rational design of immunomodulatory treatments of rheumatoid arthritis ', Advances in experimental medicine and biology , vol. 347, pp. 55-63. (elsevierpure.com)
  • David, C. S. / The immunogenetic basis of collagen induced arthritis in mice : An experimental model for the rational design of immunomodulatory treatments of rheumatoid arthritis . (elsevierpure.com)
  • METHODS: Penetrance, onset, and severity of collagen-induced arthritis were recorded in DUSP-1+/+ and DUSP-1-/- mice. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Combined collagen-induced arthritis and organic dust-induced airway inflammation to model inflammatory lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis. (cdc.gov)
  • The collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model was combined with the organic dust extract (ODE) airway inflammatory model to assess bone/joint-lung inflammatory outcomes. (cdc.gov)
  • More comprehensive molecular analyses may hold more promise in developing models to predict treatment of a disease as heterogeneous as RA, write the authors, led by chief investigator Costantino Pitzalis, MD , head of the Centre for Experimental Medicine and Rheumatology at Queen Mary University of London. (medscape.com)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune, inflammatory disease, characterized by synovitis in small- and medium-sized joints and, if not treated early and efficiently, joint damage, and destruction. (frontiersin.org)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by synovial inflammation that, if not treated early and efficiently, causes joint damage. (frontiersin.org)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that causes pain and tissue destruction in people worldwide. (springer.com)
  • These products work by blocking TNF-α, an inflammatory cytokine, and are approved for treating rheumatoid arthritis and other selected autoimmune diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Radiologic analysis of arthritis in rats after systemic injection of streptococcal cell walls. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • RESULTS: Deficiency in IL-1Ra predisposes to spontaneous arthritis, which is exacerbated by previous systemic LPS exposure. (mcw.edu)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disease affecting approximately 1% of the population worldwide. (springer.com)
  • Psoriatic arthritis involves inflammation, pain, and swelling in the joints. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a psoriatic condition, which means it is related to psoriasis . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Rare coding variants in NOX4 link high ROS levels to psoriatic arthritis mutilans. (ki.se)
  • HLA-B*27 is significantly enriched in Nordic patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans. (ki.se)
  • Role of Lipocalin-Type Prostaglandin D Synthase in Experimental Osteoarthritis. (nih.gov)
  • This then leads to osteoarthritis and other forms of arthritis, osteoporosis and tooth decay. (sott.net)
  • The clinical pattern of reactive arthritis commonly consists of an inflammation of fewer than five joints which often includes the knee or sacroiliac joint. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because common systems involved include the eye, the urinary system, and the hands and feet, one clinical mnemonic in reactive arthritis is "Can't see, can't pee, can't climb a tree. (wikipedia.org)
  • An investigational drug in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis prevents a common, life-threatening side effect of stem cell transplants, new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows. (news-medical.net)
  • Clinical trial of pentazocine in rheumatoid arthritis. (bmj.com)
  • In this newest study, researchers combined data from two clinical studies with identical design: the Stratification of Biological Therapies by Pathobiology in Biologic-Naive Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis (STRAP) trial, taking place in the United Kingdom, and STRAP-EU, which recruited patients from the European Union. (medscape.com)
  • Background: The role of nutrition in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has gained increasing attention in recent years. (mdpi.com)
  • The manifestations of reactive arthritis include the following triad of symptoms: an inflammatory arthritis of large joints, inflammation of the eyes in the form of conjunctivitis or uveitis, and urethritis in men or cervicitis in women. (wikipedia.org)
  • The interaction of inhalation-induced airway inflammation and arthritis induction resulted in compartmentalized responses with the greatest degree of arthritis and bone loss in male mice with combined exposures. (cdc.gov)
  • Modulation of the susceptibility of inbred and outbred rats to arthritis induced by cell walls of group A streptococci. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Measurement of bacterial cell wall in tissues by solid-phase radioimmunoassay: Correlation of distribution and persistence with experimental arthritis in rats. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Antibody response to streptococcal cell wall antigens associated with experimental arthritis in rats. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • But they do not seem to help the joint grow new cartilage or keep arthritis from getting worse. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Destruction of joint cartilage and bone is one of the most serious consequences of chronic arthritis. (avhandlingar.se)
  • OBJECTIVE: To seek possible links between arthritis and uveitis pathogenesis related to IL-1 signalling. (mcw.edu)
  • Arthritis Rheumatol, 2020 Sep. (nih.gov)
  • Impact of IL-1 signalling on experimental uveitis and arthritis. (mcw.edu)
  • METHODS: The eyes of IL-1Ra-deficient BALB/c mice were monitored histologically and by intravital videomicroscopy to determine if uveitis developed along with the expected spontaneous arthritis in ankles and knees. (mcw.edu)
  • DUSP-1-/- mice exhibited higher penetrance, earlier onset, and increased severity of experimental arthritis, accompanied by greater numbers of osteoclasts in inflamed joints and more extensive loss of bone. (ox.ac.uk)
  • These treatments are quite new and mostly experimental. (medlineplus.gov)
  • They are considered experimental treatments and lack scientific evidence to support their use for treating OA. (lu.se)
  • Reactive arthritis, also known as Reiter's syndrome, is a form of inflammatory arthritis that develops in response to an infection in another part of the body (cross-reactivity). (wikipedia.org)
