Popliteal Vein: The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Venous Insufficiency: Impaired venous blood flow or venous return (venous stasis), usually caused by inadequate venous valves. Venous insufficiency often occurs in the legs, and is associated with EDEMA and sometimes with VENOUS STASIS ULCERS at the ankle.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Phlebography: Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.Skin Diseases, Vascular: Skin diseases affecting or involving the cutaneous blood vessels and generally manifested as inflammation, swelling, erythema, or necrosis in the affected area.Varicose Veins: Enlarged and tortuous VEINS.Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Venous Valves: Flaps within the VEINS that allow the blood to flow only in one direction. They are usually in the medium size veins that carry blood to the heart against gravity.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Devices: Instruments that generate intermittent forces, uniformed or graduated, to facilitate the emptying of VEINS. These devices are used to reduce limb EDEMA and prevent venous THROMBOEMBOLISM, such as deep vein thrombosis in the legs.Thrombophlebitis: Inflammation of a vein associated with a blood clot (THROMBUS).Popliteal Cyst: A SYNOVIAL CYST located in the back of the knee, in the popliteal space arising from the semimembranous bursa or the knee joint.Postphlebitic Syndrome: A condition characterized by a chronically swollen limb, often a leg with stasis dermatitis and ulcerations. This syndrome can appear soon after phlebitis or years later. Postphlebitic syndrome is the result of damaged or incompetent venous valves in the limbs. Distended, tortuous VARICOSE VEINS are usually present. Leg pain may occur after long period of standing.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Renal Artery: A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Mesenteric Arteries: Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.Plethysmography: Recording of change in the size of a part as modified by the circulation in it.Basilar Artery: The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Supine Position: The posture of an individual lying face up.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Dermatitis: Any inflammation of the skin.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Mammary Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles and mammary gland.Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Mesenteric Veins: Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.Renal Veins: Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Umbilical Veins: Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.Iliac Vein: A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Splenic Artery: The largest branch of the celiac trunk with distribution to the spleen, pancreas, stomach and greater omentum.Hepatic Artery: A branch of the celiac artery that distributes to the stomach, pancreas, duodenum, liver, gallbladder, and greater omentum.Brachial Artery: The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Carotid Artery, Common: The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.Hepatic Veins: Veins which drain the liver.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Celiac Artery: The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.Mesenteric Artery, Superior: A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.Ophthalmic Artery: Artery originating from the internal carotid artery and distributing to the eye, orbit and adjacent facial structures.Umbilical Arteries: Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.Subclavian Vein: The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.Popliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.Splenic Vein: Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.Thoracic Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles, mammary gland and the axillary aspect of the chest wall.Renal Artery Obstruction: Narrowing or occlusion of the RENAL ARTERY or arteries. It is due usually to ATHEROSCLEROSIS; FIBROMUSCULAR DYSPLASIA; THROMBOSIS; EMBOLISM, or external pressure. The reduced renal perfusion can lead to renovascular hypertension (HYPERTENSION, RENOVASCULAR).Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Cerebral Veins: Veins draining the cerebrum.
  • 4 Penetrating traumas to the artery wall can cause formation of pseudoaneurysms and, if there is also venous damage, to development of AVF. (scielo.br)
  • Veins that draw blood from the brain are called dural venous sinuses. (answers.com)
  • The Systemic Veins return the venous blood from the body generally to the right atrium of the heart. (theodora.com)
  • The Portal Vein, an appendage to the systemic venous system, is confined to the abdominal cavity, and returns the venous blood from the spleen and the viscera of digestion to the liver. (theodora.com)
  • Thus, between the venous sinuses of the cranium, and between the veins of the neck, where obstruction would be attended with imminent danger to the cerebral venous system, large and frequent anastomoses are found. (theodora.com)
  • The same free communication exists between the veins throughout the whole extent of the vertebral canal, and between the veins composing the various venous plexuses in the abdomen and pelvis, e. g., the spermatic, uterine, vesical, and pudendal. (theodora.com)
  • Pulmonary embolism is a blood clot which originates in the deep venous system of the lower exterminates and travels to the lungs where it lodges in the main pulmonary artery or surrounding branches. (hindawi.com)
  • A central venous catheter was placed and tissue plasminogen activator was infused into the central pulmonary arteries. (bmj.com)
  • Immediately before treatment the central venous pressure was 22 mm Hg, right atrial pressure was 30 mm Hg, right ventricular pressure was 33/13 mm Hg, and pulmonary artery pressure was 33/20 mm Hg. (bmj.com)
  • We interposed vein grafts in 40 out of 41 arterial reconstructions and 23 out of 26 venous reconstructions at replantation surgeries, and continuously administered heparin intravenously for 2 weeks postoperatively. (go.jp)
  • Gray's s167 ) The frontal vein begins on the forehead in a venous plexus which communicates with the frontal branches of the superficial temporal vein. (statemaster.com)
  • The anterior facial vein receives a branch of considerable size, the deep facial vein, from the pterygoid venous plexus. (statemaster.com)
  • The median antebrachial vein drains the venous plexus on the volar surface of the hand . (statemaster.com)
  • A venogram showed thrombus within the right popliteal vein. (bmj.com)
  • The crane operator at the delivery location attempted to unload the cargo, but because the tubing was improperly stacked and configured for unloading, one bundle of the tubing rolled out and crushed his legs, lacerating his right popliteal artery and fracturing his fibula and tibia. (prslaw.com)
  • He arranged a battery of blood tests and a Doppler examination of my left leg, which identified a clotting abnormality and showed that I had developed a blood clot in my popliteal artery and long saphenous vein. (bmj.com)
  • at the level of the seventh thoracic vertebra, the accessory hemiazygos vein bends rightward, runs behind the aorta, and drains into the azygos vein. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The fragment was found to migrate into azygos vein, and successfully removed by thoracic surgery. (go.jp)
  • the capacity of the pulmonary veins, however, only slightly exceeds that of the pulmonary arteries. (theodora.com)
  • We present a case of a 67-yearold renal transplant patient with acute, large thrombus in pulmonary arteries and right heart cavities treated successfully with thrombolytic with low dosage in low infusion protocol. (pulsus.com)
  • This showed multiple pulmonary emboli within the main and segmental pulmonary arteries. (bmj.com)
  • A repeat CT angiogram five days after treatment showed considerable reduction in the load of embolic material within the pulmonary arteries together with a return of the interventricular septum to its normal position and resumption of normal right and left ventricular morphologies (fig 1 B). (bmj.com)
  • In the following years I underwent several operations-for example, removal of my gall bladder and a thrombus in the portal vein. (bmj.com)
  • A term used to describe a group of diseases that involve pathophysiological changes in the "peripheral" arteries (i.e., excluding the coronary arteries) or veins resulting in blood flow disturbances. (slideserve.com)
  • The Great Cardiac Vein (left coronary vein) begins at the apex of the heart and ascends along the anterior longitudinal sulcus to the base of the ventricles. (statemaster.com)
  • The middle cardiac vein commences at the apex of the heart, ascends in the posterior longitudinal sulcus, and ends in the coronary sinus near its right extremity. (statemaster.com)
  • Avoidance of a potential tracheoinnominate fistula by innominate artery re-implantation in a four year old girl with tracheostomy dependence and Pfeiffer syndrome. (mayo.edu)
  • 10 The literature tends not to recommend the use of a pneumatic cuff in patients with popliteal artery calcification. (scielo.br)