  • The term "reactive arthritis" is increasingly used as a substitute for this designation because of Hans Reiter's war crimes with the Nazi Party. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arthritis occurring alone following sexual exposure or enteric infection is also known as reactive arthritis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reactive arthritis is an RF-seronegative, HLA-B27-linked arthritis often precipitated by genitourinary or gastrointestinal infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with HIV have an increased risk of developing reactive arthritis as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • The presence of keratoderma blennorrhagica is diagnostic of reactive arthritis in the absence of the classical triad. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ocular involvement (mild bilateral conjunctivitis) occurs in about 50% of men with urogenital reactive arthritis syndrome and about 75% of men with enteric reactive arthritis syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eye involvement typically occurs early in the course of reactive arthritis, and symptoms may come and go. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dactylitis, or "sausage digit", a diffuse swelling of a solitary finger or toe, is a distinctive feature of reactive arthritis and other peripheral spondylarthritides but can also be seen in polyarticular gout and sarcoidosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The level of immune complexes increased for up to 90 days after injection of cell walls or whole-cell sonicates and correlated well with the development of the chronic stage of arthritis observed in haematoxylin and eosin and fluorescence staining of thin tissue sections. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE Wuweiganlu (WGL) is a well-known formulation described in the "Four Medical Scriptures of Tibetan medicine ", which is mainly used for the treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and other chronic ailments prescribed by Tibetan medicine . (bvsalud.org)
  • Dual-specificity phosphatase 1-null mice exhibit spontaneous osteolytic disease and enhanced inflammatory osteolysis in experimental arthritis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • A woman aged 64 years with rheumatoid arthritis had pulmonary and pericardial TB disease diagnosed in June 2002. (cdc.gov)
  • The arthritis may be "additive" (more joints become inflamed in addition to the primarily affected one) or "migratory" (new joints become inflamed after the initially inflamed site has already improved). (wikipedia.org)
  • An asymmetrical inflammatory arthritis of interphalangeal joints may be present but with relative sparing of small joints such as the wrist and hand. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, in disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal disease, and osteoporosis, elevated osteoclast activity leads to bone destruction. (ox.ac.uk)
  • CONCLUSION: DUSP-1 is a critical regulator of osteoclast activity and limits bone destruction in an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • We measured the results of 60 Rheumatoid Arthritis female patients (study group), comparing every patient in a case control paired plan (years in school and age), with control subjects (n = 60, in a total of 120 subjects). (bvsalud.org)
  • Researchers have yet to crack how to analyze synovial tissue biopsy specimens to predict treatment responses for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). (medscape.com)
  • Numerous cases during World Wars I and II focused attention on the triad of arthritis, urethritis, and conjunctivitis (often with additional mucocutaneous lesions), which at that time was also referred to as Fiessenger-Leroy-Reiter syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Defects in the expression or activity of DUSP1 in humans may correlate with a propensity to develop osteolytic lesions in arthritis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • In January 2002, a U.S.-born man aged 55 years with rheumatoid arthritis had pulmonary TB disease diagnosed 17 months after starting infliximab therapy. (cdc.gov)
  • Jusvinza group (experimental): Jusvinza 0.5 mg, by subcutaneous route, during 6 months. (who.int)
  • The eye, however, does not develop inflammatory disease despite the progressive arthritis or LPS exposure. (mcw.edu)
  • Over-the-counter pain relievers can help with your arthritis symptoms. (medlineplus.gov)
  • however, she was taking prednisone for her arthritis at the time of the TSTs. (cdc.gov)
  • Water extracts of Tibetan medicine Wuweiganlu attenuates experimental arthritis via inducing macrophage polarization towards the M2 type. (bvsalud.org)
  • To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a possible health benefit of WBM in arthritis treatment. (nih.gov)
  • The pain, swelling, and stiffness of arthritis can limit your movement. (medlineplus.gov)
  • PRP stands for "Platelet Rich Plasma" and is an experimental treatment used to reduce OA pain. (lu.se)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by extra-articular involvement including lung disease, yet the mechanisms linking the two conditions are poorly understood. (cdc.gov)
  • The non-haemolytic nitrosoguanidine-derived mutant and the naturally occurring Lowry strain induced a similar but less severe form of arthritis. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • The results have shown it to be safe and perhaps helpful for people with early arthritis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The Arthritis Foundation suggests that ginger may help people with rheumatoid arthritis , another inflammatory type of arthritis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • this has been called Reiter's syndrome, Reiter's disease or Reiter's arthritis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Data also support suppression of the lung inflammatory response, but increases in extracellular matrix protein deposition/interstitial disease in the setting of arthritis. (cdc.gov)
  • The Arthritis Foundation explains that people with psoriatic conditions tend to have more sleep problems than those without these conditions. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Impact of Rheumatoid Arthritis in cognitive functions has not been well acknowledged in Portugal. (bvsalud.org)
  • Whether mushrooms are beneficial for arthritis management remains to be investigated. (nih.gov)